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October 12, 1999     The Ortonville Independent
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October 12, 1999
 

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GOD poinf00 fho to RI00.tI[It, I:111_I_[! ), .lIVING HALL WITNESSES Ortonville Presiding Overseer a.rn. Public Meeting and p.m. Book Study. :30 p.m. Theocratic and Meeting to Help ***** r, BAPTIST north of Correll) 596-2300 J. Blackman, Pastor Worship. ***** LUTHERAN R Synod) ichard Boehnke, Pastor 6:30 p.m. Sunday ).m. Worship Service. ***** ! Stone City, SD Ray Otto, OSB - # 605/862-8319 9:00 a.m. ***** OF GOD Ortonville 839-3021 Werner, Pastor p.m. Bible Study & a.m. Sunday School; LUTHERAN Marietta Olson, Pastor Worship; t0:00 School. **** Nassau a.m. Worship; 9:30 School. ***** B north on Co. #2,5, west of Correll in Glass, Pastor 532-3113 a.m. Sabbath School; a.m. WCCO Ch. 5 or "It Is Written" speaker: 6:00 a.m. "The Quiet Yankton, SD, Bill 9:30 a.m. "The WNAX, speaker/director Lonnie ***** CHRIST OF SAINTS Wilimar, MN 235-2442 Grant McKinney 0:30 a.m. Sacrament a.m. Classes. nter open Sunday- ).m. SD Sunday of Month morning prayer. ***** Larry Kasten Morning Worship. ***** Kasten, Pastor P.m. Confirmation; 6 Relations With D.S.; 7 p.m. will meet a,m. Worship Service; School. Bellingham Friedrich 15 p.m. Confirmation Choir. Sunday School; Service; 12:30 Hour, KLQP; 7 p.m. .ra. Voters. * * * * * - LUTHERAN Friedrich ?:30 or 7:35 a.m. "By Radio. p.m. Confirmation Divine Service; 10 Study. LUTHERAN ()dela ! Parker, Pastor 4-5:30 p.m. 9th gr. [3:4-5:30 p.m. 7th gr. : 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. 6:30 p,m. Sunday , Study; 7:30 i i , May the mystery of faith unfold to protect and provide your family with peace. These Weekly Church Notices, Courtesy the following firms Come and Worship THE LORD Enjoy the Fellowship Tom's Servlce, Odessa, MN PRO AUTO We Build Toys for the Big Boys. Ortonvllle, MN , (320) 839-2911 U.S. FANCY HONEY ELLINGSON'S INC. ODESSA, MN 56276 . BIG STONE COOPERATIVE Clinton , Ortonvllle, Milbank 1-800-325-1132 or (320) 325-5466 THOLE DISTRIBUTING ORTONVILLE ii Ortonville Independent CLINTON CO-OP FARMERS ELEVATOR ASSOCIATION R0n Schlimme, Manager CLINTON, MN PHONE 325-5404 Clinton State Bank THE BANK THAT UNDERSTANDS cuNroN p.m. Divine Service. Tues., Oct. 19:4-5:30 p.m. 9th Grade Catechism at Grace. ***** GRACE LUTHERAN Correli Rev. Edwin Parker, Pastor Tues., Oct. 12:4-5:30 p.m. 9th Grade Catechism. Wed., Oct. 13:4-5:30 p.m. 8th gr. Catechism: Sun., Oct. 17:9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 10:30 a.m. Divine Service. Tues., Oct. 19:4-5:30 p.m. 9th gr. Catechism. ***** CONGREGATIONAL UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Ortonville Rev. Duane A. Lookingbill, Pastor Oct. 13:5:15 p.m. Council meet- ing. Oct. 17:9:15 a.m. Sunday School; 10:45 a.m. Worship. ***** TABOR UNITED METHODIST Big Stone City, SD R. Karl Watkins, Pastor Tues., Oct. 12: 6:59 p.m. Administrative Council. Wed., Oct. 13:7:30 p.m. Sunshine Circle at L. Brandts. Sun., Oct. 17:9:30 a.m. Worship; 10:30 a.m. Sunday School; 7:30 p.m. B-Chib. Program: Watkins. Lunch: F. Conraads and N. Mielitz. Mon., Oct. 18:9:30 a.m. Sewing; 12 noon Bible Study. Brown bag lunch. ***** ZION LUTHERAN Ortonville Rev. Shalom Kropfl Wed., Oct. 13:3:30 p.m. 8th grade Confirmation; 4:30 p,m. 9th grade Confirmation; 7 p.m. Luther League; 7 p.m. Committees; 7:30 p.m. Council. Thurs., Oct. 14: WELCA Fall Workshop in Morris; 3 p.m. Lakeside Worship with Communion. Sat. Oct. 16:4 p.m. Concert of Prayer meeting at Abiding Faith. Sun., Oct. 17:9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 10:30 a.m. Service with Communion. ***** EIDSKOG LUTHERAN Ortonville Rev. Shalom Kropfl Wed., Oct. 13:3:30 p.m. 8th grade Confirmation; 4:30 p.m. 9th grade Confirmation; 7:30 p.m. Naomi Circle at Kathy Randall's (supper). Thurs., Oct. 14: WELCA Fall Workshop in Morris; 3 p.m. Lakeside Worship with Communion. Sat. Oct. 16:4 p.m. Concert of Prayer meeting at Abiding Faith. Sun., Oct. 17:9 a.m. Service; 10 a.m. Sunday School; 4 p.m. Youth Hay Ride. ***** NEW LIFE COMMUNITY BAPTIST Ortonville Kory Tedrick, Pastor Wed:7 p.m, AWANA and Kids Club. Fri: 12 noon Men of Integrity (Pizza Ranch). Sun: 9:15 a.m. Sunday School; 10:30 a.m. Worship Service/ Children's Church. Mort: 9:30 a.m. Prayer for Persecuted Church (Prayer Room); 12 noon Lunch Bunch (Pizza Ranch); 7 p.m. Weighdown (Fireside Room). ***** FIRST ENGLISH LUTHERAN Ortonville Daniel L. Herrnanson, Pastor Tues., Oct. 12:7 a.m. Squares; 8:30 a.m. Day of Love. Wed., Oct. 13:3 p.m. Caring Friends; 3:15 p.m. Children's Choir; 4:10 p.m. Confirmation; 6 p.m. Steeple People; 7 p.m. Sr. Choir. Thurs., Oct. 14:12 noon Brown Bag. Fri., Oct. 15: 1:30 p.m. Northridge. Sat., Oct. 16:2-4:30 p.m. Open House 50th Anniversary for Lloyd and Lois Lorange; 3 p.m. Vespers. Sun., Oct. 17:8:15 a.m. Worship; 9:15 a.m. SS, Adult Class; 10:30 a.m. Worship; 4:30 p.m. KDIO Broadcast. ***** ABIDING FAITH FREE LUTHERAN Ortonville Rev. David Hinrichs, Pastor Tues., Oct. 12:7 p.m. WMF Wed., Oct. 13: 3:30 p.m. Confirmation; 7 p.m. Choir; 7:45 p.m. Bible Study. Thurs. Oct. 14:2 p.m. Sew & So. Fri., Oct. 15:7 p.m. Deacons; 8 p.m. Church Council. Sat., Oct. 16:7 a.m. Men's Promise Keepers Breakfast at Hilltop; 7:30 a.m. Leave church for WMF Fall Rally at Glyndon; 4 p.m. Concert of Prayer Steering Committee at Abiding Faith. Sun., Oct. 17:9 a.m. Worship; 10:15 a.m. Sunday School for all ages; 5 p.m. FLY meet at church for rides to Milbank Praise & Worship; 6 p.m. Maranatha Praise Band & Praise and Worship, Milbank H.S. Armory. ***** ST. JOHN'S, ST. JOSEPH'S & ST. JAMES' Ortonville, Rosen, Nassau Father Robert Goblirsch ST. JOHN'S - ORTONVILLE Wed., Oct. 13:7:30 a.m. Rosary; 9:30 a.m. Mass at Northridge; 3:15- 4:30 p.m. RE Grades K-5; 6 p.m. Choir practice; 7:00-8:00 Grades 6- 11. Thurs., Oct. 14:5:30 p.m. Region IV CCW Meeting at St. John; 6 p.m. Mass. Fri., Oct. 15:7:30 a.m. Rosary; 8 a.m. Mass. Sat., Oct. 16:5 p.m. Mass Sun., Oct. 17:8:30 a.m. Mass; 7 p.m. KC Supper/Meeting. Mon: 7:30 a.m. Rosary; 8 a.m. Mass; 1:30 p.m. Alleluia Pray Group; 3 p.m. Mothers in Christ. ST. JOSEPH'S - ROSEN Tues., Oct. 12:8:30 a.m. Mass. Wed., Oct. 13:7:30 p.m. RE Class, grades 7-12. Thurs., Oct. 14:8:30 a.m. Mass Sun., Oct. 17:9-10:10 a.m. RE Class, preschool-grade 6; 10:30 a.m. Mass. ST. JAMES' - NASSAU Tues., Oct. 12:7:30 p.m. Mass; 8 p.m. CCW meeting. Sat., Oct. 16:8 p.m. Mass ***** TRINITY LUTHERAN Ortonville Richard Boehnke, Pastor Wed., Oct. 13:1 p.m. Northridge Bible Study; 1:30 & 6:30 p.m. Life Light; 3:30-5 p.m. 9th Gr. Confirmation; 7:30 p.m. Elders. Sun., Oct. 17:8:30 & 11 a.m. Divine Services; 9:45 a.m. Sunday School & Bible Class; 9:45 a.m. 6th, 7th, 8th Gr. Catechism; 11 a.m. Radio Broadcast; 5:30 p.m. Life Light. Thoughts for life Information Provided By Local MCCL Written By Carol Karels Quoting the president of National Right to Life "It's an awful scandal, at the least." This time it is not the politicians but Australian Peter Singer begins his tenure as Ira DeCamp Professor of Bioethics at the Princeton University Center for Human Values. He considers human beings and animals morally equivalent, entitled to "equal consideration." And healthy animals superior over defective humans. He writes that it might be more compassionate to carry out medical experiments on hopelessly disabled, unconscious orphans than on perfectly healthy rats. If Singer's ideas become widely accepted, the life and liberty of all of us would be endangered. Princeton University officials argue he has a right to expound his views but it is quite another to justify appointing him to a prestigious academic position. Birthdays III As Taken From The Big Stone American Legion Auxiliary Birthday Calendar Tuesday, Oct. 12 Kyle James Rawleigh, Minnie Sellin, Peter Geier, Thomas Russell Leger, Elise Kraemer, Nathan Bergeson, Mary Watkins Wednesday, Oct. 13 Diane Howen Looney, Jacob Richard Karn, Frank Ziegler, Doug Stielow, Breann Erickson Thursday, Oct. 14 David Stolpman, Scott Jo Rawleigh, John McCallum, Benjamin Helgeson, Savannah Nelson, William Voeltz Friday, Oct. 15 Rosanna Nelson Callahan, Ursula Meier, Terry Gere, Laura Feldick, Doris Scheff, Benjamin Zahrbock, Robert Onken, Michael David Knippen, Melissa Patnoe, Lori Hamann Seidell Saturday, Oct. 16 Jason Warren Trebil, Kris Koenen Stenzel, Todd Holme, Nicholas Dean Strand, Jeff Berger, Jessica Hofhenke, Virgil Mortenson Saturday, Oct. 17 Orrin Scholberg, Sena Scholberg, David Knippen, David Cornelisen, Terry Oakes, DeLoris Strobel, Char Iverson, LaDona R. Buescher, Lloyd Sievers, Tammy Frevert LeBrun, Mardi Harder Monday, Oct. 18 Lucille Kockx, Ruth Hansen, Lyndon Johnson, Marilyn Streich, Drew Kanten, Carol Gustafson, Van Ulrich Donkersgoed, Karen Glenn Tuesday, Oct. 19 Steven Kelzer, Sandra Radtke Brusten, Jason Daniel Oakes, Carmen Lee Leger, Lance Moen, Brock, R. Tillman, Forrest Kaercher Roberts, Cindy Scherer, Racole Karels "... Think About These Things" by Rev. Wilfred C. Hansen PASTOR AT LARGE "Bless the Lord, 0 my soul. 0 Lord my God, you are very great. You are clothed with Honor and majesty .... You make sDrino_ os=r"'h forth m the valleys ,they flow between the hills .... You cause the grass to grow for cattle, and plants for people to use, to bring forth food from the earth, and wine to g[adden the human heart, oil to make the face shine, and bread to strengthen the human heart ..... 0 Lord, how manifold are your works, in wisdom you have made them all." Selected from Psalm 104. "My, O my," what a beautiful day!. Perfect for a Homecoming Parade, with most of the boys and girls in their shirt sleeves and roy- alty in their evening gowns. It is quite a sight to see, all of the chil- dren of the area parading down main street at 2 p.m. on a Friday afternoon. What a marvelous place to live and we join with the Psalmist in saying,: "Bless the Lord 0 my soul!" Homecoming and harvest come at the same time each year. The foundation of the area economy is agriculture and it is because of agriculture that we are able to live here, raise our children and cele- brate our life together. Here we labor to produce daily bread for ourselves and for the world as well. Hopefully communities like ours will be treated fairly in this world of affluence and great wealth. One of the most beautiful verses that I have ever read is simply titled BREAD and is by an unknown author. At this time of HAR- VEST AND HOMECOMING, reflect on. Be gentle when you touch bread. Let it not lie uncared for- unwanted. So often bread is taken for ganted There is so much beauty in Tbrread_" Beauty of the sun and soil. Beauty of patient toil. Wind and rain have caressed it. Christ often blessed it. Be gentle when you touch bread. Extension report I I IIII I I John Cunningham, County Extension Director 839-2518 or 1-800-279-2518 TO STORE OR NOT TO STORE The harvest season is upon us. Corn and soybeans are coming out of the fields and farmers are faced with decisions about what to do with their yields. One option that seems to always be popular is to store the grain until later next spring or summer in anticipation of seasonally higher grain prices. In order to hold on to the ownership of their grain until next year, farmers will be placing this year's crop into existing on-farm storage, renting commercial storage space, building additional permanent on-farm storage structures, or developing temporary on-farm storage capacity using existing silo or machine shed space. Farmers will first want to consider the cost of grain storage before making the decision to store this year's crop. Before you decide to place your 1999 crop into some type of storage, evaluate your costs and returns related to storage. What you have to ask yourself is, are you going to get back what you invest. Following are some suggestions that farmers should consider before deciding whether or not to store. Remember what it costs you to continue to own grain. If you sell your grain right at harvest, you will be able to pay down debt that has interest tied to it or else invest it in an interest- earning investment. This cost is big and is often overlooked. If you use a 12% figure for opportunity cost, that means 1% per bushel per month. At $2.00 corn, that comes out to 2 cents per bushel for every month that you own it. The cost of storing grain is substantial no matter which type of storage is used. Elevator storage fees are 2.5 to 3 cents per month. Storing grain on-farm can cost anywhere from 20-30 cents per bushel per year, depending on the type of bin. There are shrinkage costs associated with storage. At $2.00 per bushel, 3.5% shrink means 7 cents per bushel. It can cost 2 - 4 cents per bushel to dry the corn below 15.5% moisture. This is required for safe long-term storage of the grain. Storing grain increases risk. If grain is sold directly from the field, spoilage risk is zero. If it's stored, weatherand insects are opponents that can bite even deeper into crop returns. Given these costs, a grain producer who decides to store their 1999 corn crop for 9 months could expect on- farm storage and ownership costs to be anywhere from 40-48 cents per bushel. Ownership and commercial storage costs for 9 months can amount to 48 - 53 cents per bushel. These figures will go up for longer storage periods and down for shorter storage periods. If you are able to capture the necessary additional gain in price by storing your 1999 crop, storage will pay. If you cannot offset these costs with higher prices, selling your crop directly out of the field is the only option that makes economic sense. US, Canadian farmers to meet Hundreds of American and Canadian farmers and ranchers will meet in Fargo, N.D., this November to discuss agricultural trade issues between their countries, Minnesota Agriculture Commissioner Gene Hugoson announced recently. Despite recent trade disputes, Canada and the United States remain each other's biggest trade partners. "The Northern Plains Producer Conference - On Common Ground," will assemble farmers and ranchers from Minnesota, Manitoba, North Dakota, Saskatchewan and South Dakota with the goal of improving trade relations in the region. The event will take place from November 15-17, 1999, at the Ramada Plaza Suites in Fargo. "Improving trade relations with America's largest trading partner is important for the economy of Minnesota," Commissioner Hugoson said. "Every day, $1.5 billion in goods and services cross the U. S./Canada border, and that trade volume has steadily increased in each of the last five years." Commissioner Hugoson will co- host the conference along with North Dakota Agriculture Commissioner Roger Johnson, South Dakota Agriculture Secretary Darrell Cruea, and the soon-to-be-named agriculture ministers in Manitoba and Saskatchewan. Both provinces held elections in September, and the new provincial governments are expected to make cabinet appointments within weeks. "This conference will be the first of its kind in this region," Commissioner Hugoson said. 'The participants of this conference will be farmers and ranchers from each state or province, and the format will encourage face-to-face dialogue. Our hope is that this conference will lead to greater understanding all around." Each state and province will send up to 50 producers to work on the conference goals: * Identifying trade issues and opportunities * Developing a mutual under- standing of U.S. and Canadian agri- cultural industries * Establishing a regional producer network to find solutions to existing problems * Dispelling agricultural trade mis- conceptions Commissioner Hugoson pointed out that despite the increasing trade volume between the two countries, a number of trade disputes have popped up recently. One particular dispute flared up in late 1998, and centered on shipments of Canadian agricultural commodities coming into Minnesota and other northern states. "Trade irritants and disputes with Canada have been amp Fied by the economic pressures farmers face on both sides of the border," Commissioner Hugoson said. "We need better communication in order to ensure a trading relationship that ben- efits farmers on both sides of the bor- der. This conference will help by giv- ing producers a chance o interact face-to-face with neighbors who share common backgrounds and interests." Farm organizations in each state and province have been invited to send producers to the conference. Producers looking for more informa- tion on the Northern Plains Producer Conference can contact the Minnesota Agriculture Department at 1-800-967- 2474. I INDEPENDENT WANT ADS BRING QUICK RESULTS! ] 12, 1999  INDEPENDENT Page 5b GOD poinf00 fho to RICH[R, [III_I_[R .lIVING HALL WITNESSES Ortonville Presiding Overseer a.m. Public Meeting and p.m. Book Study. :30 p.m. Theocratic and Meeting to Help ***** r, BAPTIST north of Correll) 596-2300 J. Blackman, Pastor Worship. ***** LUTHERAN R Synod) ichard Boehnke, Pastor 6:30 p.m. Sunday ).m. Worship Service. ***** ! Stone City, SD Ray Otto, OSB - # 605/862-8319 9:00 a.m. ***** OF GOD Ortonville 839-3021 Werner, Pastor p.m. Bible Study & a.m. Sunday School; LUTHERAN Marietta Olson, Pastor Worship; t0:00 School. **** Nassau a.m. Worship; 9:30 School. ***** = north on Co. #25, west of Correll in Glass, Pastor 532-3113 a.m. Sabbath School; a.m. WCCO Ch. 5 or "It Is Written" speaker: 6:00 a.m. "The Quiet Yankton, SD, Bill 9:30 a.m. "The WNAX, speaker/director Lonnie ***** CHRIST OF SAINTS Wilimar, MN 235-2442 Grant McKinney 0:30 a.m. Sacrament a.m. Classes. nter open Sunday- ).m. SD Sunday of Month morning prayer. ***** Larry Kasten Morning Worship. **** Kasten, Pastor P.m. Confirmation; 6 Relations With D.S.; 7 p.m. will meet a,m. Worship Service; School. Bellingham Friedrich 15 p.m. Confirmation Choir. Sunday School; Service; 12:30 Hour, KLQP; 7 p.m. .rn. Voters. It , , , , . LUTHERAN Friedrich ?:30 or 7:35 a.m. "By Radio. p.m. Confirmation Divine Service; 10 Study. LUTHERAN ela ! Parker, Pastor 4-5:30 p.m. 9th gr. [3:4-5:30 p.m. 7th gr. : 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. 6:30 p,m. Sunday , Study; 7:30 i i , May the mystery of faith unfold to protect and provide your family with peace. These Weekly Church Notices, Courtesy the following firms Come and Worship THE LORD Enjoy the Fellowship Tom's $ervlee, Odessa, MN PRO AUTO We Build Toys for the Big Boys. Ortonvllle, MN , (320) 839-2911 U.S. FANCY HONEY ELLINGSON'S INC. ODESSA, MN 56276 . BIG STONE COOPERATIVE Clinton . Ortonville. Milbank 1-800-325-1132 or (320) 325-5466 THOLE DISTRIBUTING ORTONVILLE ii Ortonville Independent CLINTON CO-OP FARMERS ELEVATOR ASSOCIATION R0n Schlimme, Manager CLINTON, MN PHONE 325-5404 Clinton State Bank THE BANK THAT UNDERSTANDS cu.roN p.m. Divine Service. Tues., Oct. 19:4-5:30 p.m. 9th Grade Catechism at Grace. ***** GRACE LUTHERAN Correli Rev. Edwin Parker, Pastor Tues., Oct. 12:4-5:30 p.m. 9th Grade Catechism. Wed., Oct. 13:4-5:30 p.m. 8th gr. Catechism: Sun., Oct. 17:9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 10:30 a.m. Divine Service. Tues., Oct. 19:4-5:30 p.m. 9th gr. Catechism. ***** CONGREGATIONAL UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Ortonville Rev. Duane A. Lookingbill, Pastor Oct. 13:5:15 p.m. Council meet- ing. Oct. 17:9:15 a.m. Sunday School; 10:45 a.m. Worship. ***** TABOR UNITED METHODIST Big Stone City, SD R. Karl Watkins, Pastor Tues., Oct. 12: 6:59 p.m. Administrative Council. Wed., Oct. 13:7:30 p.m. Sunshine Circle at L. Brandts. Sun., Oct. 17:9:30 a.m. Worship; 10:30 a.m. Sunday School; 7:30 p.m. B-Club. Program: Watkins. Lunch: F. Conraads and N. Mielitz. Mon., Oct. 18:9:30 a.m. Sewing; 12 noon Bible Study. Brown bag lunch. ***** ZION LUTHERAN Ortonville Rev. Shalom Kropfl Wed., Oct. 13:3:30 p.m. 8th grade Confirmation; 4:30 p,m. 9th grade Confirmation; 7 p.m. Luther League; 7 p.m. Committees; 7:30 p.m. Council. Thurs., Oct. 14: WELCA Fall Workshop in Morris; 3 p.m. Lakeside Worship with Communion. Sat. Oct. 16:4 p.m. Concert of Prayer meeting at Abiding Faith. Sun., Oct. 17:9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 10:30 a.m. Service with Communion. ***** EIDSKOG LUTHERAN Ortonville Rev. Shalom Kropfl Wed., Oct. 13:3:30 p.m. 8th grade Confirmation; 4:30 p.m. 9th grade Confirmation; 7:30 p.m. Naomi Circle at Kathy Randall's (supper). Thurs., Oct. 14: WELCA Fall Workshop in Morris; 3 p.m. Lakeside Worship with Communion. Sat. Oct. 16:4 p.m. Concert of Prayer meeting at Abiding Faith. Sun., Oct. 17:9 a.m. Service; 10 a.m. Sunday School; 4 p.m. Youth Hay Ride. ***** NEW LIFE COMMUNITY BAPTIST Ortonville Kory Tedrick, Pastor Wed:7 p.m. AWANA and Kids Club. Fri: 12 noon Men of Integrity (Pizza Ranch). Sun: 9:15 a.m. Sunday School; 10:30 a.m. Worship Service/ Children's Church. Mort: 9:30 a.m. Prayer for Persecuted Church (Prayer Room); 12 noon Lunch Bunch (Pizza Ranch); 7 p.m. Weighdown (Fireside Room). ***** FIRST ENGLISH LUTHERAN Ortonville Daniel L. Herrnanson, Pastor Tues., Oct. 12:7 a.m. Squares; 8:30 a.m. Day of Love. Wed., Oct. 13:3 p.m. Caring Friends; 3:15 p.m. Children's Choir; 4:10 p.m. Confirmation; 6 p.m. Steeple People; 7 p.m. Sr. Choir. Thurs., Oct. 14:12 noon Brown Bag. Fri., Oct. 15: 1:30 p.m. Northridge. Sat., Oct. 16:2-4:30 p.m. Open House 50th Anniversary for Lloyd and Lois Lorange; 3 p.m. Vespers. Sun., Oct. 17:8:15 a.m. Worship; 9:15 a.m. SS, Adult Class; 10:30 a.m. Worship; 4:30 p.m. KDIO Broadcast. ***** ABIDING FAITH FREE LUTHERAN Ortonville Rev. David Hinrichs, Pastor Tues., Oct. 12:7 p.m. WMF Wed., Oct. 13: 3:30 p.m. Confirmation; 7 p.m. Choir; 7:45 p.m. Bible Study. Thurs. Oct. 14:2 p.m. Sew & So. Fri., Oct. 15:7 p.m. Deacons; 8 p.m. Church Council. Sat., Oct. 16:7 a.m. Men's Promise Keepers Breakfast at Hilltop; 7:30 a.m. Leave church for WMF Fall Rally at Glyndon; 4 p.m. Concert of Prayer Steering Committee at Abiding Faith. Sun., Oct. 17:9 a.m. Worship; 10:15 a.m. Sunday School for all ages; 5 p.m. FLY meet at church for rides to Milbank Praise & Worship; 6 p.m. Maranatha Praise Band & Praise and Worship, Milbank H.S. Armory. ***** ST. JOHN'S, ST. JOSEPH'S & ST. JAMES' Ortonville, Rosen, Nassau Father Robert Goblirsch ST. JOHN'S - ORTONVILLE Wed., Oct. 13:7:30 a.m. Rosary; 9:30 a.m. Mass at Northridge; 3:15- 4:30 p.m. RE Grades K-5; 6 p.m. Choir practice; 7:00-8:00 Grades 6- 11. Thurs., Oct. 14:5:30 p.m. Region IV CCW Meeting at St. John; 6 p.m. Mass. Fri., Oct. 15:7:30 a.m. Rosary; 8 a.m. Mass. Sat., Oct. 16:5 p.m. Mass Sun., Oct. 17:8:30 a.m. Mass; 7 p.m. KC Supper/Meeting. Mon: 7:30 a.m. Rosary; 8 a.m. Mass; 1:30 p.m. Alleluia Pray Group; 3 p.m. Mothers in Christ. ST. JOSEPH'S - ROSEN Tues., Oct. 12:8:30 a.m. Mass. Wed., Oct. 13:7:30 p.m. RE Class, grades 7-12. Thurs., Oct. 14:8:30 a.m. Mass Sun., Oct. 17:9-10:10 a.m. RE Class, preschool-grade 6; 10:30 a.m. Mass. ST. JAMES' - NASSAU Tues., Oct. 12:7:30 p.m. Mass; 8 p.m. CCW meeting. Sat., Oct. 16:8 p.m. Mass ***** TRINITY LUTHERAN Ortonville Richard Boehnke, Pastor Wed., Oct. 13:1 p.m. Northridge Bible Study; 1:30 & 6:30 p.m. Life Light; 3:30-5 p.m. 9th Gr. Confirmation; 7:30 p.m. Elders. Sun., Oct. 17:8:30 & 11 a.m. Divine Services; 9:45 a.m. Sunday School & Bible Class; 9:45 a.m. 6th, 7th, 8th Gr. Catechism; 11 a.m. Radio Broadcast; 5:30 p.m. Life Light. Thoughts for life Information Provided By Local MCCL Written By Carol Karels Quoting the president of National Right to Life "It's an awful scandal, at the least." This time it is not the politicians but Australian Peter Singer begins his tenure as Ira DeCamp Professor of Bioethics at the Princeton University Center for Human Values. He considers human beings and animals morally equivalent, entitled to "equal consideration." And healthy animals superior over defective humans. He writes that it might be more compassionate to carry out medical experiments on hopelessly disabled, unconscious orphans than on perfectly healthy rats. If Singer's ideas become widely accepted, the life and liberty of all of us would be endangered. Princeton University officials argue he has a right to expound his views but it is quite another to justify appointing him to a prestigious academic position. Birthdays III As Taken From The Big Stone American Legion Auxiliary Birthday Calendar Tuesday, Oct. 12 Kyle James Rawleigh, Minnie Sellin, Peter Geier, Thomas Russell Leger, Elise Kraemer, Nathan Bergeson, Mary Watkins Wednesday, Oct. 13 Diane Howen Looney, Jacob Richard Karn, Frank Ziegler, Doug Stielow, Breann Erickson Thursday, Oct. 14 David Stolpman, Scott Jo Rawleigh, John McCallum, Benjamin Helgeson, Savannah Nelson, William Voeltz Friday, Oct. lS Rosanna Nelson Callahan, Ursula Meier, Terry Gere, Laura Feldick, Doris Scheff, Benjamin Zahrbock, Robert Onken, Michael David Knippen, Melissa Patnoe, Lori Hamann Seidell Saturday, Oct. 16 Jason Warren Trebil, Kris Koenen Stenzel, Todd Holme, Nicholas Dean Strand, Jeff Berger, Jessica Hofhenke, Virgil Mortenson Saturday, Oct. 17 Orrin Scholberg, Sena Scholberg, David Knippen, David Cornelisen, Terry takes, DeLoris Strobel, Char Iverson, LaDona R. Buescher, Lloyd Sievers, Tammy Frevert LeBrun, Mardi Harder Monday, Oct. 18 Lucille Kockx, Ruth Hansen, Lyndon Johnson, Marilyn Streich, Drew Kanten, Carol Gustafson, Van Ulrich Donkersgoed, Karen Glenn Tuesday, Oct. 19 Steven Kelzer, Sandra Radtke Brusten, Jason Daniel takes, Carmen Lee Leger, Lance Moen, Brock, R. Tillman, Forrest Kaercher Roberts, Cindy Scherer, Rattle Karels "... Think About These Things" by Rev. Wilfred C. Hansen PASTOR AT LARGE "Bless the Lord, O my soul. O Lord my God, you are very great. You are clothed with Honor and majesty .... You make sDrina_ os="'h forth m the valleys ,they flow between the hills .... You cause the grass to grow for cattle, and plants for people to use, to bring forth food from the earth, and wine to gladden the human heart, oil to make the face shine, and bread to strengthen the human heart ..... O Lord, how manifold are your works, in wisdom you have made them all." Selected from Psalm 104. "My, O my," what a beautiful day!. Perfect for a Homecoming Parade, with most of the boys and girls in their shirt sleeves and roy- alty in their evening gowns. It is quite a sight to see, all of the chii- dren of the area parading down main street at 2 p.m. on a Friday afternoon. What a marvelous place to live and we join with the Psalmist in saying,: "Bless the Lord 0 my soul!" Homecoming and harvest come at the same time each year. The foundation of the area economy is agriculture and it is because of agriculture that we are able to live here, raise our children and cele- brate our life together. Here we labor to produce daily bread for ourselves and for the world as well. Hopefully communities like ours will be treated fairly in this world of affluence and great wealth. One of the most beautiful verses that I have ever read is simply titled BREAD and is by an unknown author. At this time of HAR- VEST AND HOMECOMING, reflect on. Be gentle when you touch bread. Let it not lie uncared for- unwanted. So often bread is taken for ganted There is so much beauty in brread_" Beauty of the sun and soil. Beauty of patient toil. Wind and rain have caressed it. Christ often blessed it. Be gentle when you touch bread. Extension report I I IIII I I John Cunningham, County Extension Director 839-2518 or 1-800-279-2518 TO STORE OR NOT TO STORE The harvest season is upon us. Corn and soybeans are coming out of the fields and farmers are faced with decisions about what to do with their yields. One option that seems to always be popular is to store the grain until later next spring or summer in anticipation of seasonally higher grain prices. In order to hold on to the ownership of their grain until next year, farmers will be placing this year's crop into existing on-farm storage, renting commercial storage space, building additional permanent on-farm storage structures, or developing temporary on-farm storage capacity using existing silo or machine shed space. Farmers will first want to consider the cost of grain storage before making the decision to store this year's crop. Before you decide to place your 1999 crop into some type of storage, evaluate your costs and returns related to storage. What you have to ask yourself is, are you going to get back what you invest. Following are some suggestions that farmers should consider before deciding whether or not to store. Remember what it costs you to continue to own grain. If you sell your grain right at harvest, you will be able to pay down debt that has interest tied to it or else invest it in an interest- earning investment. This cost is big and is often overlooked. If you use a 12% figure for opportunity cost, that means 1% per bushel per month. At $2.00 corn, that comes out to 2 cents per bushel for every month that you own it. The cost of storing grain is substantial no matter which type of storage is used. Elevator storage fees are 2.5 to 3 cents per month. Storing grain on-farm can cost anywhere from 20-30 cents per bushel per year, depending on the type of bin. There are shrinkage costs associated with storage. At $2.00 per bushel, 3.5% shrink means 7 cents per bushel. It can cost 2 - 4 cents per bushel to dry the corn below 15.5% moisture. This is required for safe long-term storage of the grain. Storing grain increases risk. If grain is sold directly from the field, spoilage risk is zero. If it's stored, weatherand insects are opponents that can bite even deeper into crop returns. Given these costs, a grain producer who decides to store their 1999 corn crop for 9 months could expect on- farm storage and ownership costs to be anywhere from 40-48 cents per bushel. Ownership and commercial storage costs for 9 months can amount to 48 - 53 cents per bushel. These figures will go up for longer storage periods and down for shorter storage periods. If you are able to capture the necessary additional gain in price by storing your 1999 crop, storage will pay. If you cannot offset these costs with higher prices, selling your crop directly out of the field is the only option that makes economic sense. US, Canadian farmers to meet Hundreds of American and Canadian farmers and ranchers will meet in Fargo, N.D., this November to discuss agricultural trade issues between their countries, Minnesota Agriculture Commissioner Gene Hugoson announced recently. Despite recent trade disputes, Canada and the United States remain each other's biggest trade partners. "The Northern Plains Producer Conference - On Common Ground," will assemble farmers and ranchers from Minnesota, Manitoba, North Dakota, Saskatchewan and South Dakota with the goal of improving trade relations in the region. The event will take place from November 15-17, 1999, at the Ramada Plaza Suites in Fargo. "Improving trade relations with America's largest trading partner is important for the economy of Minnesota," Commissioner Hugoson said. "Every day, $1.5 billion in goods and services cross the U. S./Canada border, and that trade volume has steadily increased in each of the last five years." Commissioner Hugoson will co- host the conference along with North Dakota Agriculture Commissioner Roger Johnson, South Dakota Agriculture Secretary Darrell Cruea, and the soon-to-be-named agriculture ministers in Manitoba and Saskatchewan. Both provinces held elections in September, and the new provincial governments are expected to make cabinet appointments within weeks. "This conference will be the first of its kind in this region," Commissioner Hugoson said. 'The participants of this conference will be farmers and ranchers from each state or province, and the format will encourage face-to-face dialogue. Our hope is that this conference will lead to greater understanding all around." Each state and province will send up to 50 producers to work on the conference goals: * Identifying trade issues and opportunities * Developing a mutual under- standing of U.S. and Canadian agri- cultural industries * Establishing a regional producer network to find solutions to existing problems * Dispelling agricultural trade mis- conceptions Commissioner Hugoson pointed out that despite the increasing trade volume between the two countries, a number of trade disputes have popped up recently. One particular dispute flared up in late 1998, and centered on shipments of Canadian agricultural commodities coming into Minnesota and other northern states. ''rrade irritants and disputes with Canada have been amp Fled by the economic pressures farmers face on both sides of the border," Commissioner Hugoson said. "We need better communication in order to ensure a trading relationship that ben- efits farmers on both sides of the bor- der. This conference will help by giv- ing producers a chance m interact face-to-face with neighbors who share common backgrounds and interests." Farm organizations in each state and province have been invited to send producers to the conference. Producers looking for more informa- tion on the Northern Plains Producer Conference can contact the Minnesota Agriculture Department at 1-800-967- 2474. I INDEPENDENT WANT ADS BRING QUICK RESULTS! ] 12, 1999  INDEPENDENT Page 5b