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November 3, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
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PAGE 2 COMMUNITY WORK OF RED CROSS ellpiers Show Splendid Work Soldier Work and Health. Red Cross membership in the 91 (Napters here in Minnesota shows total of 110,278. The strength of this enrollment proves the value of the rviee which the various Chapters are rendering in various sections of the state. With the opening of the Fifth An- nual Roll Call---on Armistice day--the work which these Chapters have been carrying on is of special interst to the membership, past. present, and fu- ture. First in importance are the ac- tivities in behalf of ex-soldiers. During the past year $144,000 has been expended by Minnesota Chapters in this work. Ex-service men to the number of 22.324, have been assisted hi obtaining hospital treatment, voca- tional education, and in securing addl- tinnal compensation and allotment from the government The majority of these men are the heads of fam- Uies. Many of them have developed rious disabilities which have unfit- ted them for earning living. The American Red Cross is expend- tug nationally $10,000,000 year to hip ex-service men and their families, Tlhhl work includes the same type of rvlce as that rendered by the local Chapters here in Minnesota. Other activities of the Red Cross along health lines are supplying s vi- tal service in the different communi- ties. During the past year, 106 public hlth nurses have been employed by Cross Chapters in this state. The 1retire enrollment of Red Cross nurses from Minnesota is 1,210. In case of necessity these nurses are equipped according to Red Cross standards for rvio in war or emergency. Great interest has been shown in the health wogramecially the instruction tu Home Hygiene and Care of the melt. Women to the number of 8,610 have ceived certificates from the 2,55 elates held in every section through- out the state. In the northern sec- tion, among the sparsely settled dis- triers, where railroads are few, many Women have walked miles to attend these clasH Instructors and public health nurses frequently cover miles territory on foot to reach these Glasses and the schools A number of Life-Saving lassu Imve been conducted throughout the ate. Seventy-three persons have passed the Red Cross examination and are members of the Life-Saving Corps. The Junior Red Cross program in Minnesota has created much interest ]hroughout the Central Division, of which this state is member. In the "l am school year there were 2,196 Ju- Icier &uxlliaries enrolled with a mem- bership of 126,196 children. Every person in the state will have an opportunity to support the Red Cross program and assist the Chapters tu carrying on this work by renewing their membership during the Roll Call, which opens on Armistice day and continues until Thanksgiving. Memberships will enable each of the $1 Chapters to carry on its commu- aity service and increase its useful- DOSE. JUNIOR RED CROSS AID8 CITI. ZENaHIP IN MINNESOTA. Boys and girls of today who are to be the men and women of tomorrow are learning the value of good citizen- ship, not only in their own communi- ties but throughout the world. This shown by the 126,196 members en- rolled in the 2,196 Junior auxiliaries of the American Red Cross here in this state. One of the most active centers of Junior work here in Minnesota last year was Luvern, where 50 classes in civics were taught, and also 75 dtffer mt groups were given instruction in :Home Hygiene and Care of the Sick _and 1first Aid. In Caledonia 25 civic es were conducted, toys made for freer ehndren and five First Aid class, conducted. All of the Junior funds in Minneap- olis So toward helping the work of the Michael Doviing School for Cripr ]fled Children in that city. Many chll- dreo are thus assisted to get an ed- lwatlon who wonld otherw/se be "shut in" throughout their lives. These are JuSt a few of the many Jmador aetivltlse In the IKate which 'e tim -'actteai "carryhi$ ot" of tlHI scpnilmflo4a'S ttte--uWe Serve," FAMINE WOULD WIPE OUT ENTIRE COUNTY Near East Tragedy, If In Minnesota, Would Destroy Fifth Of State Population. Wipe out the whole population of Big Stone county by slow starvation, wreck and burn every farmhouse and strip the state of livestock and even seed grain--and Minnesota might be able to realize the horror of famine conditions in southern Russia and Ar- menia. That is the message being sent out by the Near East Relief Committee in Minnesota to the farmers who are helping to gather 147,000 bushels of grain to save the lives of 1300 wom- en and children dependent on the state fcr their lives. If the plea for grain fails, these helpless refugees will per- ish of hunger this winter in Armenia, South Russia and the Holy Land, the message says. The report of actual famine condi- tions in the Near East was brought to Minnesota by two American relief workers who have just returned from Asia Minor and the Russian Caucasus. They came to attend a state confer- ence of clergymen and representatives of women's organizations, called to plead for more help for the famine victims. "At least 400,000 men and women will die of hunger in the Near Ea, this winter in spite of all we can do," Dr. W. E. Doughty, one of the work- ers, said. "That is nearly one-fifth of the whole population of Minnesota, and 20 times the population of the average Minnesota county." When Can Corn Be Used Profitably for Fuel? t The advisability of burning corn for I fuel depends upon so many things / that no hard and fast rule can be] ]aid down to meet conditions in all lo- calities. In Iowa, where large quanti- ties of coal are mined and can be de- livered without long hauls, state col- lege inve,tigators say that nothing is to be gained by burning corn for fuel. But Prof. E. A. Stewart, of the agri- cultural physics section of the Univer- sity of Minnesota, believes that with the price of corn at 25 cents and less a bushel, and when it requires from 70 to 80 pounds of corn on the cob to make a bushel, some farmers can bet- ter afford to burn their corn than to market it. "When corn is used for burning," he says, "it gives between 5,600 and 6.000 British thermal units'of heat a pound, while coal gives 10,000 to 13,000 B. T. U. for each pound. Ac- cording to that it would require two tons of corn on the cob to give as as nmch heat as one ton of coal. Coal price*s now range from one-half to one cent pound. Corn at one-fourth cent a pound might profitably be used for fuel." Corn, however, Professor Stewart emphasizes, has some speculative val- ue which may be higher than 20 cents a bushel, whereas coat has none. If corn must be sold because of lack of storage capacity or lack of funds, and coal must be bought, it is better to bm,a corn, with its price at 25 cents a bushel or less, than coal at the pre- vailing prices of coal, he says. The cost of hauling the corn to town and taking the coal back must be con,Id- ered ,he explains, in deciding what to do. "The man who has wood to cut should never burn corn, Professor Stewart says. "Labor on the farm is :oo cheap to make this profitable." A fortified watermelon patch near Parker, South Dakota, is believed to be the only one of its kind in the U. S. Armed guards patrol the patch. ssisted in their work by a powerful earchlight, which has been installed on an elevation. The searchlight ray: .hoot in every direction continually thruout the night. " "An Lmar-- d when I kissed her l .melled tobacco on her lips." John"You object to kissing a woman who smokes?" Einar--"No, but she doesn't smoke.' TIE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT Walked 5,710 Miles While Lugging Water In carrying water--2,000 tons of it --from the well to her home, a farm wife in Ohio trudged 5,710 miles in 50 years, say rural engineers of the Ohio State University. For a full half century this farm wife had been mak- i ing an average of six trips a day, sometimes lugging a bucket of water weighing 30 pounds, and sometimes two buckets. The engineers found that by laying $19 worth of lead pipe and moving the old pump up from the well to within the kitchen, run- ning water could be supplied the farm home, and the lot of this particular farm woman materially lightened. Running water can be piped into thou- sands of Minnesota farm homes at l comparatively little expense, say agri- cultural engineering division men or University Farm .'Why not consult them ? HOW TO PLAN THE KITCHEN A Well-Planned Kitchen Should Meet Requirements of Well-Arranged Workshop. A kitchen conveniently planned and equipped, having good lighting and ventilation, saves time and labor for the housekeeper. It contributes to the health and contentment of the 1 whole family. Circular 189, The Well- Planned Kitchen. just issued by the United States Department of Agri- cultur% discusses the points which are essential in making work-room. To remodel an old kitchen is often a difficult problem, but even minor improvements, such as refinishing walls, woodwork, and floor attractive- y or adjusting the table and sink to a comfortable working height, reduce drudgery and save energy. It is best, if possible, to use the kit- chen only as a place for preparing food. If the laundry, wash room, and general storage room are located elsewhere nearby, it is more sanitary. A dining alcove partitioned off the kitchen is recommended in many cases to save steps. A small kitchen about 9x12 is generally considered most con- venient. The location of the kithen with re- spect to other rooms, the outlook from its windows, and the placing of doors anti indows are points to be well considered. A trim back yard with walks helps to keep the kitchen clean. A kitchen should be well ventilated in winter as well as in summer with dos transoms and ventilating window screens. The sink, stove, worktab:e, and other important parts of the kit- chen should be well lighted and the floor easy to keep clean. Running wa- ter is desirable, both hot and col(L Windows and doors shouldbe screened against flies. The proper grouping of sink, stove, md worktable to save steps is .very important. All permanent equipment should be substantial and easy to keep in order. An abundance of cupboard ad shelf room, well planned, helps rderly storage of utensils and sup- plies. Grouping articles which are used together saves time. A rest cor- ner is recommended. The kitchen as a whole should meet the standards of a convenient well-arranged workshop. Circular 189 is free upon application to the United States Department of Agriculture., Mrs. Gottawad was showing Hilda, the Swedish maid, over the house, mad explaining her duties. "This," she said, "is my son's room..But he iu not at home now. He is in Yale." "Yah?" Hilda's face lit up with sympathetic understanding. "My brud- de ban there, too." "It that so? What year?" "Ach, he not ban there year. Da Yudge just nay, 'You Axe, sixty days in yale." Autumn blossoms on several fruit trees near Omaha and Council Bluffs, Iowa, present a strange sight. The early spring frosts, with the drouth' that followed, then excessive rain and hot weather, caused the fruit trees tn blossom it is believed. MONUMENTS DAIRY MARKETING UNIT COMPLETED Co-operative Creameries In Counties Ready For Can- solidated Shipping. Five Officers of the 230 co-operative creameries in 59 counties which have joined the Minnesota Co-operative Creameries association, Inc., are be- ing notified by their state marketing and service organization that the first district unit of the association is ready for active work. It is completely or- ganized for standardizing the pro- ducts of all members creameries, for shipping in carload lots and buying supplies at wholesale. The marketing unit, known as Dis- trict No. 2, is composed of 32 of the 38 co-operative creameries in Chisago, Pine, Isanti, Kanabec and Mille Lacs counties. A district manager is being selected to help standardize the but- ter made at the various creameries, so that they can only obtain lower freight rates by shipping in carlots, but also obtain the highest possible prices on the eastern markets for all the butter produced in the five coun- ties. Nearly 250 co-operative creameries have joined the state association, ac- cording to records of the Minnesota Farm Bureau federation. They will be formed into district marketing units as rapidly as possible. Co-oper- ative creameries of Meeker, Wright and Kandyohi counties which are working together in standardizing their pr, oduct and s]ipping in carlots have voted to join the state organiza- tion, according to A. J. McGuire, man- ager. A Scotch woman had much trouble with her gardeners. She souhl not find one who was capable of keeping sober. She appealed to her brother, who promised to do his best to help her. At last he announced that he had found just the man she needed. "I'll only ask one question," said his sister. "Is he a teetotaler?" "Well," said James, deliberately, "H,e' no juist what ye'd ca' a teeto- taler, but he's a men ye canna fill." MICKIE SAYS CoP,{ G "aS. G.:," Fkt.',./ JOL)RI4b, L  V4tq k -4 V, EO No Work is to intricate for us to handle when it comes to Machine Re- pairing. We have the equipment to handle this work promptly and efficiently. Send [0r our Designs See Our Prices Before Buyio00 Bring It In A. S. HALLS Ortonville THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1 A politeness contest has been or- Poets, they say, arc born, ganized by a Paris newspaper. Five lmade. We are alvays trying thousand francs weekly for six weeks t our sns on tie shoulders of th will be paid to the most polite persons I tor. in france. Chauffeurs and horse cab- 1 -- drivers, telephone operators, employee I --Have those Xmas PhotOS of the postoffice, railways and other tnow , at our studio. We give transport services, department stores tuine leather easle case free and policemen will be included in the [ order for a dozen or more category. I Reed Studio, Ortonville. (}00T000VII[[ MONUM[flI WORKS JOtINSON & LINDHOM, Props. We're not selling prices we re selling the best clothes that are made F YOU appreciate fine quality, fine style and ex- pert needlework in clothes; if you understand the econ- omy in good quality, you'll come to this store for Hart Schaffner Marx clothes don't want you tO come on any other basis Grosenick's Hart Schaffner & Marx clothes Pay Day and tlte Savi00gs Accoqrff, YOUR financial dance is assured you will set from each pa ............... check a certai amount for the ings account. It is the which started t b World's fortunes of todaY' It is the only that has no of failure. It is the only you cannot to ignore. The start Bank are im to you. llllmiliilHilHiliiullii$ll O II ll-ver-au"ng Take your ear to Wm. Overhauling or Repair Work. be in competent hands and the will be right. Manufacturers and Quarriers of the famous Mahogany Granite WM. CUMMENS, Ortonvl Agency for CHEVROLET CARS PAGE 2 COMMUNITY WORK OF RED CROSS ellpiers Show Splendid Work Soldier Work and Health. Red Cross membership in the 91 (Napters here in Minnesota shows total of 110,278. The strength of this enrollment proves the value of the rviee which the various Chapters are rendering in various sections of the state. With the opening of the Fifth An- nual Roll Call---on Armistice day--the work which these Chapters have been carrying on is of special interst to the membership, past. present, and fu- ture. First in importance are the ac- tivities in behalf of ex-soldiers. During the past year $144,000 has been expended by Minnesota Chapters in this work. Ex-service men to the number of 22.324, have been assisted hi obtaining hospital treatment, voca- tional education, and in securing addl- tinnal compensation and allotment from the government The majority of these men are the heads of fam- Uies. Many of them have developed rious disabilities which have unfit- ted them for earning living. The American Red Cross is expend- tug nationally $10,000,000 year to hip ex-service men and their families, Tlhhl work includes the same type of rvlce as that rendered by the local Chapters here in Minnesota. Other activities of the Red Cross along health lines are supplying s vi- tal service in the different communi- ties. During the past year, 106 public hlth nurses have been employed by Cross Chapters in this state. The 1retire enrollment of Red Cross nurses from Minnesota is 1,210. In case of necessity these nurses are equipped according to Red Cross standards for rvio in war or emergency. Great interest has been shown in the health wogramecially the instruction tu Home Hygiene and Care of the melt. Women to the number of 8,610 have ceived certificates from the 2,55 elates held in every section through- out the state. In the northern sec- tion, among the sparsely settled dis- triers, where railroads are few, many Women have walked miles to attend these clasH Instructors and public health nurses frequently cover miles territory on foot to reach these Glasses and the schools A number of Life-Saving lassu Imve been conducted throughout the ate. Seventy-three persons have passed the Red Cross examination and are members of the Life-Saving Corps. The Junior Red Cross program in Minnesota has created much interest ]hroughout the Central Division, of which this state is member. In the "l am school year there were 2,196 Ju- Icier &uxlliaries enrolled with a mem- bership of 126,196 children. Every person in the state will have an opportunity to support the Red Cross program and assist the Chapters tu carrying on this work by renewing their membership during the Roll Call, which opens on Armistice day and continues until Thanksgiving. Memberships will enable each of the $1 Chapters to carry on its commu- aity service and increase its useful- DOSE. JUNIOR RED CROSS AID8 CITI. ZENaHIP IN MINNESOTA. Boys and girls of today who are to be the men and women of tomorrow are learning the value of good citizen- ship, not only in their own communi- ties but throughout the world. This shown by the 126,196 members en- rolled in the 2,196 Junior auxiliaries of the American Red Cross here in this state. One of the most active centers of Junior work here in Minnesota last year was Luvern, where 50 classes in civics were taught, and also 75 dtffer mt groups were given instruction in :Home Hygiene and Care of the Sick _and 1first Aid. In Caledonia 25 civic es were conducted, toys made for freer ehndren and five First Aid class, conducted. All of the Junior funds in Minneap- olis So toward helping the work of the Michael Doviing School for Cripr ]fled Children in that city. Many chll- dreo are thus assisted to get an ed- lwatlon who wonld otherw/se be "shut in" throughout their lives. These are JuSt a few of the many Jmador aetivltlse In the IKate which 'e tim -'actteai "carryhi$ ot" of tlHI scpnilmflo4a'S ttte--uWe Serve," FAMINE WOULD WIPE OUT ENTIRE COUNTY Near East Tragedy, If In Minnesota, Would Destroy Fifth Of State Population. Wipe out the whole population of Big Stone county by slow starvation, wreck and burn every farmhouse and strip the state of livestock and even seed grain--and Minnesota might be able to realize the horror of famine conditions in southern Russia and Ar- menia. That is the message being sent out by the Near East Relief Committee in Minnesota to the farmers who are helping to gather 147,000 bushels of grain to save the lives of 1300 wom- en and children dependent on the state fcr their lives. If the plea for grain fails, these helpless refugees will per- ish of hunger this winter in Armenia, South Russia and the Holy Land, the message says. The report of actual famine condi- tions in the Near East was brought to Minnesota by two American relief workers who have just returned from Asia Minor and the Russian Caucasus. They came to attend a state confer- ence of clergymen and representatives of women's organizations, called to plead for more help for the famine victims. "At least 400,000 men and women will die of hunger in the Near Ea, this winter in spite of all we can do," Dr. W. E. Doughty, one of the work- ers, said. "That is nearly one-fifth of the whole population of Minnesota, and 20 times the population of the average Minnesota county." When Can Corn Be Used Profitably for Fuel? t The advisability of burning corn for I fuel depends upon so many things / that no hard and fast rule can be] ]aid down to meet conditions in all lo- calities. In Iowa, where large quanti- ties of coal are mined and can be de- livered without long hauls, state col- lege inve,tigators say that nothing is to be gained by burning corn for fuel. But Prof. E. A. Stewart, of the agri- cultural physics section of the Univer- sity of Minnesota, believes that with the price of corn at 25 cents and less a bushel, and when it requires from 70 to 80 pounds of corn on the cob to make a bushel, some farmers can bet- ter afford to burn their corn than to market it. "When corn is used for burning," he says, "it gives between 5,600 and 6.000 British thermal units'of heat a pound, while coal gives 10,000 to 13,000 B. T. U. for each pound. Ac- cording to that it would require two tons of corn on the cob to give as as nmch heat as one ton of coal. Coal price*s now range from one-half to one cent pound. Corn at one-fourth cent a pound might profitably be used for fuel." Corn, however, Professor Stewart emphasizes, has some speculative val- ue which may be higher than 20 cents a bushel, whereas coat has none. If corn must be sold because of lack of storage capacity or lack of funds, and coal must be bought, it is better to bm,a corn, with its price at 25 cents a bushel or less, than coal at the pre- vailing prices of coal, he says. The cost of hauling the corn to town and taking the coal back must be con,Id- ered ,he explains, in deciding what to do. "The man who has wood to cut should never burn corn, Professor Stewart says. "Labor on the farm is :oo cheap to make this profitable." A fortified watermelon patch near Parker, South Dakota, is believed to be the only one of its kind in the U. S. Armed guards patrol the patch. ssisted in their work by a powerful earchlight, which has been installed on an elevation. The searchlight ray: .hoot in every direction continually thruout the night. " "An Lmar-- d when I kissed her l .melled tobacco on her lips." John"You object to kissing a woman who smokes?" Einar--"No, but she doesn't smoke.' TIE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT Walked 5,710 Miles While Lugging Water In carrying water--2,000 tons of it --from the well to her home, a farm wife in Ohio trudged 5,710 miles in 50 years, say rural engineers of the Ohio State University. For a full half century this farm wife had been mak- i ing an average of six trips a day, sometimes lugging a bucket of water weighing 30 pounds, and sometimes two buckets. The engineers found that by laying $19 worth of lead pipe and moving the old pump up from the well to within the kitchen, run- ning water could be supplied the farm home, and the lot of this particular farm woman materially lightened. Running water can be piped into thou- sands of Minnesota farm homes at l comparatively little expense, say agri- cultural engineering division men or University Farm .'Why not consult them ? HOW TO PLAN THE KITCHEN A Well-Planned Kitchen Should Meet Requirements of Well-Arranged Workshop. A kitchen conveniently planned and equipped, having good lighting and ventilation, saves time and labor for the housekeeper. It contributes to the health and contentment of the 1 whole family. Circular 189, The Well- Planned Kitchen. just issued by the United States Department of Agri- cultur% discusses the points which are essential in making work-room. To remodel an old kitchen is often a difficult problem, but even minor improvements, such as refinishing walls, woodwork, and floor attractive- y or adjusting the table and sink to a comfortable working height, reduce drudgery and save energy. It is best, if possible, to use the kit- chen only as a place for preparing food. If the laundry, wash room, and general storage room are located elsewhere nearby, it is more sanitary. A dining alcove partitioned off the kitchen is recommended in many cases to save steps. A small kitchen about 9x12 is generally considered most con- venient. The location of the kithen with re- spect to other rooms, the outlook from its windows, and the placing of doors anti indows are points to be well considered. A trim back yard with walks helps to keep the kitchen clean. A kitchen should be well ventilated in winter as well as in summer with dos transoms and ventilating window screens. The sink, stove, worktab:e, and other important parts of the kit- chen should be well lighted and the floor easy to keep clean. Running wa- ter is desirable, both hot and col(L Windows and doors shouldbe screened against flies. The proper grouping of sink, stove, md worktable to save steps is .very important. All permanent equipment should be substantial and easy to keep in order. An abundance of cupboard ad shelf room, well planned, helps rderly storage of utensils and sup- plies. Grouping articles which are used together saves time. A rest cor- ner is recommended. The kitchen as a whole should meet the standards of a convenient well-arranged workshop. Circular 189 is free upon application to the United States Department of Agriculture., Mrs. Gottawad was showing Hilda, the Swedish maid, over the house, mad explaining her duties. "This," she said, "is my son's room..But he iu not at home now. He is in Yale." "Yah?" Hilda's face lit up with sympathetic understanding. "My brud- de ban there, too." "It that so? What year?" "Ach, he not ban there year. Da Yudge just nay, 'You Axe, sixty days in yale." Autumn blossoms on several fruit trees near Omaha and Council Bluffs, Iowa, present a strange sight. The early spring frosts, with the drouth' that followed, then excessive rain and hot weather, caused the fruit trees tn blossom it is believed. MONUMENTS DAIRY MARKETING UNIT COMPLETED Co-operative Creameries In Counties Ready For Can- solidated Shipping. Five Officers of the 230 co-operative creameries in 59 counties which have joined the Minnesota Co-operative Creameries association, Inc., are be- ing notified by their state marketing and service organization that the first district unit of the association is ready for active work. It is completely or- ganized for standardizing the pro- ducts of all members creameries, for shipping in carload lots and buying supplies at wholesale. The marketing unit, known as Dis- trict No. 2, is composed of 32 of the 38 co-operative creameries in Chisago, Pine, Isanti, Kanabec and Mille Lacs counties. A district manager is being selected to help standardize the but- ter made at the various creameries, so that they can only obtain lower freight rates by shipping in carlots, but also obtain the highest possible prices on the eastern markets for all the butter produced in the five coun- ties. Nearly 250 co-operative creameries have joined the state association, ac- cording to records of the Minnesota Farm Bureau federation. They will be formed into district marketing units as rapidly as possible. Co-oper- ative creameries of Meeker, Wright and Kandyohi counties which are working together in standardizing their pr, oduct and s]ipping in carlots have voted to join the state organiza- tion, according to A. J. McGuire, man- ager. A Scotch woman had much trouble with her gardeners. She souhl not find one who was capable of keeping sober. She appealed to her brother, who promised to do his best to help her. At last he announced that he had found just the man she needed. "I'll only ask one question," said his sister. "Is he a teetotaler?" "Well," said James, deliberately, "H,e' no juist what ye'd ca' a teeto- taler, but he's a men ye canna fill." MICKIE SAYS CoP,{ G "aS. G.:," Fkt.',./ JOL)RI4b, L  V4tq k -4 V, EO No Work is to intricate for us to handle when it comes to Machine Re- pairing. We have the equipment to handle this work promptly and efficiently. Send [0r our Designs See Our Prices Before Buyio00 Bring It In A. S. HALLS Ortonville THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1 A politeness contest has been or- Poets, they say, arc born, ganized by a Paris newspaper. Five lmade. We are alvays trying thousand francs weekly for six weeks t our sns on tie shoulders of th will be paid to the most polite persons I tor. in france. Chauffeurs and horse cab- 1 -- drivers, telephone operators, employee I --Have those Xmas PhotOS of the postoffice, railways and other tnow , at our studio. We give transport services, department stores tuine leather easle case free and policemen will be included in the [ order for a dozen or more category. I Reed Studio, Ortonville. (}00T000VII[[ MONUM[flI WORKS JOtINSON & LINDHOM, Props. We're not selling prices we re selling the best clothes that are made F YOU appreciate fine quality, fine style and ex- pert needlework in clothes; if you understand the econ- omy in good quality, you'll come to this store for Hart Schaffner Marx clothes don't want you tO come on any other basis Grosenick's Hart Schaffner & Marx clothes Pay Day and tlte Savi00gs Accoqrff, YOUR financial dance is assured you will set from each pa ............... check a certai amount for the ings account. It is the which started t b World's fortunes of todaY' It is the only that has no of failure. It is the only you cannot to ignore. The start Bank are im to you. llllmiliilHilHiliiullii$ll O II ll-ver-au"ng Take your ear to Wm. Overhauling or Repair Work. be in competent hands and the will be right. Manufacturers and Quarriers of the famous Mahogany Granite WM. CUMMENS, Ortonvl Agency for CHEVROLET CARS PAGE2 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT _. FAMINE WOULD WIPE Walked 5,710 Miles DAIRY MARKETING A po"e.ess coast ha+ been or- OUT ENTIRE COUNTY While Lugging Water T -- LE D wmganizedbe paid by atoParisthe mostUewspaper'polite p ..... Five U1N1T COMP TE thousanI francs weekly fur six weeks Big St ......... ly y siuw vtarvati ......... tury this farm mi'e had been oak. Near East Tragedy, If In Minnet In carrying water--2,000 tons of it Co+oerative Creameries In Fir e in france Chauffeurs and home cab- Would Desty Fifth Of --from the well to her home, a fan Courtlea Ready Fur C- drivels telephone operators emplnyes State popularly, wife in Ohio trudged 5310 miles in slidated Shipging" of the postofee, lailways and -- rio years, say oral enaeers of tbe Wipe out the whole popuintion of Ohio State University For a full half Omeers of the 230 co-operative nrcck and barn every farmho e a nd' ing an average of ix trip s a day+ joinedCteame iethe Minnesota59 untie which have Co-operative J strip the state of livemtoek and even lsometime lugging a bucket of eed grain--and Minnesota might be,I weighing 30 ponds, and THURSD.% y, NOVEMBER Poets, the3 aa, our ss on COMMUNITY WORK OF RED CROSS Chapterz Show Splendid W0 S01dier Work and Health. Obspt here In Minnesota lhowl tit of llOTs. e Btnztb ot tll mltmt p*eB the val,e o the  wmeh te vaou Capt tl ertng In vrio$ leetLom$ tate. WLt5 the opentng of the Fifth An+ u] Pn can ork wht rtqng  l o pectal Inlerst to e me.he.hip, p$t, pseat, and  ZlZre. plant m :mport,mm ltlel 1 behaLf  ex-$(dle. Dung t pelt yr 4O00 h th  ire e heall o fam- Bt* MB x Uf tb have deVelOe,d rmqou dtnbILlt d m fur eamlp ll+lns. wk mdde th ame type of rvlee  that redered by the Local ptexl +ro Lo Mane,or. 1el LC L the dJffert )zlJq ttm plt ear, 10(I pnbll bmltb nee have bm emgioye b (o Chltez Ln ts state. mR b nee,  equipped rtee to w nr emerenc. Imrut 1 been ebnw -jWoiP.gm--nJill the toStmctJm tl H* Kvgi d zt.MTed mrtLficat from the trey* amens th* ly tued m leomm b+l walked mt]m to lttmd 1 lvrueto d public ud the ioo nb of Llfnl lm  ndeted thught at sev+t-tbre pens a * ulor Red Czo pmmm m Mtnn h uPet much lnterea tbrqlhnat me Central Dtvistm. of wht th state Is ml. in me boo,hip af 121 chltd. u epportnly t upport te Red mrrol  this work bX renewing lr mbat dme the a, which op* o AXZLLLCO day MmbemhLps will mble jNiOR RID CROII AIDS ZN$HIP IN MINNKTA. be leammg the vole of goo ott- tp, ant oul In 11 +mat thughout the world. ll n the 2,19 Junior et the merlcan Rid Cam hem te th[B atre. e of e morn ,e ete of Jnninr work b 1 were taught, e lgie and care o the sick elw w ductd. o made for l]m end fly#  Aid ela cnuete& ipled CgallL"z L that etT. M8 7 chit- tiou who wld othlrWt b t,, throughout ber llv mt wbleb That is the mesage being sent out by the Near East Relief Committee in Minnesota to the faers who are helging to gather 147,000 bnshel ot grain tu 8ave the lives of 1300 worn en and chldn dependent un the state If the plea for gram fals, these helpless fugees will per ish of hunger thi wtoter In Armenia, Russia and the Holy Land, the The report of ctnal famine ndi- lions in the Near East was bught tc Minnesota by two American lie4 workers whn have just retued fm Asia Mtonr and the ann Caucus The engineers laying $19 worth of lead pipe and moving the old pump up tha well to wtbin the kitehea, n- ning water uld be supplied the farm home, and the lot ot this particutor f wom matertoiiy lightened. Running water can be piped into thuu- sanda uf /nnesot fan homes a comptlvely little expend, say agri- cultural engtorin division men nr University Fm . Why nut eosu/t them? HOW TO PLAN THE KITCHEN A WelI-Planed Kitchen Should Meet Requiments of Well.Arranged They me to attend a state confer- Workshop . eace of clergymen and prentative f meu' organizations, ned toi A kitchen cnnven e+--t y p armed ,lead for more help for the ram eel . eqn pped hay ng good hghtmg d Lctlms, I re.tileion, saves t me and abor or "At least 4O0,OOO men and wnmen I .... d ....................... : h lthkee nPedr" eolttenmntbut s te this inter in spite of a e can dn,"l ea t Dr W E Doughty oneofthe ork whlefamdy" Clreularlg9'TheWell o m o p p ion o n '1 corm e d +eus e the po nts which a and 20 times the population of the . . " a rag mn o c y. I To remodel au old itc e e M  w ount " e+sentlal m making work-room. -- . -- + dimout problem, +t When Can Corn Be Used +m+vn,'en,ents such a+ Profitably for Fuel?l,+aus, +end+or+ -- J y or adjusting the table arid The ath'isability of buxntog corn fOl  comfortable olkin height, ledc fuel depends upon so many things Clludgery and ave eaergy. lhat no hard anti fqi rule :au be It is best. i IYsible, to meet ( ,ndi tons il all 1o- ehen only as a place fur ppartog lu lowv, where Ige quanti- fond general storage room are llved without long hauls, stage eel+ ntary. lege investigators say that nothing i dining alcove prtitioned off the t be gained by humg l for fuel, But Prof. E. A. Stewart. of the agri save steps. A cu urn physlcs senti0 of the Untver- d2 is generalb fity of Mimlesnta, believ that be price of corn at 5 cents an a bushel, and when it requig from 70 to 80 pound of COlm ou piaiug of doors make a bshel, some fannem can bet- and indvws a points to be welt considered, A trim hack yard with ps to keep "When eon is ued for buing,'l A kitchen should be well ventilated in he says, "it gives between 5.6OO aud 6.00 British thena] units'of heat  and ventilating The ink, stove, worktable, pound, hile coal gives 10,000 tu U. for ach pound, Ae real other importaat cording to that it would qui* two ighted and the otm of eol on tile ++6b to give floor easy Co keep clean. Running wa-  mh ht as one ton ff coal. tel is dirabie, both hot and cold. Windows and doo should be se+ne0 pr+eem now nge cent a pound, against flies. ,ouud might profifabl + be uml for The pt+per gruuplng nf sink, stuve, fuel." Corn, however, Professog enphasizes, has some spuhtt]ve val ue which ca: a bashe/, wheas 1 h none. If con1 mut be snid bau o Ik of prage capacity ur lack of funds, and coal must be bought, it is better to bum corn. wth ts vail,,g prs of coal, he says. Thn ct of hauling the corn to tewu and king the coal bak must be eun,ld- ered Je exp]aas, in declding what ta dn. "The man who )*as should never burn corn, Stewart says. too chep tn make this pfitah+e." A fortified wateelon patch ear Parker. South Dakota, s believed t be the unly one of it kind in the U. . Aed guds patI the patch aeisted n their work by a powerful earchllghtl The sea.blight ray hoot in every direction ntinually thruout the .ight+ Ei.ar--"And when 1 kited her ] ps." object ksstog Er--"Na, vd worktable to save steps is very important+ All peauent equipment y to keep An abadee of cupbnard n l shelf om, well planned helps ,derly sorage of uensiJs and sup- plies. Gugiug articles which a used together saves time. her is recommended. The a whnle should meet e s a nore,dent wen-arranged workshop Cular 189 is f upon apptinatior to the United State Department of Agriculture.. Mrs Gnttawad was showing Hild the Swediah maid, over the hoe, d explaining her duti. "This," she sad, '% my son's nm. But he is not He Js in Yale." "Yah?" IIda's fe lit up with g. "My brud- de. ban the, tom" "It that so? What year? " "Ach, he nn ban the ye. Yudge just ay, 'Ynu Axe, sixty days Autumn blossoms nn s near Omaha and Cuundt Bluffs Iowv, psent a trnnge sight. early sprlmg frosts, dth the that fnllowed, then exesi rate and hut weather, i blnssom it is believed. MONUMENTS mm For 0u[ esins e Our Pries Blore m,m00 ORTONIL[[ M000UM[00T WORKS JOtINSON & LINDHOM, Props. Manufacturers a.d Ouarriers d the famous Granite --Have those socintiou. Inc.. are be+ Ing notified by their state marketmg I and service organizatinn that the firstl n + ready It is completely or- ganized for standardizing the pr duets uf all members came, for shipping n uarld Iot and buying wholesale The marketing unit, kuo as Dis- 2, is ompod nf 32 nf the Pine, lsantL Kabee and A distant manager is being help standardt the but+ ter made at the various eameHe, su that they can only obtain lower fight tes by sbpping Jn nhato the ghest possibln prices on the easte market for all thn bnter produced in the five ties. Nearl3 have joined the smte cording tn Fa 1 ur federation. They will be foed intv disHut marketing units as rapidly aa possible. Co-oper- ative eamerles of Meekr, Wrtght and Kandyohi eountie which a working tgether in standardizing their product and +hipping in earIo have voted to join the state organiza t0n, ending A Sentch woman had much trouble ith her gardeners. She sould na find ue who was capable of keeping sober. She appealed to her who promised to du hi best tn help her. At test he annnund that he had found just the man she needed. ,'rl nnIy ask one question," sad his "Is be a ttotaler?" "Well," id James, deliberately "H#' no j taler, but he's a mnn ye canna fill." MICKIE SAYS -e No Work is to intricate for us to handle when it comes to Machine Re- pairing. We have the equipment to handle this work promptly and efficiently. Bring It In A. S. HALLS Ortenville We're not selling "prices" we're selling the best clothes that are made F YOU appreciate fine quality, fine style and ex- pert needlework in clothes; if you understand the econ- omy in good quality, you'll come to this store for Hart Schaffner  Marx clothes --we don't want you to come on any other basis Grosenick's Hart Schaffner & Marx clothes Pay artd the Y o u R S00tvhtgs financial dence is A O1t you will set  from each pay check eertal Y ings account. It is the which started t It World's fortunes of todY' that bas no of failure. you Cannot to ignore. .The to yOU, Overhauling Take Overhauling or Repair Work. be in competent hands and will be right. WM. CUMMENS, Agency PAGE 2 COMMUNITY WORK OF RED CROSS ellpiers Show Splendid Work Soldier Work and Health. Red Cross membership in the 91 (Napters here in Minnesota shows total of 110,278. The strength of this enrollment proves the value of the rviee which the various Chapters are rendering in various sections of the state. With the opening of the Fifth An- nual Roll Call---on Armistice day--the work which these Chapters have been carrying on is of special interst to the membership, past. present, and fu- ture. First in importance are the ac- tivities in behalf of ex-soldiers. During the past year $144,000 has been expended by Minnesota Chapters in this work. Ex-service men to the number of 22.324, have been assisted hi obtaining hospital treatment, voca- tional education, and in securing addl- tinnal compensation and allotment from the government The majority of these men are the heads of fam- Uies. Many of them have developed rious disabilities which have unfit- ted them for earning living. The American Red Cross is expend- tug nationally $10,000,000 year to hip ex-service men and their families, Tlhhl work includes the same type of rvlce as that rendered by the local Chapters here in Minnesota. Other activities of the Red Cross along health lines are supplying s vi- tal service in the different communi- ties. During the past year, 106 public hlth nurses have been employed by Cross Chapters in this state. The 1retire enrollment of Red Cross nurses from Minnesota is 1,210. In case of necessity these nurses are equipped according to Red Cross standards for rvio in war or emergency. Great interest has been shown in the health wogramecially the instruction tu Home Hygiene and Care of the melt. Women to the number of 8,610 have ceived certificates from the 2,55 elates held in every section through- out the state. In the northern sec- tion, among the sparsely settled dis- triers, where railroads are few, many Women have walked miles to attend these clasH Instructors and public health nurses frequently cover miles territory on foot to reach these Glasses and the schools A number of Life-Saving lassu Imve been conducted throughout the ate. Seventy-three persons have passed the Red Cross examination and are members of the Life-Saving Corps. The Junior Red Cross program in Minnesota has created much interest ]hroughout the Central Division, of which this state is member. In the "l am school year there were 2,196 Ju- Icier &uxlliaries enrolled with a mem- bership of 126,196 children. Every person in the state will have an opportunity to support the Red Cross program and assist the Chapters tu carrying on this work by renewing their membership during the Roll Call, which opens on Armistice day and continues until Thanksgiving. Memberships will enable each of the $1 Chapters to carry on its commu- aity service and increase its useful- DOSE. JUNIOR RED CROSS AID8 CITI. ZENaHIP IN MINNESOTA. Boys and girls of today who are to be the men and women of tomorrow are learning the value of good citizen- ship, not only in their own communi- ties but throughout the world. This shown by the 126,196 members en- rolled in the 2,196 Junior auxiliaries of the American Red Cross here in this state. One of the most active centers of Junior work here in Minnesota last year was Luvern, where 50 classes in civics were taught, and also 75 dtffer mt groups were given instruction in :Home Hygiene and Care of the Sick _and 1first Aid. In Caledonia 25 civic es were conducted, toys made for freer ehndren and five First Aid class, conducted. All of the Junior funds in Minneap- olis So toward helping the work of the Michael Doviing School for Cripr ]fled Children in that city. Many chll- dreo are thus assisted to get an ed- lwatlon who wonld otherw/se be "shut in" throughout their lives. These are JuSt a few of the many Jmador aetivltlse In the IKate which 'e tim -'actteai "carryhi$ ot" of tlHI scpnilmflo4a'S ttte--uWe Serve," FAMINE WOULD WIPE OUT ENTIRE COUNTY Near East Tragedy, If In Minnesota, Would Destroy Fifth Of State Population. Wipe out the whole population of Big Stone county by slow starvation, wreck and burn every farmhouse and strip the state of livestock and even seed grain--and Minnesota might be able to realize the horror of famine conditions in southern Russia and Ar- menia. That is the message being sent out by the Near East Relief Committee in Minnesota to the farmers who are helping to gather 147,000 bushels of grain to save the lives of 1300 wom- en and children dependent on the state fcr their lives. If the plea for grain fails, these helpless refugees will per- ish of hunger this winter in Armenia, South Russia and the Holy Land, the message says. The report of actual famine condi- tions in the Near East was brought to Minnesota by two American relief workers who have just returned from Asia Minor and the Russian Caucasus. They came to attend a state confer- ence of clergymen and representatives of women's organizations, called to plead for more help for the famine victims. "At least 400,000 men and women will die of hunger in the Near Ea, this winter in spite of all we can do," Dr. W. E. Doughty, one of the work- ers, said. "That is nearly one-fifth of the whole population of Minnesota, and 20 times the population of the average Minnesota county." When Can Corn Be Used Profitably for Fuel? t The advisability of burning corn for I fuel depends upon so many things / that no hard and fast rule can be] ]aid down to meet conditions in all lo- calities. In Iowa, where large quanti- ties of coal are mined and can be de- livered without long hauls, state col- lege inve,tigators say that nothing is to be gained by burning corn for fuel. But Prof. E. A. Stewart, of the agri- cultural physics section of the Univer- sity of Minnesota, believes that with the price of corn at 25 cents and less a bushel, and when it requires from 70 to 80 pounds of corn on the cob to make a bushel, some farmers can bet- ter afford to burn their corn than to market it. "When corn is used for burning," he says, "it gives between 5,600 and 6.000 British thermal units'of heat a pound, while coal gives 10,000 to 13,000 B. T. U. for each pound. Ac- cording to that it would require two tons of corn on the cob to give as as nmch heat as one ton of coal. Coal price*s now range from one-half to one cent pound. Corn at one-fourth cent a pound might profitably be used for fuel." Corn, however, Professor Stewart emphasizes, has some speculative val- ue which may be higher than 20 cents a bushel, whereas coat has none. If corn must be sold because of lack of storage capacity or lack of funds, and coal must be bought, it is better to bm,a corn, with its price at 25 cents a bushel or less, than coal at the pre- vailing prices of coal, he says. The cost of hauling the corn to town and taking the coal back must be con,Id- ered ,he explains, in deciding what to do. "The man who has wood to cut should never burn corn, Professor Stewart says. "Labor on the farm is :oo cheap to make this profitable." A fortified watermelon patch near Parker, South Dakota, is believed to be the only one of its kind in the U. S. Armed guards patrol the patch. ssisted in their work by a powerful earchlight, which has been installed on an elevation. The searchlight ray: .hoot in every direction continually thruout the night. " "An Lmar-- d when I kissed her l .melled tobacco on her lips." John"You object to kissing a woman who smokes?" Einar--"No, but she doesn't smoke.' TIE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT Walked 5,710 Miles While Lugging Water In carrying water--2,000 tons of it --from the well to her home, a farm wife in Ohio trudged 5,710 miles in 50 years, say rural engineers of the Ohio State University. For a full half century this farm wife had been mak- i ing an average of six trips a day, sometimes lugging a bucket of water weighing 30 pounds, and sometimes two buckets. The engineers found that by laying $19 worth of lead pipe and moving the old pump up from the well to within the kitchen, run- ning water could be supplied the farm home, and the lot of this particular farm woman materially lightened. Running water can be piped into thou- sands of Minnesota farm homes at l comparatively little expense, say agri- cultural engineering division men or University Farm .'Why not consult them ? HOW TO PLAN THE KITCHEN A Well-Planned Kitchen Should Meet Requirements of Well-Arranged Workshop. A kitchen conveniently planned and equipped, having good lighting and ventilation, saves time and labor for the housekeeper. It contributes to the health and contentment of the 1 whole family. Circular 189, The Well- Planned Kitchen. just issued by the United States Department of Agri- cultur% discusses the points which are essential in making work-room. To remodel an old kitchen is often a difficult problem, but even minor improvements, such as refinishing walls, woodwork, and floor attractive- y or adjusting the table and sink to a comfortable working height, reduce drudgery and save energy. It is best, if possible, to use the kit- chen only as a place for preparing food. If the laundry, wash room, and general storage room are located elsewhere nearby, it is more sanitary. A dining alcove partitioned off the kitchen is recommended in many cases to save steps. A small kitchen about 9x12 is generally considered most con- venient. The location of the kithen with re- spect to other rooms, the outlook from its windows, and the placing of doors anti indows are points to be well considered. A trim back yard with walks helps to keep the kitchen clean. A kitchen should be well ventilated in winter as well as in summer with dos transoms and ventilating window screens. The sink, stove, worktab:e, and other important parts of the kit- chen should be well lighted and the floor easy to keep clean. Running wa- ter is desirable, both hot and col(L Windows and doors shouldbe screened against flies. The proper grouping of sink, stove, md worktable to save steps is .very important. All permanent equipment should be substantial and easy to keep in order. An abundance of cupboard ad shelf room, well planned, helps rderly storage of utensils and sup- plies. Grouping articles which are used together saves time. A rest cor- ner is recommended. The kitchen as a whole should meet the standards of a convenient well-arranged workshop. Circular 189 is free upon application to the United States Department of Agriculture., Mrs. Gottawad was showing Hilda, the Swedish maid, over the house, mad explaining her duties. "This," she said, "is my son's room..But he iu not at home now. He is in Yale." "Yah?" Hilda's face lit up with sympathetic understanding. "My brud- de ban there, too." "It that so? What year?" "Ach, he not ban there year. Da Yudge just nay, 'You Axe, sixty days in yale." Autumn blossoms on several fruit trees near Omaha and Council Bluffs, Iowa, present a strange sight. The early spring frosts, with the drouth' that followed, then excessive rain and hot weather, caused the fruit trees tn blossom it is believed. MONUMENTS DAIRY MARKETING UNIT COMPLETED Co-operative Creameries In Counties Ready For Can- solidated Shipping. Five Officers of the 230 co-operative creameries in 59 counties which have joined the Minnesota Co-operative Creameries association, Inc., are be- ing notified by their state marketing and service organization that the first district unit of the association is ready for active work. It is completely or- ganized for standardizing the pro- ducts of all members creameries, for shipping in carload lots and buying supplies at wholesale. The marketing unit, known as Dis- trict No. 2, is composed of 32 of the 38 co-operative creameries in Chisago, Pine, Isanti, Kanabec and Mille Lacs counties. A district manager is being selected to help standardize the but- ter made at the various creameries, so that they can only obtain lower freight rates by shipping in carlots, but also obtain the highest possible prices on the eastern markets for all the butter produced in the five coun- ties. Nearly 250 co-operative creameries have joined the state association, ac- cording to records of the Minnesota Farm Bureau federation. They will be formed into district marketing units as rapidly as possible. Co-oper- ative creameries of Meeker, Wright and Kandyohi counties which are working together in standardizing their pr, oduct and s]ipping in carlots have voted to join the state organiza- tion, according to A. J. McGuire, man- ager. A Scotch woman had much trouble with her gardeners. She souhl not find one who was capable of keeping sober. She appealed to her brother, who promised to do his best to help her. At last he announced that he had found just the man she needed. "I'll only ask one question," said his sister. "Is he a teetotaler?" "Well," said James, deliberately, "H,e' no juist what ye'd ca' a teeto- taler, but he's a men ye canna fill." MICKIE SAYS CoP,{ G "aS. G.:," Fkt.',./ JOL)RI4b, L  V4tq k -4 V, EO No Work is to intricate for us to handle when it comes to Machine Re- pairing. We have the equipment to handle this work promptly and efficiently. Send [0r our Designs See Our Prices Before Buyio00 Bring It In A. S. HALLS Ortonville THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1 A politeness contest has been or- Poets, they say, arc born, ganized by a Paris newspaper. Five lmade. We are alvays trying thousand francs weekly for six weeks t our sns on tie shoulders of th will be paid to the most polite persons I tor. in france. Chauffeurs and horse cab- 1 -- drivers, telephone operators, employee I --Have those Xmas PhotOS of the postoffice, railways and other tnow , at our studio. We give transport services, department stores tuine leather easle case free and policemen will be included in the [ order for a dozen or more category. I Reed Studio, Ortonville. (}00T000VII[[ MONUM[flI WORKS JOtINSON & LINDHOM, Props. We're not selling prices we re selling the best clothes that are made F YOU appreciate fine quality, fine style and ex- pert needlework in clothes; if you understand the econ- omy in good quality, you'll come to this store for Hart Schaffner Marx clothes don't want you tO come on any other basis Grosenick's Hart Schaffner & Marx clothes Pay Day and tlte Savi00gs Accoqrff, YOUR financial dance is assured you will set from each pa ............... check a certai amount for the ings account. It is the which started t b World's fortunes of todaY' It is the only that has no of failure. It is the only you cannot to ignore. The start Bank are im to you. lllmiliilHilHiliiullii$ll O II ll-ver-au"ng Take your ear to Wm. Overhauling or Repair Work. be in competent hands and the will be right. Manufacturers and Quarriers of the famous Mahogany Granite WM. CUMMENS, Ortonvl Agency for CHEVROLET CARS