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October 20, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
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OCTOBER 20, 1921 , THE ORTONVILLE INDiPENDEN] m' ...........   PAGE 7 i The Farmers Corner hi'VOTED ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF FARMERS AND FARMER'S CLUBS. HEADS rING INQUIRY Of Statewide Dairy Service Named To Lead Investigation. aCComplishments of Minnesota in co-operative enterprises by the American federation's dairy mar- of Eleven last week, elected H. B. Nickerson of Elk President of tim Minnesota Co- Creameries association, Inc., its national investigation in- of creamery and cheese Products. appointed by Jame president of the national organization, opened its Minnesota. Its first ses- at state headquarters of the and its first public hear- at the National Dairy show- of Boston, manager of England Milk Producers as- a, was elected chairman of the Mr. Mickerson was chosen of a special sub-committee to draw up plans for market- products, for the guidmlce who have not vet formed organizations. of Eleven organized into five departments. It the marketing of aml cheese factory and dairy by-products, the f co-operative laws to the of dairy products, and improving fhe market for thru advertising. The the committee will be togath- andmake recommendations help dairy farmers to pu' on the market at less Specialist To Fill Vacancy of clothing specialis Farm office of ex- Work with women, made va- August by the resignation Cooley, has been filled appointment of Miss Eunice graduate of the University Miss Ryan won her degree at Teachers College, UMvelsity, New York City. aught in high schools, nor- and colleges, and special- textiles and millinery for the work which enters in this state . Shares In Awards At Show Cooper of St. Cloud, a sen- Minnesota college of agri- Won the highest honors in the judging contest for col- at the National Dairy Show state fair grounds. gave him first place for !With all breeds of cattle. college team stood Jerseys and Holsteins; all breeds Kansas was Wi:consin second, Michi- and Minnesota fourth. rein 14 states took part in teams from eight states in the dairy products judg- Ohio winning first place, Minnesota third, South and Pennsylvania fifth. of Milmesota was Judging butter and A. G. of Mimmsota, third in judg- ird national boys' and girls' judging contest was par- In by 16 state teams, ,the been picked as 'the cattle judges in 'the boys' clubs in their respective enn Peacock of Pope coun- won a gold medal for st judge of Guernsey cat- Dakota team won for judging all breeds with Second, Ohio third, South urth and Maryland fifth. team stood in eighth To Act On Plan November 10 Ota livestock shipping organ- Mll be asked to send dole -! attend a national convention on November 10, to con- stock marketing plans by the Committee of Fif- plan calls for co-operative at terminal markets, that already established by hipI and for a nation- to handle traffic prob- the flow of livestock to and build up a national feeder trade direct from farmer. The committee by the American Farm BIG CATTLE RUN IN GOOD DEMAND Heaviest One-Day Rum This Year When 12,000 Arrive Stock Cat- tle Trade Strong. Monday's Closing-- Cattle 12,000. Market steady to strong. Best western grass beeves hele bid $6.75. Bulk grass beeves $5.00 to $6.00. Hogs 11,- 500. Market steady to strong, bulk $6.75 to $7.90, bulk desirable pigs $8.25. Sheep 16,000. Market mostly 50c lower. Bulk good na- tive and Dakota lambs $7.50, few $7.75, ewes mostly $2.75 to $3.50. South St. Paul, Minn., October 17, 1921.--While cattle receipts at seven markets showed a loss of about 7,000 compared with last Monday, the local run of 12,000 was heaviest for a single day this year. The supply was in fairly active demand, however, killing classes, selling generally steady to strong. Best fat steers here were some good Montana grassers that were bid $6.75, being unsoM at a late hour. A few loads sold at $6.00, with imtk from this price down to $5.00. Best young butcher cows and heifers are quotable from $5.00 to around $6.00 or above, with bulk here selling from $3,25 to $4.75. Canners and cut- ters are selling mostly at $2.25 to ,$3.00, bologna bulls largely $2.75 to $3.50. Bulk best light veal calves $9.00. Stockers and feeders opened at strong prices, bulk selling from $4 to $5.50, with a few loads of good fleshy feeding steers averaging 1,000 to 1,200 pounds at $6.00. The hog market opened steady to strong, range $6.00 to $8.10, bulk $6.75 to $7.90. About 1,600 pigs here, bulk desirable kinils $8.25. With a liberal run here a lower market at Chicago, sheep and lambs dropped about' 50c, bulk good lambs $7.50, ewes mostly $2.75 to $3.50 according to weight, and good 54-pound feeding lambs at $6.65. A Bill To Cure Farm Credit Troubles We read in the newspapers that the credit stringency has passed. Doubt- less it has in the commercial world. But how is it in the country? This is the more vital question. It is there the industry exists which makeghe wheels of every other business go around. For four (lays recently, every wit- hess that appeared before the com- mission conducting the Agricultural Inqry at Washington, made the statement that opportunities for bor- rowing money had not been equal to the demand from farmers. This is the most oft-repeated statement we hear. As if answering the question direct- ly, I have this from a country bank- er, written to me as recently as Sep- tember 19, 1921: "We need money the worst in the world in our community. We have plenty of feed, corn to feed the cattle and people willing to do it, but we can get no money. Our loan om- panies now want 8 per cent interest on choicest loans, they cut valuation down 25 per cent and then lend only up to 40 per cent value. How can  a farmer pay it? Something will have to be done to get agriculture "beck to its feet." Something is being done. The War Finance Corporation's billion dollar fund for financing exports and assist- ing farmers and seockmen under cer- tain conditions as a emergency relief measure is going to be tremendously helpful. But the need is for a perma- nent system of farm credit to meet the very same conditions always pres- ent in greater or less degree. Indicating how widespread are these condLions at present, I get this re- port under date of September 15, 1921, from one of the best farming communities in the Middle West: "Farmer need financial aid. I see daily able-bodied young farmers clos- ing out with public sales at suicide prices, and the brawn and hope of them going from the farm. Our banks are unable to aid them. There is no adequate credit provision, none at all for the moneyless man even the he can prove abundant ability. There are thousands of renters on a shoe-string of capital who need and deserve some aid. They are the ones who suffer now. The stockbreeder comes next. He sells because he must. A 90-day, or a 60-months' loan on a 2-year deal such as he must have to handle stock and repay the loan, drives him crazy in times like these. There is no re- newal. I have just seen several young farmers sell plows, mules, horses and cows, all for a song, and quit, when there was no question of their hon- esty, their industry, nor their ability. "We are living on an ideal stock %rm of 800 acres, but we are look- ing for another place because our landlord is broke. A St. Paul stock Kolah Club. I company has a mortgage on his cat- .f the Kolah C'ub le, a.other party one on his horses on Thursday, October 291 aim another a mortgage on his land of Mrs. Jas.'Hadley. ?Ir:. [ and thev all want their money." and Mv. Claire Mer-i They want their money, but they the sul jeer, "Ready iwitl )ot ive this owner of a 800-acre ,ta(t. Garments. Mv i farm a chance to earn it. Not be- :s sur)iect will be: "Va- i cawe he is a farmer, 1)ut because they Vi'omen," i do no wish to tie up their money so long, particularly in a time of credit stringency. There is nothing specially new in t.he present farm credit situation, the after-war crisis has only magnified] its weakness. Faruaers always are at a disadvantage in obtaining credit. For this reason farmers' banks have long existed in almost every European country. Inthe U. S. we ah'eady have Farm Loan Banks for long term farm cred- its and amortized loans. We also have what ia probably the-best commercial credit system in the world providing 60 and 90-day loans. What is needed to fill the Nap between, is a credit system for farmers running from 6 to 12 months, with loans secured by warehouse receipts on staple farm products. This to facilitate the or- derly marketing of crops. Also there is need of credits running not longer than 3 years, for the benefit of live- stock farmers. If we had had such a credit system last fall, providing for loans of 50 per cent on a uniform warehouse re- ceipt, the banker would not have had to consider his man or his financial condition at all, simply the genuine- hess of the negotiable warehouse re- ceipt for the wheat or cotton he had deposited there. This kind of a credit system wouht give farmers a chance to restock and l The Farm Loan Banks should be I In asking for such a system of to go on producing even in times of!empowed to make these loans direet t credit, farmers are not asking for stress. I to farmers or cattlemen on proper se- [ class legislation, but for a chance to The history of the farm loans is that I curity or thru associations, and also I exist and do business on an equality should be prepared to rediscount such 1 and in a modern way. * To efficiently theythey m'eare stOW,paid, bUtAllthatthe almostfarm always li paper for banks and cattle companies. ] carry on their business our farmers brrw' The Farm Loan Act can he amended tmust have an instrument which will er needs is time to make good. He ito make this the business of a ncw ladmit them to our great national re- cannot do this with a commercial sys- tem. Every farmer knows that the department in each of the twelve Fed- i servoir of money, and credit. That is frequent renewal of notes--when they oral Farm Loan Banks and this ma- t the object of my bill. can be renewed--is costly in fees and chinery once established would be I --Arthur Capper, in Capper's Weekly. commissions, self-sustaining. -- Under such a credit system as th e The new credit measure will au- Farmer Firm Handles one I have outlined, all farm loans thorize the Farm Loan Board to offer would be what they should be--the to the public notes of the Farm Loan Third of Day's Trade safest loan risks in the world. A far- Banks running no longer than 3 year. mer should have 12 months' credit to These notes to be secured by the market a crop. When a crop must notes and collateral representing the be thrown on the market regardless I loans made out of the fund. of conditions, it is certain to be mar- The objection may be raised that keted at a loss to the producers, t this is putting the Government in The Warehouse Act makes an inter- I business. If so, this is most essential mediate system of farm credit like business and, as private interests can- this possible, and the existing ma- not be expected to undertake it, we chinery of the Federal Farm Loan sys- [shall be following an example based tern supplies the needed foundation, lon the long anti bitter experience of A fund can be obtained to start with, 1 much older countries which has proved from the franchise taxes of the Fed- that the saLation of agriculture de- oral Reserve Banks. ! ponds on it. It also must be admitted I have been working on a farm that in the Farm Loan Banks the gov-[ credit measure embodying these fea- tures. The bill soon will be intro- duced in the House by Congressman Strong of. Kansas, and by myself in the Senate. Co-operative livestock marketing set a new record for telf in, Minne- sota last week, when the Central Co- operative Commis.ion association han- dled more than one-third of all the cars of stock arriving on the South St. Paul market. On October 13, to- tal receipts on the market were 242 cars; 81 of these cars went to the far- mer-controlled co-operative selling agency. That's What Takes So Long. "Do you mind it when your wife. ernment already is engaged in this doesn't believe what you tell her when business. The proposed bill merely[ you get home?" " r ]  ' i " " extends an mtermedmr3 type not i I dent m nd her not behewng wanted by commercial banks and not what I tell her, but then she goes on secured by mortgages on real estate. ]and tells glue what she believes. i i Sale Commences at 12:30 Sharp. FREE LUNCH AT NOON , ,11 i i WE WILL OFFER THE FOLLOWING LIVESTOCK FOR SALE AT PUBLIC AUCTION, AT OUR FARM, 7!/2 MILES N. E. OF ORTONVILLE, 7  MILES S. E. OF CLINTON 2 MIEES EAST OF THE STATE ROAD, ON U ,0g II 22-Head of Pure Bred Duroc-Jersey Hogs-22 Boars of correct bloodlines that will demand your attention in the selection of your Herd Sire. Sows, both yearlings and gilts, that will grade up your herd and start you right for next year. i I NO. SIRE DAM FARROWED LITTER 1 Boar. Pathfinders Best .......................... I Am A Superior Girl ................................ March 23, 1921 ...................................... 12 i  2 & 3, Boars. Leader of Fashion ............ Pathfinder Lady 3d .................................... April 10, 1921 ........................................ 8 I 4, Boar Path. Wonder Disturber .......... Golden Princess ........................................ April 6, 1921 ........................................ 9 ! 5, Boar. Path. Wonder Disturber ........ Pathfinder Wonder E ............................... March 26, 1921 .................................... 10 6, Boar. Double Sensation ...................... Sensation Challenger .............................. March 27, 1921 .................................... 9 7,8,9,10, Boars. Path Won. Disturber .... Pathfinder Wonder E, 2d ......................... March 19, 1921 .................................... 12 11 Boar. Great Sensation Challenger .... Fairview Chloe .......................................... March 18, 1919 .................................... 10 12, Boar. Pathfinder Protection ............ I Am Lady .................................................. March 2, 1921 ...................................... 14 13, Boar. Path. Wonder Disturber ........ Col. Golden Beauty 6th ............................ March 21, 1921 ...... : ............................. 15 14 & 15, Sows. Wonder King Gano ........ Col. Golden Beauty 4th ............................ May 31, 1920 ........................................ 8 ...................... M $ ........................................ 16, Sow. Wonder King Gano .................. Path. Wonder E ................. ay 31, 1920 5 17, Sow. Wonder King Dane .................... Pathfinder Wonder E 3d .......................... June 1, 1920 ........................................ 8 18 & 19, Sows. Wonder King Gano ........ Orion's Queen A ........................................ September 14, 1920 .............................. 10 20 & 21, Sows. Path. Won. Disturber .... Golden Princess .......................................... April 6, 1921 .......................................... 9 22, Sow. Path. Wonder Disturber .......... Golden Princess ........................................ April 19, 1921 ...................................... 10 All Are Cholera Immune. Registration Papers Furnished. 1 Pure Bred Holstein Bull and 5 Grade Cows 1 Pure-bred Holstein Bull, 12 Months old. Sire: King Hartog Beets Ormsby. Dam: Mercedes C'hnary Ormsby. 5 Grade Cows. Will be fresh this fall. 2 Pure ed Percheron Mares 1 11 years old, weight 1,600, grey. No. 81606. 1 3 years old, weight 1,300, grey. No. 152680. TERMS: Good bankable paper bearing 8% interest, due October 1, 1922. 470 Discount for Cash. i HARRY HIPPLE & SON, Owners Ortortville, Minnesota & DALY, Auctk,neers CITIZENS NAT'L BANK, Clerk ! OCTOBER 20, 1921 , THE ORTONVILLE INDiPENDEN] m' ...........   PAGE 7 i The Farmers Corner hi'VOTED ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF FARMERS AND FARMER'S CLUBS. HEADS rING INQUIRY Of Statewide Dairy Service Named To Lead Investigation. aCComplishments of Minnesota in co-operative enterprises by the American federation's dairy mar- of Eleven last week, elected H. B. Nickerson of Elk President of tim Minnesota Co- Creameries association, Inc., its national investigation in- of creamery and cheese Products. appointed by Jame president of the national organization, opened its Minnesota. Its first ses- at state headquarters of the and its first public hear- at the National Dairy show- of Boston, manager of England Milk Producers as- a, was elected chairman of the Mr. Mickerson was chosen of a special sub-committee to draw up plans for market- products, for the guidmlce who have not vet formed organizations. of Eleven organized into five departments. It the marketing of aml cheese factory and dairy by-products, the f co-operative laws to the of dairy products, and improving fhe market for thru advertising. The the committee will be togath- andmake recommendations help dairy farmers to pu' on the market at less Specialist To Fill Vacancy of clothing specialis Farm office of ex- Work with women, made va- August by the resignation Cooley, has been filled appointment of Miss Eunice graduate of the University Miss Ryan won her degree at Teachers College, UMvelsity, New York City. aught in high schools, nor- and colleges, and special- textiles and millinery for the work which enters in this state . Shares In Awards At Show Cooper of St. Cloud, a sen- Minnesota college of agri- Won the highest honors in the judging contest for col- at the National Dairy Show state fair grounds. gave him first place for !With all breeds of cattle. college team stood Jerseys and Holsteins; all breeds Kansas was Wi:consin second, Michi- and Minnesota fourth. rein 14 states took part in teams from eight states in the dairy products judg- Ohio winning first place, Minnesota third, South and Pennsylvania fifth. of Milmesota was Judging butter and A. G. of Mimmsota, third in judg- ird national boys' and girls' judging contest was par- In by 16 state teams, ,the been picked as 'the cattle judges in 'the boys' clubs in their respective enn Peacock of Pope coun- won a gold medal for st judge of Guernsey cat- Dakota team won for judging all breeds with Second, Ohio third, South urth and Maryland fifth. team stood in eighth To Act On Plan November 10 Ota livestock shipping organ- Mll be asked to send dole -! attend a national convention on November 10, to con- stock marketing plans by the Committee of Fif- plan calls for co-operative at terminal markets, that already established by hipI and for a nation- to handle traffic prob- the flow of livestock to and build up a national feeder trade direct from farmer. The committee by the American Farm BIG CATTLE RUN IN GOOD DEMAND Heaviest One-Day Rum This Year When 12,000 Arrive Stock Cat- tle Trade Strong. Monday's Closing-- Cattle 12,000. Market steady to strong. Best western grass beeves hele bid $6.75. Bulk grass beeves $5.00 to $6.00. Hogs 11,- 500. Market steady to strong, bulk $6.75 to $7.90, bulk desirable pigs $8.25. Sheep 16,000. Market mostly 50c lower. Bulk good na- tive and Dakota lambs $7.50, few $7.75, ewes mostly $2.75 to $3.50. South St. Paul, Minn., October 17, 1921.--While cattle receipts at seven markets showed a loss of about 7,000 compared with last Monday, the local run of 12,000 was heaviest for a single day this year. The supply was in fairly active demand, however, killing classes, selling generally steady to strong. Best fat steers here were some good Montana grassers that were bid $6.75, being unsoM at a late hour. A few loads sold at $6.00, with imtk from this price down to $5.00. Best young butcher cows and heifers are quotable from $5.00 to around $6.00 or above, with bulk here selling from $3,25 to $4.75. Canners and cut- ters are selling mostly at $2.25 to ,$3.00, bologna bulls largely $2.75 to $3.50. Bulk best light veal calves $9.00. Stockers and feeders opened at strong prices, bulk selling from $4 to $5.50, with a few loads of good fleshy feeding steers averaging 1,000 to 1,200 pounds at $6.00. The hog market opened steady to strong, range $6.00 to $8.10, bulk $6.75 to $7.90. About 1,600 pigs here, bulk desirable kinils $8.25. With a liberal run here a lower market at Chicago, sheep and lambs dropped about' 50c, bulk good lambs $7.50, ewes mostly $2.75 to $3.50 according to weight, and good 54-pound feeding lambs at $6.65. A Bill To Cure Farm Credit Troubles We read in the newspapers that the credit stringency has passed. Doubt- less it has in the commercial world. But how is it in the country? This is the more vital question. It is there the industry exists which makeghe wheels of every other business go around. For four (lays recently, every wit- hess that appeared before the com- mission conducting the Agricultural Inqry at Washington, made the statement that opportunities for bor- rowing money had not been equal to the demand from farmers. This is the most oft-repeated statement we hear. As if answering the question direct- ly, I have this from a country bank- er, written to me as recently as Sep- tember 19, 1921: "We need money the worst in the world in our community. We have plenty of feed, corn to feed the cattle and people willing to do it, but we can get no money. Our loan om- panies now want 8 per cent interest on choicest loans, they cut valuation down 25 per cent and then lend only up to 40 per cent value. How can  a farmer pay it? Something will have to be done to get agriculture "beck to its feet." Something is being done. The War Finance Corporation's billion dollar fund for financing exports and assist- ing farmers and seockmen under cer- tain conditions as a emergency relief measure is going to be tremendously helpful. But the need is for a perma- nent system of farm credit to meet the very same conditions always pres- ent in greater or less degree. Indicating how widespread are these condLions at present, I get this re- port under date of September 15, 1921, from one of the best farming communities in the Middle West: "Farmer need financial aid. I see daily able-bodied young farmers clos- ing out with public sales at suicide prices, and the brawn and hope of them going from the farm. Our banks are unable to aid them. There is no adequate credit provision, none at all for the moneyless man even the he can prove abundant ability. There are thousands of renters on a shoe-string of capital who need and deserve some aid. They are the ones who suffer now. The stockbreeder comes next. He sells because he must. A 90-day, or a 60-months' loan on a 2-year deal such as he must have to handle stock and repay the loan, drives him crazy in times like these. There is no re- newal. I have just seen several young farmers sell plows, mules, horses and cows, all for a song, and quit, when there was no question of their hon- esty, their industry, nor their ability. "We are living on an ideal stock %rm of 800 acres, but we are look- ing for another place because our landlord is broke. A St. Paul stock Kolah Club. I company has a mortgage on his cat- .f the Kolah C'ub le, a.other party one on his horses on Thursday, October 291 aim another a mortgage on his land of Mrs. Jas.'Hadley. ?Ir:. [ and thev all want their money." and Mv. Claire Mer-i They want their money, but they the sul jeer, "Ready iwitl )ot ive this owner of a 800-acre ,ta(t. Garments. Mv i farm a chance to earn it. Not be- :s sur)iect will be: "Va- i cawe he is a farmer, 1)ut because they Vi'omen," i do no wish to tie up their money so long, particularly in a time of credit stringency. There is nothing specially new in t.he present farm credit situation, the after-war crisis has only magnified] its weakness. Faruaers always are at a disadvantage in obtaining credit. For this reason farmers' banks have long existed in almost every European country. Inthe U. S. we ah'eady have Farm Loan Banks for long term farm cred- its and amortized loans. We also have what ia probably the-best commercial credit system in the world providing 60 and 90-day loans. What is needed to fill the Nap between, is a credit system for farmers running from 6 to 12 months, with loans secured by warehouse receipts on staple farm products. This to facilitate the or- derly marketing of crops. Also there is need of credits running not longer than 3 years, for the benefit of live- stock farmers. If we had had such a credit system last fall, providing for loans of 50 per cent on a uniform warehouse re- ceipt, the banker would not have had to consider his man or his financial condition at all, simply the genuine- hess of the negotiable warehouse re- ceipt for the wheat or cotton he had deposited there. This kind of a credit system wouht give farmers a chance to restock and l The Farm Loan Banks should be I In asking for such a system of to go on producing even in times of!empowed to make these loans direet t credit, farmers are not asking for stress. I to farmers or cattlemen on proper se- [ class legislation, but for a chance to The history of the farm loans is that I curity or thru associations, and also I exist and do business on an equality should be prepared to rediscount such 1 and in a modern way. * To efficiently theythey m'eare stOW,paid, bUtAllthatthe almostfarm always li paper for banks and cattle companies. ] carry on their business our farmers brrw' The Farm Loan Act can he amended tmust have an instrument which will er needs is time to make good. He ito make this the business of a ncw ladmit them to our great national re- cannot do this with a commercial sys- tem. Every farmer knows that the department in each of the twelve Fed- i servoir of money, and credit. That is frequent renewal of notes--when they oral Farm Loan Banks and this ma- t the object of my bill. can be renewed--is costly in fees and chinery once established would be I --Arthur Capper, in Capper's Weekly. commissions, self-sustaining. -- Under such a credit system as th e The new credit measure will au- Farmer Firm Handles one I have outlined, all farm loans thorize the Farm Loan Board to offer would be what they should be--the to the public notes of the Farm Loan Third of Day's Trade safest loan risks in the world. A far- Banks running no longer than 3 year. mer should have 12 months' credit to These notes to be secured by the market a crop. When a crop must notes and collateral representing the be thrown on the market regardless I loans made out of the fund. of conditions, it is certain to be mar- The objection may be raised that keted at a loss to the producers, t this is putting the Government in The Warehouse Act makes an inter- I business. If so, this is most essential mediate system of farm credit like business and, as private interests can- this possible, and the existing ma- not be expected to undertake it, we chinery of the Federal Farm Loan sys- [shall be following an example based tern supplies the needed foundation, lon the long anti bitter experience of A fund can be obtained to start with, 1 much older countries which has proved from the franchise taxes of the Fed- that the saLation of agriculture de- oral Reserve Banks. ! ponds on it. It also must be admitted I have been working on a farm that in the Farm Loan Banks the gov-[ credit measure embodying these fea- tures. The bill soon will be intro- duced in the House by Congressman Strong of. Kansas, and by myself in the Senate. Co-operative livestock marketing set a new record for telf in, Minne- sota last week, when the Central Co- operative Commis.ion association han- dled more than one-third of all the cars of stock arriving on the South St. Paul market. On October 13, to- tal receipts on the market were 242 cars; 81 of these cars went to the far- mer-controlled co-operative selling agency. That's What Takes So Long. "Do you mind it when your wife. ernment already is engaged in this doesn't believe what you tell her when business. The proposed bill merely[ you get home?" " r ]  ' i " " extends an mtermedmr3 type not i I dent mnd her not behewng wanted by commercial banks and not what I tell her, but then she goes on secured by mortgages on real estate. ]and tells glue what she believes. i i Sale Commences at 12:30 Sharp. FREE LUNCH AT NOON , ,11 i i WE WILL OFFER THE FOLLOWING LIVESTOCK FOR SALE AT PUBLIC AUCTION, AT OUR FARM, 7!/2 MILES N. E. OF ORTONVILLE, 7  MILES S. E. OF CLINTON 2 MIEES EAST OF THE STATE ROAD, ON U ,0g II 22-Head of Pure Bred Duroc-Jersey Hogs-22 Boars of correct bloodlines that will demand your attention in the selection of your Herd Sire. Sows, both yearlings and gilts, that will grade up your herd and start you right for next year. i I NO. SIRE DAM FARROWED LITTER 1 Boar. Pathfinders Best .......................... I Am A Superior Girl ................................ March 23, 1921 ...................................... 12 i  2 & 3, Boars. Leader of Fashion ............ Pathfinder Lady 3d .................................... April 10, 1921 ........................................ 8 I 4, Boar Path. Wonder Disturber .......... Golden Princess ........................................ April 6, 1921 ........................................ 9 ! 5, Boar. Path. Wonder Disturber ........ Pathfinder Wonder E ............................... March 26, 1921 .................................... 10 6, Boar. Double Sensation ...................... Sensation Challenger .............................. March 27, 1921 .................................... 9 7,8,9,10, Boars. Path Won. Disturber .... Pathfinder Wonder E, 2d ......................... March 19, 1921 .................................... 12 11 Boar. Great Sensation Challenger .... Fairview Chloe .......................................... March 18, 1919 .................................... 10 12, Boar. Pathfinder Protection ............ I Am Lady .................................................. March 2, 1921 ...................................... 14 13, Boar. Path. Wonder Disturber ........ Col. Golden Beauty 6th ............................ March 21, 1921 ...... : ............................. 15 14 & 15, Sows. Wonder King Gano ........ Col. Golden Beauty 4th ............................ May 31, 1920 ........................................ 8 ...................... M $ ........................................ 16, Sow. Wonder King Gano .................. Path. Wonder E ................. ay 31, 1920 5 17, Sow. Wonder King Dane .................... Pathfinder Wonder E 3d .......................... June 1, 1920 ........................................ 8 18 & 19, Sows. Wonder King Gano ........ Orion's Queen A ........................................ September 14, 1920 .............................. 10 20 & 21, Sows. Path. Won. Disturber .... Golden Princess .......................................... April 6, 1921 .......................................... 9 22, Sow. Path. Wonder Disturber .......... Golden Princess ........................................ April 19, 1921 ...................................... 10 All Are Cholera Immune. Registration Papers Furnished. 1 Pure Bred Holstein Bull and 5 Grade Cows 1 Pure-bred Holstein Bull, 12 Months old. Sire: King Hartog Beets Ormsby. Dam: Mercedes C'hnary Ormsby. 5 Grade Cows. Will be fresh this fall. 2 Pure ed Percheron Mares 1 11 years old, weight 1,600, grey. No. 81606. 1 3 years old, weight 1,300, grey. No. 152680. TERMS: Good bankable paper bearing 8% interest, due October 1, 1922. 470 Discount for Cash. i HARRY HIPPLE & SON, Owners Ortortville, Minnesota & DALY, Auctk,neers CITIZENS NAT'L BANK, Clerk ! THE ORTNVILLE INDE'ENDENY ' "  PAGE T The Farmers Corner VOTED ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF FARMERS HEADS Lead Investigation. iua eoperativ e enterprlses by the elected H B. Niekerson of Elk e Camerie association, Inc., its tional investigation in- and Products. at state headquarters of the public hear- y show of Boston, manager of r England Milk Producers as- h was elected chairm of the special BIG CATTLE RUN IN GOOD DEMAND One-Day R This When 12.1}00 Arrive Stk Cat. tie Trade Stng. Monday's Closing-- Cattle J2,000. Market steady to stl'ong. Best wtern beeves hew bid $6.75. Bulk grs beeves $5.00 to $6,00, Hogs 11,- 5O0, Market steady to stng, bulk $6,75 to $7.90, bulk desirable pigs $8.25. Sheep 16,000. Mket mostly fi0c lower. Bulk good na tire and Dakota Imbs $7.50,,few $7,75, es nmstly $2.75 to $.50. South St. paul, Minn., run of 12,O00was heaviest for a singl day this year. The supply generally steady Best fat strs he some good Montana rassers that ,e bid $6.75 bemg nso[ a a late fhe guidaleet A few loads soM at $6.00, with not et formed:i'ulk from this price down to $5.OO. Best al quotable from $5.OO to into five department? it $.00 o1" above, wlth huk he selling the "marktlng of flm $3,2S to $4.75. Canners and cut- a cheese factory ters a, selling mostly at $2.25 to by-prluets. $00, bnogua bulls largely $2.75 to Bulk best light veal ;e laws to the of dairy products, and Stackers improving te market for attrong prices, balk seUig fom $4 The to $5.5O, with a few Ioad of good the committee will he ogath- fleshy feeding steer averaglng 1,000 andmake to 1,200 pounds at $6.O0. help dairy farmers The ho market opened steady to treng, range $.00 to $8A0, hulk $.7S to $7.10. About 1,00 ps here, bulk $S.25. With a a I'er market at Chi ago, heep and lambs ,Iropped aboutFS0c, TO FIll Vacancy J hulk gvl lambs $7.50, ewes rues ly -- I $2.75 to S3.50 aording to weight, and ,g specialist I goal 54-pound feeding lambs at $668. Farm ufee of ex. I ,nade- t Bill To Cure xslgnation  E , Farm Credit T hIe_rou___s nn'ee  t graduate of the University] We lad in the newspapels that the iu. Miss Ryan won her cledit tringeey h passed. Do*bt degree at Teachers College, le it has in the commeial worId. Uiversity New YOlk City. Bu how s it in the untry? Thi is taught in high schools nor- e mo'e . a question. It is tare sis and euHeges, and speeia/- the idustry exists which tnakese Shares In msio,, conducting the Agricultural t( Othin  textiles and millinery wheels of every other busin go aling far the work which around enters in thi state, For fuur days eently, every wi t- -- nes that appeared befo the om , [nquil'y at Washington mzde the A ards At Show - statement that opportumtles for bet- 'Cnper of ag- at the Natiol Dairy Show gunds, first place for breeds of cattle. llege took part iv teams ight tile daiT g flint pl third, of national boys' and girls Judging contest was par. by s, ,th their spectiv pe eoun-' wan a gold medal for le of G rnsey eat- I Dakota team won for judging *end, Ohio third, South and blaryland fifth. team stood in eighth To Act On 10 livestock shipping orgy- be .asked stk mrketlng plns t by the Committe pl calls for co-operative retinal markets, t alsdy established by pb- and build p feeder trade dhct fm farmer. The comnitee Fa, galah Cub. r 29 o Mls Jas, Hadley, Mrs. ad , "Read lowing money had not been equal to This is the As if answering the question diet- ly, 1 have this from a country Imnk- to me as cently as Sep tember 19, 1)21: "We need ney the wot in community. plenty of feed, lopIe willing to de it, but we get no money panies now want 8 per teat on oicest loans, they cut valerian down 25 per eent and then lend only up to 4O per cent value. How u a fael' pay it? Something will get agMcultu "beek + gomethlvg ia being done. ing  a emergency llef is going to be tmeudously helpful. But the need is for a perma- 'neat system of fa eredlt t meet I the very same nditions alway ps- nt iu greater or less dege. tndicating how widespread are tI at pnt, I get port ander date of September 1921, from one of the best in the Middle West: "Faer need finaneil aid. daily able-bied young fa elos- lag out with public sales at priee, nd t Le brawn a l Lhem going from the farm. O a unable to aid the  he eqte cledit pvion, none a all for the moneyless maa even the he ca ability. aid. They a the one who suffe: now. The stoekbeder comes next He lls because he musL A lay -year deal and pay the loan, cows, all for a song, ao quit, whet eaty, their industry, nor their ability. "we a living on an ideal stock 'e are ook- in for another place bause our broke. A St. Paul ha a mnlgae on his eat another party one on his on his and they all want their money." cy wat their money, but they farm a chance to earn it Not be. be: cause he is a farmer, but because they do not wlsh to ie so long, particularly in a time of lit give faters a chance to restock and ringency, to go on pdueing even in times ol There s nothing specially new in stress. prese,,t farm credit ituation, the The history of the farm loans is tha: crisis has only nmgnifiedl, they am slow, but that almost alway Fae aways are at I they a paid. All the arm horw. a dsadantage in obtaining credit, er needs is time to make good. For this ason faers' banks have eannot do thi with a commeial : long existed in almost every European In the U. S. we already have Fa Loan Banks for nag te fa cred- We also have what i pbably the-best eommeial cdit system in the world providing aml SO-day Ioas. What is nded the ap betwn, is a cdit eystem for fae running fm 6 to 12 months, wlth loans sured by celpts on staple fa products. This to facilitate the or- derly marketing of crops. Also the is need of credits nning v6t longer than 3 years, for the benefit of live- If we had had such a edit system tern supplies the nded foundation. Lst fall, proqding for loans of 50 A fund can he obtained to start qth, per cent on a uniform warehouse - fm the franehi taxes of the Fed. eeipt, the banker would net hve had[ eml Reee Banks. his man or his financial! ! have been working on a fa credit measurb emblyin these fen- The bill soon will he int eeipt for House by Congressman deposited the. Strong of, Kansas, and by myself in This klnd of a credit system tern. Every falaner knows that the I frequent 1newal of antes--when they [ can be renewed--is costly in fs and commissions. Under such a credit system a the one I have outlined, all fa oans would be what they should be--the saft Ipan risks in the world. A far- met should have 12 months' dit a marhet a crop. When a ep must be thrown on the arket gardless of nditions, it is certain t e ma keted at a loss to the prelude. The Warehou Act makes a iute mediate system of fa edit llke ti,is possible, and the existing ma- chinery of the Federal Fa Loan ssys- The Farm Loan Banks should be in as]ng for such a system of empowered to make the Ioan diet credit, fe a not asking or to farmers or cattlemen on pper s class legislation, but for a chan to The Farm Loan Act can he amended must haw an instrument wlfieh wll curity or thru associations, and alo ist ad do business on au equality should be ppad to llount such and in a modern way. - To etflclently paper far banks and ttle eompanlee. T on their business or fmers to make this the busines of a newladmit them to our gloat naonal  department n each of the twelve Fed ! servnir of money, and eredJL That is eral Farm Loan Banks and this ma-] the object of my bill. chluery once estahllshed would beI--ArthurCapper, in Capper'sWeekIy. self-sustaining. The new lit meul will au- thori the Fa,, Loan Bnal to offer to the publle notes of the Farm Loan Bks running no longer than 3 ea The notes to be seud by the nnte and collateral presenting the Is made nut of the fund. The el,jtioa may .he raised that this s putting the Government iv business. If so, this is most essential biness and,  private intests can- not be exleted to underake it,  shall be following an example based on the long and bitter exl:erien at much older count nes which h proved that te salvation of agrleultu de IIS on Jr. It also must be lmltted that in the Fa Loan Baks the Farmer Firm Handles Third of Day's Trade Co-operatlve listoek marketing t a new rd for j.tself in Mie- sots last wk, when the Central Co- operative Coiaon siatiou }tan. died mote th one-third of aH the ears of stk arriving on the Sth St. Paul market. On Otober 18, to- tal eipts on the market we 242 ea; 81 of these es nt to the ar- met-controlled co-operatlve ]ling agency. That's What Takes So bang. "Do you mind it when your wife ernment alady is engaged thi dsn't believe what you teii her when biness. The proposed hill meretyyou get home?" extends a inteediary type not "I don't mind her not believing wanted by commeiai banks and not what ! tell her, but then she gces on seeud by mortgages on real estate, land tells.me what she believes. Sale Commences FREE LUNCH at 12:30 Sharp, AT NOON WE WILL OFFER THE FOLLOWING LIVESTOCK FOR SALE AT PUBLIC AUCTION, AT OUR FARM, 7!/z MILl'S N. E. OF ORTONVILLE, 7/ MILES S. E. OF CLINTON 2 MIEES EAST OF THE STATE ROAD, ON ESDAY, OCT. 25TH 22- Head of Pure Bred Duroc-Jersey Hogs- 22 Boars of correct bloodlines that will demand your attention in the selection of your Herd Sire. Sows, both yearlings and gilts, that will grade up your herd and start you right for next year. NO. SIRE \\; DAM FARROWED LITTER 1 Boar. PaIhllnders Best .......................... I Am A Superior Girl ............................... March 23, 1921 ............................... 12 2 & 3, Boars. Leader of Fashion ............ Pathfinder Lady 3d .................................... Aprd 11), 1921 ...................................... 8 4, Boar Path. Wonder DlsBlrber ......... Golden Princess ........................................ April 6, 1921 ........................................ 9 5, Boar. Path. Wonder Disturber ........ Pathfinder Wonder E ....................... March 26, 1921 .................................... 10 6, Boar. Double Sensation ...................... Sensation Challenger .............................. March 27, 1921 .................................... 9 7,8,9,10, Boars. Path Won. Disturber_..PaIhfinder Wonder E, 2d ......................... March 19, 1921 .................................... 12 11 Boar. Great Sensation Cbellenger....Fairview Chloe ...................................... March 18, 1919 .................................... 10 12, Boar. Pathfinder Protection ........... .I Am Lady .......... : .................................... March 2, 1921 ...................................... 14 13, Boar. Path. Wonder Disturber........Coh Golden Beauty 6th ............................ March 21, 1921 .....?. ............................. 15 14 & 15, Sows. Wonder King Gano......_Coi. Golden Beauty 4th .......................... May 31, 1920 ........................................ 8 16, Sow. Wonder King Gano ................. Path. Wonder E .................................. Ma 31, 1920 .......................................... 17, Sow. Wonder King Dane ................... Pathfinder Wonder E 3d ....................... June 1, 1920 ........................................ 8 18 & 19, Sows. Wonder King Gano.._....Orion's Queen A ........................................ September 14, 1920 ............................. 10 20 & 21, Sows. Path. Won. Dlsturber....Golden Princess ......................................... April 6, 1921 ........................................... 9 Sow. ,Path. Wonder Disturber .......... Golden Princess ..................................... April 19, 1921 ...................................... 10 All Are Cholera Immune. Registration Papers Furnished. 1 Pure Bred Holstein Bull and 5 Grade Cows Pure-bred Holstein Bull, 12 Months old. Sire: King Hartog Beets Ormsby. Dam: Mereedes Cnary Ormsby. 5 Grade Cows. Will be fresh this falL 2 Pure Bred Percheron Mares 1 1t years old, weight 1,600, grey. No. 81606. I 3 years old, weight 1,300, grey. No. 152680. TERMS: Good bankable paper bearing 8% interest, due October 1, 1922. 4% Discount for Cash. HIPPLE & SON,, Owners Ortonville, Minnesota TREmL & DALY, Auctioneers CITIZENS NAT'L BANK, Clerk OCTOBER 20, 1921 , THE ORTONVILLE INDiPENDEN] m' ...........   PAGE 7 i The Farmers Corner hi'VOTED ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF FARMERS AND FARMER'S CLUBS. HEADS rING INQUIRY Of Statewide Dairy Service Named To Lead Investigation. aCComplishments of Minnesota in co-operative enterprises by the American federation's dairy mar- of Eleven last week, elected H. B. Nickerson of Elk President of tim Minnesota Co- Creameries association, Inc., its national investigation in- of creamery and cheese Products. appointed by Jame president of the national organization, opened its Minnesota. Its first ses- at state headquarters of the and its first public hear- at the National Dairy show- of Boston, manager of England Milk Producers as- a, was elected chairman of the Mr. Mickerson was chosen of a special sub-committee to draw up plans for market- products, for the guidmlce who have not vet formed organizations. of Eleven organized into five departments. It the marketing of aml cheese factory and dairy by-products, the f co-operative laws to the of dairy products, and improving fhe market for thru advertising. The the committee will be togath- andmake recommendations help dairy farmers to pu' on the market at less Specialist To Fill Vacancy of clothing specialis Farm office of ex- Work with women, made va- August by the resignation Cooley, has been filled appointment of Miss Eunice graduate of the University Miss Ryan won her degree at Teachers College, UMvelsity, New York City. aught in high schools, nor- and colleges, and special- textiles and millinery for the work which enters in this state . Shares In Awards At Show Cooper of St. Cloud, a sen- Minnesota college of agri- Won the highest honors in the judging contest for col- at the National Dairy Show state fair grounds. gave him first place for !With all breeds of cattle. college team stood Jerseys and Holsteins; all breeds Kansas was Wi:consin second, Michi- and Minnesota fourth. rein 14 states took part in teams from eight states in the dairy products judg- Ohio winning first place, Minnesota third, South and Pennsylvania fifth. of Milmesota was Judging butter and A. G. of Mimmsota, third in judg- ird national boys' and girls' judging contest was par- In by 16 state teams, ,the been picked as 'the cattle judges in 'the boys' clubs in their respective enn Peacock of Pope coun- won a gold medal for st judge of Guernsey cat- Dakota team won for judging all breeds with Second, Ohio third, South urth and Maryland fifth. team stood in eighth To Act On Plan November 10 Ota livestock shipping organ- Mll be asked to send dole -! attend a national convention on November 10, to con- stock marketing plans by the Committee of Fif- plan calls for co-operative at terminal markets, that already established by hipI and for a nation- to handle traffic prob- the flow of livestock to and build up a national feeder trade direct from farmer. The committee by the American Farm BIG CATTLE RUN IN GOOD DEMAND Heaviest One-Day Rum This Year When 12,000 Arrive Stock Cat- tle Trade Strong. Monday's Closing-- Cattle 12,000. Market steady to strong. Best western grass beeves hele bid $6.75. Bulk grass beeves $5.00 to $6.00. Hogs 11,- 500. Market steady to strong, bulk $6.75 to $7.90, bulk desirable pigs $8.25. Sheep 16,000. Market mostly 50c lower. Bulk good na- tive and Dakota lambs $7.50, few $7.75, ewes mostly $2.75 to $3.50. South St. Paul, Minn., October 17, 1921.--While cattle receipts at seven markets showed a loss of about 7,000 compared with last Monday, the local run of 12,000 was heaviest for a single day this year. The supply was in fairly active demand, however, killing classes, selling generally steady to strong. Best fat steers here were some good Montana grassers that were bid $6.75, being unsoM at a late hour. A few loads sold at $6.00, with imtk from this price down to $5.00. Best young butcher cows and heifers are quotable from $5.00 to around $6.00 or above, with bulk here selling from $3,25 to $4.75. Canners and cut- ters are selling mostly at $2.25 to ,$3.00, bologna bulls largely $2.75 to $3.50. Bulk best light veal calves $9.00. Stockers and feeders opened at strong prices, bulk selling from $4 to $5.50, with a few loads of good fleshy feeding steers averaging 1,000 to 1,200 pounds at $6.00. The hog market opened steady to strong, range $6.00 to $8.10, bulk $6.75 to $7.90. About 1,600 pigs here, bulk desirable kinils $8.25. With a liberal run here a lower market at Chicago, sheep and lambs dropped about' 50c, bulk good lambs $7.50, ewes mostly $2.75 to $3.50 according to weight, and good 54-pound feeding lambs at $6.65. A Bill To Cure Farm Credit Troubles We read in the newspapers that the credit stringency has passed. Doubt- less it has in the commercial world. But how is it in the country? This is the more vital question. It is there the industry exists which makeghe wheels of every other business go around. For four (lays recently, every wit- hess that appeared before the com- mission conducting the Agricultural Inqry at Washington, made the statement that opportunities for bor- rowing money had not been equal to the demand from farmers. This is the most oft-repeated statement we hear. As if answering the question direct- ly, I have this from a country bank- er, written to me as recently as Sep- tember 19, 1921: "We need money the worst in the world in our community. We have plenty of feed, corn to feed the cattle and people willing to do it, but we can get no money. Our loan om- panies now want 8 per cent interest on choicest loans, they cut valuation down 25 per cent and then lend only up to 40 per cent value. How can  a farmer pay it? Something will have to be done to get agriculture "beck to its feet." Something is being done. The War Finance Corporation's billion dollar fund for financing exports and assist- ing farmers and seockmen under cer- tain conditions as a emergency relief measure is going to be tremendously helpful. But the need is for a perma- nent system of farm credit to meet the very same conditions always pres- ent in greater or less degree. Indicating how widespread are these condLions at present, I get this re- port under date of September 15, 1921, from one of the best farming communities in the Middle West: "Farmer need financial aid. I see daily able-bodied young farmers clos- ing out with public sales at suicide prices, and the brawn and hope of them going from the farm. Our banks are unable to aid them. There is no adequate credit provision, none at all for the moneyless man even the he can prove abundant ability. There are thousands of renters on a shoe-string of capital who need and deserve some aid. They are the ones who suffer now. The stockbreeder comes next. He sells because he must. A 90-day, or a 60-months' loan on a 2-year deal such as he must have to handle stock and repay the loan, drives him crazy in times like these. There is no re- newal. I have just seen several young farmers sell plows, mules, horses and cows, all for a song, and quit, when there was no question of their hon- esty, their industry, nor their ability. "We are living on an ideal stock %rm of 800 acres, but we are look- ing for another place because our landlord is broke. A St. Paul stock Kolah Club. I company has a mortgage on his cat- .f the Kolah C'ub le, a.other party one on his horses on Thursday, October 291 aim another a mortgage on his land of Mrs. Jas.'Hadley. ?Ir:. [ and thev all want their money." and Mv. Claire Mer-i They want their money, but they the sul jeer, "Ready iwitl )ot ive this owner of a 800-acre ,ta(t. Garments. Mv i farm a chance to earn it. Not be- :s sur)iect will be: "Va- i cawe he is a farmer, 1)ut because they Vi'omen," i do no wish to tie up their money so long, particularly in a time of credit stringency. There is nothing specially new in t.he present farm credit situation, the after-war crisis has only magnified] its weakness. Faruaers always are at a disadvantage in obtaining credit. For this reason farmers' banks have long existed in almost every European country. Inthe U. S. we ah'eady have Farm Loan Banks for long term farm cred- its and amortized loans. We also have what ia probably the-best commercial credit system in the world providing 60 and 90-day loans. What is needed to fill the Nap between, is a credit system for farmers running from 6 to 12 months, with loans secured by warehouse receipts on staple farm products. This to facilitate the or- derly marketing of crops. Also there is need of credits running not longer than 3 years, for the benefit of live- stock farmers. If we had had such a credit system last fall, providing for loans of 50 per cent on a uniform warehouse re- ceipt, the banker would not have had to consider his man or his financial condition at all, simply the genuine- hess of the negotiable warehouse re- ceipt for the wheat or cotton he had deposited there. This kind of a credit system wouht give farmers a chance to restock and l The Farm Loan Banks should be I In asking for such a system of to go on producing even in times of!empowed to make these loans direet t credit, farmers are not asking for stress. I to farmers or cattlemen on proper se- [ class legislation, but for a chance to The history of the farm loans is that I curity or thru associations, and also I exist and do business on an equality should be prepared to rediscount such 1 and in a modern way. * To efficiently theythey m'eare stOW,paid, bUtAllthatthe almostfarm always li paper for banks and cattle companies. ] carry on their business our farmers brrw' The Farm Loan Act can he amended tmust have an instrument which will er needs is time to make good. He ito make this the business of a ncw ladmit them to our great national re- cannot do this with a commercial sys- tem. Every farmer knows that the department in each of the twelve Fed- i servoir of money, and credit. That is frequent renewal of notes--when they oral Farm Loan Banks and this ma- t the object of my bill. can be renewed--is costly in fees and chinery once established would be I --Arthur Capper, in Capper's Weekly. commissions, self-sustaining. -- Under such a credit system as th e The new credit measure will au- Farmer Firm Handles one I have outlined, all farm loans thorize the Farm Loan Board to offer would be what they should be--the to the public notes of the Farm Loan Third of Day's Trade safest loan risks in the world. A far- Banks running no longer than 3 year. mer should have 12 months' credit to These notes to be secured by the market a crop. When a crop must notes and collateral representing the be thrown on the market regardless I loans made out of the fund. of conditions, it is certain to be mar- The objection may be raised that keted at a loss to the producers, t this is putting the Government in The Warehouse Act makes an inter- I business. If so, this is most essential mediate system of farm credit like business and, as private interests can- this possible, and the existing ma- not be expected to undertake it, we chinery of the Federal Farm Loan sys- [shall be following an example based tern supplies the needed foundation, lon the long anti bitter experience of A fund can be obtained to start with, 1 much older countries which has proved from the franchise taxes of the Fed- that the saLation of agriculture de- oral Reserve Banks. ! ponds on it. It also must be admitted I have been working on a farm that in the Farm Loan Banks the gov-[ credit measure embodying these fea- tures. The bill soon will be intro- duced in the House by Congressman Strong of. Kansas, and by myself in the Senate. Co-operative livestock marketing set a new record for telf in, Minne- sota last week, when the Central Co- operative Commis.ion association han- dled more than one-third of all the cars of stock arriving on the South St. Paul market. On October 13, to- tal receipts on the market were 242 cars; 81 of these cars went to the far- mer-controlled co-operative selling agency. That's What Takes So Long. "Do you mind it when your wife. ernment already is engaged in this doesn't believe what you tell her when business. The proposed bill merely[ you get home?" " r ]  ' i " " extends an mtermedmr3 type not i I dent m nd her not behewng wanted by commercial banks and not what I tell her, but then she goes on secured by mortgages on real estate. ]and tells glue what she believes. i i Sale Commences at 12:30 Sharp. FREE LUNCH AT NOON , ,11 i i WE WILL OFFER THE FOLLOWING LIVESTOCK FOR SALE AT PUBLIC AUCTION, AT OUR FARM, 7!/2 MILES N. E. OF ORTONVILLE, 7  MILES S. E. OF CLINTON 2 MIEES EAST OF THE STATE ROAD, ON U ,0g II 22-Head of Pure Bred Duroc-Jersey Hogs-22 Boars of correct bloodlines that will demand your attention in the selection of your Herd Sire. Sows, both yearlings and gilts, that will grade up your herd and start you right for next year. i I NO. SIRE DAM FARROWED LITTER 1 Boar. Pathfinders Best .......................... I Am A Superior Girl ................................ March 23, 1921 ...................................... 12 i  2 & 3, Boars. Leader of Fashion ............ Pathfinder Lady 3d .................................... April 10, 1921 ........................................ 8 I 4, Boar Path. Wonder Disturber .......... Golden Princess ........................................ April 6, 1921 ........................................ 9 ! 5, Boar. Path. Wonder Disturber ........ Pathfinder Wonder E ............................... March 26, 1921 .................................... 10 6, Boar. Double Sensation ...................... Sensation Challenger .............................. March 27, 1921 .................................... 9 7,8,9,10, Boars. Path Won. Disturber .... Pathfinder Wonder E, 2d ......................... March 19, 1921 .................................... 12 11 Boar. Great Sensation Challenger .... Fairview Chloe .......................................... March 18, 1919 .................................... 10 12, Boar. Pathfinder Protection ............ I Am Lady .................................................. March 2, 1921 ...................................... 14 13, Boar. Path. Wonder Disturber ........ Col. Golden Beauty 6th ............................ March 21, 1921 ...... : ............................. 15 14 & 15, Sows. Wonder King Gano ........ Col. Golden Beauty 4th ............................ May 31, 1920 ........................................ 8 ...................... M $ ........................................ 16, Sow. Wonder King Gano .................. Path. Wonder E ................. ay 31, 1920 5 17, Sow. Wonder King Dane .................... Pathfinder Wonder E 3d .......................... June 1, 1920 ........................................ 8 18 & 19, Sows. Wonder King Gano ........ Orion's Queen A ........................................ September 14, 1920 .............................. 10 20 & 21, Sows. Path. Won. Disturber .... Golden Princess .......................................... April 6, 1921 .......................................... 9 22, Sow. Path. Wonder Disturber .......... Golden Princess ........................................ April 19, 1921 ...................................... 10 All Are Cholera Immune. Registration Papers Furnished. 1 Pure Bred Holstein Bull and 5 Grade Cows 1 Pure-bred Holstein Bull, 12 Months old. Sire: King Hartog Beets Ormsby. Dam: Mercedes C'hnary Ormsby. 5 Grade Cows. Will be fresh this fall. 2 Pure ed Percheron Mares 1 11 years old, weight 1,600, grey. No. 81606. 1 3 years old, weight 1,300, grey. No. 152680. TERMS: Good bankable paper bearing 8% interest, due October 1, 1922. 470 Discount for Cash. i HARRY HIPPLE & SON, Owners Ortortville, Minnesota & DALY, Auctk,neers CITIZENS NAT'L BANK, Clerk !