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October 28, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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Council will donate to "The Rock" teen center to help with utilities Mary Zahn attended last Monday's used toward utilities, provided the Thompson mentioned he felt this is Hard to believe what we received today via fax from the office of Senator Mark Dayton. The report says he has joined several of his Democratic and Republican col- leagues as an original co-sponsor of a bill designed to end the practice of charging our wounded and sick sol- diers for their meals while recovering in hospitals. The report goes on to state that "Currently, enlisted mem- bers of the military receive a monthly allowance for food as part of their pay; the allowance equals $243. When meals are provided to our troops in non-combat situations, the government recoups this allowance directly from the soldiers at a rate of $8.10 per day. During combat how- ever, the government assumes the cost of feeding our troops. Dayton's legislation would extend such cover- age to soldiers in combat who are hospitalized when they become wounded or sick." So nice it is to now be able to drive straight through to the west on highway 12, without tak- ing the detour...the new bridge having opened for travel over the past week- end. Our congrats to those men working on the bridge, in their prediction that it would be open by late October...right on the money!! Enjoyed a brief, but most pleasant visit one day recently from a son of former residents, Vern and Ruth Strege, who now live in Valparaiso, IN. Their son, Dennis, 47, nephew of Jim Strege, stopped in, having driven here from Pierre, SD, where he had flown, as chief pilot, in a King Air 200 plane that belongs to the H.T. Hackney Company of Knoxville, TN, where Dennis lives. We became acquainted with Dennis via phone several months ago when he called to ,, the gest ii Store chain, might add Hobo Soup to their stores. Nothing has happened yet, but Dennis is still working on the possibility! He's been a chief pilot for Hackney for nine years, having learned to fly through Moody Bible School. He returned with some data on our soup being in The Vermont Country Store national catalog, hop- ing that might help persuade the Hackney owners. We really appreci- ate your efforts, Dennis, it was good visiting with you. Dennis is pictured here in photo taken at the Indy office. By the way, his parents will not know of the visit until they read this! Surprise! Once again, after watching our Vikes "throw away" a win over the Giants last week, we are reminded of late friend Bob Barrett's contention that the pro games are rigged*. How any team, with the talent of the Vikes, can play so lousy[? regular meeting of Ortonville's City Council to discuss "The Rock", a new teen center in Ortonville. According to Zahn, the teen center has been up and running for about one month now, and has been successful. Zahn requested assistance from the Council on paying the center's utility bills, as it is a non-profit organization, and most funding depends on the suc- cess of a thrift store located on the lower level of the teen center. Councilmember Mel Reinke posed the question of what age group is tar- geted at the center. Zahn answered that the teen center is available to any- one that is willing to come, and there have been kids aged from fifth or sixth grade up to seniors in high school who have spent time at The Rock. She also mentioned that atten- dance has been anywhere from 20-80 kids per night since the center has opened. Courlcilmember Lisa Berkner sug- gested that the council not offer 100 percent of the utilities, but make a monetary donation per month, and the teen center will be responsible for paying the remainder of the bill. Ortonville's Ken Archer, who was also at the meeting, spoke on behalf of the center, as his children spend time there regularly. Archer noted that when his kids are there, he knows they are supervised, they enjoy the center, he knows where his children are and what time the center closes. "I think it is an asset to this community," said Archer. Following further discussion, Councilmember Berkner offered a motion to offer $25 per month to be teen center pays the remaining bal- ance. The motion was seconded, but failed in a two-to-three vote. Councilmember Artie Arndt offered a second motion that the coun- cil pays all utilities for the year, an amount of approximately $1,500. The motion was seconded and failed in a two-to-four vote. Councilmember Dan Oakes then offered a third motion that the council pays one-half the center's yearly utili- ties, in an amount of about $750. The motion was seconded and passed five- to-one, with Councilmember Arndt voting against the motion. Ken Archer of Ortonville Area Health Services was also present at the meeting to update Councilmembers on the progress of the dialysis project. According to Archer, once contrac- tors have been selected, it will take approximately 75 days to complete construction in the new dialysis area. Archer mentioned that OAHS hopes to have a contractor selected by about November 17. Councilmember Dorry offered a motion to go ahead with a contract for the project, pending an accurate agreement. The motion was seconded and passed unanimously. Councilmembers also discussed recommendations from the Golf Board, and Mark (Elmer) Thompson was also present to discuss recom- mendations and the Golf Club House. According to Thompson, when he took over management responsibili- ties at the Club House, he rented a grease pit, which is used to dump grease from the deep fat fryer. something important to the Club House, as it allows him to dispose of grease in the proper manner. He requested reimbursement for cost of leasing the grease pit, which is approximately $10 to $12 per month. Councilmember Berkner stated she felt the lease of a grease pit is a cost of doing business, as part of the business consists of using the deep fat fryer. She made a motion to not reimburse Thompson from golf course expenses. The motion was seconded and carried in a four-to-two vote. Councilmembers Reinke and Berkner agreed to form an ad hoc committee to look at the lease agree- ment for the Golf Course Club House, with golf board members who might choose to be on the committee. In other business, Councilmember Arndt requested that a public input meeting be held. According to Arndt, the Budget Committee needs to come up with an additional $90,000 that was moved to even out the budget, and are considering several possibili- ties for budget cuts. Arndt suggested a meeting be held in which Ortonville citizens could come give their input on what they feel are necessary and/or unnecessary cuts, and offer other suggestions for possible cuts. He made a motion to hold this public input meeting during the next regular City Council meeting, next Monday, November 3 at 7 p.m. The meeting will be held in Council chambers, which is located in the Sr. Citizens Center building. The motion was seconded and car- ried. Board hears revisions to Feedlot Ordinance, public hearing Nov. 4 Big Stone County Environmental Officer Darren Wilke was at last Tuesday's regular meeting of Big Stone County's Board of Commissioners to update the board on the feedlot ordinance. According to Wilke, many resi- dents of Big Stone County have expressed wishes that the revised ordinance include setbacks from rural churches and cemeteries. Revisions have been made to the ordinance to include a setback from all churches and cemeteries in Big Stone County that are not already included in the setback for a town. a.m. in the Big Stone County Court Room before Commissioners will vote on the ordinance. County Engineer Nick Anderson also met with Commissioners to give an update on the County's Highway Department. Anderson requested that the Board certify work done in Akron Township, to complete the job. Commissioner Torgerson made a motion to certify the work, the motion was seconded and carried. Anderson also presented to Board members some design possibilities on new bridges to be installed on the road pro-' running from Ortonville to Big Stone  ': mWilke, City, SD af the foot of Big Stone.;i '- that reads Lake. No action was taken on choos- .... all feedlots €ontaining 10or more ani- ing a design. .................................... mal units must obtain a permit and Darryl Haugen and Don Kieven register as a feedlot, from the Department of Natural No action was taken at the Board Resources attended the meeting to meeting, as there will be a public present a proposal for a Wetland hearing held on Tuesday, Nov. 4 at 10 Easement. Voters reminded to head to the polls on Tuesday, Nov. 4 Area voters will be heading to the polls next Tuesday, Nov. 4, as it is election day. On the ballot for the City of Ortonville are City Council seats B, D and E. Incumbent Mike Dorry is run- ning for Seat B unopposed. Incumbent Artie Arndt is running unopposed for seat D, and Incumbent Dan Oakes is running unopposed for seat E. Also on the ballot for Ortonville is the question 'shall the City Council be allowed to issue two On-Sale licenses for the sale of intoxicating liquor at retail, in addition to the number now permitted by law'? Polling places are as follows: First precinct will vote at City Hall, 315 Madison Avenue. Second precinct will vote at the Ortonville Fire Hall, 5 SE First Street. For the City of Bellingham, voters will be voting on whether or not the School Board should revoke its exist- ing referendum revenue authorization of $936.57 per resident marginal cost pupil unit and replace it with a new authorization that would increase its general education revenue for a total of $1,536.57 per resident marginal pupil unit. Bellingham polling place will be the front entrance of Bellingham Public School, and will be held from 7 a.m. until 8 p.m. In Clinton, voters will elect three School Board members. Five candi- dates are running for the Board, including incumbent Conrad Diekmann, Jr., Elizabeth Athey, Tom McNally, Eric Torgerson and Wayne Zych. Polling place will be the C-G- B High School in Graceville, and will be open from 4-8 p.m. According to Haugen and Kleven, the easement would be located on property that has private ownership, and will have no tax impact on the County. The purpose of this easement is to keep water on the land, and out of roads and ditches. Commissioner Torgerson present- ed a motion to approve the proposal for the Wetland Easement. The motion was seconded and carried by unanimous vote. Yet another small woflder! While dining at di Napoli's in downtown Mpls., on the occasion of the 12th birthday of our grandson, Forrest Roberts (Collette's oldest), an elderly man sitting next to us, noticing Ortonville on the back of our jacket asked if we knew "Bumpy" Throndrud (alias Elwood), with whom the man said he grew up with in Dawson. In side photo, you see 75-year-old Stan Anderson, now retired in Minnetonka, with his wife, Marion. They were eating with their son, Steve and his wife, Kristin, and their son. Start said "my father, Ted, and Elwood's father, Gayhard, worked together in the Dawson stockyards "way back when. Bumpy was a few years ahead of me in school," said Stan, "and I remember he was a great football player." This newspaper is a community We appreciate and need your input. If you know of any please contact this newspaper by phone (320) 839-6163 or 336, Ortonville, MN 56278. Letters to the editor Dear Concerned Citizen: We know you are someone who cares about Ortonville, so are in need of your assistance We have long been aware of the need for a sign to "Welcome" people to Ortonville and finally have land donated for such a sign by the Hilltop Cafe, at the intersections of highway 12 and 75. Now we need the money to purchase a sign. Our sister city, Big Stone, has two lovely granite signs at each entrance to their town. We would like to use our local granite to make at least ONE welcome sign to Ortonville. Our request is for donations to have the granite sign made plus money for perpetual care for the land. For contributions of $100 or more, your business and/or family name will be inscribed on the back of this granite sign. Our local to contribute along still have ties to may already know, is one of the small€ and lowest in We are trying to tourism. Please contribute this project may be soon as possible. checks to the Big Chamber of Street, Ortonville, indicate For the "1 Wish I knew how much to give r " fund drive; it seems like there , • many people out Colle • each year that o , cting for drives Y u can t keep track of you have given to and how much you gave." writing 21 checks to 21 DO THE GIVE BUSINESS AND RESIDENTIAL November 2 t VOLUNTEERS WILL CALL ON NEWER ENGLISH TUDOR... H00:E FOR 550 NORTH PARK AVE. • ORTONVILLE, • Two bedroom, lower level family room with fireplace • Two fireplaces, central air, three-season porch • Single attached garage and detached double garage New Roof • New FuJ Aluminum Sidin For Viewing Appointment Call Dr. Charles Nolop at 952-4 WAYZATA, MINNESOTA Page 2  INDEPENDENT Tuesday, Council will donate to "The Rock" teen center to help with utilities Mary Zahn attended last Monday's used toward utilities, provided the Thompson mentioned he felt this is Hard to believe what we received today via fax from the office of Senator Mark Dayton. The report says he has joined several of his Democratic and Republican col- leagues as an original co-sponsor of a bill designed to end the practice of charging our wounded and sick sol- diers for their meals while recovering in hospitals. The report goes on to state that "Currently, enlisted mem- bers of the military receive a monthly allowance for food as part of their pay; the allowance equals $243. When meals are provided to our troops in non-combat situations, the government recoups this allowance directly from the soldiers at a rate of $8.10 per day. During combat how- ever, the government assumes the cost of feeding our troops. Dayton's legislation would extend such cover- age to soldiers in combat who are hospitalized when they become wounded or sick." So nice it is to now be able to drive straight through to the west on highway 12, without tak- ing the detour...the new bridge having opened for travel over the past week- end. Our congrats to those men working on the bridge, in their prediction that it would be open by late October...right on the money!! Enjoyed a brief, but most pleasant visit one day recently from a son of former residents, Vern and Ruth Strege, who now live in Valparaiso, IN. Their son, Dennis, 47, nephew of Jim Strege, stopped in, having driven here from Pierre, SD, where he had flown, as chief pilot, in a King Air 200 plane that belongs to the H.T. Hackney Company of Knoxville, TN, where Dennis lives. We became acquainted with Dennis via phone several months ago when he called to ,, the gest ii Store chain, might add Hobo Soup to their stores. Nothing has happened yet, but Dennis is still working on the possibility! He's been a chief pilot for Hackney for nine years, having learned to fly through Moody Bible School. He returned with some data on our soup being in The Vermont Country Store national catalog, hop- ing that might help persuade the Hackney owners. We really appreci- ate your efforts, Dennis, it was good visiting with you. Dennis is pictured here in photo taken at the Indy office. By the way, his parents will not know of the visit until they read this! Surprise! Once again, after watching our Vikes "throw away" a win over the Giants last week, we are reminded of late friend Bob Barrett's contention that the pro games are rigged*. How any team, with the talent of the Vikes, can play so lousy[? regular meeting of Ortonville's City Council to discuss "The Rock", a new teen center in Ortonville. According to Zahn, the teen center has been up and running for about one month now, and has been successful. Zahn requested assistance from the Council on paying the center's utility bills, as it is a non-profit organization, and most funding depends on the suc- cess of a thrift store located on the lower level of the teen center. Councilmember Mel Reinke posed the question of what age group is tar- geted at the center. Zahn answered that the teen center is available to any- one that is willing to come, and there have been kids aged from fifth or sixth grade up to seniors in high school who have spent time at The Rock. She also mentioned that atten- dance has been anywhere from 20-80 kids per night since the center has opened. Courlcilmember Lisa Berkner sug- gested that the council not offer 100 percent of the utilities, but make a monetary donation per month, and the teen center will be responsible for paying the remainder of the bill. Ortonville's Ken Archer, who was also at the meeting, spoke on behalf of the center, as his children spend time there regularly. Archer noted that when his kids are there, he knows they are supervised, they enjoy the center, he knows where his children are and what time the center closes. "I think it is an asset to this community," said Archer. Following further discussion, Councilmember Berkner offered a motion to offer $25 per month to be teen center pays the remaining bal- ance. The motion was seconded, but failed in a two-to-three vote. Councilmember Artie Arndt offered a second motion that the coun- cil pays all utilities for the year, an amount of approximately $1,500. The motion was seconded and failed in a two-to-four vote. Councilmember Dan Oakes then offered a third motion that the council pays one-half the center's yearly utili- ties, in an amount of about $750. The motion was seconded and passed five- to-one, with Councilmember Arndt voting against the motion. Ken Archer of Ortonville Area Health Services was also present at the meeting to update Councilmembers on the progress of the dialysis project. According to Archer, once contrac- tors have been selected, it will take approximately 75 days to complete construction in the new dialysis area. Archer mentioned that OAHS hopes to have a contractor selected by about November 17. Councilmember Dorry offered a motion to go ahead with a contract for the project, pending an accurate agreement. The motion was seconded and passed unanimously. Councilmembers also discussed recommendations from the Golf Board, and Mark (Elmer) Thompson was also present to discuss recom- mendations and the Golf Club House. According to Thompson, when he took over management responsibili- ties at the Club House, he rented a grease pit, which is used to dump grease from the deep fat fryer. something important to the Club House, as it allows him to dispose of grease in the proper manner. He requested reimbursement for cost of leasing the grease pit, which is approximately $10 to $12 per month. Councilmember Berkner stated she felt the lease of a grease pit is a cost of doing business, as part of the business consists of using the deep fat fryer. She made a motion to not reimburse Thompson from golf course expenses. The motion was seconded and carried in a four-to-two vote. Councilmembers Reinke and Berkner agreed to form an ad hoc committee to look at the lease agree- ment for the Golf Course Club House, with golf board members who might choose to be on the committee. In other business, Councilmember Arndt requested that a public input meeting be held. According to Arndt, the Budget Committee needs to come up with an additional $90,000 that was moved to even out the budget, and are considering several possibili- ties for budget cuts. Arndt suggested a meeting be held in which Ortonville citizens could come give their input on what they feel are necessary and/or unnecessary cuts, and offer other suggestions for possible cuts. He made a motion to hold this public input meeting during the next regular City Council meeting, next Monday, November 3 at 7 p.m. The meeting will be held in Council chambers, which is located in the Sr. Citizens Center building. The motion was seconded and car- ried. Board hears revisions to Feedlot Ordinance, public hearing Nov. 4 Big Stone County Environmental Officer Darren Wilke was at last Tuesday's regular meeting of Big Stone County's Board of Commissioners to update the board on the feedlot ordinance. According to Wilke, many resi- dents of Big Stone County have expressed wishes that the revised ordinance include setbacks from rural churches and cemeteries. Revisions have been made to the ordinance to include a setback from all churches and cemeteries in Big Stone County that are not already included in the setback for a town. a.m. in the Big Stone County Court Room before Commissioners will vote on the ordinance. County Engineer Nick Anderson also met with Commissioners to give an update on the County's Highway Department. Anderson requested that the Board certify work done in Akron Township, to complete the job. Commissioner Torgerson made a motion to certify the work, the motion was seconded and carried. Anderson also presented to Board members some design possibilities on new bridges to be installed on the road pro-' running from Ortonville to Big Stone  ': mWilke, City, SD af the foot of Big Stone.;i '- that reads Lake. No action was taken on choos- .... all feedlots €ontaining 10or more ani- ing a design. .................................... mal units must obtain a permit and Darryl Haugen and Don Kieven register as a feedlot, from the Department of Natural No action was taken at the Board Resources attended the meeting to meeting, as there will be a public present a proposal for a Wetland hearing held on Tuesday, Nov. 4 at 10 Easement. Voters reminded to head to the polls on Tuesday, Nov. 4 Area voters will be heading to the polls next Tuesday, Nov. 4, as it is election day. On the ballot for the City of Ortonville are City Council seats B, D and E. Incumbent Mike Dorry is run- ning for Seat B unopposed. Incumbent Artie Arndt is running unopposed for seat D, and Incumbent Dan Oakes is running unopposed for seat E. Also on the ballot for Ortonville is the question 'shall the City Council be allowed to issue two On-Sale licenses for the sale of intoxicating liquor at retail, in addition to the number now permitted by law'? Polling places are as follows: First precinct will vote at City Hall, 315 Madison Avenue. Second precinct will vote at the Ortonville Fire Hall, 5 SE First Street. For the City of Bellingham, voters will be voting on whether or not the School Board should revoke its exist- ing referendum revenue authorization of $936.57 per resident marginal cost pupil unit and replace it with a new authorization that would increase its general education revenue for a total of $1,536.57 per resident marginal pupil unit. Bellingham polling place will be the front entrance of Bellingham Public School, and will be held from 7 a.m. until 8 p.m. In Clinton, voters will elect three School Board members. Five candi- dates are running for the Board, including incumbent Conrad Diekmann, Jr., Elizabeth Athey, Tom McNally, Eric Torgerson and Wayne Zych. Polling place will be the C-G- B High School in Graceville, and will be open from 4-8 p.m. According to Haugen and Kleven, the easement would be located on property that has private ownership, and will have no tax impact on the County. The purpose of this easement is to keep water on the land, and out of roads and ditches. Commissioner Torgerson present- ed a motion to approve the proposal for the Wetland Easement. The motion was seconded and carried by unanimous vote. Yet another small woflder! While dining at di Napoli's in downtown Mpls., on the occasion of the 12th birthday of our grandson, Forrest Roberts (Collette's oldest), an elderly man sitting next to us, noticing Ortonville on the back of our jacket asked if we knew "Bumpy" Throndrud (alias Elwood), with whom the man said he grew up with in Dawson. In side photo, you see 75-year-old Stan Anderson, now retired in Minnetonka, with his wife, Marion. They were eating with their son, Steve and his wife, Kristin, and their son. Start said "my father, Ted, and Elwood's father, Gayhard, worked together in the Dawson stockyards "way back when. Bumpy was a few years ahead of me in school," said Stan, "and I remember he was a great football player." This newspaper is a community We appreciate and need your input. If you know of any please contact this newspaper by phone (320) 839-6163 or 336, Ortonville, MN 56278. Letters to the editor Dear Concerned Citizen: We know you are someone who cares about Ortonville, so are in need of your assistance We have long been aware of the need for a sign to "Welcome" people to Ortonville and finally have land donated for such a sign by the Hilltop Cafe, at the intersections of highway 12 and 75. Now we need the money to purchase a sign. Our sister city, Big Stone, has two lovely granite signs at each entrance to their town. We would like to use our local granite to make at least ONE welcome sign to Ortonville. Our request is for donations to have the granite sign made plus money for perpetual care for the land. For contributions of $100 or more, your business and/or family name will be inscribed on the back of this granite sign. Our local to contribute along still have ties to may already know, is one of the small€ and lowest in We are trying to tourism. Please contribute this project may be soon as possible. checks to the Big Chamber of Street, Ortonville, indicate For the "1 Wish I knew how much to give r " fund drive; it seems like there , • many people out Colle • each year that o , cting for drives Y u can t keep track of you have given to and how much you gave." writing 21 checks to 21 DO THE GIVE BUSINESS AND RESIDENTIAL November 2 t VOLUNTEERS WILL CALL ON NEWER ENGLISH TUDOR... H00:E FOR 550 NORTH PARK AVE. • ORTONVILLE, • Two bedroom, lower level family room with fireplace • Two fireplaces, central air, three-season porch • Single attached garage and detached double garage New Roof • New FuJ Aluminum Sidin For Viewing Appointment Call Dr. Charles Nolop at 952-4 WAYZATA, MINNESOTA Page 2  INDEPENDENT Tuesday,