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October 28, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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00old days in the Ortonville area -.:+H: ...... ::f ..,.,.. DOWN MEMORY'S LANE From the Files of The Ortonville Independent THESE FACES? At left is the late Pastor Harold Ward (First English Lutheran Church), in s Dr. Robert Yaeger, Optometrist here for many years, now retired and still living here, and at right Zimmerman, long-time cashier at Tri-County State Bank (later CenBank). 10 YEARS AGO Nov. 2, 1993 Construction Co. !ng 100 years in the business. A spe- is included in this Wil Hansen has minister of the ;ational church in 'ille and the Milbank Wee has been cho- be the new hospital after serving as hospital administrator finance. oys Scouts will col- for the food shelf this morning. res Furniture is 10 years in business This cohunn sponsored il1 part by ORTONVlLLE STONE Ortonville, MN 320-839-6163 For All Yore" Rock Needs! 25 YEARS AGO Oct. 25, 1978 Independent publish- last Saturday that these days tight when they to attend the whirl of Pres. Carter and vice president, Mondale. One of the area's better corn crops in recent years and nice weather has made a run on the local elevators. Harvey Kidman Jr. was honored recently by being pre- sented with the highest award given by the Jaycee organiza- tion, the Jaycee International Senatorship award. Lisa Sis, a fifth grader at the Ortonville school, was the winner of the poster contest for the Ortonville Firemen. A girl was born to Mr. and Mrs. Richard Carlin of Milbank at the Ortonville Hospital. 50 YEARS AGO Nov. 12, 1953 The junior class will pre- sent the play "Hillbilly Weddin"" next Tuesday. Members of the cast include Jacqueline Hahn, Joan Kamin, Charles Blink, Janet Gustafson, Jerry Loy and Dennis Sigloh. The school board unani- mously decided to name the new school building the James Knoll Elementary School after the long time janitor at the school. M.W. Brown of the Northwestern Bell Telephone Co. announced a $30,000. expansion here. Ardell Agre and Arlen LaCombe were united in mar- riage Nov. 8 at Our Savior's Lutheran Church in Montevideo. The following births were recorded at the Ortonville Hospital: a girl to Mr. and Mrs. Albert Redfield of Clinton, a boy to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wittnebel of Nassau, a boy to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Onken of Marietta and a girl to Mr. and Mrs. Frances Boogaard of Ortonville. 70 YEARS AGO Oct. 19, 1933 "The Ortonic" is the name that was selected this week to be the name of the school newspaper. Elsie Shau sug- gested the name in the contest which was held. Marlene Kiernat is far in the lead in the opening day of the Baby popularity contest. Verna Lou Kahler and Cyrus Martinson were united in marriage Oct. 14 at Morris. Eleven young men and women from Big Stone County are enrolled in school at the West Central School of Agriculture. Meta Schwarze and John Noess were wed Thursday at the Trinity Lutheran parson- age. by Rev. Wm. Hartman. Mayor A.H. Sturges announced this week he will not be a candidate for that office after serving two terms. Extension report Colleen Gengler Regional Relations Specialist, Regional Extension Educator County Extension Office Slayton, MN 507 836-6927 PUTTING FAMILY FIRST One of the common complaints I hear from families is being "too busy." Families with school age children have church, school, work and community activities going on. Add it up and there isn't much time for the important institution of the family. The over-scheduled nature of today's family can happen gradually. A parent of a young child hears about a class and signs up. Their spouse commits to something in the community. The church begins a new faith campaign. Before you know it, the family has a "famine of time." These are all good things, but families need to sort out what is most important and what fits limited family resources of time and money. Dr. William Doherty, University of Minnesota faculty member and founder of an effort called "Putting Family First" suggests answering the true-false questions below. These help put dissatisfaction into words the entire family can talk about. Jot down your responses because there is a "scoring" system. 1. We struggle to find time for unhurried family meals. 2. I think we spend too much time getting to and from our children's activities 3. Homework can be difficult to squeeze into the children's schedules. 4. My kids don't have enough time to hang out and entertain themselves. 5. I wish we spent more time home as a family. 6. It is hard to visit with relatives and family friends because we are so busy. 7. We don't go on family trips and outings as much as we would like. 8. Even on weekends it can be hard to get the whole family together because of everyone's schedules. To score, give yourself one point for each true item. If you have six to eight, you probably have a famine of time. If your total is three to five "true" responses, you are a somewhere in between. If your total is two or under, feel good about achieving the goal of family time together. There is no one way for families to decide how they can spend more time together. Every family has their own set of values and priorities. The questions to ask: do you value family time? and is it a priority'? Dr. Doherty says start small. For example, if you don't have many family meals together, start with one or two a week where everyone is committed to being there. Make dining time pleasant. It should not be a time for discipline issues. Think of what your family wants to talk about. Get back into the art of conversation and discussion. Unfortunately some families have gotten to the point that logistics concerning getting to the next activity is the main focus of family conversation. Put family time first. It is one of the most beneficial things you will ever do for your family. Source: Dr. William Doherty for Family Information Services, Minneapolis, MN 2003. Reprinted with permission. Colleen Gengler is a Family Relations Specialist with the University of Minnesota Extension Service. report Vince Crary Extension Educator, Livestock PO Box 250 ..... ' "  56567-0250 385 -3086 of Donkey Grazing Holen, IPM Specialist Search and Outreach and I worked with i: ::: :il trial. Region Partnership by Executive tron Rezac Andersen, for our research. by Dr. Sedivec, the with for the trial into 3 acre paddocks cow/calf pairs and 2 that were grazed by cow/calf pair. t, Dr. Bobby Holder, Soil Scientist from Crookston, Doug Holen, Extension Educator and I divided and flagged both pastures belonging to Chad Moyer of Wadena a;rt  of Vergas, Minnesota. The Moyer and Lahr families did all the fencing and installed water systems on both trial pastures. The Lahr pastures had been sprayed in the fall of 2002 so there were few bolted thistles in 2003. The pasture contains a lot of rosettes and will be part of 2004 research. The chart is from counts done on the Moyer pasture. As suggested by NDSU Specialists, tram lines were laid out in each pasture and counts were done along these lines. Each pasture was sampled in 3 areas and each area had two tram lines. The first line was sampled at 50' and 100' and the second line was sampled at 50', 100', and 125'. Thistles within a 5' radius of the location were counted and blossoms per plant as well as plant length were recorded. Results are (please note this is only one year of the study) summarized in the chart above. Vince Crary is an Educator with the University of Minnesota Extension Service in the Ag Production Systems - Dairy area serving the West Central District that includes Big Stone and Traverse Counties. WANT ADS BRING QUICK RESULTS! I iFl for O test drive today! 197 2911 U.s. 12 MN 56278 #25623 Effects of Donkey Grazing on Plumeless Thistle Chad Moyer Farm- 200" 35- 30- I '25 20 15 10 5 0 Plant Height (inches) Plant heiqht 30 vs 27 inches Seed heads/plant 15vs 4 lity New & Used Autos of cars, trucks and SUVs for you to choose from! TONY MOSEY - SALES Seed Heads (per plant) I-1 Beef Cows II Donkey + Beef Cows ( Check out our web site at www.ortonviUeindependent.com ) i Graceville HealthCenter 115 West Second Street - Graceville, MN - Phone (320) 748-7223 Business Office Hours: Monday - Friday 8:00 am. - 4:30 p.m. dHOly Trinity Hospital Grace Home CUntoa- Center F Phone: (320)748-7223 Phone: (320)748-7261 Phone: 320-325-5414 1 Dr. Arthur VanVranken A 60 bed long Long- term care facility | une Zimmerman, RN, CNP term care facility located in Clinton [ located across the street from e Health Center 1 I Kathi Kremer, RN CNP Holy Trinity Hospital Hmlle lleldth ] Gracevgle Health Center Clinic I-Iottrs MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY 9am-spin ][ 9am-3pm. Dr. VanVrankan |[ Dr VanVrartken I[ Dr. VanVranken RN, CNP RN, CNP lp, m-Spm ,|l veLm.-]zron iz Cloud June RN, CNP June Zmnmn RN, CNP CIo,l Kathi Krsmer Kathi Kremer RN. CNP RN, CNP THURSDAY FRIDAY June Zrcr'n, Dr. VanVranken FIN, CNP lsm . 19 NY II 'm'mlI'--RN, oNP II Ckod Cbsed li ,lam,p00 II ,00.m,om Kathi Kremer Kathi Kremer 8:30 a.m- 5:00 p.ml, RN, CNP RN, CNP Effective October 23, 2003 Welcome Kathi Krerner, R.N.C.N.P. Graceville Health Center announces that Kathi Kremer and the Family Healthcare in Wheaton are now associated with their facility. Kathi has been operating the Family Healthcare Clinic in Wheaton since 1998. She received her Masters Degree as Nurse Practitioner from the University of Minnesota in 1997. As a Nurse Practitioner, she specializes in preventive medicine, wellness and health education. Kathi will see patients at Family Healthcare Clinic in Wheaton. Kathi's staff includes: Clinic Manager, Julie Ernst, Rose Lubben, LPN and Paula Baxter, LPN. Kathi Kremer, MSN, RN, CS, FNP Appointments can be made with Kill;hi Kremer,:CFNP Mon., Tues., Thurs. Er Fri. OFFICE HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 8:0 .m.-5" . , 28, 2003 INDEPENDENT Page 5 00old days in the Ortonville area -.:+H: ...... ::f ..,.,.. DOWN MEMORY'S LANE From the Files of The Ortonville Independent THESE FACES? At left is the late Pastor Harold Ward (First English Lutheran Church), in s Dr. Robert Yaeger, Optometrist here for many years, now retired and still living here, and at right Zimmerman, long-time cashier at Tri-County State Bank (later CenBank). 10 YEARS AGO Nov. 2, 1993 Construction Co. !ng 100 years in the business. A spe- is included in this Wil Hansen has minister of the ;ational church in 'ille and the Milbank Wee has been cho- be the new hospital after serving as hospital administrator finance. oys Scouts will col- for the food shelf this morning. res Furniture is 10 years in business This cohunn sponsored il1 part by ORTONVlLLE STONE Ortonville, MN 320-839-6163 For All Yore" Rock Needs! 25 YEARS AGO Oct. 25, 1978 Independent publish- last Saturday that these days tight when they to attend the whirl of Pres. Carter and vice president, Mondale. One of the area's better corn crops in recent years and nice weather has made a run on the local elevators. Harvey Kidman Jr. was honored recently by being pre- sented with the highest award given by the Jaycee organiza- tion, the Jaycee International Senatorship award. Lisa Sis, a fifth grader at the Ortonville school, was the winner of the poster contest for the Ortonville Firemen. A girl was born to Mr. and Mrs. Richard Carlin of Milbank at the Ortonville Hospital. 50 YEARS AGO Nov. 12, 1953 The junior class will pre- sent the play "Hillbilly Weddin"" next Tuesday. Members of the cast include Jacqueline Hahn, Joan Kamin, Charles Blink, Janet Gustafson, Jerry Loy and Dennis Sigloh. The school board unani- mously decided to name the new school building the James Knoll Elementary School after the long time janitor at the school. M.W. Brown of the Northwestern Bell Telephone Co. announced a $30,000. expansion here. Ardell Agre and Arlen LaCombe were united in mar- riage Nov. 8 at Our Savior's Lutheran Church in Montevideo. The following births were recorded at the Ortonville Hospital: a girl to Mr. and Mrs. Albert Redfield of Clinton, a boy to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wittnebel of Nassau, a boy to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Onken of Marietta and a girl to Mr. and Mrs. Frances Boogaard of Ortonville. 70 YEARS AGO Oct. 19, 1933 "The Ortonic" is the name that was selected this week to be the name of the school newspaper. Elsie Shau sug- gested the name in the contest which was held. Marlene Kiernat is far in the lead in the opening day of the Baby popularity contest. Verna Lou Kahler and Cyrus Martinson were united in marriage Oct. 14 at Morris. Eleven young men and women from Big Stone County are enrolled in school at the West Central School of Agriculture. Meta Schwarze and John Noess were wed Thursday at the Trinity Lutheran parson- age. by Rev. Wm. Hartman. Mayor A.H. Sturges announced this week he will not be a candidate for that office after serving two terms. Extension report Colleen Gengler Regional Relations Specialist, Regional Extension Educator County Extension Office Slayton, MN 507 836-6927 PUTTING FAMILY FIRST One of the common complaints I hear from families is being "too busy." Families with school age children have church, school, work and community activities going on. Add it up and there isn't much time for the important institution of the family. The over-scheduled nature of today's family can happen gradually. A parent of a young child hears about a class and signs up. Their spouse commits to something in the community. The church begins a new faith campaign. Before you know it, the family has a "famine of time." These are all good things, but families need to sort out what is most important and what fits limited family resources of time and money. Dr. William Doherty, University of Minnesota faculty member and founder of an effort called "Putting Family First" suggests answering the true-false questions below. These help put dissatisfaction into words the entire family can talk about. Jot down your responses because there is a "scoring" system. 1. We struggle to find time for unhurried family meals. 2. I think we spend too much time getting to and from our children's activities 3. Homework can be difficult to squeeze into the children's schedules. 4. My kids don't have enough time to hang out and entertain themselves. 5. I wish we spent more time home as a family. 6. It is hard to visit with relatives and family friends because we are so busy. 7. We don't go on family trips and outings as much as we would like. 8. Even on weekends it can be hard to get the whole family together because of everyone's schedules. To score, give yourself one point for each true item. If you have six to eight, you probably have a famine of time. If your total is three to five "true" responses, you are a somewhere in between. If your total is two or under, feel good about achieving the goal of family time together. There is no one way for families to decide how they can spend more time together. Every family has their own set of values and priorities. The questions to ask: do you value family time? and is it a priority'? Dr. Doherty says start small. For example, if you don't have many family meals together, start with one or two a week where everyone is committed to being there. Make dining time pleasant. It should not be a time for discipline issues. Think of what your family wants to talk about. Get back into the art of conversation and discussion. Unfortunately some families have gotten to the point that logistics concerning getting to the next activity is the main focus of family conversation. Put family time first. It is one of the most beneficial things you will ever do for your family. Source: Dr. William Doherty for Family Information Services, Minneapolis, MN 2003. Reprinted with permission. Colleen Gengler is a Family Relations Specialist with the University of Minnesota Extension Service. report Vince Crary Extension Educator, Livestock PO Box 250 ..... ' "  56567-0250 385 -3086 of Donkey Grazing Holen, IPM Specialist Search and Outreach and I worked with i: ::: :il trial. Region Partnership by Executive tron Rezac Andersen, for our research. by Dr. Sedivec, the with for the trial into 3 acre paddocks cow/calf pairs and 2 that were grazed by cow/calf pair. t, Dr. Bobby Holder, Soil Scientist from Crookston, Doug Holen, Extension Educator and I divided and flagged both pastures belonging to Chad Moyer of Wadena a;rt  of Vergas, Minnesota. The Moyer and Lahr families did all the fencing and installed water systems on both trial pastures. The Lahr pastures had been sprayed in the fall of 2002 so there were few bolted thistles in 2003. The pasture contains a lot of rosettes and will be part of 2004 research. The chart is from counts done on the Moyer pasture. As suggested by NDSU Specialists, tram lines were laid out in each pasture and counts were done along these lines. Each pasture was sampled in 3 areas and each area had two tram lines. The first line was sampled at 50' and 100' and the second line was sampled at 50', 100', and 125'. Thistles within a 5' radius of the location were counted and blossoms per plant as well as plant length were recorded. Results are (please note this is only one year of the study) summarized in the chart above. Vince Crary is an Educator with the University of Minnesota Extension Service in the Ag Production Systems - Dairy area serving the West Central District that includes Big Stone and Traverse Counties. WANT ADS BRING QUICK RESULTS! I iFl for O test drive today! 197 2911 U.s. 12 MN 56278 #25623 Effects of Donkey Grazing on Plumeless Thistle Chad Moyer Farm- 200" 35- 30- I '25 20 15 10 5 0 Plant Height (inches) Plant heiqht 30 vs 27 inches Seed heads/plant 15vs 4 lity New & Used Autos of cars, trucks and SUVs for you to choose from! TONY MOSEY - SALES Seed Heads (per plant) I-1 Beef Cows II Donkey + Beef Cows ( Check out our web site at www.ortonviUeindependent.com ) i Graceville HealthCenter 115 West Second Street - Graceville, MN - Phone (320) 748-7223 Business Office Hours: Monday - Friday 8:00 am. - 4:30 p.m. dHOly Trinity Hospital Grace Home CUntoa- Center F Phone: (320)748-7223 Phone: (320)748-7261 Phone: 320-325-5414 1 Dr. Arthur VanVranken A 60 bed long Long- term care facility | une Zimmerman, RN, CNP term care facility located in Clinton [ located across the street from e Health Center 1 I Kathi Kremer, RN CNP Holy Trinity Hospital Hmlle lleldth ] Gracevgle Health Center Clinic I-Iottrs MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY 9am-spin ][ 9am-3pm. Dr. VanVrankan |[ Dr VanVrartken I[ Dr. VanVranken RN, CNP RN, CNP lp, m-Spm ,|l veLm.-]zron iz Cloud June RN, CNP June Zmnmn RN, CNP CIo,l Kathi Krsmer Kathi Kremer RN. CNP RN, CNP THURSDAY FRIDAY June Zrcr'n, Dr. VanVranken FIN, CNP lsm . 19 NY II 'm'mlI'--RN, oNP II Ckod Cbsed li ,lam,p00 II ,00.m,om Kathi Kremer Kathi Kremer 8:30 a.m- 5:00 p.ml, RN, CNP RN, CNP Effective October 23, 2003 Welcome Kathi Krerner, R.N.C.N.P. Graceville Health Center announces that Kathi Kremer and the Family Healthcare in Wheaton are now associated with their facility. Kathi has been operating the Family Healthcare Clinic in Wheaton since 1998. She received her Masters Degree as Nurse Practitioner from the University of Minnesota in 1997. As a Nurse Practitioner, she specializes in preventive medicine, wellness and health education. Kathi will see patients at Family Healthcare Clinic in Wheaton. Kathi's staff includes: Clinic Manager, Julie Ernst, Rose Lubben, LPN and Paula Baxter, LPN. Kathi Kremer, MSN, RN, CS, FNP Appointments can be made with Kill;hi Kremer,:CFNP Mon., Tues., Thurs. Er Fri. OFFICE HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 8:0 .m.-5" . , 28, 2003 INDEPENDENT Page 5