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October 28, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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October 28, 2003
 

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(INDERGARTEN VISITS FIRE STATION on Oct. 8th. Mrs. Maas' kindergarten students ot le's Fire Station and met four firefighters. Students saw all the different equipment that the o put out fires. Highlight of the trip was a ride back to school on the fire truck with the lights Students received fire hats, stickers, and pencils from the firefighters. "ng mortality an angling reality fishing the other partner began to strip eel and carefully feed it rod. We were back- leeches. He'd had a ,as we waited for the fish e bait, we wondered might be. Walleye? Maybe nothing? suggests a switch to circle hooks would not result in any great saving of walleye. Regular hooks, Jones noted, did injure fish more 'frequently than circle hooks but circle hooks slipped out of the fish's mouth more frequent- ly. Circle hooks, therefl)re, did reduce internal injuries to walleye but largely because circle hooks hooked fewer fish. What are the practical applications of this and other DNR hooking mor- Bob tightened his rod and set the 17-inch walleye. This was destined to die to dine on one of - a pan- and the sour drip- of lemon. Still, died even if because hooking lity. die as a result of to say because so many into play. Mortality Species type, whether live bait or arti- and tempera- fish size, and more. Clearly, to see a fish go to when mortality rates say 15 percent - 85 alive to be caught gen- aside, hooking mor- Wave of attention for a On the international Cause within the animal Nationally, fish of and release fishing in Minnesota, mor- ajor management issue so many fish or to comply with regulations. Moreover, !ly snagged a fair attention -last year bite on Mille Lacs above average. This resulted in hooking at 228,000 pounds total kill. really that high'? Is an angler can do to are the subject of under way by Natural Resources at Aitkin. Though a for- months away, pre- from data collected Summer suggest that at Mille Lacs - pre- for walleye inches and 10 percent than 13 inches - is s than that. In May, for 145 walleye that died within the first tg released. In June, of 244. In July, based on a fish. ng are based on a study y col- by anglers and for a number of in a holding pen lake's bottom. This %ntinue into October. results in a lower over- Stimate - especially in May and June proportion of wall- Would translate into caught again. research project Lacs aims to fference in the rate of Valleye caught and fishing hook and released on a circle hook points Sign tends to increase jaw and decrease esophagus. Tom s Mille Lacs large has been catching kinds of hooks the and this is what he's that 45 percent of ith a leech and circle 'deep in the mouth Percent with a start- percentages are seconds after the difference in on about 75 fish, tality research fl)r anglers'? One, most hooking mortality is the result of puncture wounds to organs inside the fish. Therefore, the longer an angler waits between the bite and the hook set the greater the likelihood the fish will swallow the bait deep and potentially suffer life threatening injury. Two, the jury is still out on barb- less hooks. Research findings are mixed. Barbless hooks allow anglers to handle fish more quickly yet study results vary as to the hook's effect on short-term mortality. Three, infections kill fish, be they viral, fungal or bacterial. Frequently these infections are related to punc- ture wounds or the removal of the fish's protective slime. Like fish, humans are unlikely to die from a small puncture wound. On the other hand, you and I could die from an infection that results from stepping on a nail or some other small, deep wound. Similarly, a walleye that loses its protective slime while flopping around on the carpet of a boat could die from a fungal infection even though it was healthy when released. Four, fighting a fish quickly is bet- ter than fighting it slowly. That's because the hmger a fish fights the greater the lactic acid build-up and the greater the oxygen debt of the fish. Ironically, big fish are more likely to die from oxygen debt than small- or medium-sized fish because the ratio of their smaller gill size to body mass ratio. This ratio is why anglers who catch a big fish sometimes have a hard time reviving it to the point that it suc- cessfully swims away. Finally, we all share a personal responsibility for fish mortality. Catch-and-release is great. It is natur- al resource conservation. Still, we anglers must accept the fact that healthy-looking fish some- times die. And more importantly, we have a responsibility to minimize that loss so other anglers can gain from our good intentions. For in the end, the angler who catches and releases many fish may kill more than the angler who simply harvests a few for supper, stows the rod and motors back to shore. To reduce mortality, your local DNR fisheries managers ask that you remember the following: Set the hook quickly. A quick hook-set usually puts the hook in the fish's mouth, where it does little darn- age. Don't tear hooks from a fish's mouth. Wet hands before handling the fish. This will minimize the loss of the fish's protective mucous. Cut the line if you cannot easily remove the hook without damaging the gills or throat. A fish has a good chance of surviving if released quick- ly. Leave at least an inch of line hang- ing out the mouth. This helps the hook to lay flush when the fish takes in food. Don't keep the fish out of water for long periods. If possible, unhook the fish.without placing it in a net or lifting it from the water. Don't place fish you plan to release on a stringer or in a live well. Confinement adds significant stress to the fish and decreases their chance of survival upon release. o00reing 1/, ,.$,9   . FOUNDATION YSTEMSi INC. Quality We Can Guaramee Basement wall anchor and Piering systems Free estimates and advice call 1-800-430-5851 lV,o un dt.o " FIVE STAR Jim Geuweln o... 'O00ltam __ UO 25OO Su $25  Hemi V8 - 4 Full Doors *inc. rebate & comm. cert. Afow Heavy Duty , Ram 4x4's 2500's & 3500 s Hemi V8 & Cummins Diesel 7 year - 70_,000 rile & I' oil- tel Powertrain Warranty qt/ '00 J "os Grand Cherokees 60 JEEP EXPERTS Sa/es Serv/ce o One Wrier '02 RAM 1500 "QUAD CAB" 4x4 s19,685.,00 SLT - CD - 4 Full Doorsf 28, 2003  INDEPENDENT Page 3 (INDERGARTEN VISITS FIRE STATION on Oct. 8th. Mrs. Maas' kindergarten students ot le's Fire Station and met four firefighters. Students saw all the different equipment that the o put out fires. Highlight of the trip was a ride back to school on the fire truck with the lights Students received fire hats, stickers, and pencils from the firefighters. "ng mortality an angling reality fishing the other partner began to strip eel and carefully feed it rod. We were back- leeches. He'd had a ,as we waited for the fish e bait, we wondered might be. Walleye? Maybe nothing? suggests a switch to circle hooks would not result in any great saving of walleye. Regular hooks, Jones noted, did injure fish more 'frequently than circle hooks but circle hooks slipped out of the fish's mouth more frequent- ly. Circle hooks, therefl)re, did reduce internal injuries to walleye but largely because circle hooks hooked fewer fish. What are the practical applications of this and other DNR hooking mor- Bob tightened his rod and set the 17-inch walleye. This was destined to die to dine on one of - a pan- and the sour drip- of lemon. Still, died even if because hooking lity. die as a result of to say because so many into play. Mortality Species type, whether live bait or arti- and tempera- fish size, and more. Clearly, to see a fish go to when mortality rates say 15 percent - 85 alive to be caught gen- aside, hooking mor- Wave of attention for a On the international Cause within the animal Nationally, fish of and release fishing in Minnesota, mor- ajor management issue so many fish or to comply with regulations. Moreover, !ly snagged a fair attention -last year bite on Mille Lacs above average. This resulted in hooking at 228,000 pounds total kill. really that high'? Is an angler can do to are the subject of under way by Natural Resources at Aitkin. Though a for- months away, pre- from data collected Summer suggest that at Mille Lacs - pre- for walleye inches and 10 percent than 13 inches - is s than that. In May, for 145 walleye that died within the first tg released. In June, of 244. In July, based on a fish. ng are based on a study y col- by anglers and for a number of in a holding pen lake's bottom. This %ntinue into October. results in a lower over- Stimate - especially in May and June proportion of wall- Would translate into caught again. research project Lacs aims to fference in the rate of Valleye caught and fishing hook and released on a circle hook points Sign tends to increase jaw and decrease esophagus. Tom s Mille Lacs large has been catching kinds of hooks the and this is what he's that 45 percent of ith a leech and circle 'deep in the mouth Percent with a start- percentages are seconds after the difference in on about 75 fish, tality research fl)r anglers'? One, most hooking mortality is the result of puncture wounds to organs inside the fish. Therefore, the longer an angler waits between the bite and the hook set the greater the likelihood the fish will swallow the bait deep and potentially suffer life threatening injury. Two, the jury is still out on barb- less hooks. Research findings are mixed. Barbless hooks allow anglers to handle fish more quickly yet study results vary as to the hook's effect on short-term mortality. Three, infections kill fish, be they viral, fungal or bacterial. Frequently these infections are related to punc- ture wounds or the removal of the fish's protective slime. Like fish, humans are unlikely to die from a small puncture wound. On the other hand, you and I could die from an infection that results from stepping on a nail or some other small, deep wound. Similarly, a walleye that loses its protective slime while flopping around on the carpet of a boat could die from a fungal infection even though it was healthy when released. Four, fighting a fish quickly is bet- ter than fighting it slowly. That's because the hmger a fish fights the greater the lactic acid build-up and the greater the oxygen debt of the fish. Ironically, big fish are more likely to die from oxygen debt than small- or medium-sized fish because the ratio of their smaller gill size to body mass ratio. This ratio is why anglers who catch a big fish sometimes have a hard time reviving it to the point that it suc- cessfully swims away. Finally, we all share a personal responsibility for fish mortality. Catch-and-release is great. It is natur- al resource conservation. Still, we anglers must accept the fact that healthy-looking fish some- times die. And more importantly, we have a responsibility to minimize that loss so other anglers can gain from our good intentions. For in the end, the angler who catches and releases many fish may kill more than the angler who simply harvests a few for supper, stows the rod and motors back to shore. To reduce mortality, your local DNR fisheries managers ask that you remember the following: Set the hook quickly. A quick hook-set usually puts the hook in the fish's mouth, where it does little darn- age. Don't tear hooks from a fish's mouth. Wet hands before handling the fish. This will minimize the loss of the fish's protective mucous. Cut the line if you cannot easily remove the hook without damaging the gills or throat. A fish has a good chance of surviving if released quick- ly. Leave at least an inch of line hang- ing out the mouth. This helps the hook to lay flush when the fish takes in food. Don't keep the fish out of water for long periods. If possible, unhook the fish.without placing it in a net or lifting it from the water. Don't place fish you plan to release on a stringer or in a live well. Confinement adds significant stress to the fish and decreases their chance of survival upon release. o00reing 1/, ,.$,9   . FOUNDATION YSTEMSi INC. Quality We Can Guaramee Basement wall anchor and Piering systems Free estimates and advice call 1-800-430-5851 lV,o un dt.o " FIVE STAR Jim Geuweln o... 'O00ltam __ UO 25OO Su $25  Hemi V8 - 4 Full Doors *inc. rebate & comm. cert. Afow Heavy Duty , Ram 4x4's 2500's & 3500 s Hemi V8 & Cummins Diesel 7 year - 70_,000 rile & I' oil- tel Powertrain Warranty qt/ '00 J "os Grand Cherokees 60 JEEP EXPERTS Sa/es Serv/ce o One Wrier '02 RAM 1500 "QUAD CAB" 4x4 s19,685.,00 SLT - CD - 4 Full Doorsf 28, 2003  INDEPENDENT Page 3