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The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
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October 20, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
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October 20, 1921
 

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THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT n ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1921 NUMBER 24 HONORS BY McCOY AT CLINTON W. Auto Race Champion- After Series Halls Wins 10- Event. to twenty-five hundred people the automobile races held last Sunday at which the cords for the five and ten mile broken. It was the "final of four conducted un- auspices of the Ralph M. of the American Legion to championship of the north- The title was won by Jack Mc- Rapids, Iowa, against of ten contenders. weather conditions were re a large extent for the large crowd that tured the races. Many were from Appleton, Mil- Morris. Races which were held at Morris on Satur- called off because of the spectators, and the proceeds held at Browns Valley were far below expecta- men said. The races at saved the series from being failure, when a total of was taken in. the start of the time trials was a battle. Ten cars en- only half of them qualified aain event. During the trial SeVeral ties resulted add near- driver was obliged to use trials allowed in order to break tie. of Sioux City, Iowa, won Position with his Halcott spe- McCoy in second position special. Finlayson of Breck- in a Mooney Ford special, of Ortonville, fourth, and in a Chalmers special, three mile event, which was on the program, McCoy won second, Halls third, and fourth. Time 3 m4nutes seconds. The five mile race McCoy first, Steece sec- third and Halls fourth. ainutes 4% seconds. Previous on Clinton track was 6 mln- 8 seconds, and was made ago. mile event proved to be the &apos;eVent of the day. In this event first, Steece second. McCoy Kilvington fourth. Time flat, breaking the previous by 2 seconds for a ten and averaging 36 seconds for 20 laps which was faster made in any of the time r a single lap. The track rec- a single lap is 34 and It was made by Mc- five mile event Finlayson SPectacular race beating Halls third place. The outstanding of the day took place in the race when McCoy, who was after throwing an outside in the fifteenth lap finished Place. Death When Upsets miraculously escaped an automobile in which riding overturned at a point south of Clinton on the Sunday afternoon. and Mrs. John Thorne six years old, and Mr. Briggs and son Lloyd, was on their way to at- auto races at Clinton when after throwing a rear casing at a rate of 30 miles in the ditch bottom headed in the opposite di- that in which it had been Mrs. Thorne was driving the time of the accident. on which the rear caught in such a man- car rested with the cen- ;two feet from the bottom of the only thing that saved from death or serious six in the party crawled the overturned car with- of a serious nature, altho and top were complete- injuries were received by to her left wrist when and Leslie Briggs re- of a minor nature by the storage battery. His a slight cut on his in the Hoffman Auto, closely behind the aided the party i righting of the state road be- and Wheato, was Saturday. Mr. Mowry, contract, stated that while was not as coarse as other sections he is sat- When it becomes packed it a splendid road. Teachers of County Will Convene Here Next Week Ortonville will be the mecca for ru- ral school teachers next week from Monday until Friday, it was an- hounced today by Miss Martha Roth- well, county superintendent of schools, when the Teacher's Institute of Big Stone county will be in session. The institute will be conducted by George F.' Howard of the extension department of the University Farm School. He will be assisted by Miss Jessie Widen. Altho the complete program was ot given out it is understood that Miss Edith Harris of the N. A. Pal- mer Company, will be here on Thurs- day and Friday to give instructions on the Palmer system of penmanship. President J. C. Brown of the St. Cloud Teachers' College will speak at a meeting on Thursday evening at the Assembly Room at the Ortonville High School to which an invitation has been extended to all superinten- dents and teachers in all parts of the county. Mr. Brown is widely known in ducational circles thruout the United States and the attendance on that evening is expected to be very large. Mr. Snesrud of the tpublic schools will also speak at that.met- ing. Newton to Retire After 40 Years of Railroading James A. Newton, who has been in the service of the Milwaukee railroad for forty years as locomotive engin- eer will retire following the sale of his residence here which was made this week thru the Kaercher Land Co. Mr. and Mrs. Newton will [cave for Park Rapids, Ia., in Hubbard county, where they-will make their future home. Mr. Newton owns a tract of land. in that vicinity which he will de- vote his time to. The Newtons have lived in Orton- ville for the past twenty-five years during wtich time they have taken active  part in the activities of the Masonic and Eastern Star lodges. Mrs. Newton was secretary of the lo- cal chapter of the Eastern Star for fourteen years. War Hero's Widow Because she had never received compensation from the government and was entirely depend "e en the $28.00 a month insurance money, Mrs. William Dresher, widow of the sailor who died six months ago near Tintah, was allcLwed $100 from the county funds to pay funeral expanses for her husband Monday and a ticket to New Yd'rk City, her former home.--Whea- ton Gazette Reporter. DRIVE TO IAST TILL OCTOBER TERM OF COURT WILL CLOSE SATURDAY Warwick Male Quartet To Appear at Big Stone The first number of the Lyceum course this season, under the auspices of the Big Stone CityPublic Schools, will appear at the city hall there'on Friday night, October 28, commencing at 8:t5 o'clock, when the Warwick Case of State vs. Kight and Male Quartet will furnish the enter- Foster Put Over Until tainment. Next Term. Jury Dismis- sed On Tuesday. The present term of the District Court now in session will close after the case of Christ Grimm. vs. August Panseh, involving a drainage ditch, is disposed of. Metnbers of the petit jury were dis- missed Tuesday evening by Judge S. A. Flarehty after returning a verdict in the amount of $187.81 in favor of the defendant in the case of George Gibson vs. A. S. Halls, for repairs made to plaintiff's car after lien had been filed by defendant. The case of J. J. Corm, executor of the estate of R. A. Graves, deceased, vs. K. R. Long, to quit, title was the first Court case tried and resulted in a judgment for plaintiff. Judgrnent on the pleadings of plaintiff were granted in the case of Anton Volvka, administrator, vs. A. A. Randall and A V. Randall. Divorce Decrees were granted to Effie L. Miller and to Grace Vander- kar, both of this city. The case of State vs.. Sol Kight and George Foster, in which they were charged with stilling chickens was put over the term. Judgment for $200 for attorney's fees in the case of M. S. Stevens vs. Bridgett G. Burns was awardQd plain- tiff. Albertina Onsrud Larsen, who. was charged with having issued a check without funds was found not guilty. Bellingham Gets Juice. The high-power line which carries electricity from the Ottertail Power company plant at Fergus Falls was completed between Odessa and BeN lingham last week and the new juice was turned on Wednesday of last week.--Bellingham Times. Fourth Collision Near River Bridge At OdeSsa For the fourth time this season gar- age men of Odessa have been called to the Minnesota River Bridge a short distance from there .to toe-in wreck- age caused by eollissions. This time parties that figured in the accident, which occurred Saturday, were from California. They were driv- ing a souvenir of the Ford Plant at a fair rate of speed when they unex- GRAIN QUOTA IS MET pectedly came to the sharp turn at the approach to the bridge and crash- Despairing Plea From Starving Na- ed into the railing, throwing the car t tion Spurs Relief Work In Minnesota. The drive for gifts of grain, launch- ed in this county and 67 other Minne- sota counties in an effort to save the lives of 3,500 starving children in southern Russia, Armenia and the Holy Land, will continue until the state's full*quota is raised. "Get two shiploads of food to the Caucasus before January 1 or witness the wholesale death of the popula- tion." said a cablegram received by American headquarters of the Near East Relief this week and forwarded to J. M. Davies, state director. The statewide drive to raise 147,000 bush- els of corn and wheat, as Minnesota's share of 5,000,000 bushels being gathered in the United States for shipment to the famine sufferers, be- gan during Famine Relief week, Octo- ber 3 to 8. It will continue until the .full amount is raised, Mr. Davies said. Relief workers expect gifts of grain to be received and shipped at least until Christmas time, or even later. Approximately ten carloads, most- ly wheat, already have been donated, Mr. Davies estimates, attho only small amounts have been received by any one elevator. Gifts of grain may be turned over to local elevators; vir- tually every elevator in the state is willing to receive .the grain and to see that it goes to the Near East Re- lief, according to Mr. Davies. - into the ditch bottom-side up and pin- ning them beneath it. Luckily for them a car was follow- ing closely, with men in, who extri- cated them, They were taken to Rel- lingham for treatment where it is said they were not injured badly. About three years ago parties from South Dakota went over the grade at that point and a woman in the car was not expected to live for hours, she was injured so badly. A law-suit is now pending against Chet Call of Iowa in the amount of $400.C0 for damages to the car of E. T. Mikkelson of Ortly, S. D., due to an accident which happened at the same spot just a short time ago. Shortly before that two cars from Iova collided on the bridge. Erection of a railing similar to those used on grades along the state high ways or a change in the course of the road is being contemplated, it is un- derstood, to furnh protecon against accidents at this point. Pageant To Be Given By "Red Cross Members For the purpose of stimulating in- terest in the Red Cross work, the lo- cal organization will give a pageant in Ortonville some time in the near fu- ture. Plans were made at a meet- ing held here on Wednesday after- noon. The pageant wiR sho& the wm'k of the organization from the date of its origin to the present day. It is being staged thruout the country. From fifty to seventy-five charac- ters take part in the spactacle. The one given at Glenwood On Saturday a- .ternoon was attended by the follow- mg young ladies from this city: Misses Helen Michell, Anna Gowan, Hazel Geier, Myrtle Geier, Mary Shu- maker, Anes Rogashaska, and Mr. and Mrs. Roy Geier. They drove to Glenwood in the Geier car for the purpose of receiving instructions in taging the one to be put on here. Miss Alice Barrows of the Central Di- vision directed the work. Wayne Kelly won high honors at the card party given by Mesdames HarD" Coderre and Ed. Persson last week, at the home of the former. A two course luncheon was served to twenty-eight guests. Will Leave for Wisconsin. Mr. and Mrs. Guy Hardley expect to leave the latter part of the week for Wisconsin where they have pur- chased 113 acres of land, one and a half miles from Trego, which is about four miles from Spooner. They re- cently sold their eighty-acre farm north of Ortonville which they have lived upon for over two years. They lived in Wisconsin prior tC their resi- dence here. To Participate In Races Al Wahpeton. A. S. Hails and Verne Kilvington of this city will leave Friday afterneon for Wahpeton, N. D., to participate in the auto races to be held at that city on Saturday,October 22, Many speed demons will compet in this contest, and keen competition is expected. Mr. Halls also plans on participating in the races to be held at Sioux City, Ia., on Armistice Day, November 11. The Warwick Quartet comes high- ly recommended. Endorsements by the press from places where they have appeared state that they are good vo- calists who can play and good instru- mentalists who can really sing. They come as artists of experience in solo as well as ensemble work and possess real intrumental abilities. Everyone attending is assurrecl an evening brimful of good things, Miss Tillie Snyder, principal of the Big Stone'City Schools stated. They are hopeful of having a large attendance. Reserved seats will be on sale at Clute's Drug Store on Thursday, Oc- tober 27. Prices for season tickets for the series of five entertainments has been fixed at $1.50 for adults and $1.00 for children. Single ad/nission tickets sell for 50c for adults and 40c for children. Ortonville Ladies On Visit At Washington, D. C. Mrs. Frank Fey and Miss Mary Me- gren of this ty who are in Washing- ton, D. C., wrote friends here that they are having an enjoyable time in that city. They attended two recep- tions at the White Hour. One was given by Mrs. Harding for the Na- tional Council of Catholic Women who are in session there and the other was given by President Hating for the Postmasters. Trinity College also entertained the Catholic ladies with a sight-seeing tour and luncheon. The ladies also attended a Ianquet given at the New Willard Hotel in Washington for the Postal employees at which two thousand guests were served. President Harding and Post- master General Hayes spoke at the banquet. Hippie & Son to Hold Duroc-Jersey Sale Oct. 25 Farmers interested in the purchase of pure-bred Duroc-Jersey hogs will have an opportunity to make selec- tion from the largest herd in Big Stone county, on Tuesday, October 25, when Harry Hipple and Son will con- duct a sale at their farm located sev- en and one-half miles northeast of Or- tonville. This firm has been developing one of the finest herds of pure-bred hogs in this section of the state and have at the present time over 175 register- ed Duroc hogs. Their herd sire is "Pathfinder Wonder's Disturber, a showy boar now weighi*ng 800 pounds that is developing into a great herd leader. The sweepstakes prize was I won by this firm at both the Clinton and Whetstone Valley fairs this year. 1 On account of the surplus of corn] in the country and the present low[ price, keen interest will no doubt be shown at the sale for the only way in which the farmer can get rid of his corn crop at a profit is to feed it. .... ..,n New Books At Public Library. The following books donated to the library by the Camp Fire Girls are of special interest to the young girls. "On the Trail," by Beard & Beard; "Indian Story and Song from N. America," by A. C. Fletcher; "Indian Games and Dances with Native Songs," by A. C. Fletcher; "The Torch Bearer," by I. T. Thurston; "Fagots and Flames," by A. E. Blanchard; The library also has just receied, "Protection Our Proper Permanent Policy," by J. T. McCleary. How Automobile License Mone Is Consumed The report of State Treasurer Rines on the money paid out in the month of September in the Trunk Highway fund, which is a correct in- dex for the ther months of the year, shows h.o. it is being expended in commmsmner Babcock's department. Administration, $4,788.45; construc- tion $858,874.47; maintenance $287,- 885.57; equipment, $51,963.32. The total is near a million and a quarter dollars, and of this amount less than five thousand goes to the ad- ministrative officers, which included commissioners, engineers and clerks. Most of the million dollars wen to labor in building permanent highways, building and care of other trunk high- way roads. There seems to be an impression that only a small part of the money goes into actual road work. and the INTERESTING SCHOOL EVENT TO BE INCLUDED IN REGULAR PROGRAM Loses Hand In Shredder; "GO TO SCHOOL wVEmNG" AT- Another May Lose Fingers TENDED B Y LARGE NUMBER. Corn shredders caused the loss to Mr. Swan Nelson of his left hand, and may claim the left hand of J. A. An- derson, a farmer near Clinton, whose fingers were caught in he rollers while operating one of the machines on the farm of his father, Mr. J. J. Anderson. Mr. Nelson was brought to the Evangelical hospital here Tuesday evening where it was found necessary to amputate his left hand at Yae wrist. He had been operating a shed- der at the Pete Holmquist farm East of town when hi hand became en- meshed in the rollers. What an error[ Imagine writing up a notice of an entertainment by the society women of a town, to find added to the article in its proper place "A too coarse luncheon was-served to forty guests." Horrible! Thieves Ply Pfession In Oty Thursday Night That it does not pay to trust to the honor of all people even when living in Ortonville was the dlcision of J. J. Dann of the Pioneer Meat Market when he awoke on Friday morning and discovered that his automobile which he had left standing in the street in front of his residence was minus its accessories. Not content with helping themselves to the more easily obtainable parts the thieves even went so far as to take off the doors and headlights. Tires, inner tubes and tools became their property as well. This is the third or fourth time within the last few months that this class of thievery has been worked in Ortonville and it seems to be the gen- eral opinion that in each case it was the operations of someone in this sec- tion of the country. Legion Auxiliary Aid Disabled. The Women's Auxiliary shipped two large barrels of canned fruits, canned vegetables and jellies to Asbury hos- pital this week for the sick and dis- abled soldiers, donations made by the local members. At the last meeting of this organization three new mem- bers were added: Mrs. Sophia La- Combe, Mrs. George B. Crooker and Miss Gladys Tweet. The next meet- ing will be held November 10. ODESSA-JOHNSON ROAD QUESTION UP County Commissioners Favor East Route After Heated Discussion Tuesday, October 18. Storm clouds made their appearance at the special session of the county commissioners held at the court house here on Tuesday when the matter of designation of the Odessa-Johnson state road question came up for final approval. After a lengthy discussion with ref- erence to the change in route from that a. originally laid out by the Board which was petitioned for by a large number of interested farmers along the route, it was voted to for- ward the recommendations favoring the east route to the Commissioner of Highways at St, Paul. The motion favoxing the east route was made by Commissioner Geeny and seconded by Knudson. When put to a vote Commiioners Geenty and Knudson voted for it and Meyers and Seen vete41 against it. Chairman Nels Lundberg cast his vote in favor vt the original route. Circulation of a petition appealing to the state highway commissioner for a revocation of the action of the county board is already in circula- tion among the farmers favoring the west route and it will be forwarded to St. Paul within a few days, according to reports. The petition will request the commissioner to designate the west route. Refundment of bonds in the amount of $20,000 also came before the board and the bid was awarded to the Min- neapolk Trust company at the rate of 5 per cent, a reduction of one- imlf of one per cent from that previ- ously paid. An additional levy of $5,000 upon the taxable property of the county was made to meet the general ex- pense forthe next fiscal year. Farmer-Banker Body To Plan Credit Firm statement has been made and epeated ] Farmers. county agents, extension that only 25 cents of every dollar is workers, farm magazine editors and actually used for road building. The hankers met at St. Paul at the call o absurdity of this is shown by the the Minne.ota Farm Bureau federa- above figures. Less than five thous-ition to discuss agricultural credit con- and dollars in an expenditure of a ditions last week, and authorized the million and a quarter for 'overhead' appointment of a committee of five is a better showing than i. made by bankers and farmers to plan the or- any business or manufacturing con- ganization of a state farm credit cor- cern in the country, potation. The success of "Go To School Eve- ning," held on Tuesday night under the auspices of the Parent-Teacher Association won for itself a distinct place as a constructive enterprise for increasing a sympathetic relationship between the parents, teachers and the pupils, thereby strengthening com- munity ties upon which the strength of the country depends. The event, which was the first of its kind undertaken in this part *of the state, was initiated by J. M. Snes- rud, superintendent of public schools, and the success of the undertaking means that others will be conducted at times deemed by the officers of the association as opportune Many were in attendance from the rural sections, besides the members of the faculty of the Consolidated Schools of Correll and teachers from the Clinton schools. Every department of the school was functioning between 7:30 and 8:30 p. m., just as it does during the regular day periods. The visitors were free to visit all classes. Business men, professional men, far- mers, workmen, mechanics, and men and their wives from practically every. walk of life was represented. The memories of their old school days were vividly brought to mind.  They enjoyed it and the spirit of friendliness that prevailed was easily neticeable. Attention, while divided, seemed to center chiefly about the grades, and every room from the first .grade to the sixth wa taxed for standing room. Following the visiting hour a meet- ing of tlie Parent-Teacher Associa- tion was held in the assembly room which was filled to capacity, and ad- ditional chairs were brought into use in the aisles. The meeting opened by community singing followed by introductory re- marks by R. F. Walker, president of the Association. Representative speeches were given by Mrs. John Michell, president of the Community Club and by C. E. Chrisman, repre- senting the city council. These were followed by a vocal solo by Mis Mary Shumaker after which the Cap Fire" Girls were represented by Miss Myr- tle Geier, Miss Ruth Gowan and Miss Margaret Hippie. Rev. Paul J. Bock- oven gave a short talk and also Mr. John E. Palmer of the school board and Mr. Snesrud. The meeting closed by community singing. Derric "Timbers Arrive. A Chevrolet truck passed thru this city last Saturday enroute for Orton- vilte, carrying two long timbers to be used for cranes in the granite quar- ries near that city. They were Oregon timbers and were being hauled from Minneepolis. On of them measured 76 feet in length and the other 70 feet. The longer one was 12x16 and the other 12x12 inches. They are to be used by the Ortomrille Monument works in their new quarry near Odes- sa. They are the longest timbers that have ever been seen in this city and were some load for that little Ctew'olet truckMadison Indepen- dent Press. Phone Heads of " "::' Nation  On Visit Here Saturday Ortonvill'e was visited on Saturday afternoon by a party of notable men, well up in'the world of industry. The visitors were headed by H. B. Thayer, who stands at the head of the tele- phone industry of the nation and by that token, of the world. He is presi- dent of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company, of New York, having succeeded T. N. Vail in this position of authoritative eminence and power. With him were W. S. Gifl%rd, vice- president of the A. T. & T. Co., W. B, T. Belt, president and A. A. Low- man, vice-president and general man- ager of the Northwestern Bell Tele- phone company of Omaha, and I. D. Richardson, district commercial super- intendent of the Northwestern ]Jell Telephone company of Fargo. These gentlemen arrived from Aberdeen by motor Saturday after- ,oon enroute to Sioux Falls and Oma- ha proceedig thence to St. Louis, where they will attend the annual con- vention of the pioneers of the tele- rhone development next week. They came to Ortonville to visit the local telephone exchange while enroute on this cross-c0untry tour of the Dakotas. During their stay in Or- tonville, Mr. Thayer, inspected the lo- cal office and expressed satisfaction in the appearance, location, and the eneral affairs of the office. Mr. Thayer came out from the twin cities to Fargo where the auto was taken to cover the two Dakotas. Of his tp of inspection over the country, Mr. Thayer made the state- ment that he found business covtditions and the appearance of Minnesota and the Dakotas far ahead of many east- ern states. THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT n ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1921 NUMBER 24 HONORS BY McCOY AT CLINTON W. Auto Race Champion- After Series Halls Wins 10- Event. to twenty-five hundred people the automobile races held last Sunday at which the cords for the five and ten mile broken. It was the "final of four conducted un- auspices of the Ralph M. of the American Legion to championship of the north- The title was won by Jack Mc- Rapids, Iowa, against of ten contenders. weather conditions were re a large extent for the large crowd that tured the races. Many were from Appleton, Mil- Morris. Races which were held at Morris on Satur- called off because of the spectators, and the proceeds held at Browns Valley were far below expecta- men said. The races at saved the series from being failure, when a total of was taken in. the start of the time trials was a battle. Ten cars en- only half of them qualified aain event. During the trial SeVeral ties resulted add near- driver was obliged to use trials allowed in order to break tie. of Sioux City, Iowa, won Position with his Halcott spe- McCoy in second position special. Finlayson of Breck- in a Mooney Ford special, of Ortonville, fourth, and in a Chalmers special, three mile event, which was on the program, McCoy won second, Halls third, and fourth. Time 3 m4nutes seconds. The five mile race McCoy first, Steece sec- third and Halls fourth. ainutes 4% seconds. Previous on Clinton track was 6 mln- 8 seconds, and was made ago. mile event proved to be the 'eVent of the day. In this event first, Steece second. McCoy Kilvington fourth. Time flat, breaking the previous by 2 seconds for a ten and averaging 36 seconds for 20 laps which was faster made in any of the time r a single lap. The track rec- a single lap is 34 and It was made by Mc- five mile event Finlayson SPectacular race beating Halls third place. The outstanding of the day took place in the race when McCoy, who was after throwing an outside in the fifteenth lap finished Place. Death When Upsets miraculously escaped an automobile in which riding overturned at a point south of Clinton on the Sunday afternoon. and Mrs. John Thorne six years old, and Mr. Briggs and son Lloyd, was on their way to at- auto races at Clinton when after throwing a rear casing at a rate of 30 miles in the ditch bottom headed in the opposite di- that in which it had been Mrs. Thorne was driving the time of the accident. on which the rear caught in such a man- car rested with the cen- ;two feet from the bottom of the only thing that saved from death or serious six in the party crawled the overturned car with- of a serious nature, altho and top were complete- injuries were received by to her left wrist when and Leslie Briggs re- of a minor nature by the storage battery. His a slight cut on his in the Hoffman Auto, closely behind the aided the party i righting of the state road be- and Wheato, was Saturday. Mr. Mowry, contract, stated that while was not as coarse as other sections he is sat- When it becomes packed it a splendid road. Teachers of County Will Convene Here Next Week Ortonville will be the mecca for ru- ral school teachers next week from Monday until Friday, it was an- hounced today by Miss Martha Roth- well, county superintendent of schools, when the Teacher's Institute of Big Stone county will be in session. The institute will be conducted by George F.' Howard of the extension department of the University Farm School. He will be assisted by Miss Jessie Widen. Altho the complete program was ot given out it is understood that Miss Edith Harris of the N. A. Pal- mer Company, will be here on Thurs- day and Friday to give instructions on the Palmer system of penmanship. President J. C. Brown of the St. Cloud Teachers' College will speak at a meeting on Thursday evening at the Assembly Room at the Ortonville High School to which an invitation has been extended to all superinten- dents and teachers in all parts of the county. Mr. Brown is widely known in ducational circles thruout the United States and the attendance on that evening is expected to be very large. Mr. Snesrud of the tpublic schools will also speak at that.met- ing. Newton to Retire After 40 Years of Railroading James A. Newton, who has been in the service of the Milwaukee railroad for forty years as locomotive engin- eer will retire following the sale of his residence here which was made this week thru the Kaercher Land Co. Mr. and Mrs. Newton will [cave for Park Rapids, Ia., in Hubbard county, where they-will make their future home. Mr. Newton owns a tract of land. in that vicinity which he will de- vote his time to. The Newtons have lived in Orton- ville for the past twenty-five years during wtich time they have taken active  part in the activities of the Masonic and Eastern Star lodges. Mrs. Newton was secretary of the lo- cal chapter of the Eastern Star for fourteen years. War Hero's Widow Because she had never received compensation from the government and was entirely depend "e en the $28.00 a month insurance money, Mrs. William Dresher, widow of the sailor who died six months ago near Tintah, was allcLwed $100 from the county funds to pay funeral expanses for her husband Monday and a ticket to New Yd'rk City, her former home.--Whea- ton Gazette Reporter. DRIVE TO IAST TILL OCTOBER TERM OF COURT WILL CLOSE SATURDAY Warwick Male Quartet To Appear at Big Stone The first number of the Lyceum course this season, under the auspices of the Big Stone CityPublic Schools, will appear at the city hall there'on Friday night, October 28, commencing at 8:t5 o'clock, when the Warwick Case of State vs. Kight and Male Quartet will furnish the enter- Foster Put Over Until tainment. Next Term. Jury Dismis- sed On Tuesday. The present term of the District Court now in session will close after the case of Christ Grimm. vs. August Panseh, involving a drainage ditch, is disposed of. Metnbers of the petit jury were dis- missed Tuesday evening by Judge S. A. Flarehty after returning a verdict in the amount of $187.81 in favor of the defendant in the case of George Gibson vs. A. S. Halls, for repairs made to plaintiff's car after lien had been filed by defendant. The case of J. J. Corm, executor of the estate of R. A. Graves, deceased, vs. K. R. Long, to quit, title was the first Court case tried and resulted in a judgment for plaintiff. Judgrnent on the pleadings of plaintiff were granted in the case of Anton Volvka, administrator, vs. A. A. Randall and A V. Randall. Divorce Decrees were granted to Effie L. Miller and to Grace Vander- kar, both of this city. The case of State vs.. Sol Kight and George Foster, in which they were charged with stilling chickens was put over the term. Judgment for $200 for attorney's fees in the case of M. S. Stevens vs. Bridgett G. Burns was awardQd plain- tiff. Albertina Onsrud Larsen, who. was charged with having issued a check without funds was found not guilty. Bellingham Gets Juice. The high-power line which carries electricity from the Ottertail Power company plant at Fergus Falls was completed between Odessa and BeN lingham last week and the new juice was turned on Wednesday of last week.--Bellingham Times. Fourth Collision Near River Bridge At OdeSsa For the fourth time this season gar- age men of Odessa have been called to the Minnesota River Bridge a short distance from there .to toe-in wreck- age caused by eollissions. This time parties that figured in the accident, which occurred Saturday, were from California. They were driv- ing a souvenir of the Ford Plant at a fair rate of speed when they unex- GRAIN QUOTA IS MET pectedly came to the sharp turn at the approach to the bridge and crash- Despairing Plea From Starving Na- ed into the railing, throwing the car t tion Spurs Relief Work In Minnesota. The drive for gifts of grain, launch- ed in this county and 67 other Minne- sota counties in an effort to save the lives of 3,500 starving children in southern Russia, Armenia and the Holy Land, will continue until the state's full*quota is raised. "Get two shiploads of food to the Caucasus before January 1 or witness the wholesale death of the popula- tion." said a cablegram received by American headquarters of the Near East Relief this week and forwarded to J. M. Davies, state director. The statewide drive to raise 147,000 bush- els of corn and wheat, as Minnesota's share of 5,000,000 bushels being gathered in the United States for shipment to the famine sufferers, be- gan during Famine Relief week, Octo- ber 3 to 8. It will continue until the .full amount is raised, Mr. Davies said. Relief workers expect gifts of grain to be received and shipped at least until Christmas time, or even later. Approximately ten carloads, most- ly wheat, already have been donated, Mr. Davies estimates, attho only small amounts have been received by any one elevator. Gifts of grain may be turned over to local elevators; vir- tually every elevator in the state is willing to receive .the grain and to see that it goes to the Near East Re- lief, according to Mr. Davies. - into the ditch bottom-side up and pin- ning them beneath it. Luckily for them a car was follow- ing closely, with men in, who extri- cated them, They were taken to Rel- lingham for treatment where it is said they were not injured badly. About three years ago parties from South Dakota went over the grade at that point and a woman in the car was not expected to live for hours, she was injured so badly. A law-suit is now pending against Chet Call of Iowa in the amount of $400.C0 for damages to the car of E. T. Mikkelson of Ortly, S. D., due to an accident which happened at the same spot just a short time ago. Shortly before that two cars from Iova collided on the bridge. Erection of a railing similar to those used on grades along the state high ways or a change in the course of the road is being contemplated, it is un- derstood, to furnh protecon against accidents at this point. Pageant To Be Given By "Red Cross Members For the purpose of stimulating in- terest in the Red Cross work, the lo- cal organization will give a pageant in Ortonville some time in the near fu- ture. Plans were made at a meet- ing held here on Wednesday after- noon. The pageant wiR sho& the wm'k of the organization from the date of its origin to the present day. It is being staged thruout the country. From fifty to seventy-five charac- ters take part in the spactacle. The one given at Glenwood On Saturday a- .ternoon was attended by the follow- mg young ladies from this city: Misses Helen Michell, Anna Gowan, Hazel Geier, Myrtle Geier, Mary Shu- maker, Anes Rogashaska, and Mr. and Mrs. Roy Geier. They drove to Glenwood in the Geier car for the purpose of receiving instructions in taging the one to be put on here. Miss Alice Barrows of the Central Di- vision directed the work. Wayne Kelly won high honors at the card party given by Mesdames HarD" Coderre and Ed. Persson last week, at the home of the former. A two course luncheon was served to twenty-eight guests. Will Leave for Wisconsin. Mr. and Mrs. Guy Hardley expect to leave the latter part of the week for Wisconsin where they have pur- chased 113 acres of land, one and a half miles from Trego, which is about four miles from Spooner. They re- cently sold their eighty-acre farm north of Ortonville which they have lived upon for over two years. They lived in Wisconsin prior tC their resi- dence here. To Participate In Races Al Wahpeton. A. S. Hails and Verne Kilvington of this city will leave Friday afterneon for Wahpeton, N. D., to participate in the auto races to be held at that city on Saturday,October 22, Many speed demons will compet in this contest, and keen competition is expected. Mr. Halls also plans on participating in the races to be held at Sioux City, Ia., on Armistice Day, November 11. The Warwick Quartet comes high- ly recommended. Endorsements by the press from places where they have appeared state that they are good vo- calists who can play and good instru- mentalists who can really sing. They come as artists of experience in solo as well as ensemble work and possess real intrumental abilities. Everyone attending is assurrecl an evening brimful of good things, Miss Tillie Snyder, principal of the Big Stone'City Schools stated. They are hopeful of having a large attendance. Reserved seats will be on sale at Clute's Drug Store on Thursday, Oc- tober 27. Prices for season tickets for the series of five entertainments has been fixed at $1.50 for adults and $1.00 for children. Single ad/nission tickets sell for 50c for adults and 40c for children. Ortonville Ladies On Visit At Washington, D. C. Mrs. Frank Fey and Miss Mary Me- gren of this ty who are in Washing- ton, D. C., wrote friends here that they are having an enjoyable time in that city. They attended two recep- tions at the White Hour. One was given by Mrs. Harding for the Na- tional Council of Catholic Women who are in session there and the other was given by President Hating for the Postmasters. Trinity College also entertained the Catholic ladies with a sight-seeing tour and luncheon. The ladies also attended a Ianquet given at the New Willard Hotel in Washington for the Postal employees at which two thousand guests were served. President Harding and Post- master General Hayes spoke at the banquet. Hippie & Son to Hold Duroc-Jersey Sale Oct. 25 Farmers interested in the purchase of pure-bred Duroc-Jersey hogs will have an opportunity to make selec- tion from the largest herd in Big Stone county, on Tuesday, October 25, when Harry Hipple and Son will con- duct a sale at their farm located sev- en and one-half miles northeast of Or- tonville. This firm has been developing one of the finest herds of pure-bred hogs in this section of the state and have at the present time over 175 register- ed Duroc hogs. Their herd sire is "Pathfinder Wonder's Disturber, a showy boar now weighi*ng 800 pounds that is developing into a great herd leader. The sweepstakes prize was I won by this firm at both the Clinton and Whetstone Valley fairs this year. 1 On account of the surplus of corn] in the country and the present low[ price, keen interest will no doubt be shown at the sale for the only way in which the farmer can get rid of his corn crop at a profit is to feed it. .... ..,n New Books At Public Library. The following books donated to the library by the Camp Fire Girls are of special interest to the young girls. "On the Trail," by Beard & Beard; "Indian Story and Song from N. America," by A. C. Fletcher; "Indian Games and Dances with Native Songs," by A. C. Fletcher; "The Torch Bearer," by I. T. Thurston; "Fagots and Flames," by A. E. Blanchard; The library also has just receied, "Protection Our Proper Permanent Policy," by J. T. McCleary. How Automobile License Mone Is Consumed The report of State Treasurer Rines on the money paid out in the month of September in the Trunk Highway fund, which is a correct in- dex for the ther months of the year, shows h.o. it is being expended in commmsmner Babcock's department. Administration, $4,788.45; construc- tion $858,874.47; maintenance $287,- 885.57; equipment, $51,963.32. The total is near a million and a quarter dollars, and of this amount less than five thousand goes to the ad- ministrative officers, which included commissioners, engineers and clerks. Most of the million dollars wen to labor in building permanent highways, building and care of other trunk high- way roads. There seems to be an impression that only a small part of the money goes into actual road work. and the INTERESTING SCHOOL EVENT TO BE INCLUDED IN REGULAR PROGRAM Loses Hand In Shredder; "GO TO SCHOOL wVEmNG" AT- Another May Lose Fingers TENDED B Y LARGE NUMBER. Corn shredders caused the loss to Mr. Swan Nelson of his left hand, and may claim the left hand of J. A. An- derson, a farmer near Clinton, whose fingers were caught in he rollers while operating one of the machines on the farm of his father, Mr. J. J. Anderson. Mr. Nelson was brought to the Evangelical hospital here Tuesday evening where it was found necessary to amputate his left hand at Yae wrist. He had been operating a shed- der at the Pete Holmquist farm East of town when hi hand became en- meshed in the rollers. What an error[ Imagine writing up a notice of an entertainment by the society women of a town, to find added to the article in its proper place "A too coarse luncheon was-served to forty guests." Horrible! Thieves Ply Pfession In Oty Thursday Night That it does not pay to trust to the honor of all people even when living in Ortonville was the dlcision of J. J. Dann of the Pioneer Meat Market when he awoke on Friday morning and discovered that his automobile which he had left standing in the street in front of his residence was minus its accessories. Not content with helping themselves to the more easily obtainable parts the thieves even went so far as to take off the doors and headlights. Tires, inner tubes and tools became their property as well. This is the third or fourth time within the last few months that this class of thievery has been worked in Ortonville and it seems to be the gen- eral opinion that in each case it was the operations of someone in this sec- tion of the country. Legion Auxiliary Aid Disabled. The Women's Auxiliary shipped two large barrels of canned fruits, canned vegetables and jellies to Asbury hos- pital this week for the sick and dis- abled soldiers, donations made by the local members. At the last meeting of this organization three new mem- bers were added: Mrs. Sophia La- Combe, Mrs. George B. Crooker and Miss Gladys Tweet. The next meet- ing will be held November 10. ODESSA-JOHNSON ROAD QUESTION UP County Commissioners Favor East Route After Heated Discussion Tuesday, October 18. Storm clouds made their appearance at the special session of the county commissioners held at the court house here on Tuesday when the matter of designation of the Odessa-Johnson state road question came up for final approval. After a lengthy discussion with ref- erence to the change in route from that a. originally laid out by the Board which was petitioned for by a large number of interested farmers along the route, it was voted to for- ward the recommendations favoring the east route to the Commissioner of Highways at St, Paul. The motion favoxing the east route was made by Commissioner Geeny and seconded by Knudson. When put to a vote Commiioners Geenty and Knudson voted for it and Meyers and Seen vete41 against it. Chairman Nels Lundberg cast his vote in favor vt the original route. Circulation of a petition appealing to the state highway commissioner for a revocation of the action of the county board is already in circula- tion among the farmers favoring the west route and it will be forwarded to St. Paul within a few days, according to reports. The petition will request the commissioner to designate the west route. Refundment of bonds in the amount of $20,000 also came before the board and the bid was awarded to the Min- neapolk Trust company at the rate of 5 per cent, a reduction of one- imlf of one per cent from that previ- ously paid. An additional levy of $5,000 upon the taxable property of the county was made to meet the general ex- pense forthe next fiscal year. Farmer-Banker Body To Plan Credit Firm statement has been made and epeated ] Farmers. county agents, extension that only 25 cents of every dollar is workers, farm magazine editors and actually used for road building. The hankers met at St. Paul at the call o absurdity of this is shown by the the Minne.ota Farm Bureau federa- above figures. Less than five thous-ition to discuss agricultural credit con- and dollars in an expenditure of a ditions last week, and authorized the million and a quarter for 'overhead' appointment of a committee of five is a better showing than i. made by bankers and farmers to plan the or- any business or manufacturing con- ganization of a state farm credit cor- cern in the country, potation. The success of "Go To School Eve- ning," held on Tuesday night under the auspices of the Parent-Teacher Association won for itself a distinct place as a constructive enterprise for increasing a sympathetic relationship between the parents, teachers and the pupils, thereby strengthening com- munity ties upon which the strength of the country depends. The event, which was the first of its kind undertaken in this part *of the state, was initiated by J. M. Snes- rud, superintendent of public schools, and the success of the undertaking means that others will be conducted at times deemed by the officers of the association as opportune Many were in attendance from the rural sections, besides the members of the faculty of the Consolidated Schools of Correll and teachers from the Clinton schools. Every department of the school was functioning between 7:30 and 8:30 p. m., just as it does during the regular day periods. The visitors were free to visit all classes. Business men, professional men, far- mers, workmen, mechanics, and men and their wives from practically every. walk of life was represented. The memories of their old school days were vividly brought to mind.  They enjoyed it and the spirit of friendliness that prevailed was easily neticeable. Attention, while divided, seemed to center chiefly about the grades, and every room from the first .grade to the sixth wa taxed for standing room. Following the visiting hour a meet- ing of tlie Parent-Teacher Associa- tion was held in the assembly room which was filled to capacity, and ad- ditional chairs were brought into use in the aisles. The meeting opened by community singing followed by introductory re- marks by R. F. Walker, president of the Association. Representative speeches were given by Mrs. John Michell, president of the Community Club and by C. E. Chrisman, repre- senting the city council. These were followed by a vocal solo by Mis Mary Shumaker after which the Cap Fire" Girls were represented by Miss Myr- tle Geier, Miss Ruth Gowan and Miss Margaret Hippie. Rev. Paul J. Bock- oven gave a short talk and also Mr. John E. Palmer of the school board and Mr. Snesrud. The meeting closed by community singing. Derric "Timbers Arrive. A Chevrolet truck passed thru this city last Saturday enroute for Orton- vilte, carrying two long timbers to be used for cranes in the granite quar- ries near that city. They were Oregon timbers and were being hauled from Minneepolis. On of them measured 76 feet in length and the other 70 feet. The longer one was 12x16 and the other 12x12 inches. They are to be used by the Ortomrille Monument works in their new quarry near Odes- sa. They are the longest timbers that have ever been seen in this city and were some load for that little Ctew'olet truckMadison Indepen- dent Press. Phone Heads of " "::' Nation  On Visit Here Saturday Ortonvill'e was visited on Saturday afternoon by a party of notable men, well up in'the world of industry. The visitors were headed by H. B. Thayer, who stands at the head of the tele- phone industry of the nation and by that token, of the world. He is presi- dent of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company, of New York, having succeeded T. N. Vail in this position of authoritative eminence and power. With him were W. S. Gifl%rd, vice- president of the A. T. & T. Co., W. B, T. Belt, president and A. A. Low- man, vice-president and general man- ager of the Northwestern Bell Tele- phone company of Omaha, and I. D. Richardson, district commercial super- intendent of the Northwestern ]Jell Telephone company of Fargo. These gentlemen arrived from Aberdeen by motor Saturday after- ,oon enroute to Sioux Falls and Oma- ha proceedig thence to St. Louis, where they will attend the annual con- vention of the pioneers of the tele- rhone development next week. They came to Ortonville to visit the local telephone exchange while enroute on this cross-c0untry tour of the Dakotas. During their stay in Or- tonville, Mr. Thayer, inspected the lo- cal office and expressed satisfaction in the appearance, location, and the eneral affairs of the office. Mr. Thayer came out from the twin cities to Fargo where the auto was taken to cover the two Dakotas. Of his tp of inspection over the country, Mr. Thayer made the state- ment that he found business covtditions and the appearance of Minnesota and the Dakotas far ahead of many east- ern states. THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT ORTONVILLE. MINN., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20.1921 NUMBE R 24 HONORS BY McCOY AT CLINTON e Champion- ! Races. Halls Wins 10- twenty-five hundred people ras held last Sunday at which the Ieerd for the five and I the Snal auspices of the RaIpk M. It o the Lm tlean Legion to chmmpiokip of the north- by Jack Mc- Cedtr Rapids. Iowa, onnde t weathe r eonditlons we r large extent for the large crowd that turned ras. My we flm Appleton, Mil- Morris, Rle$ which  off became of the apeetato, and the proceeds ree s held at B Valley peeta- The s at the ries from being lu when a total of taknn in. t the start time triis Ten ears en- only half of them qualified event. Duling the tl'ial mtVetal ties nsulted add near- ry driver was obliged to u tl trials allowed ill order to or break tie..  o N[oux City, lw, wo McCo+. n second position leinlayson of Mooney Ford special, ) mville, fourth, and m a Chalmer+ special, three mile event, whlch was on the program, McCoy won Teachers of County Will Convene Here Next Week Olonville will raI scho Monday until Frhlay, it was an hounced today by Miss Martha Roth- be n session. George F: Howard of the department of the University Fa He will be aiste hy Miss AItho the mplete pgram wa ot #yen out it is undecided that Mis Edith Horns of the N. A. Pal- mer Company, will be he on Thu- day and Friday t give system of pennsp. PsMent J. C. Brown of the St. spk at a meeting on Thursday evening at Asmbly Boom at High School to which an has been extende to all superinten+ dents d the in all parts of he uy. Mr. B ia widely kno n edutional eiles thout the States d the attendan on that evenlng is expected to be ver large. Mr. Snrud nf th ,public mhe speak ing. Newton to Retire After 40 Years of Time 8 rcaaes The five male W ar McCoy firs, Sleet e-! Because she had ver eivE fm the governrdent tinu e s 4! eo ds oa Clinton track d 8 snds, and was rs ago. first, McCoy Kilvh,gton fourth. Time g the previo I,y 2 snds for  tel, averaglng 36 sons r 2O lot made in any ef the time a single lap. The track c- a single lap is 34 and It w made by Me- ig Hails pe. The outtadng took place in the when McCoy, after thi,owi.g a. e iu the fifteenth tap finished place Death When Upsets eped automobile in riding overturned at a point Sunday old. at ,r thawing in the ditch the obosite di- i the only thing that saved death m of a serious natu, aths OCTOBER TERM OF COURT WILL CLOSE SATURDAY Case of State vs. Kight and Foster Put Over Until Next Term. Jury Dismis- sed On Tuesday. The pnt tel of the District Court now ht sion will elo after the  of Christ Grimm vs. Augist Pansoh, involving a drainage ditch, i cHsposed of. Members of the petit jury m d missed Tuesday ening by Judge S A. Flanhty after returning a verdict [187.81 in favor ot of George vs. A. S. Hll. for pai made to plaintiff' car after lien had been filed by defendant The  of J. J. Conn, executor ot de--sad, v F R. Long, to quit, title was the first Court  tried and ruLted in a judgraent for ptalntiff. Jgment on the pleadings of plaintiff were granted in the ca of Anion Volvka, administrator, vs. A. A. da[l and Divorce I)tcree we gted t -- and to Ge Vdev Jam A. Newton, who kar, both of this city. e Milwaukee rilad The  nf State v Sol hight and for forty yea  Imotive origin- Ceoxe Foster, in which they we r will reti followln the sale af charged with sfling ehiekns as . . .g put over the ter hLs lden he which was made Judgment for $2OO for att*y's this ek th the Keher Land Co. fees In the ease of M. S. SteVens vs. Mr. and Mrs. Newton will tuve Ior Bndgett G. Btwas w awarded plain- Park Rapids, In., in Hubbard county, ff- where they will make their future Albertina Onsmd Laden, whO* was borne. Mr. Newton os a tt of charged with haqng issued a ehk landin that vicinity which he will d without funds was foand not guilty. vote his time to. The Newtons have lived it, Ortn- P.elligham Gets Jui. eiIle for the past twenty-five years he high+power line which rries durl.g w{Fh time they ha, takea eltclty from the Ottert*Jl Power active' part in the tivities of the company plant at Fergus Falls was and Eastern Star Iodges. lcampleted betwn Odessa and Bel yefthelo- I nghan at week and the new jce was turned o Wednesday of tast fourteen years, wk. Bellngh Tmes. Fourth Collision Near , River Bridge At OdesSa and was en$ily dependS, $88.00 a month insurance money, Mrs. William Dsher six months age near Tinmh, w allowed $100 from the county funds to pay funeral expo for her YOrk City, Gatte Reporter, DRIVE TO I:AST TILL GRAIN QUOTA IS MET nespairing PI From Starving t Spu Relief Work In Mnnot a. The dri for gft of grain, launch- lives of 3,500 starving childn in southe Russia, Aenia md the Holy Ind, will continue until state' full*qunta i raised. "Get two shiploads of food to auc be ore Janu ry I or it Le wholes e death of the popula- tlon." aid a cablegram received hy ca headquarters of the Near ge ef this week ud forwarded M, Davies, state dilator. The t47,0O0 bush- of 5,000,000 bushels being gathered in the U.ited States far sbipment to the famh,e suffel"S, be- gan dung Fmine Relief week, Oeto- It will ntinue until the Mr. navie sad. expel gifts of grain and shipped at east ta,e, or even later. Appximately ten carinads, most- ]y wht. already have bn donated, h althe only small have bn eived by any Gifts of grain may to local tualy every elevator in the willing to reive.the groin and to s that it goes to the Near East Re- lief, a:l[ng to Mr. Davle Will Leave for Wionsin. Mr, and Mm. Guy Hardley the latter they have par- tnjuries were recelved b ann, one and a wrist whe , which is about Sponer+ They - and Leslie Bggs re- neatly soLd their eighty-acre of a mlnnr nature b3 sin age battery. Hi, !i,d upon for over two years. They received a slight cut on hi llved in Wisconsin prim' t'o" their nsi- Autn closely . . S Halls and Vemo Kilvington o this city wll leave Friday afteem e odd I-or Wahpeton, N. D.. to partlcato i. and Wheatot, was[ the auto r to be held at tha e Saturday. Mr. Mowry, oe Sa i ay,e ober 22, Many pen e contract, stated that while w not as coarse a[und knc, [a ether tio.+ he s +at ' Ha/s also plans on partieipatng J When t bme pked it I the races ta be held at Sinux Cit ", In. a sp ended mad. J on Armistice Day, Novemher 11. For the foarth time this season ga age men of edema have been called to the Mi.nesota River Bdge a shaft fm the ta toe-in k- age caused by enllissions. This tlme partl that figured in the aideat, which ed Saturday, y we driv- ing a snuvenir of the Ford Plant at a fr rate of speed when they unex- rctedly came to the sharp turn at the approh to the bride d crash- ed into the railing, thawing the ca* into the dtch bottem-slde up and pin- ning them beneath it. Luckily for them a car w fallow ing closely, with men in, who extri eared them. They we take. to Bel- lingham for treatment when it i said they were not njured badly. About thee yea ago parties fm Warwick Male Quartet To Appear at Big Stone The first number of the Lyceum course this season, under the aospis of the Big Stol,e City Publle Schls, wilI appeal, at the city halt the on Friday night, October 28, commencing at 8:L5 o'clock, when the warwick Male Quartet will fuish the enter- tainment. The Warwick Quartet comes high- ly mmended. Endorments by the pss fm p]a whe they have appeared state that they a good vo- calists who can play and good inst- mentalists she can ally sing. They come as artists of experien in solo a well as enmble work and pess a] intmenta[ abiHt[. Everyone attending is assurred sn evening br/mful of good things, iJs TBtle Snyder, principal of the Big Siena'City Schools stated. They an hopeful of hoeing a large attendance. Reseed seats will be on sale at Clute's Drug Store on Thursday Oc- teber 27. Pces for ason tieket for the series of five entertainment has been fixed at $1.50 for adults and $1.00 for chfid Single admission tickets l[ for 5 for adults and 40 for child--., Or tonville Ladies On Visit INTERESTING SCHOOL EVENT TO BE INCLUDED IN REGULAR PROGRAM Loses Hand In Shredder; Another May Lose Fingers Coru shredde used the loss to Mr. Saa Neton of his left hand, and may claim the left hand of J. A. An- dern* a faer near Clinton, whe fingers we ught in he rollers while operating one of the mhines on the fa of his father, Mr. J. J Andeon. Mr. Nelson was brought to the Evangelica] hpital he Tuesday evening whe it was found nsry to putate his left hand at wrist. He had been operating a abed. tier at the pete Holmquist fan Et of town when h hand became en- meshed in the llers. What an erl Imagine writing up a notice of  entertainment by the society womn of a town, to find added to the article in its proper place "A to o ee luncheon w sed to forty gues" Ho%]eI "0O TO SCHOOL EVENING" AT- TENDED B Y LARGE NUMBER The success of "Go To Sobs[ Eve uiug." held on Tuesday night under the auspis of the Parent-Teher Aoeiation won for itself a distinct pla as a nstrtive eaterprise for inereing a sympathetic latiatmhlp betwn the paints, teachers and the pupils, thereby tngthenlng eom- mnnity ties upon which the strength of the untry depend& The event, which was the first of its kind dettak in thl$ part.of the state, was initiated by J, M. S- d, supeintedent of pubUe echlz, and the success of the undertaldug mes that othe will be conducted at times dmed by the omeers of tins assiation as opportur My we in attendan from the rural sections, besides the members of the futy of the Coolldte Sehls of CII iix, td teaehe :m the Clinton achaia. Every department of the school w fetloning between 7:30 and 8;80 p. Thiev Ply 1Wofession At Washington, D. C In ORy Thursday Night M. Frank Fey d Mi Mary M 'glutt It ds not pay to tst to the gn of this ty who are in Washing- honor, of all. eole even when living to D C te friend he th t in Ortonwlle s the dision of J. n, .., , . s re  J Dann of the Pioneer Meat Market thbeY al "e hawng a enjoy able t .... when he awoke on Friday me.ling at ity. They a tended two p- d disco e .o - v red tha h s autemob e t as at the White Hove. One was . . which he had left sndinff in the g en by Mrs Hard ng for the No- . . Iv . street m fnt of his riden wm tional Coel] of Catholic Women who min its aeeesso "e a in qeion the and the other wa Not eo te t ' n s.. b Pie u n with helping tham]v gven y sdent Haring for he . , l to the mo easdy obtainable parts stm *stars' . the thieves even went so far  to Tnn ty Co lege al entelned the take off the drs and head g t Cathohc ladles with a sght-Seelng Ti, inner tubes and tools became tour and luncheon, their pperty as well. The ladies also atteeded a ?anqt] This is the third or fourth time given at the New Willal,d Hotel in within the last few months that this Washington for the Postal employs cos o thevery has been worked in a* which two thousand guests we I OrtonvilIe and it s to be the ge- se-ed, psldent Harding and pt- eraI opinion that in eh ce it was master General Hayes spoke at the the opetlons of someone in thi s- [muquet. tins of the country. Hippie & Son to Hold Legion Auxiliary Aid Dibl ed. Duroc=Jersey Sale eel 25 The Womnn's Auxffiary shipped tw __ large barreTs of canned fruits, ene vegetables and jellies to Asbury hes followed by a vocal solo by Mill.s Mary Farmers iatereste<l in the puha pital this week for the sick and dis Shumaker after which the Cap Fin of ppn hd Duroc-Jersey hogs wlt have an opportunity to make sel- a blud ldiers, donations made by tile Girls wen psented by Mi Myr- ties from the largest herd in Big local member. At the ]mqt meeting tie Geier, Miss Ruth Gowan and Mi Store ty, on qPuesday, October 25, of this organization thee new mere. Margat Hippie. Rev. Paul J+ Beck. when Harry Hippie dud Son will con- bars were added: Mr Sophia l,a- oven gave a shot tlk ate[ also Mr. dt a sale at their falm late v. Cmbe, Mrs. CeorEe B. Coker and John E. l,lmer of the sehool board en and on.half miles northeast of Or- Miss Gladys Tweet The next meet tenville, ins 'roll be held November 10. 'l'hs firm has been developing one of the finest herds of pub.bred hogs ODESSA-JOHNSON ia thla ion nf the state d bae ROAD QUESTION UP at the psent time over 175 gister-t ed Duroc hogs. Their herd sire iCnnty Commiione Favor East "+pathfinder Wonder' s Disturber," a Route After Heated Diussion showy boar now weighing 8O0 pourds I Tuesday. October 18. that is developing into a great herd[ leader. The sweepstakes prize w Storm clouds made their appeare won by this fi at both the Clinton at the special session of the mnty and Whetstone Valley fairs this yearl commissioners held at the court house . On aeeonnt of the supius of eo I hel on Tuesday when the matter of Ill the untry anti the pnsent lowl designation of the Odessaohnn pri, keen intest will no doubt be state road qtstion me up for flnul shown at the sale for the only way n : app .a. South Dakota went over the grade at that point a.d a woman in the cat was eel expected to live for hours which tha faar can get rid of his After a lengthy <liscuion wth f- she was injured so badly. A law.nil corn crop at a profit is to f0ed it. eren to the change i. route from is now pending against Chet Call o -- , that as ernst.ally lad out by the lawn in the amount of $400C0 fnl New Book. At Public Library. [oar which ws petitioned for by a danges to the ear of E. T. Mikkelsor The followmg books dnnated to the largn number of intested fairs of Ortly, S, D., due to an aidenl Ibrary by the Camp Fh'e Girls a of aong the nte, it was voted to for- which happent at the same spot Jura special hltetst to the young girls, wa the recommendations favoring short time ago. "On the Trail," by Beard & Beard; the east route to the Commissioner of Shortly hefo that two ears fm "Indian Story and Song fnm N tlighways at St. Paul. Ameri," by A. C. Fletcher; "Indian The motlnn inventing the east route lows collided on the brdga. Games and Dances with Native was made by Cnmmissinner Geenty Etion of a mln" similar to tho Sog," by A. C. Fletcher; "The Toh a on grades along the state hgh[ Boar," by I. T. Thuto'n; "Fagots and seennded by Knudsen. Wh put to a cote Commiioners Geenty and ways or a change in the cour of the and Flames," by A. E. B]anchard; Knudson voted for it and Meyers and road is being ntemplated, it is us- The libra,5 also has jt ived Steen retell against it. Caian derstood, tn fumh pteetlon against "Prottinn Our Proper Pea,anent Nels Lundberg cast his vnte in favor point. Pulley," hy J. T. MeCleary. t the original route. Pageant To Be Given By Red Cross Member For the pul'pesn of stlmu]ating in- work, the Id- eal organization will give a pageant in Ortonville some time in the near fu- to. Plans were made at a mnet- ng held he on Wednesday after- nn. The pagsant will shoq. the work of the organization fm the date of i origin to the present day. It is being stagl thmout the country. Fm fifty to seventy-five eharac- te take part in the apactacle. The a at Glenwood on Saturday af- w attended by the follow- ing young ladies front this city Misses Helen Michell, Anna Gswan Hazel Geinr, Myrtle Geier, Mary Shu makm'. Agnes Rogashaska and Mr. :nd Mrs Roy Giel. They drove to in the Geler cat, for the reiving insruetlons in tasting the one to be put on here. :entral D- Wayne Kelly won h+gh honors at the card party given by Medames Harry Code and Ed+ Perssnn ]mat week, at the home of the format. two sour+ tunehn was seed twenty-eight gleSt s. . Ciulation of a petition appealing How Automobile License to the state highway eommiioner MoIley IS Cofisum for a vtlon nf the action nf the "-- enunty board is stead' in eirta- Thn report of State Turer lion among the farme favoring the Rines on the sonny paid out in the st route and t will be forwarded to month of September in the Trunk St Paul within a few days ordlng commissioner .Babcock's deparmt. Refundent of bonds in the aunt Highway fund, which is a cot in- to" reports The petition will req'st dex for the other months of the year, the mmiioner to designate the shows ho W it is being expended in west ute - Admlmstratlon, $4, 884; construe- i of $20,00 also e before the board Uon $858,874.47; mmntensn $287,- and the hid was awardnd to the Min- 895,57; equipment, $51,963.32. I neapolis Tst company at the rate The total is near a million and a f 5'z r ell a dution f o e uarer rio ar a d of h amoun , ffnlone rm fromtha ' ' I n pe p - less th five thousand goes to the ad oaslv paid mtmstratlve officer, which mobbed I An aditiona levy of $5000 upon m?;at:rs' ex i ........... t clerks.: th ....... Iv property of th ...... y os o e ml ton dollars went to, mas made to meet the general ex. labor in building pea/anent highwa ,s  pe o the nex rises yea, building and can of other trunk hgh- ! waYThereadS.seems to he an implosion Farmer-Banker Body that only a small pa+ el the moey TO P an Cred t Firm goes into actual road work, and tha + statement has h,n made and ipeated I Farmers, eonnty aeats, exrensnr m., just as it does during the regnllar day pericds. The visit were free to visit ll e2 Basfss m, professional mnn. f- me, workmen, mechardcs, and men avd their wives from prtlly er walk nf llfe was presente. qm memori of their old hl da were vi'dLy brought to rnd.. They oyed it and the spit nf fendline that prevailed was eily netieble. Attention, whle divided, smed to center chiefly about the grades, and every om fm the flt radn to the sixth wap taxed fnr stsading ronm. Followng the v1*tlng hnur a mt- ing of the Pnt-Teaeher Asia- tion was held in the mbly om which was filled to pseit. and ad+ rltoal chairs  brought into use in the aisles. The meeting opened by mmunity sining follnd by intlductory re+ marks by R. F. Walker. pident f thn Assnciation. Repsnntatlve peeehes were given by Mrs, John Miehell, pidsnt of the Connlty Club and by G E. Chrisms, pr nting the eity eonneil. These we and Mr. Snesd. The mting closed by eommurty sluing. Derri :limbers Aive. A Chevlet truck ped thm this city lt Saturday enronte for Orton- vile, carrying two 10rig tmhe to bn ud for cran in the granite quar- ries near that city. They we Oregon timbers and wen being hauled from Minneapolis. 0 uf thm measured 76 feet in length and the other 7O fL The longer one w lgxl6 and the uther 12x12 inches. They a to be used by the Oonlle Ment works in their newquarry nn Odes- so. They a the longest timbers that have ever been seen in this city and w some load far that little Cevrolet tck Madison lmlepen- dent Pss. Phone Heads of Natlon"V% "'- On Visit Here Saturday Ortonv le was vs ed on Saturday afternoon by a party of notable men, well up in'the work of indtry. Thn visitors were headed by H. B. Thayer, who stands at the head of the tele- phone industry of the nado d by that token, of thn world. He is presi- dent of the Areriean Telephone d Telegraph Comply, of N york, havng succeeded T. N. Wdl. in thls position of authoritative emin and power. With him were W. & Gifford, vi- pl'esident of the A. T. & T. Co., W. B. T. Belt, psident and A. A. Low- mnn, vice-psident and general man- ager of the Northwestern Bell Tele- phone mpy of Omaha, d I. D Richardson, district commercial per- inteudent of the Northwte BelI Te[ephoue eomny of Fargo. These gentlem rlived fm AherGee by motor Satday aRer- roon enute to Sio FaMs md Oma- ha proceeding thence to SL Louis, hen they will attend the nual . ventlon of the pinnee of the tale- lhma development next week. They ce to Ortonville to visit the Ideal te]ephnne ehange white enroute on thi css-enuntry tour of lhe Dakotas, During their stay in o. tonviHe. Mr. Thayer, inspired the id- eal omee and nxpressed satisftion ia the appearan, location, d the enera/ affairs of the oiti, that onh 25 cetlts of eer del]a i[ ,nlkrs farm magazine editnrs and Mr. Thaer me oat fm the tw actua/ly'ued ter road hui/iag. Thei I+r, ukers met at St I'aal at the call o cities to largo where he au o was absurdity of this s hewn by the' the Mhmeo:a F, m Burean feder takon to eueer he two Dakntas. nbo,e figures. Less than five thnus-itm, tn duss arieulturaerdlt con O hi tp of inspection over the and david's n a exle d a o a+d n  as 'aek, and autho iel e count,, Mr. Thayer made the state- million and a quarter for 'overhead'la,,pnntment of a committee o v nest hat he foundbinessen.ditions s a better showin than is made b, h,nkers and farmo, to plal, the or- and the appearance nf Minnesota and any husness or nlfacturia con- anizaton of a ate farm e'e co.+ he Dakntas far ahead nf many east cel in the enuntry.  [poration. ern states ......... L: : THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT n ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1921 NUMBER 24 HONORS BY McCOY AT CLINTON W. Auto Race Champion- After Series Halls Wins 10- Event. to twenty-five hundred people the automobile races held last Sunday at which the cords for the five and ten mile broken. It was the "final of four conducted un- auspices of the Ralph M. of the American Legion to championship of the north- The title was won by Jack Mc- Rapids, Iowa, against of ten contenders. weather conditions were re a large extent for the large crowd that tured the races. Many were from Appleton, Mil- Morris. Races which were held at Morris on Satur- called off because of the spectators, and the proceeds held at Browns Valley were far below expecta- men said. The races at saved the series from being failure, when a total of was taken in. the start of the time trials was a battle. Ten cars en- only half of them qualified aain event. During the trial SeVeral ties resulted add near- driver was obliged to use trials allowed in order to break tie. of Sioux City, Iowa, won Position with his Halcott spe- McCoy in second position special. Finlayson of Breck- in a Mooney Ford special, of Ortonville, fourth, and in a Chalmers special, three mile event, which was on the program, McCoy won second, Halls third, and fourth. Time 3 m4nutes seconds. The five mile race McCoy first, Steece sec- third and Halls fourth. ainutes 4% seconds. Previous on Clinton track was 6 mln- 8 seconds, and was made ago. mile event proved to be the 'eVent of the day. In this event first, Steece second. McCoy Kilvington fourth. Time flat, breaking the previous by 2 seconds for a ten and averaging 36 seconds for 20 laps which was faster made in any of the time r a single lap. The track rec- a single lap is 34 and It was made by Mc- five mile event Finlayson SPectacular race beating Halls third place. The outstanding of the day took place in the race when McCoy, who was after throwing an outside in the fifteenth lap finished Place. Death When Upsets miraculously escaped an automobile in which riding overturned at a point south of Clinton on the Sunday afternoon. and Mrs. John Thorne six years old, and Mr. Briggs and son Lloyd, was on their way to at- auto races at Clinton when after throwing a rear casing at a rate of 30 miles in the ditch bottom headed in the opposite di- that in which it had been Mrs. Thorne was driving the time of the accident. on which the rear caught in such a man- car rested with the cen- ;two feet from the bottom of the only thing that saved from death or serious six in the party crawled the overturned car with- of a serious nature, altho and top were complete- injuries were received by to her left wrist when and Leslie Briggs re- of a minor nature by the storage battery. His a slight cut on his in the Hoffman Auto, closely behind the aided the party i righting of the state road be- and Wheato, was Saturday. Mr. Mowry, contract, stated that while was not as coarse as other sections he is sat- When it becomes packed it a splendid road. Teachers of County Will Convene Here Next Week Ortonville will be the mecca for ru- ral school teachers next week from Monday until Friday, it was an- hounced today by Miss Martha Roth- well, county superintendent of schools, when the Teacher's Institute of Big Stone county will be in session. The institute will be conducted by George F.' Howard of the extension department of the University Farm School. He will be assisted by Miss Jessie Widen. Altho the complete program was ot given out it is understood that Miss Edith Harris of the N. A. Pal- mer Company, will be here on Thurs- day and Friday to give instructions on the Palmer system of penmanship. President J. C. Brown of the St. Cloud Teachers' College will speak at a meeting on Thursday evening at the Assembly Room at the Ortonville High School to which an invitation has been extended to all superinten- dents and teachers in all parts of the county. Mr. Brown is widely known in ducational circles thruout the United States and the attendance on that evening is expected to be very large. Mr. Snesrud of the tpublic schools will also speak at that.met- ing. Newton to Retire After 40 Years of Railroading James A. Newton, who has been in the service of the Milwaukee railroad for forty years as locomotive engin- eer will retire following the sale of his residence here which was made this week thru the Kaercher Land Co. Mr. and Mrs. Newton will [cave for Park Rapids, Ia., in Hubbard county, where they-will make their future home. Mr. Newton owns a tract of land. in that vicinity which he will de- vote his time to. The Newtons have lived in Orton- ville for the past twenty-five years during wtich time they have taken active  part in the activities of the Masonic and Eastern Star lodges. Mrs. Newton was secretary of the lo- cal chapter of the Eastern Star for fourteen years. War Hero's Widow Because she had never received compensation from the government and was entirely depend "e en the $28.00 a month insurance money, Mrs. William Dresher, widow of the sailor who died six months ago near Tintah, was allcLwed $100 from the county funds to pay funeral expanses for her husband Monday and a ticket to New Yd'rk City, her former home.--Whea- ton Gazette Reporter. DRIVE TO IAST TILL OCTOBER TERM OF COURT WILL CLOSE SATURDAY Warwick Male Quartet To Appear at Big Stone The first number of the Lyceum course this season, under the auspices of the Big Stone CityPublic Schools, will appear at the city hall there'on Friday night, October 28, commencing at 8:t5 o'clock, when the Warwick Case of State vs. Kight and Male Quartet will furnish the enter- Foster Put Over Until tainment. Next Term. Jury Dismis- sed On Tuesday. The present term of the District Court now in session will close after the case of Christ Grimm. vs. August Panseh, involving a drainage ditch, is disposed of. Metnbers of the petit jury were dis- missed Tuesday evening by Judge S. A. Flarehty after returning a verdict in the amount of $187.81 in favor of the defendant in the case of George Gibson vs. A. S. Halls, for repairs made to plaintiff's car after lien had been filed by defendant. The case of J. J. Corm, executor of the estate of R. A. Graves, deceased, vs. K. R. Long, to quit, title was the first Court case tried and resulted in a judgment for plaintiff. Judgrnent on the pleadings of plaintiff were granted in the case of Anton Volvka, administrator, vs. A. A. Randall and A V. Randall. Divorce Decrees were granted to Effie L. Miller and to Grace Vander- kar, both of this city. The case of State vs.. Sol Kight and George Foster, in which they were charged with stilling chickens was put over the term. Judgment for $200 for attorney's fees in the case of M. S. Stevens vs. Bridgett G. Burns was awardQd plain- tiff. Albertina Onsrud Larsen, who. was charged with having issued a check without funds was found not guilty. Bellingham Gets Juice. The high-power line which carries electricity from the Ottertail Power company plant at Fergus Falls was completed between Odessa and BeN lingham last week and the new juice was turned on Wednesday of last week.--Bellingham Times. Fourth Collision Near River Bridge At OdeSsa For the fourth time this season gar- age men of Odessa have been called to the Minnesota River Bridge a short distance from there .to toe-in wreck- age caused by eollissions. This time parties that figured in the accident, which occurred Saturday, were from California. They were driv- ing a souvenir of the Ford Plant at a fair rate of speed when they unex- GRAIN QUOTA IS MET pectedly came to the sharp turn at the approach to the bridge and crash- Despairing Plea From Starving Na- ed into the railing, throwing the car t tion Spurs Relief Work In Minnesota. The drive for gifts of grain, launch- ed in this county and 67 other Minne- sota counties in an effort to save the lives of 3,500 starving children in southern Russia, Armenia and the Holy Land, will continue until the state's full*quota is raised. "Get two shiploads of food to the Caucasus before January 1 or witness the wholesale death of the popula- tion." said a cablegram received by American headquarters of the Near East Relief this week and forwarded to J. M. Davies, state director. The statewide drive to raise 147,000 bush- els of corn and wheat, as Minnesota's share of 5,000,000 bushels being gathered in the United States for shipment to the famine sufferers, be- gan during Famine Relief week, Octo- ber 3 to 8. It will continue until the .full amount is raised, Mr. Davies said. Relief workers expect gifts of grain to be received and shipped at least until Christmas time, or even later. Approximately ten carloads, most- ly wheat, already have been donated, Mr. Davies estimates, attho only small amounts have been received by any one elevator. Gifts of grain may be turned over to local elevators; vir- tually every elevator in the state is willing to receive .the grain and to see that it goes to the Near East Re- lief, according to Mr. Davies. - into the ditch bottom-side up and pin- ning them beneath it. Luckily for them a car was follow- ing closely, with men in, who extri- cated them, They were taken to Rel- lingham for treatment where it is said they were not injured badly. About three years ago parties from South Dakota went over the grade at that point and a woman in the car was not expected to live for hours, she was injured so badly. A law-suit is now pending against Chet Call of Iowa in the amount of $400.C0 for damages to the car of E. T. Mikkelson of Ortly, S. D., due to an accident which happened at the same spot just a short time ago. Shortly before that two cars from Iova collided on the bridge. Erection of a railing similar to those used on grades along the state high ways or a change in the course of the road is being contemplated, it is un- derstood, to furnh protecon against accidents at this point. Pageant To Be Given By "Red Cross Members For the purpose of stimulating in- terest in the Red Cross work, the lo- cal organization will give a pageant in Ortonville some time in the near fu- ture. Plans were made at a meet- ing held here on Wednesday after- noon. The pageant wiR sho& the wm'k of the organization from the date of its origin to the present day. It is being staged thruout the country. From fifty to seventy-five charac- ters take part in the spactacle. The one given at Glenwood On Saturday a- .ternoon was attended by the follow- mg young ladies from this city: Misses Helen Michell, Anna Gowan, Hazel Geier, Myrtle Geier, Mary Shu- maker, Anes Rogashaska, and Mr. and Mrs. Roy Geier. They drove to Glenwood in the Geier car for the purpose of receiving instructions in taging the one to be put on here. Miss Alice Barrows of the Central Di- vision directed the work. Wayne Kelly won high honors at the card party given by Mesdames HarD" Coderre and Ed. Persson last week, at the home of the former. A two course luncheon was served to twenty-eight guests. Will Leave for Wisconsin. Mr. and Mrs. Guy Hardley expect to leave the latter part of the week for Wisconsin where they have pur- chased 113 acres of land, one and a half miles from Trego, which is about four miles from Spooner. They re- cently sold their eighty-acre farm north of Ortonville which they have lived upon for over two years. They lived in Wisconsin prior tC their resi- dence here. To Participate In Races Al Wahpeton. A. S. Hails and Verne Kilvington of this city will leave Friday afterneon for Wahpeton, N. D., to participate in the auto races to be held at that city on Saturday,October 22, Many speed demons will compet in this contest, and keen competition is expected. Mr. Halls also plans on participating in the races to be held at Sioux City, Ia., on Armistice Day, November 11. The Warwick Quartet comes high- ly recommended. Endorsements by the press from places where they have appeared state that they are good vo- calists who can play and good instru- mentalists who can really sing. They come as artists of experience in solo as well as ensemble work and possess real intrumental abilities. Everyone attending is assurrecl an evening brimful of good things, Miss Tillie Snyder, principal of the Big Stone'City Schools stated. They are hopeful of having a large attendance. Reserved seats will be on sale at Clute's Drug Store on Thursday, Oc- tober 27. Prices for season tickets for the series of five entertainments has been fixed at $1.50 for adults and $1.00 for children. Single ad/nission tickets sell for 50c for adults and 40c for children. Ortonville Ladies On Visit At Washington, D. C. Mrs. Frank Fey and Miss Mary Me- gren of this ty who are in Washing- ton, D. C., wrote friends here that they are having an enjoyable time in that city. They attended two recep- tions at the White Hour. One was given by Mrs. Harding for the Na- tional Council of Catholic Women who are in session there and the other was given by President Hating for the Postmasters. Trinity College also entertained the Catholic ladies with a sight-seeing tour and luncheon. The ladies also attended a Ianquet given at the New Willard Hotel in Washington for the Postal employees at which two thousand guests were served. President Harding and Post- master General Hayes spoke at the banquet. Hippie & Son to Hold Duroc-Jersey Sale Oct. 25 Farmers interested in the purchase of pure-bred Duroc-Jersey hogs will have an opportunity to make selec- tion from the largest herd in Big Stone county, on Tuesday, October 25, when Harry Hipple and Son will con- duct a sale at their farm located sev- en and one-half miles northeast of Or- tonville. This firm has been developing one of the finest herds of pure-bred hogs in this section of the state and have at the present time over 175 register- ed Duroc hogs. Their herd sire is "Pathfinder Wonder's Disturber, a showy boar now weighi*ng 800 pounds that is developing into a great herd leader. The sweepstakes prize was I won by this firm at both the Clinton and Whetstone Valley fairs this year. 1 On account of the surplus of corn] in the country and the present low[ price, keen interest will no doubt be shown at the sale for the only way in which the farmer can get rid of his corn crop at a profit is to feed it. .... ..,n New Books At Public Library. The following books donated to the library by the Camp Fire Girls are of special interest to the young girls. "On the Trail," by Beard & Beard; "Indian Story and Song from N. America," by A. C. Fletcher; "Indian Games and Dances with Native Songs," by A. C. Fletcher; "The Torch Bearer," by I. T. Thurston; "Fagots and Flames," by A. E. Blanchard; The library also has just receied, "Protection Our Proper Permanent Policy," by J. T. McCleary. How Automobile License Mone Is Consumed The report of State Treasurer Rines on the money paid out in the month of September in the Trunk Highway fund, which is a correct in- dex for the ther months of the year, shows h.o. it is being expended in commmsmner Babcock's department. Administration, $4,788.45; construc- tion $858,874.47; maintenance $287,- 885.57; equipment, $51,963.32. The total is near a million and a quarter dollars, and of this amount less than five thousand goes to the ad- ministrative officers, which included commissioners, engineers and clerks. Most of the million dollars wen to labor in building permanent highways, building and care of other trunk high- way roads. There seems to be an impression that only a small part of the money goes into actual road work. and the INTERESTING SCHOOL EVENT TO BE INCLUDED IN REGULAR PROGRAM Loses Hand In Shredder; "GO TO SCHOOL wVEmNG" AT- Another May Lose Fingers TENDED B Y LARGE NUMBER. Corn shredders caused the loss to Mr. Swan Nelson of his left hand, and may claim the left hand of J. A. An- derson, a farmer near Clinton, whose fingers were caught in he rollers while operating one of the machines on the farm of his father, Mr. J. J. Anderson. Mr. Nelson was brought to the Evangelical hospital here Tuesday evening where it was found necessary to amputate his left hand at Yae wrist. He had been operating a shed- der at the Pete Holmquist farm East of town when hi hand became en- meshed in the rollers. What an error[ Imagine writing up a notice of an entertainment by the society women of a town, to find added to the article in its proper place "A too coarse luncheon was-served to forty guests." Horrible! Thieves Ply Pfession In Oty Thursday Night That it does not pay to trust to the honor of all people even when living in Ortonville was the dlcision of J. J. Dann of the Pioneer Meat Market when he awoke on Friday morning and discovered that his automobile which he had left standing in the street in front of his residence was minus its accessories. Not content with helping themselves to the more easily obtainable parts the thieves even went so far as to take off the doors and headlights. Tires, inner tubes and tools became their property as well. This is the third or fourth time within the last few months that this class of thievery has been worked in Ortonville and it seems to be the gen- eral opinion that in each case it was the operations of someone in this sec- tion of the country. Legion Auxiliary Aid Disabled. The Women's Auxiliary shipped two large barrels of canned fruits, canned vegetables and jellies to Asbury hos- pital this week for the sick and dis- abled soldiers, donations made by the local members. At the last meeting of this organization three new mem- bers were added: Mrs. Sophia La- Combe, Mrs. George B. Crooker and Miss Gladys Tweet. The next meet- ing will be held November 10. ODESSA-JOHNSON ROAD QUESTION UP County Commissioners Favor East Route After Heated Discussion Tuesday, October 18. Storm clouds made their appearance at the special session of the county commissioners held at the court house here on Tuesday when the matter of designation of the Odessa-Johnson state road question came up for final approval. After a lengthy discussion with ref- erence to the change in route from that a. originally laid out by the Board which was petitioned for by a large number of interested farmers along the route, it was voted to for- ward the recommendations favoring the east route to the Commissioner of Highways at St, Paul. The motion favoxing the east route was made by Commissioner Geeny and seconded by Knudson. When put to a vote Commiioners Geenty and Knudson voted for it and Meyers and Seen vete41 against it. Chairman Nels Lundberg cast his vote in favor vt the original route. Circulation of a petition appealing to the state highway commissioner for a revocation of the action of the county board is already in circula- tion among the farmers favoring the west route and it will be forwarded to St. Paul within a few days, according to reports. The petition will request the commissioner to designate the west route. Refundment of bonds in the amount of $20,000 also came before the board and the bid was awarded to the Min- neapolk Trust company at the rate of 5 per cent, a reduction of one- imlf of one per cent from that previ- ously paid. An additional levy of $5,000 upon the taxable property of the county was made to meet the general ex- pense forthe next fiscal year. Farmer-Banker Body To Plan Credit Firm statement has been made and epeated ] Farmers. county agents, extension that only 25 cents of every dollar is workers, farm magazine editors and actually used for road building. The hankers met at St. Paul at the call o absurdity of this is shown by the the Minne.ota Farm Bureau federa- above figures. Less than five thous-ition to discuss agricultural credit con- and dollars in an expenditure of a ditions last week, and authorized the million and a quarter for 'overhead' appointment of a committee of five is a better showing than i. made by bankers and farmers to plan the or- any business or manufacturing con- ganization of a state farm credit cor- cern in the country, potation. The success of "Go To School Eve- ning," held on Tuesday night under the auspices of the Parent-Teacher Association won for itself a distinct place as a constructive enterprise for increasing a sympathetic relationship between the parents, teachers and the pupils, thereby strengthening com- munity ties upon which the strength of the country depends. The event, which was the first of its kind undertaken in this part *of the state, was initiated by J. M. Snes- rud, superintendent of public schools, and the success of the undertaking means that others will be conducted at times deemed by the officers of the association as opportune Many were in attendance from the rural sections, besides the members of the faculty of the Consolidated Schools of Correll and teachers from the Clinton schools. Every department of the school was functioning between 7:30 and 8:30 p. m., just as it does during the regular day periods. The visitors were free to visit all classes. Business men, professional men, far- mers, workmen, mechanics, and men and their wives from practically every. walk of life was represented. The memories of their old school days were vividly brought to mind.  They enjoyed it and the spirit of friendliness that prevailed was easily neticeable. Attention, while divided, seemed to center chiefly about the grades, and every room from the first .grade to the sixth wa taxed for standing room. Following the visiting hour a meet- ing of tlie Parent-Teacher Associa- tion was held in the assembly room which was filled to capacity, and ad- ditional chairs were brought into use in the aisles. The meeting opened by community singing followed by introductory re- marks by R. F. Walker, president of the Association. Representative speeches were given by Mrs. John Michell, president of the Community Club and by C. E. Chrisman, repre- senting the city council. These were followed by a vocal solo by Mis Mary Shumaker after which the Cap Fire" Girls were represented by Miss Myr- tle Geier, Miss Ruth Gowan and Miss Margaret Hippie. Rev. Paul J. Bock- oven gave a short talk and also Mr. John E. Palmer of the school board and Mr. Snesrud. The meeting closed by community singing. Derric "Timbers Arrive. A Chevrolet truck passed thru this city last Saturday enroute for Orton- vilte, carrying two long timbers to be used for cranes in the granite quar- ries near that city. They were Oregon timbers and were being hauled from Minneepolis. On of them measured 76 feet in length and the other 70 feet. The longer one was 12x16 and the other 12x12 inches. They are to be used by the Ortomrille Monument works in their new quarry near Odes- sa. They are the longest timbers that have ever been seen in this city and were some load for that little Ctew'olet truckMadison Indepen- dent Press. Phone Heads of " "::' Nation  On Visit Here Saturday Ortonvill'e was visited on Saturday afternoon by a party of notable men, well up in'the world of industry. The visitors were headed by H. B. Thayer, who stands at the head of the tele- phone industry of the nation and by that token, of the world. He is presi- dent of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company, of New York, having succeeded T. N. Vail in this position of authoritative eminence and power. With him were W. S. Gifl%rd, vice- president of the A. T. & T. Co., W. B, T. Belt, president and A. A. Low- man, vice-president and general man- ager of the Northwestern Bell Tele- phone company of Omaha, and I. D. Richardson, district commercial super- intendent of the Northwestern ]Jell Telephone company of Fargo. These gentlemen arrived from Aberdeen by motor Saturday after- ,oon enroute to Sioux Falls and Oma- ha proceedig thence to St. Louis, where they will attend the annual con- vention of the pioneers of the tele- rhone development next week. They came to Ortonville to visit the local telephone exchange while enroute on this cross-c0untry tour of the Dakotas. During their stay in Or- tonville, Mr. Thayer, inspected the lo- cal office and expressed satisfaction in the appearance, location, and the eneral affairs of the office. Mr. Thayer came out from the twin cities to Fargo where the auto was taken to cover the two Dakotas. Of his tp of inspection over the country, Mr. Thayer made the state- ment that he found business covtditions and the appearance of Minnesota and the Dakotas far ahead of many east- ern states.