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Ortonville, Minnesota
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October 28, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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October 28, 2003
 

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GALORE! Ladies belonllinll to nine different chapters of the Red Hat Society .athered for a "Get luncheon at the Matador "last Thursday, Oct. 23. Clubs from Appleton, Bng Stone City, SD, ta, Milbank, Wilmot and Ortonville were decked out in their finery of Red Hats and beautiful More than 80 ladies enjoyed the event that was hosted by the RedChapeaus of Milbank. n: Pork producers need markets, not checkoff need a good price md open market more to see TV ads touting Aaron Peterson a federal court down the pork matter how much pork if too little of kes it back to Peterson, of rural "While livestock in an up phase, ' cattle, there's no guar- back to the disas- prices of 1998-1999. We have to take steps to Lt hurts everyone in a rural Whether they farm or not." A federal appellate court panel in Michigan Wednesday reaffirmed a district court ruling striking down the USDA-backed pork checkoff pro- gram. Pork producers voted against the checkoff in a referendum in 2000, but the USDA implemented it anyway and joined a Michigan pork producers group is challenging the referendum in court. "With two court rulings against it, I hope that USDA Secretary Ann Venneman will give up instead of undertaking another risky appeal," Peterson said. "This is a case of pow- erful and well-financed minority try- ing to overturn majority rule." Pork producers would benefit more by having competitive bids for their animals, instead of the closed and concentrated market that devel- oped during the 1990s, Peterson said. "We had a lot more healthy live- stock farms in the era when we made more open and competitive markets," Peterson said. "And when we had those financially healthy, independent farms, we had financially healthy rural commUnities with strong down- towns and strong community institu- tions. Put a dollar in a farmer's pock- et and he'll spend it on Main Street, where it flows throughout the commu- nity. Take that dollar away, and everyone suffers." ice to unmask drunk rs during Halloween Police Department offi- or painted faces out of drunk dri- stepped-up The Oct. 31 crack- three officers on extra patrols. A statewide spider web of more than 300 law enforcement agencies, including local police departments, county sherriff's offices and the Minnesota State Patrol will partici- pate in the impaired witch hunt. The effort is a component of the Safe & Sober campaign, a federally-funded program administered by the Minnesota Department of Public Safety. "If you think a belly-ache from eating to much candy is painful," says Officer Jason Mork. "then I wouldn't recommend mixing a hangover with a DWI." Ortonville Police Department urges Ortonville's dressed-up drinkers to have a plan for a safe ride before heading home: designate a sober dri- vet. use alternative or public trans- portation, or stay the night at the loca- tion of the celebration. Ortonville Police Department also emphasizes the importance of pedes- trian safety on Halloween. Treat-seek- ers and parents should also review basic pedestrian rules, use flashlights and reflective wear, know where and how to cross the streets-and never dart in front of traffic. Motorists should reduce speeds and remain alert at all times. The Safe & Sober education and - enforcement campaign is funded by " the National Highway Traffic Safety , Administration and is designed to - reduce the number of traffic crashes and injuries. Wouldn't you want it located at the busiest intersection in the Ortonville area? The Value of Keeping it Local The ortonvilleindependent.com deliv- ers what online users crave--news. But not just any news, it's news about our community. No one else on the entire World Wide Web delivers the local news, local sports, local events, local photos, local information and advertising like we do. When people search the web to find out what's happening in the Or- tonville area they look to the Inde- pendent's online edition, ortonvillein- dependent.corn Traffic: The Competitive Advantage Because we offer fresh news, our online readers keep coming back and they read an average of four pages of the online edition. The ortonvilleindependent.com is reg- istered on over 200 search engines and updated monthly. Because "we get tound", this community that we serve also gets promoted. You too can reach the world by adver- tising locally. Gain the advantage of the Independent's high traffic and loyal readers; advertise your wehsite on our website. Find out more---call today, but hurry ad space is limited. www.ortonvilleindependent.com WEB TRENDS for SEPTEMBER 2002: Entire Site Hits 72,684 Average Hits Per Day 2,422 Page Views 12,741 Visitors 2,399 And growing? Ortonville Independent (320) 839-6163 .... 00FEATU RINGNEW BIG STONE LAKE AREA ,RESIDENTS, ....... e Ken and Carrie Henneberg Carrie Henneberg have always enjoyed Lake Area. Carrie has visited the area life, as her family owned land here, and summers here. moved to Big Stone Lake in the after they had made the decision to 'anted to find a good place to spend their "We actually built our retirement home Said Carrie. "There was a cabin on the and we tore down the cabin and built a we knew this was where we wanted to take the boat out and do some fishing, or take the snowmobile, or anything having to do with the out- doors. When he's around, all those things come out." Ken and Carrie spend most of their free time gar- dening. The couple is currently working on creating a five acre park-like garden in their yard, complete with a water garden. They also have a greenhouse on their property. The Hennebergs have also become active in Citizens for Big Stone Lake, which they joined last February. Carrie also enjoys arts and crafts, particularly sewing, crocheting and painting. home is located about 11 miles out on Highway 7. They feel fortunate to along Big Stone Lake. "Most people area are in a bay, but we are right the lake," Carrie said. hail from St. Paul, and both nneapolis before retiring. Ken worked where he was the Inventory at Moor, a printing compa- database publishing. Carrie was the of Graphic Arts and has two children, Allen and Andrea, two children, ages two years, and eight and Ken enjoy spending time with and love to have both their chil- them. "Allen is an outdoorsman," "When he comes to visit, he really likes In addition to their lake front property, where the Hennebergs livefull time, they also own a farm site near Odessa, overlooking the Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge. Most of the land has been rented out, but the Hennebergs have kept 45 acres, on which they have planted prairie grass, two and one-half acres is used in rotation for wildlife feeding, and two and one-half acres have been planted with trees. There is a house located on the property, but has not been inhabited for a few years. "Up until two years ago, that was the oldest continuously occupied farm house in Big Stone County," said Carrie. Both Hennebergs are happy to be spending their retirement days along Big Stone Lake. "We may end up spending parts of our wimers somewhere warmer," said Carrie. "January through March can get pretty unbearable around here, but we absolutely love this area, and are pleased to have become mem- bers of the Big Stone Lake community." KEN AND CARRIE HENNEBERG are happy to be part of the Big Stone Lake area. The couple moved into the area after they retired from their jobs m Minneapolis. The Hennebergs are pictured above in their Big Stone Lake-side home. Series sponsored by Minnwest Bank the BEST THINGS in life REST take a little MONEY. are free, a home equity loan to finance whatever you need - from home to a new car to a family vacation Low, fixed rate for term of loan Possible tax-deductibility Convenient application process Srnart way to get the money you need NOW. Loans subject to our standard credit qualifications and certain reatrictiom apply. Consult your tax dvisor regardinlt the deductibility of interest. Lucie Thoreson Deb Steuart Heather Henrich See Lucie, Deb or Heather today! MINNWEST BAI"4K ORTOI00 I\\; 'ILLE Member FDIC MINNWEST BANK GROUP 320-89-2568 21 Southeast Second Street s Ortonville Moneykine 1-888-616-2265 www.minnwestbank.com * Some restrictions may @ply, Subject to credit approaval 28, 2003  INDEPENDENT Page 13 GALORE! Ladies belonllinll to nine different chapters of the Red Hat Society .athered for a "Get luncheon at the Matador "last Thursday, Oct. 23. Clubs from Appleton, Bng Stone City, SD, ta, Milbank, Wilmot and Ortonville were decked out in their finery of Red Hats and beautiful More than 80 ladies enjoyed the event that was hosted by the RedChapeaus of Milbank. n: Pork producers need markets, not checkoff need a good price md open market more to see TV ads touting Aaron Peterson a federal court down the pork matter how much pork if too little of kes it back to Peterson, of rural "While livestock in an up phase, ' cattle, there's no guar- back to the disas- prices of 1998-1999. We have to take steps to Lt hurts everyone in a rural Whether they farm or not." A federal appellate court panel in Michigan Wednesday reaffirmed a district court ruling striking down the USDA-backed pork checkoff pro- gram. Pork producers voted against the checkoff in a referendum in 2000, but the USDA implemented it anyway and joined a Michigan pork producers group is challenging the referendum in court. "With two court rulings against it, I hope that USDA Secretary Ann Venneman will give up instead of undertaking another risky appeal," Peterson said. "This is a case of pow- erful and well-financed minority try- ing to overturn majority rule." Pork producers would benefit more by having competitive bids for their animals, instead of the closed and concentrated market that devel- oped during the 1990s, Peterson said. "We had a lot more healthy live- stock farms in the era when we made more open and competitive markets," Peterson said. "And when we had those financially healthy, independent farms, we had financially healthy rural commUnities with strong down- towns and strong community institu- tions. Put a dollar in a farmer's pock- et and he'll spend it on Main Street, where it flows throughout the commu- nity. Take that dollar away, and everyone suffers." ice to unmask drunk rs during Halloween Police Department offi- or painted faces out of drunk dri- stepped-up The Oct. 31 crack- three officers on extra patrols. A statewide spider web of more than 300 law enforcement agencies, including local police departments, county sherriff's offices and the Minnesota State Patrol will partici- pate in the impaired witch hunt. The effort is a component of the Safe & Sober campaign, a federally-funded program administered by the Minnesota Department of Public Safety. "If you think a belly-ache from eating to much candy is painful," says Officer Jason Mork. "then I wouldn't recommend mixing a hangover with a DWI." Ortonville Police Department urges Ortonville's dressed-up drinkers to have a plan for a safe ride before heading home: designate a sober dri- vet. use alternative or public trans- portation, or stay the night at the loca- tion of the celebration. Ortonville Police Department also emphasizes the importance of pedes- trian safety on Halloween. Treat-seek- ers and parents should also review basic pedestrian rules, use flashlights and reflective wear, know where and how to cross the streets-and never dart in front of traffic. Motorists should reduce speeds and remain alert at all times. The Safe & Sober education and - enforcement campaign is funded by " the National Highway Traffic Safety , Administration and is designed to - reduce the number of traffic crashes and injuries. Wouldn't you want it located at the busiest intersection in the Ortonville area? The Value of Keeping it Local The ortonvilleindependent.com deliv- ers what online users crave--news. But not just any news, it's news about our community. No one else on the entire World Wide Web delivers the local news, local sports, local events, local photos, local information and advertising like we do. When people search the web to find out what's happening in the Or- tonville area they look to the Inde- pendent's online edition, ortonvillein- dependent.corn Traffic: The Competitive Advantage Because we offer fresh news, our online readers keep coming back and they read an average of four pages of the online edition. The ortonvilleindependent.com is reg- istered on over 200 search engines and updated monthly. Because "we get tound", this community that we serve also gets promoted. You too can reach the world by adver- tising locally. Gain the advantage of the Independent's high traffic and loyal readers; advertise your wehsite on our website. Find out more---call today, but hurry ad space is limited. www.ortonvilleindependent.com WEB TRENDS for SEPTEMBER 2002: Entire Site Hits 72,684 Average Hits Per Day 2,422 Page Views 12,741 Visitors 2,399 And growing? Ortonville Independent (320) 839-6163 .... 00FEATU RINGNEW BIG STONE LAKE AREA ,RESIDENTS, ....... e Ken and Carrie Henneberg Carrie Henneberg have always enjoyed Lake Area. Carrie has visited the area life, as her family owned land here, and summers here. moved to Big Stone Lake in the after they had made the decision to 'anted to find a good place to spend their "We actually built our retirement home Said Carrie. "There was a cabin on the and we tore down the cabin and built a we knew this was where we wanted to take the boat out and do some fishing, or take the snowmobile, or anything having to do with the out- doors. When he's around, all those things come out." Ken and Carrie spend most of their free time gar- dening. The couple is currently working on creating a five acre park-like garden in their yard, complete with a water garden. They also have a greenhouse on their property. The Hennebergs have also become active in Citizens for Big Stone Lake, which they joined last February. Carrie also enjoys arts and crafts, particularly sewing, crocheting and painting. home is located about 11 miles out on Highway 7. They feel fortunate to along Big Stone Lake. "Most people area are in a bay, but we are right the lake," Carrie said. hail from St. Paul, and both nneapolis before retiring. Ken worked where he was the Inventory at Moor, a printing compa- database publishing. Carrie was the of Graphic Arts and has two children, Allen and Andrea, two children, ages two years, and eight and Ken enjoy spending time with and love to have both their chil- them. "Allen is an outdoorsman," "When he comes to visit, he really likes In addition to their lake front property, where the Hennebergs livefull time, they also own a farm site near Odessa, overlooking the Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge. Most of the land has been rented out, but the Hennebergs have kept 45 acres, on which they have planted prairie grass, two and one-half acres is used in rotation for wildlife feeding, and two and one-half acres have been planted with trees. There is a house located on the property, but has not been inhabited for a few years. "Up until two years ago, that was the oldest continuously occupied farm house in Big Stone County," said Carrie. Both Hennebergs are happy to be spending their retirement days along Big Stone Lake. "We may end up spending parts of our wimers somewhere warmer," said Carrie. "January through March can get pretty unbearable around here, but we absolutely love this area, and are pleased to have become mem- bers of the Big Stone Lake community." KEN AND CARRIE HENNEBERG are happy to be part of the Big Stone Lake area. The couple moved into the area after they retired from their jobs m Minneapolis. The Hennebergs are pictured above in their Big Stone Lake-side home. Series sponsored by Minnwest Bank the BEST THINGS in life REST take a little MONEY. are free, a home equity loan to finance whatever you need - from home to a new car to a family vacation Low, fixed rate for term of loan Possible tax-deductibility Convenient application process Srnart way to get the money you need NOW. Loans subject to our standard credit qualifications and certain reatrictiom apply. Consult your tax dvisor regardinlt the deductibility of interest. Lucie Thoreson Deb Steuart Heather Henrich See Lucie, Deb or Heather today! MINNWEST BAI"4K ORTOI00 I\\; 'ILLE Member FDIC MINNWEST BANK GROUP 320-89-2568 21 Southeast Second Street s Ortonville Moneykine 1-888-616-2265 www.minnwestbank.com * Some restrictions may @ply, Subject to credit approaval 28, 2003  INDEPENDENT Page 13