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October 28, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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Editorial comment Commissioners note: Most people want more feedlot restrictions Big Stone County's Planning and Zoning Commission has put a lot of time and effort into creating a new animal feedlot ordinance, which was spurred by a request from Citizens for Big Stone Lake. The Commission ought to be commended on coming up with a thorough document, which puts more restrictions on feedlot producers to be sensitive to the environment. However, we feel the majority of Big Stone County resi- dents and taxpayers would like to see it be more restric- tive. Those at the Environmental Office, say they have reached a good compromise, because the "farmers" aren't happy, and the "lake people" aren't happy. Well that's no way to justify things. First off, it's not the "lake people" vs. the "farmers." There are many farmers, wanting tighter restrictions on continued feedlot operations, as well as most residential people. Secondly, they certainly are not against family farms. They're against large scale confined feedlot oper- ations that may move here in the future. They aren't against those feedlot producers who are here already, for they will be grand-fathered in with the new ordinance, and will be allowed to continue operating as' they are now. Look at other parts of our country and state where they've allowed these large scale operations to come in. They are having nothing but problems trying to elimi- nate harmful odors, and trying to clean up the mess they've created for the environment. We need to learn from their mistakes, and not wait until we have the same problems here. At a Planning Commission meeting our County Attorney asked if confined feedlot operators could be bonded, to protect the County in case costly environ- mental clean-up would be needed. One of the Commission members responded, that it is impossible for a confined feedlot operator to get bonded, because the risk is too great. That should raise a red flag right there! Confined feedlot proponents say there are regulations to follow that prevent odor from spreading and leakage from occurring. But, for laws to be followed, they need to be enforced. With all the cuts in government aid and spending, do you really think they'll hire more people to enforce this in Big Stone County? The environmental office said, other than when pro- ducers apply for a permit for something, the office does- n't check on livestock operations until they receive a complaint, and not just a few. They wait until they have a substantial number of complaints, and perhaps even wait until they've gone out and surveyed a number of neighbors. By this time, if there is a problem, the damage is already done. It's much easier to prevent the problem, rather than try to fix it later. In recent years, we're starting to see more people move away from the metropolitan areas to live in our county, especially along the lake. When we ask people why they are coming here, they say, "because there is no pollution, you have a beautiful lake and it's a nice place to raise a family." These people aren't tourists, or "lake people," they are our residents, taxpayers, they send their kids to our schools, go to our health care facilities and volunteer on our committees. We don't want them to ,# ..................................... alii illii • Willyand tlae PoD By Bill Weida, reprinted from the Grace Factory Farm Project $$$$$ I. On farms and in towns in a valley of green Lived farmers and ranchers in county Dundeen. And under the valley in pools deep and sweet, Lay water to drink and good food to eat. When talking to others, those folks of Dundeen Said, "It's paradise here, so peaceful, so clean! A place to raise children, a place that inspires(A place to grow old, when one stops and retires." Young folks in Dundeen, starting out on their own, Found money was tight as they struggled alone. So they first would raise pigs, for hogs take great care, And young folks have time but not dollars to spare. Communities prosper when their young stay around, While food that is grown from the crops in the ground, And water that comes the pools clown below Bind the people together in a place they can grow. II. While Dundeen was happy, elsewhere in the land Professors at Ag schools were lending a hand To corporate interests whose money could buy Research on factories that make small farms die. III. One day a stranger arrived with a scheme For that old Smith place on the bank of the stream That runs through the valley and seeps down below To. replenish water to drink and to grow. A product ,of Ag schools--taught "get big or die," This stranger s appeal was based on the ,c,.W, Of econ development (and good jobs, of course.) It s time to act now; because things may get worse. "You II need a big factory to breed and raise hogs. You II need lots of workers to serve as small cogs In a giant machine whose output is food These animal factories were based on a plan To crowd things so tightly no animal can Move freely or feed like most animals do. They were raised in a cell--a room with no view. But where man,y hogs live, strong odors abound That affect people s lives for miles all around. And tons of hog poD spread all over the land Cause problems aplenty - unless folks take a stand. The reason one heard for committing this sin Was to make things efficient, to bring money in. But the animals knew these factories were bad. Their response was to die from the stress that they had. Since you can t sell a corpse for pennies per pound, Corporations demanded solutions be found. Antibiotics and new special feeds, To keep pigs from • dying, to meet growers' needs. Each pig they produced was now raised in a stew Of chemicals, medicines, and a lot of its poD, Was identically sized with meat that was lean, Efficient to slaughter, less hog than machine. , 'It sits in lagoons, where it sits in small lakes, It s flushed and it s gathered, whatever it takes, To get liquid 13oo away from the hogs And out on the land where it seeps and it sogs.' ,, But, sir, said young Willy, Ive pigs of my own, And their pod smells bad when it s out on the lawn. What you are proposing sounds terrible to me, Huge pools of hog waste to smell and to see. "The lagoons you propose are as foul as they're deep. They II leak from the sides. They continue to seep And whose by-products add to the corporate good. For the corporate good is required, you know, move away, or stop coming because of harmful manure odors or polluted water. Big Stone Lake is keeping our community alive. It's what's saving our main street from looking like a vacat- ed ghost town, like many other small towns. We can't afford to risk losing the lake. All of us have an obliga- tion to be stewards of our God given assets, the land, air and water. We've worked so hard to clean up the lake, beginning with the Upper Minnesota River Watershed Project. We can't risk the chance of taking a step back- ward, by allowing too many animals, too close to the lake. The Commission has been meeting for months on this issue and has had many citizens at most of the meetings, voicing their concerns. It is fair to say that the majority of citizens at all the meetings have continually said they want more restrictions. Yes it's true we need to listen to the minority voice too, but by allowing a larger animal unit cap, we won't be protecting the family farm, we'll be opening the door to large cooperations who don't contribute to the local economy. They simply take the money out of the com- munities. Is that worth risking the potential damage which could destroy our environment, and cause people to move away? Also would moving the setback one more mile create a hardship to large scale producers who aren't even here? Remember those who are here will be grand-fathered in. Public hearings aren't just sounding boards with public concerns going in one ear and out the other of the governing members. They are designed for the lead- ers to hear what the people who voted them into office want. Too many times elected officials have their minds made up on what they are going to do long before they ever get to the hearing stage, and the hearings are just a joke, simply held because they have to by law. Commissioners - don't let this be one of those times. You are in the office you are in, because we put you there. Now it's time you vote the way we (the majority of the people) want you to vote. Look at the percentage of large confined animal feedlot producers in the county (you can count them on one hand) vs. the rest of the people, who are the overwhelming majority. • We propose the Commissioners show their support for the Planning and Zoning Commission by passing the proposed ordinance, with two simple amendments, which we feel would satisfy most of the people; 1) change the animal cap from 3,000 animal units to 1,000 swine (because hogs have the most offensive odors with liquid manure) and/or 1,500 other animal units; 2) move the setback from the Big Stone Lake from two miles to three miles or more. By doing this, it shows the county is not against livestock producers, only against large confinement operations, and that they want to protect our family farmers as well as our most valuable assets, the land, air and water, which set us apart from other counties. Commissioners - listen to the people and vote the way the majority ask you to vote. County taxpayers - call your commissioners and come to the public hearing to voice your concerns. The hearing is set for next Tuesday, Nov• 4 at 10 a.m. in the Big Stone County Courtroom. ! To generate capital so investments will grow, To make this hog factory technologically sound, To lower the cost of hogs sold by the pound. IV. Now, proposals for hog farms must first be approved By Planning and Zoning where, approval is moved, By P and Z members after they ve weighed The good points and bad points the speakers have made. While the stranger held forth at the old P and Z, In the audience sat young Willy McGee, Who asked, (raising his hand, trying not to be rude), "What are these by-products to which you allude? "Young man," said the speaker, "all hogs produce poD. Our hogs are no different When numbers are few The land can recycle the hog waste you get, But as hog numbers grow, the hog waste must sit. V. In no time at all the construction began, With sheds and lagoons laid out on a plan, With Wells that drew water to flush all the waste, And roads to bring feed and remove hogs with haste. The, first pigs arrived, and then more and then more, Til the land of the Smith place held hogs by the score. The hogs - well, they ate and produced lots of poD With odors that carried on winds as they blew. And the jobs that were promised weren t all that great. The few that there were paid a very low rate, And the folks that they hired all came from outside. Could it possibly be that the stranger had lied? VI. It wasn t too long before folks in Dundeen Were forced to admit that their air wasn't clean. The stench from the hogs was far worse than they d guessed, In mornings and evenings with wind from the West. With nitrates and metals and pathogens too, All part of a soup that's made of hog poD. "And the factory you plan sits next to the stream Where I swim and I fish. But now with your scheme The hog waste is liquid. It II all run down To pollute all the water that's used by our town." "Believe me, my boy, we will treat all that poD. We'll make it so safe, it will be good for you. You won't smell a thing. You can trust in our word. You won't need a bond, just the pledge that you've heard." Young Willy had more he was dying to say, Bt' the P and Z folks moved to call it a day. "Enoug time's been wasted on things that don't matter. We've heard plenty now. We don t need more chatter." The site was approved on a 5 to zip vote. The commission adjourned, the chairman took note Of the jobs and the money now bound for Dundeen, Where the air was so pure and the water so clean• Young Willy reported that on opening day He'd gone down to fish, and to his dismay, The water looked funny, the fish had all died. Downstream from the hog farm no life had he spied. No one can recall how the concept first sprea , But the folks in Dundeen now found in each head thought, no, a fear, that their water was bad, That: hogs had polluted this resource they had. But once hogs get in they are hard to get out, And so the hogs stayed while the community fought, Pitting those to whom odors were causing great harm Against those whose income came from the hog farm. While the battle raged on - the lawsuit, did too, And right through it all, the hogs made more poD. It drained and collected in lagoons with a leak, And a dead zone replaced what had once been the creek. Out in the country, where the wells had been fine, Each family drank from a new waterline. Those great pools of water that were under Dundeen Were no longer great, and were no longer clean. VII. Still, time marches on, and ten years have now gone. Young Willy the boy is now out on his own. One morning, arising along about dawn, Willy drove by the hog farm - the pigs were all gone, Willy raced into town to spread 'round the word, And strangely. enough he found no one had heard, Except that one worker who worled at the farm Said, "The site was diseased and caused the hogs harm. "It turns out," the worker continued to say, "With that many hogs, to keep sickness at bay You have to move often, you, have to move fast, And hog farms like this one just aren t meant to last. ' "But what," Willy said, "about all the lagoons? And all of the pig poD and buildings in ruins? In short, who will clean up this mess that's been made? .... Not me," said the worker, "l'm no longer paid." VIII. Now Wil!y is mayor, elected by those Who remembered the boy and questions he d pose. When he talks to outsiders, wanting them to move near, They say, "Your valley's filthy, who'd want to live here?" And on farms and towns in county Dundeen, The folks have all learned that to keep water clean, And to keep air ,so pure one loves to inhale, You must always remember some things aren t for sale. For land once polluted is hard to redeem. A few short-term jobs or a quick-money scheme Won't cover the costs to the earth and sky, Or the costs that occur when communities die. Library corner The hours of the Ortonville Library are Monday - Thursday 12 - 8 p.m. and Friday and Saturday 10 - 3 p.m. Remember if you ordered Krispy Kreme donuts to Dick them up on ONCE AGAIN... ..... MANY THANKS ....... Recent new and renewal sub- scribers to The Independent which we gratefully acknowledge with thanks for your loyalty: Maas Farms Trucking Inc Evelyn Nolop Emma Schwarze Rome & Karl Wiegman Mark Swigerd Mark Dybdal Kenneth Voecks Brent Nelson Verna Scott Michael Kraemer Loretta Schmieg Mary & Gerard Radermacher Dr. lhno Janssen John or Joan Grad Clarence Koeckeritz Mary Geier Orville Grimm William Koeckeritz Harvey Pansch Rick MayBee Glenda Reiffenberger Gary Johnson Marilyn Storm John Rebehn Virgil Doschadis Lloyd Rinke Blent Zahrbock Harry Steffen Willard Hangen Vivlan Keller Sgt. John F. Karn Kathleen Froslie Shawna Cameron Chris P. Kelly Darrei A. Farr II Mary Jane Sanborn Dean Johnson Friday at the Ortonville Library by 3:00 p.m. Thanks to everyone who supported us again? New in Mystery is Dana Stabenow's "A Grave Denied". When the body of a murdered town handyman is discovered, frozen and in the path of a receding glacier, Alaska '"state trooper Jirff fihop'in asks Kate Shugak to investigate the victim's background in the hope of find the killer• Also new is "Popped" by Carol Higgins Clark. At the height of the nine day Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta, sleuth Regan Reilly finds th.e festivities threatened by saboteurs and winds her way through a host of pilots, balloonists, enthusiasts, tourists, and merchants. New in Suspense is Iris Johansen's "Fatal Tide". Determined to protect herself from the horrors of her childhood, a young woman finds her remote island refuge terrorized by ruthless mercenaries and heads to the open seas in a perilous race against time to find the site of a lost city before it is too late. Also new is Sandra Brown's "Hello, Darkness". The host of a late night call-in radio show, Paris Gibson joins forces with police psychologist Dean Malloy to identify a mysterious caller known only as "Valentine" before he can kill a woman whom he feels has wronged him, only to find herself the target of the would be killer, who feels that Paris destroyed his relationship with his girlfriend. We also have received in David Baldacci's new book "Split Second". Eight years after leaving the Secret Service following the assassination of the third party presidential candidate he had been protecting, Sean King, now a lawyer and part time deputy sheriff, reluctantly joins forces with agent Michelle Maxwell to uncover the truth when another third party candidate is abducted. CLASSIFIED ADS BRING QUICK RESULTS BELLINGHAM CLiNiC C&C Manor, Apt. 3 11 3 - 3rd Avenue Bellingham, MN CALL 320-598-7551 FOR APPOINTMENTS Satellite of Lac qu! Parle Clinic, Madison, MN 00INDEPENDENT The Inde (U.S.P.S. ooee I JAMES D. Publisher / Man Editor and ARLENI Office KATHIE Computer and Con" Compositor / BETH Reporter TIM ( Camera NANCY Collater Layout ! eoeee Tues., Oct. 28, 2003 Continuing the ORTONVILLE J Published Every Tuesday at ', Oronville Periodicals SUBSCRIPIION $30.00 per year in Parle, Traverse and Minnesota, Grant and in South Dakota. counties All others, $38.00 Postmaster: Send The Ortonville Ortonville, Minnesota NEW SUBI RATE ALL A FEBRUARY Big Stone, Lac qui Swift Counties in Grant and Roberts In February ........... 30.00 March ................ 27.50 April .................. 25.00 May ................... 22.50 June .................. 20.00 July ................... 17.50 ALl OTHERS IN MINN. February ........... 34.00 March ................ 31.24 April ................. 28.40 May ................... 25.56 June .................. 22.72 July ................... 19.88 ALL AREA q AND SO. 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Opinions tor are her own of other staff expressed in items tions may own views, but are eral interest. 839-3761 to lifted Ortonville Page 4 Tuesday, Oct. t Editorial comment Commissioners note: Most people want more feedlot restrictions Big Stone County's Planning and Zoning Commission has put a lot of time and effort into creating a new animal feedlot ordinance, which was spurred by a request from Citizens for Big Stone Lake. The Commission ought to be commended on coming up with a thorough document, which puts more restrictions on feedlot producers to be sensitive to the environment. However, we feel the majority of Big Stone County resi- dents and taxpayers would like to see it be more restric- tive. Those at the Environmental Office, say they have reached a good compromise, because the "farmers" aren't happy, and the "lake people" aren't happy. Well that's no way to justify things. First off, it's not the "lake people" vs. the "farmers." There are many farmers, wanting tighter restrictions on continued feedlot operations, as well as most residential people. Secondly, they certainly are not against family farms. They're against large scale confined feedlot oper- ations that may move here in the future. They aren't against those feedlot producers who are here already, for they will be grand-fathered in with the new ordinance, and will be allowed to continue operating as' they are now. Look at other parts of our country and state where they've allowed these large scale operations to come in. They are having nothing but problems trying to elimi- nate harmful odors, and trying to clean up the mess they've created for the environment. We need to learn from their mistakes, and not wait until we have the same problems here. At a Planning Commission meeting our County Attorney asked if confined feedlot operators could be bonded, to protect the County in case costly environ- mental clean-up would be needed. One of the Commission members responded, that it is impossible for a confined feedlot operator to get bonded, because the risk is too great. That should raise a red flag right there! Confined feedlot proponents say there are regulations to follow that prevent odor from spreading and leakage from occurring. But, for laws to be followed, they need to be enforced. With all the cuts in government aid and spending, do you really think they'll hire more people to enforce this in Big Stone County? The environmental office said, other than when pro- ducers apply for a permit for something, the office does- n't check on livestock operations until they receive a complaint, and not just a few. They wait until they have a substantial number of complaints, and perhaps even wait until they've gone out and surveyed a number of neighbors. By this time, if there is a problem, the damage is already done. It's much easier to prevent the problem, rather than try to fix it later. In recent years, we're starting to see more people move away from the metropolitan areas to live in our county, especially along the lake. When we ask people why they are coming here, they say, "because there is no pollution, you have a beautiful lake and it's a nice place to raise a family." These people aren't tourists, or "lake people," they are our residents, taxpayers, they send their kids to our schools, go to our health care facilities and volunteer on our committees. We don't want them to ,# ..................................... alii illii • Willyand tlae PoD By Bill Weida, reprinted from the Grace Factory Farm Project $$$$$ I. On farms and in towns in a valley of green Lived farmers and ranchers in county Dundeen. And under the valley in pools deep and sweet, Lay water to drink and good food to eat. When talking to others, those folks of Dundeen Said, "It's paradise here, so peaceful, so clean! A place to raise children, a place that inspires(A place to grow old, when one stops and retires." Young folks in Dundeen, starting out on their own, Found money was tight as they struggled alone. So they first would raise pigs, for hogs take great care, And young folks have time but not dollars to spare. Communities prosper when their young stay around, While food that is grown from the crops in the ground, And water that comes the pools clown below Bind the people together in a place they can grow. II. While Dundeen was happy, elsewhere in the land Professors at Ag schools were lending a hand To corporate interests whose money could buy Research on factories that make small farms die. III. One day a stranger arrived with a scheme For that old Smith place on the bank of the stream That runs through the valley and seeps down below To. replenish water to drink and to grow. A product ,of Ag schools--taught "get big or die," This stranger s appeal was based on the ,c,.W, Of econ development (and good jobs, of course.) It s time to act now; because things may get worse. "You II need a big factory to breed and raise hogs. You II need lots of workers to serve as small cogs In a giant machine whose output is food These animal factories were based on a plan To crowd things so tightly no animal can Move freely or feed like most animals do. They were raised in a cell--a room with no view. But where man,y hogs live, strong odors abound That affect people s lives for miles all around. And tons of hog poD spread all over the land Cause problems aplenty - unless folks take a stand. The reason one heard for committing this sin Was to make things efficient, to bring money in. But the animals knew these factories were bad. Their response was to die from the stress that they had. Since you can t sell a corpse for pennies per pound, Corporations demanded solutions be found. Antibiotics and new special feeds, To keep pigs from • dying, to meet growers' needs. Each pig they produced was now raised in a stew Of chemicals, medicines, and a lot of its poD, Was identically sized with meat that was lean, Efficient to slaughter, less hog than machine. , 'It sits in lagoons, where it sits in small lakes, It s flushed and it s gathered, whatever it takes, To get liquid 13oo away from the hogs And out on the land where it seeps and it sogs.' ,, But, sir, said young Willy, I ve pigs of my own, And their pod smells bad when it s out on the lawn. What you are proposing sounds terrible to me, Huge pools of hog waste to smell and to see. "The lagoons you propose are as foul as they're deep. They II leak from the sides. They continue to seep And whose by-products add to the corporate good. For the corporate good is required, you know, move away, or stop coming because of harmful manure odors or polluted water. Big Stone Lake is keeping our community alive. It's what's saving our main street from looking like a vacat- ed ghost town, like many other small towns. We can't afford to risk losing the lake. All of us have an obliga- tion to be stewards of our God given assets, the land, air and water. We've worked so hard to clean up the lake, beginning with the Upper Minnesota River Watershed Project. We can't risk the chance of taking a step back- ward, by allowing too many animals, too close to the lake. The Commission has been meeting for months on this issue and has had many citizens at most of the meetings, voicing their concerns. It is fair to say that the majority of citizens at all the meetings have continually said they want more restrictions. Yes it's true we need to listen to the minority voice too, but by allowing a larger animal unit cap, we won't be protecting the family farm, we'll be opening the door to large cooperations who don't contribute to the local economy. They simply take the money out of the com- munities. Is that worth risking the potential damage which could destroy our environment, and cause people to move away? Also would moving the setback one more mile create a hardship to large scale producers who aren't even here? Remember those who are here will be grand-fathered in. Public hearings aren't just sounding boards with public concerns going in one ear and out the other of the governing members. They are designed for the lead- ers to hear what the people who voted them into office want. Too many times elected officials have their minds made up on what they are going to do long before they ever get to the hearing stage, and the hearings are just a joke, simply held because they have to by law. Commissioners - don't let this be one of those times. You are in the office you are in, because we put you there. Now it's time you vote the way we (the majority of the people) want you to vote. Look at the percentage of large confined animal feedlot producers in the county (you can count them on one hand) vs. the rest of the people, who are the overwhelming majority. • We propose the Commissioners show their support for the Planning and Zoning Commission by passing the proposed ordinance, with two simple amendments, which we feel would satisfy most of the people; 1) change the animal cap from 3,000 animal units to 1,000 swine (because hogs have the most offensive odors with liquid manure) and/or 1,500 other animal units; 2) move the setback from the Big Stone Lake from two miles to three miles or more. By doing this, it shows the county is not against livestock producers, only against large confinement operations, and that they want to protect our family farmers as well as our most valuable assets, the land, air and water, which set us apart from other counties. Commissioners - listen to the people and vote the way the majority ask you to vote. County taxpayers - call your commissioners and come to the public hearing to voice your concerns. The hearing is set for next Tuesday, Nov• 4 at 10 a.m. in the Big Stone County Courtroom. ! To generate capital so investments will grow, To make this hog factory technologically sound, To lower the cost of hogs sold by the pound. IV. Now, proposals for hog farms must first be approved By Planning and Zoning where, approval is moved, By P and Z members after they ve weighed The good points and bad points the speakers have made. While the stranger held forth at the old P and Z, In the audience sat young Willy McGee, Who asked, (raising his hand, trying not to be rude), "What are these by-products to which you allude? "Young man," said the speaker, "all hogs produce poD. Our hogs are no different When numbers are few The land can recycle the hog waste you get, But as hog numbers grow, the hog waste must sit. V. In no time at all the construction began, With sheds and lagoons laid out on a plan, With Wells that drew water to flush all the waste, And roads to bring feed and remove hogs with haste. The, first pigs arrived, and then more and then more, Til the land of the Smith place held hogs by the score. The hogs - well, they ate and produced lots of poD With odors that carried on winds as they blew. And the jobs that were promised weren t all that great. The few that there were paid a very low rate, And the folks that they hired all came from outside. Could it possibly be that the stranger had lied? VI. It wasn t too long before folks in Dundeen Were forced to admit that their air wasn't clean. The stench from the hogs was far worse than they d guessed, In mornings and evenings with wind from the West. With nitrates and metals and pathogens too, All part of a soup that's made of hog poD. "And the factory you plan sits next to the stream Where I swim and I fish. But now with your scheme The hog waste is liquid. It II all run down To pollute all the water that's used by our town." "Believe me, my boy, we will treat all that poD. We'll make it so safe, it will be good for you. You won't smell a thing. You can trust in our word. You won't need a bond, just the pledge that you've heard." Young Willy had more he was dying to say, Bt' the P and Z folks moved to call it a day. "Enoug time's been wasted on things that don't matter. We've heard plenty now. We don t need more chatter." The site was approved on a 5 to zip vote. The commission adjourned, the chairman took note Of the jobs and the money now bound for Dundeen, Where the air was so pure and the water so clean• Young Willy reported that on opening day He'd gone down to fish, and to his dismay, The water looked funny, the fish had all died. Downstream from the hog farm no life had he spied. No one can recall how the concept first sprea , But the folks in Dundeen now found in each head thought, no, a fear, that their water was bad, That: hogs had polluted this resource they had. But once hogs get in they are hard to get out, And so the hogs stayed while the community fought, Pitting those to whom odors were causing great harm Against those whose income came from the hog farm. While the battle raged on - the lawsuit, did too, And right through it all, the hogs made more poD. It drained and collected in lagoons with a leak, And a dead zone replaced what had once been the creek. Out in the country, where the wells had been fine, Each family drank from a new waterline. Those great pools of water that were under Dundeen Were no longer great, and were no longer clean. VII. Still, time marches on, and ten years have now gone. Young Willy the boy is now out on his own. One morning, arising along about dawn, Willy drove by the hog farm - the pigs were all gone, Willy raced into town to spread 'round the word, And strangely. enough he found no one had heard, Except that one worker who worled at the farm Said, "The site was diseased and caused the hogs harm. "It turns out," the worker continued to say, "With that many hogs, to keep sickness at bay You have to move often, you, have to move fast, And hog farms like this one just aren t meant to last. ' "But what," Willy said, "about all the lagoons? And all of the pig poD and buildings in ruins? In short, who will clean up this mess that's been made? .... Not me," said the worker, "l'm no longer paid." VIII. Now Wil!y is mayor, elected by those Who remembered the boy and questions he d pose. When he talks to outsiders, wanting them to move near, They say, "Your valley's filthy, who'd want to live here?" And on farms and towns in county Dundeen, The folks have all learned that to keep water clean, And to keep air ,so pure one loves to inhale, You must always remember some things aren t for sale. For land once polluted is hard to redeem. A few short-term jobs or a quick-money scheme Won't cover the costs to the earth and sky, Or the costs that occur when communities die. Library corner The hours of the Ortonville Library are Monday - Thursday 12 - 8 p.m. and Friday and Saturday 10 - 3 p.m. Remember if you ordered Krispy Kreme donuts to Dick them up on ONCE AGAIN... ..... MANY THANKS ....... Recent new and renewal sub- scribers to The Independent which we gratefully acknowledge with thanks for your loyalty: Maas Farms Trucking Inc Evelyn Nolop Emma Schwarze Rome & Karl Wiegman Mark Swigerd Mark Dybdal Kenneth Voecks Brent Nelson Verna Scott Michael Kraemer Loretta Schmieg Mary & Gerard Radermacher Dr. lhno Janssen John or Joan Grad Clarence Koeckeritz Mary Geier Orville Grimm William Koeckeritz Harvey Pansch Rick MayBee Glenda Reiffenberger Gary Johnson Marilyn Storm John Rebehn Virgil Doschadis Lloyd Rinke Blent Zahrbock Harry Steffen Willard Hangen Vivlan Keller Sgt. John F. Karn Kathleen Froslie Shawna Cameron Chris P. Kelly Darrei A. Farr II Mary Jane Sanborn Dean Johnson Friday at the Ortonville Library by 3:00 p.m. Thanks to everyone who supported us again? New in Mystery is Dana Stabenow's "A Grave Denied". When the body of a murdered town handyman is discovered, frozen and in the path of a receding glacier, Alaska '"state trooper Jirff fihop'in asks Kate Shugak to investigate the victim's background in the hope of find the killer• Also new is "Popped" by Carol Higgins Clark. At the height of the nine day Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta, sleuth Regan Reilly finds th.e festivities threatened by saboteurs and winds her way through a host of pilots, balloonists, enthusiasts, tourists, and merchants. New in Suspense is Iris Johansen's "Fatal Tide". Determined to protect herself from the horrors of her childhood, a young woman finds her remote island refuge terrorized by ruthless mercenaries and heads to the open seas in a perilous race against time to find the site of a lost city before it is too late. Also new is Sandra Brown's "Hello, Darkness". The host of a late night call-in radio show, Paris Gibson joins forces with police psychologist Dean Malloy to identify a mysterious caller known only as "Valentine" before he can kill a woman whom he feels has wronged him, only to find herself the target of the would be killer, who feels that Paris destroyed his relationship with his girlfriend. We also have received in David Baldacci's new book "Split Second". Eight years after leaving the Secret Service following the assassination of the third party presidential candidate he had been protecting, Sean King, now a lawyer and part time deputy sheriff, reluctantly joins forces with agent Michelle Maxwell to uncover the truth when another third party candidate is abducted. CLASSIFIED ADS BRING QUICK RESULTS BELLINGHAM CLiNiC C&C Manor, Apt. 3 11 3 - 3rd Avenue Bellingham, MN CALL 320-598-7551 FOR APPOINTMENTS Satellite of Lac qu! Parle Clinic, Madison, MN 00INDEPENDENT The Inde (U.S.P.S. ooee I JAMES D. Publisher / Man Editor and ARLENI Office KATHIE Computer and Con" Compositor / BETH Reporter TIM ( Camera NANCY Collater Layout ! eoeee Tues., Oct. 28, 2003 Continuing the ORTONVILLE J Published Every Tuesday at ', Oronville Periodicals SUBSCRIPIION $30.00 per year in Parle, Traverse and Minnesota, Grant and in South Dakota. counties All others, $38.00 Postmaster: Send The Ortonville Ortonville, Minnesota NEW SUBI RATE ALL A FEBRUARY Big Stone, Lac qui Swift Counties in Grant and Roberts In February ........... 30.00 March ................ 27.50 April .................. 25.00 May ................... 22.50 June .................. 20.00 July ................... 17.50 ALl OTHERS IN MINN. February ........... 34.00 March ................ 31.24 April ................. 28.40 May ................... 25.56 June .................. 22.72 July ................... 19.88 ALL AREA q AND SO. 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