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The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
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November 1, 2011     The Ortonville Independent
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November 1, 2011
 

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ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT was one of the participating businesses that handed out candy to trick and treaters last Friday m downtown Or- tonville. Shown above is Emilee Okeson handing out candy to a little "trick and treater". TRICK AND TREATERS were out in full force on Ortonville's Main Street on Friday, Oct. 28. Shown above are a few of the trick and treaters as they made their way through town. Bowling Monday Nite - 10/17/2011 Won Lost Ortonville Independent ........... .21 3 Otrey Lake ................................ 16 8 Moose Lodge ............................. 14 10 Larry's Refrigeration ............... 11 13 Pro Image Partners ............... 10 14 Precission Glass ........................ 10 14 Minnwest Bank ......................... .8 16 Bye ............................................. .6 18 HTSG: Pro Image Partners- 956; HTSS: Pro Image Partners- 2566; HTHG: Pro Image Partners- 1155; HTHS: Ortonville Independent - 3205; HISG: Jared Heck- 255; HISS: Art Vollmer- 629. Friday Nite - 10/21/2011 Won Lost M.S Construction ..................... 13 7 Peterson Chiropractic ............. 11.5 8.5 C.H.S .......................................... 11 9 Team 2 ...................................... .9.5 10.5 Alley Cats ................................. 8 12 Team 6 ....................................... .7 13 HTSG: Peterson Chiropractic- 512; HTSS: Peterson Chiropractic. 1490; HTHG: Team 6- 715; HTHS: Team 6 - 1999; HISG: Eric Montzka- 236; HISS: Eric Montzka- 592. THURSDAY SPARKLERS-10/27/ll Won Lost Beilingham Elevator ............... 222 10 Moose ......................................... 19 13 SMAC Enterprises ................... 17 15 RJB Trucking ............................ 16 16 Alley Cats .................................. 12 20 Wanna B's ................................. 10 21 HISG: Jeanne Cloos- 201; HIHG: Can- dice Henningson- 224; HISS: Adrienne Stattelman-554;HIHS: Jennifer Hen- rich-615; HTSG: SMAC Enterprises- 617; HTHG: Wanna B's- 778; HTSS: SMAC Enterprises-1716; HTHS: Wanna B's-2225. CLICKIT OR TICKET Experts, advocates looking to end factory farming Consume r, environmental and ani- mal-welfare activists are converging in Virginia this week, with a mission to end so-called "factory farming." The food industry has changed dra- matically in the past few decades. Thousands of family farms that once dotted the landscape in Minnesota are no longer there, and most of our food is produced by a handful of multinational corporations. A number of reports and experts say human and animal health and the environment are suffering as a result. The reasons and solutions were discussed at the first National Confer- ence to End Factory Farming, which was held last week in Arlington, Va. Gene Bauer, president and co- founder of Farm Sanctuary, helped or ganize the event and hopes lawmakers will attend. "Unfortunately, Washington, D.C., has supported industrialized animal farming, and that's what the problem stems from - where we have billions of dollars that are spent to support and allow these industrial factory farms to profit." Wenonah Hauter, executive director of Food and Water Watch and one of the conference presenters, says most food isn't as safe as it once was because of factory farming. She describes it as animals crammed by the thousands into small, filthy environments and fed antibiotics indiscriminately so they don't get sick. The meat industry, Hauter says, is so powerful that it is able to influence regulations. "When you have these large compa- nies in charge, there's just more eco- nomic and political power to not have our federal agencies be as protective as they should be. We need to hold our elected officials accountable for their role in making sure that we have a safe food system." It's critical, Bauer says, that federal farm policy start promoting different kinds of agriculture, such as family farms and community-based agricul- ture. More than 30 experts from around the nation - including Whole Foods chief executive officer John Mackey, authors and environmental and animal- welfare advocates - spoke at the con- ference. More information is online at factoryfarmingconference.org. Farm Management The World of Seven Billion, By Gene Kuntz, Farm Business Man- agement Insructor, Faribault I've been reading more than one ar- ticle in the past several months focus- ing on the world's population reaching seven billion this year. If you give it some thought it has huge implications for our industry. What I find interest- ing is that the each article questions how can we feed the world with our limited amount of arable acres and water currently available to all of us. The reality is that neither of these two world resources will significantly change in the future, in fact they will decrease. This is the underlying reason there is a fundamental bullish attitude  supporting our industry currently and in the long term. That fundamental bullish attitude has caught the attention of outside in- vestors and supporters of our industry. We will pay more for our inputs to make food. Leading the way is equip- ment (power and machinery) with a projected 17 percent increase in cost for the year. Farmland is second with a pro- jected increase of 15 percent. We will have an increased cost of production for the 2011 and 2012 crop. How much per acre, how much per bushel, how much per farm? Can you answer those ques- tions? Do you really know? Are you prepared to make a reasonable bid on some farm land to purchase or rent and know how far you can go? I am sure you 'all have heard of the rapid rise in land costs in the past sev- eral months. Several pieces of farm- land in Minnesota have sold for over $8,000 per acre. We have also wit- nessed initial cash rents of over $425 per acre for the 2012 crop. Amazing! Amazing, yes but again it is reality. As stated earlier you will now have to con- tend with outside investors in the farm- land market, not just your neighbor. Can you do it? Do you want to do it? Speaking of your neighbor, how about livestock producers? How are they fitting into this fundamental bull- ish attitude surrounding grain produc- tion? Hog producers are finally getting some breathing room in recent months with finishing hogs in the $90 per CWT range. Dairy producers are operating on just a dollar per CWT margin for the past nine months. Poultry producers are struggling as well. What we must keep in mind is that $7 corn and $13 soybeans might be a bonanza for grain producers, but it's very challenging for the livestock industry in this state. It is simply amazing how the hog and dairy producers have rapidly changed rations to significantly reduce their corn and soybean meal needs. What are they switching to? Well leading the list is dried distillers grain, corn gluten meal, canola meal, and beet pulp. What skills will it take for any farmer to compete in this industry in the next few years? I believe most would agree that identifying your cost of pro- duction is an important skill to have. What does it cost you to produce a bushel of com or soybeans, a 100 CWT of milk, a 100 CWT of hogs. Do you know? Can you accurately calculate it? If you are student enrolled in a Farm Business Management (FBM) program you should know and you can calculate it. With the assistance of your FBM in- structor you calculate it every year through the enterprise analysis, and in some cases you calculate it on a quar- terly basis. For more information, contact a Farm Business Management Instructor, or visit our website: www.fbm.nmscu.edu Y OF CHE:VROLET 100 YEARS AND STILL CRUISIN" Tuesday, Nov. 1,2011 INDEPENDENT Page 9  , ,&'llJlltlliillliI ] ] 1,1 I]11 .... ] : l, l]llil'llllllll ,11 llltlllllHt iliill:l, llllllll?id'[llIi:]llllllrllEIBltlli]:; llllllliHi! lii[1,1 ]tt iit ill ill l';lFl:!lll!l ]ltlirl 'limmllllm00