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October 28, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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you the following well for the of the Water Inc. which had here in but is now Iocat- ND and MN. The story in the Oct. 23, of the Wall Shortages of Water, Moves to Make Pay for it A s149 VALUE of THE WALL &apos;million households are a new bill turn up in their ,: a water bill. Protection of efforts to promote is seeking a rule for every drop of agency says peg- about taking those if they realize their down the drain along 0f water has been climb- the past few vast majority of the never know it. Only about two million roughly 35 million are currently paying for their water. have contributed to Water prices, and the over who should foot there is increasing to population and At the same time, Northwest, the are sufferihg drought. In some way for much of five years, says Jay the climate moni- at the National Climact U.S. (homes and three times more HEMOPHILIAC PATIENTS: household uses a to fill a five '-16-foot in- pool four - times in Roanoke, Va., Seattle, up 23.8%; :ities been hit par- price surge. Va., where Binghamton, N.Y., rself for another bill up 26.7%: Seattle, 23.8%; Fort Smith, Ark., 15.6%; Boston, 13.7%, and Detroit, 13% Utilities not only sell the water, but also usually set the rates. If the EPA rule change passes -- and many experts believe it will-- many renters will be picking up more of this burden. They'll be writing out a new check every month for between $15 and $30, or $180 to $360 a year, that's roughly what the 106 million homeowners now pay for their water. Currently, most landlords decide it's not worth the hassle to hit their renters up for these costs. Here's why: To charge their tenants, landlords have to adhere to many of the same guide- lines as utilities, including hiring experts and doing water-quality test- ing. (The logic is that because the land- lords are "selling" water, they need to be able to guarantee that it meets cer- tain standards.) Properly owners have argued that these measures are burden- some. The EPA agrees, and last month proposed scrapping those require- ments. That change would likely prompt huge numbers of property own- ers to install meters that track usage by individual apartments. The federal agency believes it would also spur a big drop in water consumption. "Helping to make people more aware of how much water they are using and the cost is one of the steps to produce environmental benefits," says G. Tracy Mehan III, the EPA's assistant adminis- trator for water. The deadline for comments on the proposal is Monday, and the EPA expects to make a final decision on the policy change early next year. So far, there hasn't been any significant oppo- sition to the move, though some tenant groups argue that it's inequitable. "This is just one more way for building owners to pass on costs directly to renters and abdicate their responsibili- ty for their properties," says Douglas Pensack associate director of the Illinois Tenants Union. Though supplies have ebbed in some areas, there's no permanent shortage of water in the U.S. While getting safe drinking water is a huge problem in many parts of the world, it's implausible that anytime in the foreseeable future Americans will turn on their faucets and have nothing come out. The current droughts could turn into surpluses at any time, and prices could drop again. The complexity of managing water supplies was highlighted last week when the federal government signed a landmark deal that ensures that more water from the Colorado River will go to fast-growing cities in Southern California, while limiting supplies to farms. The agreement is aimed at end- ing years of rancor among Western states over water rights. The new water proposal brings to mind changes in the electricity market. Until the energy crisis of the 1970s, tenants typically didn't pay for their own electricity. Today, of course, it's commonplace. Some research has shown double-digit drops in energy consumption by tenants in major cities in the year following that switchover. Regulators say that change in behavior has continued into the present, with tenants being more conscientious about turning off lights they're not using and flipping switches before they leave the house. Some evidence suggests that water consumption could trace a similar arc if the new rules pass. Currently, land- lords who charge tenants for their water do it in one of two ways: either by installing renters that measure usage in each apartment, or through "allocat- ed" billing, where tenants pay a per- centage of the building's total bill. A study four years ago of apart- ments being charged for water for the first time found that usage in properties with individual meters fell 18% to 39%, while those in properties charged through allocated billing saw drops of only 6% to 27%. The study was done by Industrial Economics Inc. for the National Apartment Association and the National Multi Housing Council. But there's one reason why people may not be so quick to give up their indulgent hot baths: Because water is generally much cheaper than electrici- ty, people won't see as dramatic finan- cial benefits when they cut back. Just a decade ago, we thought of charging a tenant for something as basic as water was unthinkable. But in recent years, some of the country's biggest apartment owners, including Equity Residential in Chicago and AvalonBay Communities Inc., in Alexandria, Va, have begun doing just that. The number of renters paying water bills has been growing at an esti- mated 25% a year the past four years, according to Viterra Energy Services, a provider of tenant billing services. State governments, too, have been pushing ahead on this issue. Recent moves by Alabama, Mississippi and Texas have made it easier for landlords to bill tenants for water. Massachusetts is now the only state that has a law against it, but efforts are under way to dunk that ban. Write to Ray A. Smith at ray.smith@wsj.com YOUR LAKE AREA --'['/i--- i' Steve Stern, owner, with certified installers Don and Gene I Elm EE OF THE DISH NE1NORK I , , MONTHS tit E,E, VALOr PAXl I "i; " ' ..... ------ Sioux Falls I ...... 3-Roe I T 00'$yste, I 100211 $49.9J Ur tM  ag- l  TV tmrK. ~ ........................................... atmmwat. i '   ._ ,_ ' _L L Tilt LOWEST ALL-emiTMPalCEm I I   7--=='====7:,-'-<': me,,=_r, Rv I "Pure Heart" drama team at Living Hope Trinity Bible College presents a drama team called "Pure Heart" at Ortonville's Living Hope Fellowship, A.G. this coming Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 1 and 2. On Saturday, their program starts at 7 p.m.. and on Sunday, the program gets underway at 10 a.m. "Come and join us," says David Homrighausen D i n L./yL* i, IJI lgLO LV  ..... .BUY-.'ZZ nn one week SHASTEEN, LINSCOTT & BROCK 840 North 48th St., Lincoln, NE 68504 402-464-0064 or 800-665-0064 (to. free) County's Sheriff's responded to a rash of through- he two weeks. Sheriff Dave was broken Oct. 18 and tried to get Elevator, but were the safe, and nothing Sheriff's Department the crime. of Ortonville to be burglarized last According to Deputy of hunting items h as shells and goose worth of hunting n surgery has had surgery Cancer,-and will be least the next three cards to her at this Ileen Christensen, th Ave. & C Street, tah, 84143. :ler services 'ervices for Lucille at 11 a.m. this Oct. 30th, at the will appear next meet Nov, 6th items were taken from the scene. Another hunting cabin was bur- glarized sometime within the last few weeks, when 50 bundles of shingles were taken from the property. According to Deputy Hills, there are no suspects in either burglary. Last Wednesday, Oct. 22, a vacant farmplace located two miles east of Ortonville was also burglarized. Deputy Hills reported that items such as tools, a tool box, a Weedeater, and household appliances were report- ed stolen. It was estimated at approx- imately $900.00 worth of items stolen from the house. No suspects have been found for the burglary. Drivers needed for Meals on Wheels Drivers from Big Stone City and Ortonville are needed for delivery of Meals on Wheels. If interested, you're asked to call Gen Davis of Ortonville, 839-2146. DNR PRIM maps-good resource for hunters Looking for a new place to hunt this fall? The Minnesota DNR offers its Public Recreation Information Maps (PRIM) as a resource for recre- ational hunters looking for public lands on which to hunt. The maps are divided into 51 area maps and contain a great deal of pub- lic ownership data, including federal, state and county lands. All maps have been updated within the last three years to provide hunters with the most current information for planning their outing. Deer hunters may find good places to hunt in the wildlife management areas, state forests and other public lands around the state. Duck hunters may find it useful to know where the WMAs and wildlife lakes are located and where they can put in their water- craft. Each map displays parks, forests, scientific and natural areas, waterfowl production areas and wildlife man- agement areas. In addition, each map shows facilities such as state trails, fishing piers, campgrounds, historic sites and more. PRIM maps are available from the DNR Gift Shop at 500 Lafayette Road, St. Paul, Minnesota's Bookstore, 117 University Ave., St. Paul, and several sporting goods and map stores around the state. They can be purchased online at www.minneso- tasbookstore.com. Maps are $4.95 each, plus tax. The DNR advises hunters to be aware of private property when they are looking into a new hunting area, and to always ask first before hunting on private property. ,'s Housing and y will be er Monthly on Thursday, Nov. 6th Community Room of the date and time Auditor gives school an "A" By Arnold Souba At the regular school board meet- ing, Oct. 20th, the auditor, Eide Bailly Company, gave the Ortonville school district an "A" for their performance in 2002-03. The report noted that the district was in better financial shape than the average school district across Minnesota. The auditor did caution against over confidence, however. A decline in local enrollment was cited as one reason for concern. The board voted to approve the audit report. The board also voted to take appli- cations for a business manager posi- tion, and posted an opening for a spe- cial ed/family services secretary. A series of supplemental contracts were approved. October bills were paid in the amount of $522,604.81. The resignation of Janet Weeding as special ed/family services secretary was accepted with regret. Area School relations were discussed in general terms, with no action taken. The board decided to hold a retreat on Saturday, Nov. 22nd at 9 a.m. The next regular school board meeting will be held Monday, Nov. 17th at 7 p.m. in the school library. If you or someone you know used blood factor con- centrate (known as FACTOR VIII or FACTOR IX) in the period from 1978 to 1990 and you have been diagnosed with Hepatitis C, you may have a legal claim for compensation. Shasteen Linscott & Brock is representing hemo- philiac clients (on a contingency fee basis) who have ben diagnosed witthi  life, shortening di- ease. For more information and a free consulta- tion, call today: PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the City Council of the City of Ortonville, Minnesota at the 7:00 PM City Council meeting on Monday, November 3, 2003 will discuss the transfer of the Local Board of Appeal and Equalization duties to Big Stone County. Charleen K. Grossman City Clerk/Administrator Dated: October 27, 2003 I I IIIII icher Nov. Health 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. 5 Meeting Room, 1 ).m. y Center, Crn. to 1 p.m. ADS BRING RESULTS 28, 2O03 Milbank, SD. CARS '94 Grand Caravan LE ............. '3,199 '95 Pontiac Transport ............. *3,699 '96 Chevrolet Lumina APV ........ %999 '96 Grand Caravan LE ............ '4,999 '97 Grand Caravan LE ............ *6,499 Trucks '80 Dodge 1/2 ton 4x4 .............. J99 '89 Ford 1/2 ton, 2wd .............. NJ99 '85 Ford 1/2 ton Super cab, 4x4 ...... J99 '95 Dakota Club Cab, 4x4 ......... $3,999 '96 Ram 1/2 ton Club Cab, 2wd .... s3,999 '98 Dakota, Reg. Cab, 2wd ......... *6,499 '94 Ford Super Cab, 2wd .......... s6,499 '97 Che W 1/2 ton, Ext. Cab, 4x4 #84 s6,999 '91 Dodge 3/4 ton, "Diesel", 4x4 .... ,999 INDEPENDENT SUV- 4x4's '85 Ford Bronco li ................. '1,499 '88 Chevrolet Suburban ............ '1,999 '85 Jeep Wagoneer ................ '2,199 '92 Oldsmobile Bravada ........... *4,399 '95 Chevrolet Blazer LT #40o ........ *4,999 ' GMC Jimmy LT ............... *4,999 '93 Blazer, 6k miles on engine ..... I5,499 '94 Jeep Grand Cherokee SE ...... I5,499 '96 Chevrolet Blazer kS ........... *5,499 '94 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo #396 '5,499 '94 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo #723'6,399 '95 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited #2s316,499 '95 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo #4 *6499 '95 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited #2e217,499 '89 Olds Cutlass Ciera, 4 dr. ......... =399 '91 Dodge Dynasty, 4 dr. ............. *699 '92 Buick Regal, 4 dr. ............... '999 '96 Olds Delta, 4 dr. ................ '1,199 '96 Chevrolet Corsica, 4 dr. ......... '1,399 '89 Lincoln Continental ............ '1,499 '93 Pontiac Sunbird, 2 dr. .......... %599 '82 Dodge 400, 4 dr., 40k miles ...... '2,199 '89 Eagle Premier ES, 82k miles ..... '2,199 '91 Olds Delta 88, 73k miles ........ '2,699 '97 Pontiac Bonneville #739 ........ *3,699 VANS '91 Grand Caravan LE .............. 1999 '94 Plymouth Voyager SE .......... '2,199 Page 9 you the following well for the of the Water Inc. which had here in but is now Iocat- ND and MN. The story in the Oct. 23, of the Wall Shortages of Water, Moves to Make Pay for it A s149 VALUE of THE WALL 'million households are a new bill turn up in their ,: a water bill. Protection of efforts to promote is seeking a rule for every drop of agency says peg- about taking those if they realize their down the drain along 0f water has been climb- the past few vast majority of the never know it. Only about two million roughly 35 million are currently paying for their water. have contributed to Water prices, and the over who should foot there is increasing to population and At the same time, Northwest, the are sufferihg drought. In some way for much of five years, says Jay the climate moni- at the National Climact U.S. (homes and three times more HEMOPHILIAC PATIENTS: household uses a to fill a five '-16-foot in- pool four - times in Roanoke, Va., Seattle, up 23.8%; :ities been hit par- price surge. Va., where Binghamton, N.Y., rself for another bill up 26.7%: Seattle, 23.8%; Fort Smith, Ark., 15.6%; Boston, 13.7%, and Detroit, 13% Utilities not only sell the water, but also usually set the rates. If the EPA rule change passes -- and many experts believe it will-- many renters will be picking up more of this burden. They'll be writing out a new check every month for between $15 and $30, or $180 to $360 a year, that's roughly what the 106 million homeowners now pay for their water. Currently, most landlords decide it's not worth the hassle to hit their renters up for these costs. Here's why: To charge their tenants, landlords have to adhere to many of the same guide- lines as utilities, including hiring experts and doing water-quality test- ing. (The logic is that because the land- lords are "selling" water, they need to be able to guarantee that it meets cer- tain standards.) Properly owners have argued that these measures are burden- some. The EPA agrees, and last month proposed scrapping those require- ments. That change would likely prompt huge numbers of property own- ers to install meters that track usage by individual apartments. The federal agency believes it would also spur a big drop in water consumption. "Helping to make people more aware of how much water they are using and the cost is one of the steps to produce environmental benefits," says G. Tracy Mehan III, the EPA's assistant adminis- trator for water. The deadline for comments on the proposal is Monday, and the EPA expects to make a final decision on the policy change early next year. So far, there hasn't been any significant oppo- sition to the move, though some tenant groups argue that it's inequitable. "This is just one more way for building owners to pass on costs directly to renters and abdicate their responsibili- ty for their properties," says Douglas Pensack associate director of the Illinois Tenants Union. Though supplies have ebbed in some areas, there's no permanent shortage of water in the U.S. While getting safe drinking water is a huge problem in many parts of the world, it's implausible that anytime in the foreseeable future Americans will turn on their faucets and have nothing come out. The current droughts could turn into surpluses at any time, and prices could drop again. The complexity of managing water supplies was highlighted last week when the federal government signed a landmark deal that ensures that more water from the Colorado River will go to fast-growing cities in Southern California, while limiting supplies to farms. The agreement is aimed at end- ing years of rancor among Western states over water rights. The new water proposal brings to mind changes in the electricity market. Until the energy crisis of the 1970s, tenants typically didn't pay for their own electricity. Today, of course, it's commonplace. Some research has shown double-digit drops in energy consumption by tenants in major cities in the year following that switchover. Regulators say that change in behavior has continued into the present, with tenants being more conscientious about turning off lights they're not using and flipping switches before they leave the house. Some evidence suggests that water consumption could trace a similar arc if the new rules pass. Currently, land- lords who charge tenants for their water do it in one of two ways: either by installing renters that measure usage in each apartment, or through "allocat- ed" billing, where tenants pay a per- centage of the building's total bill. A study four years ago of apart- ments being charged for water for the first time found that usage in properties with individual meters fell 18% to 39%, while those in properties charged through allocated billing saw drops of only 6% to 27%. The study was done by Industrial Economics Inc. for the National Apartment Association and the National Multi Housing Council. But there's one reason why people may not be so quick to give up their indulgent hot baths: Because water is generally much cheaper than electrici- ty, people won't see as dramatic finan- cial benefits when they cut back. Just a decade ago, we thought of charging a tenant for something as basic as water was unthinkable. But in recent years, some of the country's biggest apartment owners, including Equity Residential in Chicago and AvalonBay Communities Inc., in Alexandria, Va, have begun doing just that. The number of renters paying water bills has been growing at an esti- mated 25% a year the past four years, according to Viterra Energy Services, a provider of tenant billing services. State governments, too, have been pushing ahead on this issue. Recent moves by Alabama, Mississippi and Texas have made it easier for landlords to bill tenants for water. Massachusetts is now the only state that has a law against it, but efforts are under way to dunk that ban. Write to Ray A. Smith at ray.smith@wsj.com YOUR LAKE AREA --'['/i--- i' Steve Stern, owner, with certified installers Don and Gene I Elm EE OF THE DISH NE1NORK I , , MONTHS tit E,E, VALOr PAXl I "i; " ' ..... ------ Sioux Falls I ...... 3-Roe I T 00'$yste, I 100211 $49.9J Ur tM  ag- l  TV tmrK. ~ ........................................... atmmwat. i '   ._ ,_ ' _L L Tilt LOWEST ALL-emiTMPalCEm I I   7--=='====7:,-'-<': me,,=_r, Rv I "Pure Heart" drama team at Living Hope Trinity Bible College presents a drama team called "Pure Heart" at Ortonville's Living Hope Fellowship, A.G. this coming Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 1 and 2. On Saturday, their program starts at 7 p.m.. and on Sunday, the program gets underway at 10 a.m. "Come and join us," says David Homrighausen D i n L./yL* i, IJI lgLO LV  ..... .BUY-.'ZZ nn one week SHASTEEN, LINSCOTT & BROCK 840 North 48th St., Lincoln, NE 68504 402-464-0064 or 800-665-0064 (to. free) County's Sheriff's responded to a rash of through- he two weeks. Sheriff Dave was broken Oct. 18 and tried to get Elevator, but were the safe, and nothing Sheriff's Department the crime. of Ortonville to be burglarized last According to Deputy of hunting items h as shells and goose worth of hunting n surgery has had surgery Cancer,-and will be least the next three cards to her at this Ileen Christensen, th Ave. & C Street, tah, 84143. :ler services 'ervices for Lucille at 11 a.m. this Oct. 30th, at the will appear next meet Nov, 6th items were taken from the scene. Another hunting cabin was bur- glarized sometime within the last few weeks, when 50 bundles of shingles were taken from the property. According to Deputy Hills, there are no suspects in either burglary. Last Wednesday, Oct. 22, a vacant farmplace located two miles east of Ortonville was also burglarized. Deputy Hills reported that items such as tools, a tool box, a Weedeater, and household appliances were report- ed stolen. It was estimated at approx- imately $900.00 worth of items stolen from the house. No suspects have been found for the burglary. Drivers needed for Meals on Wheels Drivers from Big Stone City and Ortonville are needed for delivery of Meals on Wheels. If interested, you're asked to call Gen Davis of Ortonville, 839-2146. DNR PRIM maps-good resource for hunters Looking for a new place to hunt this fall? The Minnesota DNR offers its Public Recreation Information Maps (PRIM) as a resource for recre- ational hunters looking for public lands on which to hunt. The maps are divided into 51 area maps and contain a great deal of pub- lic ownership data, including federal, state and county lands. All maps have been updated within the last three years to provide hunters with the most current information for planning their outing. Deer hunters may find good places to hunt in the wildlife management areas, state forests and other public lands around the state. Duck hunters may find it useful to know where the WMAs and wildlife lakes are located and where they can put in their water- craft. Each map displays parks, forests, scientific and natural areas, waterfowl production areas and wildlife man- agement areas. In addition, each map shows facilities such as state trails, fishing piers, campgrounds, historic sites and more. PRIM maps are available from the DNR Gift Shop at 500 Lafayette Road, St. Paul, Minnesota's Bookstore, 117 University Ave., St. Paul, and several sporting goods and map stores around the state. They can be purchased online at www.minneso- tasbookstore.com. Maps are $4.95 each, plus tax. The DNR advises hunters to be aware of private property when they are looking into a new hunting area, and to always ask first before hunting on private property. ,'s Housing and y will be er Monthly on Thursday, Nov. 6th Community Room of the date and time Auditor gives school an "A" By Arnold Souba At the regular school board meet- ing, Oct. 20th, the auditor, Eide Bailly Company, gave the Ortonville school district an "A" for their performance in 2002-03. The report noted that the district was in better financial shape than the average school district across Minnesota. The auditor did caution against over confidence, however. A decline in local enrollment was cited as one reason for concern. The board voted to approve the audit report. The board also voted to take appli- cations for a business manager posi- tion, and posted an opening for a spe- cial ed/family services secretary. A series of supplemental contracts were approved. October bills were paid in the amount of $522,604.81. The resignation of Janet Weeding as special ed/family services secretary was accepted with regret. Area School relations were discussed in general terms, with no action taken. The board decided to hold a retreat on Saturday, Nov. 22nd at 9 a.m. The next regular school board meeting will be held Monday, Nov. 17th at 7 p.m. in the school library. If you or someone you know used blood factor con- centrate (known as FACTOR VIII or FACTOR IX) in the period from 1978 to 1990 and you have been diagnosed with Hepatitis C, you may have a legal claim for compensation. Shasteen Linscott & Brock is representing hemo- philiac clients (on a contingency fee basis) who have ben diagnosed witthi  life, shortening di- ease. For more information and a free consulta- tion, call today: PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the City Council of the City of Ortonville, Minnesota at the 7:00 PM City Council meeting on Monday, November 3, 2003 will discuss the transfer of the Local Board of Appeal and Equalization duties to Big Stone County. Charleen K. Grossman City Clerk/Administrator Dated: October 27, 2003 I I IIIII icher Nov. Health 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. 5 Meeting Room, 1 ).m. y Center, Crn. to 1 p.m. ADS BRING RESULTS 28, 2O03 Milbank, SD. CARS '94 Grand Caravan LE ............. '3,199 '95 Pontiac Transport ............. *3,699 '96 Chevrolet Lumina APV ........ %999 '96 Grand Caravan LE ............ '4,999 '97 Grand Caravan LE ............ *6,499 Trucks '80 Dodge 1/2 ton 4x4 .............. J99 '89 Ford 1/2 ton, 2wd .............. NJ99 '85 Ford 1/2 ton Super cab, 4x4 ...... J99 '95 Dakota Club Cab, 4x4 ......... $3,999 '96 Ram 1/2 ton Club Cab, 2wd .... s3,999 '98 Dakota, Reg. Cab, 2wd ......... *6,499 '94 Ford Super Cab, 2wd .......... s6,499 '97 Che W 1/2 ton, Ext. Cab, 4x4 #84 s6,999 '91 Dodge 3/4 ton, "Diesel", 4x4 .... ,999 INDEPENDENT SUV- 4x4's '85 Ford Bronco li ................. '1,499 '88 Chevrolet Suburban ............ '1,999 '85 Jeep Wagoneer ................ '2,199 '92 Oldsmobile Bravada ........... *4,399 '95 Chevrolet Blazer LT #40o ........ *4,999 ' GMC Jimmy LT ............... *4,999 '93 Blazer, 6k miles on engine ..... I5,499 '94 Jeep Grand Cherokee SE ...... I5,499 '96 Chevrolet Blazer kS ........... *5,499 '94 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo #396 '5,499 '94 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo #723'6,399 '95 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited #2s316,499 '95 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo #4 *6499 '95 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited #2e217,499 '89 Olds Cutlass Ciera, 4 dr. ......... =399 '91 Dodge Dynasty, 4 dr. ............. *699 '92 Buick Regal, 4 dr. ............... '999 '96 Olds Delta, 4 dr. ................ '1,199 '96 Chevrolet Corsica, 4 dr. ......... '1,399 '89 Lincoln Continental ............ '1,499 '93 Pontiac Sunbird, 2 dr. .......... %599 '82 Dodge 400, 4 dr., 40k miles ...... '2,199 '89 Eagle Premier ES, 82k miles ..... '2,199 '91 Olds Delta 88, 73k miles ........ '2,699 '97 Pontiac Bonneville #739 ........ *3,699 VANS '91 Grand Caravan LE .............. 1999 '94 Plymouth Voyager SE .......... '2,199 Page 9