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The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
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November 3, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
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November 3, 1921
 

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NOVEMBER 3, 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT e Farmers Corner ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF FARMERS AND FARMER'S CLUBS. FIRM SAVES FREIGHT RATE CUT $15,000.00 IS FARMER VICTORY Selling Agency Pays For Charges On Grain And Hay Ordered Stock Investment LoweredBureau Seeks Eleven Weeks. Further Reductions. livestock sales by Minnesota pro- :he South St. Paul market ago has saved the far-i actual cash, more than the of money they invested stock. issued today by department of the Farm Bureau federation. Co-operative Com- opened for busi- 8, it has saved its pa- by handling their live- commission rates, the said. reductions in commission to more than $9,- Weeks, the central agency able to set aside approxi- cent of all commissions farm bureau statement surplus at $5,800. Co-operative Commis- has handled the larg- done by any firm on the operating cost at least tha, the farmers of the would have had to pay for large volume of business Co-operative sales com- statement said. agency is charging] rates fixed by the I and warehouse commis- appeal to the courts dealers has pre- enforcement of the of the new scbodule of into effect company are be 20 to 35 per cent less rates. report summarized the central livestock selling have .invested $9,400 in Stock of the. association; savings to the Jestock 1 n reduced" handling greater than the capital Savings to the far- commission rates and accumulated by the co- cOmPany are within $2,000 equal to the total amount Capital stock and member- that 40,000 farmers of the co-operative ship- which have joined agency. The total in- farmers in the con- is less than 45 cents firm, altho- months old, is handling times as much business on the market. 8 to October 19 it head of livestock; its handled 43,784. period, it handled 18.- calves, 65,165 hogs, Sheep. The next largest business handled by any 16,516 cattle, 4,039 hogs and 14,500 sheep. this month, the co- received 81 of the on the market. It as high as 88 eats in a 1,144 cars from August 30, there are 20 firms St. Paul market which than that number in the 3 endig September LEADS DRIVE QRAIN GROWERS Co-operative Marketing Open Minnseota Of- Up Members. Grain Growers, Inc., will headquarters in St. its membership drive / organization director Farm Bureau fed- cepted the "management rain Growers' organiza- ga in this state. The di- farm bureau federation to conduct the mere- for the national co- marketing corpora- his position as farm bureau's organi- planned to conduct a in St. Paul this to start on a small as we go along," he are going to pros- marketing plan of of Seventeen absolu- and see that every a member of the Inc., understands and knows exactly contract he signs will be the regular of the U. S. Grain the the farmer the methods of selHlig his central marketing sale, consignment and w . Organized farmers have won a de- cisive victory in their fight for lower railroad rates, the Minnesota Farm Bureau Federation says in a report prepared to inform its members that the Interstate Commerce commission has ordered sweeping reductions in rates on wheat, coarse grains and hay Following hearings in Washington, at which Thomas E. Cashman of Owa- tonna testified ag the official repre- senntative of the Minnesota Farm Bureau, the commission ordered rates reduced not later than November 20. The order directs that rates on wheat and hay be cut half as much as they were increased in August, 1920, and that rates on coarse grains be set 10 per cent below the new rates on heat.:,,r It is estimated that the or- der means a reduction of 25 per cent on coarse grain, and that the average reduction on all commodities affec- ted amounts to 16 or 18 per cent. The ra came just after the Ameri- can Farm Bureau Federation took le- gal action to force .reductions, by fil- ing a formal petition with the Inter- state Commerce commission asking that successive cuts be ordered until the whole rate increase of 1920 is wiped out. The farm bureau will con- tinue its fight for lower rates, officers of both the state and national organi- zations assert. "The commission's order cutting rates on hay and grain is a victory for the farmers, because it means that the United States government admits our contention that high freight rate have penalized agriculture and vir- tually created a blockade between the falzner and his market," Mr. Cashman said. "The Interstate Commerce com- missmn has recognized that rates must be reduced. Winning the fight for the principle of rate reduction is even more important to the farmer than the actual savings that may re- sult from this one order. Other re- ductions will follow. A large part of this year's grain crop already has been marketed, but the saving in freight on what is left on the farms is esti- mated at several million dollars for the northwest alone. Even that sav- ing will amount to many times the total amount of money the farmers have invested in the farm bureau. "Next year the actual cash saving should be tremendous; it is estimated at $50,000,000." The order for reduced rates is a step in the right direction, but only the first step, farm bureau federa- tion officials said. Further reductions must, be ordered until railroad rates are brought down to normal, they said. Cuts on freight rates are a direct benefit to the farmer, according to F. W. Peck, director of agriculturar ex- tension work at University farm. "Freight rates are a direct tax on the farmer's income," Mr. Peck said. "and. a decrease in freight charges means a direct increase in his re- turns." Mr .Peck also testified before the commission, urging rate reductions, The farm bureau federations of the middle west led the farmers' fight for lower rates, as a result of the midwest farm bureau conference held at head- quarters of the Minnesota federation this summer. None Too Early To Phn For Ice" Cut It fs' none too early to make plans for harvesting and storing the coming crop of ice. The farm ice supply can often be gathered and stored at light expense. Those who have the time and means to build a house with in- sulated walls should write the office of publications, university farm, St. Paul, for blueprint No. 171, price 10 cents, showing plans for a 16,ton ca- pacity icehouse. i Wright's Underwear Wears Longer 'NDERWEAR, like everything e I s e, must eventually wear out, but its length of life should be sufficient to give you the worth of your money. Wright'a Underwear is made right from the right kind of material which insures a longer life than most any other kind. For Men and Boys WRIGHT'$ SPRING  N[EDIL IIIBBD UNDERWEAR The Pioneer Store STRONG TO HIGHER LIVESTOCK TRADE Cattle Trade Strong At Week's Open- ingHogs Mostly 15c to 25c Higher, T o p $7.40. Monday's Closing-- Cattle I1.000. Market closin stea- dy to strong, grass beeves $4 to $7. hulk $4.75 to $5.75. Calves 900. Mar- ket steady to strong, bulk of best lights $10.00. Hogs 9,400. Market 15c to 25c higher, bulk $6.75 to $7.25, top $7.40, bulk good pigs $8.50 to $8.60, Sheep 17,500. Fat lambs strong to 25c higher, bulk $8.00. bulk good me- dium-weight ewes $3.75. South St. Paul, Minn., October 31, 1921: Around 11,000 cattle were re- ceived for the week's opening" trade, being mostly from the Dakotas and Montana, with a considerable number o. of Canadian origin. Well fatted Mon- tana beeves of choice beef breeding sold in Saturday's trade to packers a: $7.00, 51 head of these averaging 1.236 pounds. Altho a like kind are still quotable at the same price, noth- ing arrived for today's trade with enough quality and fat to sell over $6.50, this price being paid for a part load, the best lot going at $6.00. Bulk of the grass beeves cashed from $4.75, a few of the commonest ones down around $4.00 to $4.50. A few of the best grass fat heifers and young cows sold from $5 to $6, with bulk at $3.25 to $4.75. A few old shelly canners sold as low as $2, bulk of canners and cutters $2.25 to $3. Prices of bologna bulls rangetl _rom. $2.50 to $3.50. bulk $2.75 zo $3.2 Bulk of best light veal calves brought $10.00, a very few up to $10.50. Stock- ers and feeders sold under a fairly broad demand at steady to strong plices, bulk at $4.00 to $5.25, strictty good anti choice kinds on up to around $6.00. Hogs advanced 15c to 25c Monday, range $5.75 to $7.40, bulk $6.75 to $7.25. Bulk desirable pigs $8.50 to $.%60. Lambs opened strong to 25c higher, bulk good and choice native Dakota lambs $8.00, bulk good me- dium-weight ewes $3.75, some lights $4.00, good and choice western fee(l- ing lambs quotable $6.75 to $7.00. Hen House Should Be Well Ventilated According to N. E. Chapman, poul- try specialist for the state university and the farm bureau, ventilation is one of the most important factors to be considered in building a poultry house. "The windows should be of two sash with six panes each," he says, "so put in as to be opened as desired in warm weather. Transoms of muslin above the windows, or a louvred frame : ii beside the windows, will allow th ,el dairy farmer can afford to feed grain frosty air to go out aaal fresh air to] when a bushel of cats and a pound of come in. The windows should go up lbutterfat are the same price. This to the plate to allow the sun to shine year a pound ef butterfat is double hack in the house; thus louvred frames the market value of a bushel of oats, tmside the windows will give best yen- and other grain is lower than it ha:- ilation. Call on county agents for been for years. plans and specifications for poultry houses." Good Practice Now To Feed Cows Grain Campaigns for better feeding and better dairy cows are in order at any time, but the present is an especially opportune time for agitation and work of this kind, in the opinion of A. J. McGuire of the agricultural exten- sion division of the state university. "There has never been a time in the history of dailw farming," says Mr. McGuire, "when it will pay so well to feed grain liberally as at present. A "The success of a co-operative creamery depends upon three factors a sufficient amount of butterfat, the manufactm*e of a high quality of but- ttr. and good business management. it certainly is good business manage- ent for every co-operative creamery ssociation to urge good feeding this fall and winter. Lunch At The Eat Shop Where Everything is home cooked. We serve a special dinner which include meat, potatoes, gravy, bread, butter, and coffee for 30c Try itYou'll Come Again. Our Pis, cakes, doughnuts, cookies and sandwiches are all Home Made, and the coffee is the very b e s t quality, with pure cream. The Eat Shop J. A. Jacobson, Prop. IT'S GOOD LURBIR't'tll YOU NEEU IT WITH PROPER 5PEISD! ' HEN it comes to deliver- ing the goods on time we're there, that's all. For big jobs or small jobs--lum- ber sawed to the proper length and widthlumber for every practical purpose prac- tically priced. Geie[ bmnber CO. OneMinn.;:. PAGE 7" @ O Professional and ] Business Directory C. E. SIGLOH SERVICE WIRING REPAIRING Phone 284-L Ortonville, Mime, @ JOE BAYER & SON Of the Ortonville Tailoring C All kinds of cleaning and pressi The hydroscope is a clever instru- neatly done. ment by which the sea bottom can be Suits Made to Order. examined with a clearness hitherto ira- Ortonviile, Mim possible. It is similar to a huge tele-   scope, with a complex system of 12 lenses. A newspaper lying on the bot- ELECTRIC SHOE tom at a depth of 360 feet from the SHOP surface can be read by means of the hvdroscope by daylight. Shoes repaired neatly and prez- " , .... -___. ly. Our Work Guaranteed. Boost Your Booster! Every one loves a booster, but every one is not always ready to boost for his booster. The booster is supposed to boost because he likes to do it--and in a great measure that is so. The greatest booster in history, however-- the home town paper--must combine with the matural liking for the boosting game, the re- wards the simplest rules of business requires for the continuance of the boosting spirit. The editor of your home town paper likes to be appreciated just as you like to be appre- ciated. And how better may your appreciation be ex- pressed than by the amount of moneY that goes through his cash register? Every one in this town and community will have an opportunity to show appreciation for the home town paper during the week of No- vember 7-12, which will be observed in every state in the Union as GUS. E. ANDERSON, Prolt. 0 JOHN SPANYERS Light Hauling of all Kinds Express and Baggage Telephone 287 Ortonville, Mdma. "Subscribe for Your Home Town Paper Week" Why not get the BEST? When buying Meats get it at the City Meat Market You are sure then of getting only choice steaks, chops, roasts, stews, etc. LUNDSTROM & GEISEL, Ortonville NOTICE To Our Patrons Beginning Tuesday, November 1, we will sell for cash at the Mill door all feed flour and other goods we handle at greatly reduced prices. A par- tial list at this time will show the amount of this reduction. Bran, ton lots .................... $19.00 Bran, 100 lb. lots .................. 1.1O Middlings, ton .................... 21.00 Middlings, 100 lb ............. 1.20 Ground feed, ton .................. 20.00 Ground feed, 100 lb ............. 1.15 Graham flour, 100 lbs ....... 4.50 Graham flour, 10 lbs ................ 50 Corn Meal 100 lbs ............. 3.00 Corn Meal, 10 lbs ............ 35 This meal and flour is home manufactured and fresh ground. Flour is too high for the price of wheat. We will grind your wheat, corn, rye, or buckwheat in- to fine meal or flour at ninety cents per 100 lbs. Bring in a bag or two and let us show what we can do.. Everything will be sold in line with the above prices. See us before you buy flour. We will sell at the lowest price. PAUL DIRNBAUER Brick Layer and Plasterer Stone Mason and AM Kinds ef Cement Wok. Ortonville, Minn. R.F. t PETERSON & SON Dray Line Big Stone Lake Ice t Phone 38 Ortonville, ]bm I Kodak DEVELOPING PRINTING ENLARGING Prompt, Quality Service, Modert Pric. THE REED STUDIO Ortonville Mim. ? DR. R. D. RIFENBARK OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN One block uhill fra Gtmdeve' ,rug Store Vapor-Sulphur Cabin, st TreatmeRts,i (For rheumatism, neuritis, etc.} F. L. BROWN THE JEWELER I Ortonville. Minnemd:a > FOR TRUCK SERVICE [ and any kind of light and hq. draying Hausauer Bros.  PHONE 268 All Orders Given Prompt Attntk[ A. B. KAERCHER Attorney at Law Odd Fellows Building Ortonville, Min. Lake View Feed & Mill Co. (ORTONvlLLE rEED SZOR) ED. SHULT, Proprietor. DR. F. W. DUNN. . CHIROPRACTOR D. D. WHITE, D. C PEL EL Spinographer 12-13-14-15-16 Shumaker Bldg. Ortonv/lle, Minn. Col. Wm. Wellendorf AUCTIONEER 30 years' experience. No praeti. ing on your property. Call write me early and get in on am early date. i" Ortonvtll Mlmmm 3. A. JOHNSON PIANO TUNING AND REPAIRING PHONES--Residence - 194 " Funtiture Store - M 'All Work Guaranteed Or tonville, Mnnesota. WILL FINCH Experienced Painter Phone 255.L Ali Work Guaranteed ELMER SALSBURY !i "rile WELL DIGGE]' Fifteen Years' Exprleaw Ortonville, Minn. R. IF. D. k ,. 9P We will pay rite falwil prices for jank: Old Irma, $1L to $11L00  tm Copper and heavy Ikasm,4 to 8e per lmumL Old Rap,  neat per purred. Old Rubbers ml   pint to I cent pro" pomul. Pipe Fittings, Brass Belthtg and Hue carried In stk. Atyl ,, Weighs. The Ortonvil Fonndry 3, 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT e Farmers Corner ESPECIALLY TO THE ACq'IVITIES OF FARMERS AND FARMER'S CLUBS. SAVES FREIGHT RATE CUT $15,000.00 IS FARMER VICTORY Selling Agency Pays For Charges On Grain And Hay Ordered Stock Investment LoweredBureau Seeks Eleven Weeks. Further Reductions. livestock sales Organized farmers have won a de- by Minnesota pro-] cisive victory in their fight for lower he South St. Paul market lrailroad rates, the Minnesota Farm ago has saved the far-il Bureau Federation says in a report al cash, more than the l prepared to inform its members that of money they invested] the Interstate Commerce commission stock, has ordered sweeping reductions in the report issued today by j rates on wheat, coarse grains and hay department of the Bureau federation. Co-operative Cam- opened for bust- 8, it has saved its pa- by handling their live- commission rates, the report said. reductions in commission to more than $9,- Weeks, the central agency able to set aside approxi- cent of all commissions farm bureau statement surplus at $5,800. Co-operative Commis- has handled the larg- done by any firm on the an operating cost at least tha, the farmers of the have had to pay for volume of business Co-operative sales cam- Statement said. agency is charging f rates fixed by the I and warehouse commis- appeal to the courts dealers has pre- enforcement of the of the new schodule of charges put into effect company are be 20 to 35 per cent less rates. summarized the central livestock selling have ,invested $9,400 in Stock of the. association; savings to the estock 1 n reduced" handling greater than the capital Savings to the far- commission rates and accumulated by the co- COmPany are within $2,000 equal to the total amount capital stock and member- that 40,000 farmera of the co-operative ship- which have joined agency. The total in- farmers in the cen- ts less than 45 cents firm, altho- months old, is handling times as much business on the market. 8 to October 19 it head of livestock; its handled 43,784. period, it handled 18.- calves, 65,165 hogs, aheep The next largest business handled by any 16,516 cattle, 4,039 hogs and 14,500 sheep. this month, the co- received 81 of the on the market. It as high as 88 cats in a 1,144 cars from August 30, there are 20 firms St. Paul market which than that number in the months endig September DRIVE QRAIN GROWERS Co-operative Marketing Minnseot a Of- Up Members. Grain Growers, Inc., will headquarters in St. its membership drive l organization director Farm Bureau fed- cepted the "management rain Growers' organiza- gn iv this state. The di- farm bureau federation to conduct the mere- for the national co- marketing corpora- his position as farm bureau's organi- Planned to conduct a in St. Paul this to start on a small as we go along," he are going to pros- marketing plan of of Seventeen absolu- and see that every a member of the Inc., understands and knows exactly contract he signs will be the regular of the U. S. Grain the the farmer the methods of selling his central marketing sale, eonsignmeat and Following hearings in Washington, at which Thomas E. Cashman of Owa- tonna testified ag the official repre- senntative of the Minnesota Farm Bureau, the commission ordered rates reduced not later than November 20. The order directs that rates on wheat and hay be cut half as much as they were increased in August, 1920, and that rates on coarse grains be set 10 per cent below the new rates on wheat. It is estimated that the or- der means a reduction of 25 per cent on coarse grain, and that the average reduction on all commodities affec- ted amounts to 16 or 18 per cent. The rate came just after the Ameri- can Farm Bureau Federation took le- gal action to force "reductions, by fil- ing a formal petition with the Inter- state Commerce commission asking that successive cuts be ordered until the whole rate increase of 1920 is wiped out. The farm bureau will con- tinue its fight for lower rates, officers of both the state and national organi- zations assert. "The commission's order cutting rates on hay and grain is a victory for the farmers, because it means that the United States government admits our contention that high freight rates have penalized agriculture and vir- tually ceated a blockade between the falzner and his market," Mr. Cashman said. "The Interstate Commerce com- mission has recognized that rates must be reduced. Winning the fight for the principle of rate reduction is even more important to the farmer than the actual savings that may re- sult from this one order. Other re- ductions wffi follow. A large part of this year's grain crop already has been marketed, but the saving in freight on what is left on the farms is esti- mated at several million dollars for the northwest alone. Even that sav- ing will amount to many times the total amount of money the farmers have invested in the farm bureau. "Next year the actual cash saving should be tremendous; it is estimated at $50,000,000." The order for reduced rates is a step in the right direction, but only the first step, farm bureau federa- tion officials said. Further reductions must. be ordered until railroad rates are brought down to normal, they said. Cuts on freight rates are a direct benefit to the farmer, according to F. W. Peck, director of agriculturar ex- tension work at University farm. "Freight rates are a direct tax on the farmer's income," Mr. Peck said. "and. a decrease in freight charges means a direct increase in his re- turns." Mr .Peck also testified before the commission, urging rate reductions, The farm bureau federations of the middle west led the farmers' fight for lower rates, as a result of the midwest farm bureau conference held at head- quarters of the Minnesota federation this summer None Too Early To Plan For Ice" Cut It is ' none too early to make plans for harvesting and storing the coming crop of ice. The farm ice supply can often be gathered and stored at light expense. Those who have the time and means to build a house with in- sulated walls should write the office of publications, university farm, St. Paul, for blueprint No. 171, price 10 cents, showing plans for a 16,ton ca- pacity icehouse. i Wrights Underwear Wears Longer NDERWEAR, like everything e 1 s e, must eventually wear out, but its length of life should be sufficient to give you the worth of your money. Wrlght's Underwear is made right from the right kind of material which insures a longer life than most any other kind. For Men and Boy, WRIGHT'$ IIDSI I/N.WEAII The Pioneer Store Co-Operative Co. STRONG TO HIGHER LIVESTOCK TRADE Cattle Trade Strong At Week's Open- ingHogs Mostly 15c to 25c Higher, T o p $7.40. Monday's Closing-- Cattle II,000. Market closinff stea- dy tO strollg', grass beeves $4 to $7. bulk $4.75 to $5.75. Calves 900. Mar- ket steady to strong, bulk of besl lights $10.00. Hogs 9,400. Market 15c to 25c higher, bulk $6.75 to $7.25, top $7.40, bulk good pigs $8.50 to $8.60, Sheep 17,500. Fat lambs strong to 25c higher, bulk $8.00. bulk good me- dium-weight ewes $3.75. South St. Paul, Minn., October 31, 1921: Around 11,000 cattle were re- ceived for the week's opening trade, being mostly from the Dakotas and Montana, with a considerable number of Canadian origin. Well fatted Mon- tana beeves of choice beef breeding sold in Saturday's trade to packers az $7.00, 51 head of these averaging 1,236 pounds. Altho a like kind are still quotable at the same price, noth- ing arrived for today's trade with enough quality and fat to sell over $6.50, this price being paid for a part load, the best lot going at $6.00. Bulk of the grass beeves cashed from $4.75, a few of the commonest ones down around $4.00 to $4.50. A few of the best grass fat heifers and young cows sold from $5 to $6, with bulk at $3.25 to $4.75. A few old shelly canners sold as low as $2, bulk of canners and cutters $2.25 to $3. Prices of bologna bulls rangetl _rom. $2.50 to $3.50. bulk $2.75 zo $3.2- Bulk of best light veal calves brought $10.00, a very few up to $10.50. Stock- ers and feeders sold under a fairly broad demand at steady to  strong p15c.,, bulk at $4.00 to $5.25, strict y good and choice kinds on up to around $6.00. Hogs advanced 15c to 25c Monday, range $5.75 to $7.40, bulk $675 to $7.25. Bulk desirable pigs $8.50 to $.%60. Lambs opened strong to 25c higher, bulk good and choice native Dakota lambs $8.00, bulk good me- dium-weight ewes $3.75, some lights $4.00, good and choice western feed- ing lambs quotable $6.75 to $7.00. Hen House Should Be Well Ventilated According to N. E. Chapman, poul- try specialist for the state university and the farm bureau, ventilation is one of the most important factors to be considered in building a poultry house. "The windows should be of two sash with six panes each," he says, "so put in as to be opened as desired in warm weather. Transoms of muslin above the windows, or a louvred frame Lunch At The Eat Shop Where Everything is home cooked. We serve a special dinner which include meat, potatoes, gravy, bread, butter, and coffee for 30c Try itYou'll Come Again. Our Pis, cakes, doughnuts, cookies and sandwiches are all Home Made, and the coffee is the very b e s t quality, with pure cream. The Eat Shop J. A. Jacobson, Prop. ' HEN it comes to deliver- ing the goods on time we're there, that's all. For big jobs or small jobs--lum- ber sawed to the proper length and widthlumber for every practical purpose prac- tically priced. Geiet bmaber CO. Ortonviile Minn. ;i. beside the windows, will allow the frosty air to go out and fresh air to come in. The windows should go up to the plate to allow the sun to shine back in the house; thus louvred frames tside the windows will give best ven- tilation. Call on county agents for plans and specifications for poultry houses." Good Practice Now To Feed Cows Grain Campaigns for better feeding and dairy farmer can afford to feed grain v;hen a bushel of oats and a pound of butterfat are the same price. This year a pound cf butterfat is double the market value of a bushel of oats and other grain is lower than it ha:- been for years. "The success of a co-operative creamery depends upon three factors a sufficient amount of butterfat, the manufactme of a high quality of but- tcr. and good business management. it certainly is good business manage- :ent for every co-operative creamery ,sociation to urge good feeding this better dairy cows are in order at any fall and winter. time, but the present is an especially The bydroscope is a clever instru- opportune time for agitation and work ment by which the sea bottom can be of this kind, in the opinion of A. J. examined with a clearness hitherto im- McGuire of the agricultural exten- possible. It is similar to a huge tele- sign division of the state university.  scope, with a complex system of 12 "There has never been a time in the I lenses. A newspaper lying on the bot- history of dailT farming," says Mr. ] tom at a depth of 360 feet from the McGuire, when it will pay so well to / surface can be read by means of the feed grain liberally as at present. Abvdroscope by daylight. m i J " " i .m iH J.21 . Boost Your Booster! Every one loves a booster, but every one is not always ready to boost for his booster. The booster is supposed to boost because he likes to do it,---and in a great measure that is so. The greatest booster in history, however-- the home town paper--must combine with the natural liking for the boosting game, the re- wards the simplest rules of business requires for the continuance of the boosting spirit. The editor of your home town paper likes to be appreciated just as you like to be appre- ciated. And how better may your appreciation be ex- pressed than by the amount of money that goes through his cash register? Every one in this town and community will have an opportunity to show appreciation for the home town paper during the week of No- vember 7-12, which will be observed in every state in the Union as "Subscribe for Your Home Town Paper Week" Why not get the BEST? When buying Meats get it at the City Meat Market You are surb then of getting only choice steaks, chops, roasts, stews, etc. LUNDSTROM & GEISEL, Ortonville NOTICE To Our Patrons Beginning Tuesday, November 1, we will sell for cash at the Mill door all feed flour and other goods we handle at greatly reduced prices. A par- tial list at this time will show the amount of this reduction. Bran, ton lots .................... $19.00 Bran, 100 lb lots .................. 1.10 Middlings, ton .................... 21.00 Middlings, 100 lb ............. 1,20 Ground feed, ton .................. 20,00 Ground feed, 100 lb ............. 1A5 Graham flour, 100 lbs ....... 4.50 Graham flour, 10 lbs ................ 50 Corn Meal 100 lbs ............. 3.00 Corn Meal, 10 lbs ............ 35 This meal and flour is home manufactured and fresh ground. Flour is too high for the price of wheat. We will grind your wheat, corn, rye, or buckwheat in- to fine meal or flour at ninety cents per 100 lbs. Bring in a bag or two and let us show what we can de. Everything will be sold in line with the above prices. See us before you buy flour. We will sell at the lowest price. Lake View Feed & Mill Co. (ORTONVILLE FEED STORE) ED. SHULT, Proprietor. PAGE T. i Professional and ! .!. Business Directory C. E. SIGLOH SERVICE WIRING REPAIRINC Phone 284-L Ortonville, Mim O JOE BAYER & SON Of the Ortonville Tailoring Co. All kinds of cleaning and press/aS neatly done. Suits Made to Order. Ortonviile, Mim ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP Shoes repaired neatly and p- ly. Our Work Guaranteed. GUS. E. ANDERSON, Prop. @ JOHN SPANYERS Light Hauling of all Kinds Express and Baggage Telephone 287 Ortanvill 1 PAUL DIRNBAUER Brick Layer and Plasterer Stone Mason and Atl Kinds of Cement Work. Ortonville, Minn. R.F. PETERSON & SON Dray Line Big Stone Lake Ice i, Phone 38 Ortonville, ]bEau ' 0" Kodak DEVELOPING PRINTIN ENLARGING Prompt, Qua|ity Service, Modert Pri. THE REED STUDIO Ortonville Minn. , i'i DR. R. D. RIFENBARK ! OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN , One block uhill fraw Gunderma' ,rug Store Vapor-Sulphur Cabinet Treatment (For rheumatism, neuritis, etc.} F. L. BROWN THE JEWELER Ortonville. Minnesota @ FOR TRUCK SERVICE and any kind of light and hea draying Hausauer Bros. PHONE 268 All Orders Given Prompt Attenttes A. B. KAERCHER Attorney at Law Odd Fellows Building Ortonville, Minn. DR. F. W. DUNN. CHIROPRACTOR D. D. WHITE, D. C PEL C Spinographer 12-13-14-15-16 Shumaker Bldg. Ortonvqe, Minn. Col. Wm. Wellendorf AUCTIONEER 30 years' experience. No praeti mg on your property. Call ee write me early and get in on m early date. Ortonvflte. Mhtmm J. A. JOHNSON PIANO TUNING AND REPAIRING PHONES---Reaidenco 194 ' Fundtm'e Store - M 'All Work Guaranteed Ortonville, Mnnesot a. FINCH Experienced Painter Phone 235.L All Work Guaranteed ELMER SALSBURY !i aTHE WELL DIGGER" Fifteen Years' Exlrleaw Ortonville, Minn. R.F.D. We will pay the falbwlg prices for junk: Old Iron, $11.00 to $10.00 pe tm Copper and heavy ]kass,4e to 8 per poumL Old Rags,  cent Pe lmtmd. Old Rubbers mul  K seat to 1 cent lV immtd, Pipe Fittiap, Brus Belthtg and Hue earrted In stock. Acetyhme Wldhtg. The Ortonvii Foundry I, 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE N. STRONG TO HIGHER the window, 'i a.ow the!,l.irr farme, can alrord to fel g, ain air to go out pound of The Farmers Corner LIVESTOCK TRADE ....... i ............................................. " .... plate to allow the :.an to shine e , a pound cf bkttterfat is ,louMc Week's Open. of a bushel o( oats, - ng_Hog s Mtly 15 to 25e give best yen- and other glaill is lower thai1 it ha nigher, Top $7.40. Call on county agents been for years. AND FARMER'S CLUBS. Mend a ,' Closing-- P lass and specficatlos for poultry "The surces of a co operative Carrie lI,O Market closhl sees- houses" eeamery depends upon three factor amount of bulterfat, t. dy to trc], rss heves $4 to 7 IFREIGHT RATE CUT hulk $47 to $5.7 Calves O00. Good Practice NoV*r igh quality f hut H5,000.001 IS sleady to strong, bulk TO Eeed Cows Grain "' and good business mmagement it eeltainly is eed basinns manage- -- lght slo0o Ho -- o r t e - Stk rives me I Lowered--B eau Seeks i ' ,.40, hulk good pig $8.50 to $860 tter da ry cow a n orde at a v fa] und winter. I Furthe tReductions. I Sheep 17,5O0..at lamus etlong t, . -- Eleven Weeks. ] 25e higher bulk SSO0 holk ood me time but the present is an especially The hv o cope a el e gt u. . , . dium weight ew $375 Jpportune time re agitation and work ( r s s h ev i m b ratlve ]ivtoek sales Organized farmers have won I mn by which  a ottom can e li hod by M ...... p .... ire vletozy in their fight for I .... SOut h St. Paul Minn, October 3 3 this kind, m file oP ....... * ...... arnmed wRh a elerns hl[hertntet'l" e South S paul market railrol rates, the Minnesota Fa 192 A ound 1 O00 ca e we re MeGuiI of the agricultural exten posmble. It is smllar o a uge . ago has ved he far- Buau Fedetin says in a reprt ceive] for the week' open ng' trade son dvison of the state university, scope, with a complex system of 12 he po r s ued today by tes on wheat, car grains and hay tans heees ofgchoiee beef bling' feed gra_ln hherally as at present. A hydroseope by dayhght,  al ch mo than the ppad to info its members that beng o y f he D k ta "The has never heen atimein the lewes. Anewspaper ]yingonthebot- of money they n*es ed be Interstate Commode commission 1% onta "w h a con# erab e umbe history of dahT farming," says Mr. tom at a depth of 360 ft from the sloe k ha ordered sweeplug duetlons in of Canad'ia o *. Well fate Men MeOuire, "when it will pay so well t surfa can be ad by means of the f Foliowlng hearings in Washintton, sold in Saturday's trade to pkers a; ., tonna testified ag the otfieial opened senntative of the Minnesota it h saved its by handilng not later than , the and hay be cut half  much as they reductions in in August, 1920, d to more than $9, beow the new rate on eks the ntral agency 1L is estimated that the or able to t aside appxl- per cent iz surplus at $5O0. on al oommodie ted amda.ts to 16 or 18 per cent. The raie came , Farm Bureau Federation operating eost gal action to force eductions, by el- ; of the ing a formal petition OU]d have had to pay for state Commerce commission kiug large that uecesive cuts be L opemt ve sales rate uease of tatement said. wipe(] out. 'e agency Ss h tluue ts fight for lower rate, rates 6xed by thel of both the state and national organl , the eours' "The and g because it means that pu our contention that high freight rate. ed have penalized agriculture d vr. ' be 2O to 35 per cent les tua/ly cleated a blockade between the thel fler a.d his market," Mr. Cahman summarized s,i. has eognized that rote. reduce& Winning the fight have .invested for the plneple of rate reduction s even more impolant to the i tlu the ataL savings that ma r- tn rueed ult fm this one order.  greater than the  will follow. A large part o] Savings to the far. Uhis year' grain crop alty hae ,v marketed, but the saving in fighl by the co- the far are within $2,O0O mated at serea) to the total mount the nolhwost alone. Even ptal stock and membe ing will amount to many times th total amount of money the invested n the farm bureau. )f the co-operative ship- "Next year the aetI cash savng which have iona hould be tmeo; it is estimated es ateney, a $50.0,00." The order for dued is less than 45 step n the right dheetlon, but only the first step. farm buau raiad rates e tim as much business are brought do to nol, they said. Cut on freight ras a a direct 43,784. benefit to the farraer, cordlng to F. it handled 1,- W. Peck, dictor of agric.lturaF ex- fa. 65,1 S5 hogs, The next ]art "Freight handled by any the farmer' income." Mr. Peck said, 16,516 eattle, 4,099 "and a deeease in flt charges 14, sheep, a (lit iuerse in his month, the eo- :eiv 81 of the Mr .Peck atso testifl before the on the market, It eommsslon, urging rate reductions, m a 'l%e tam bureau fedetions of the middle west led the fmet' fight for 1,144 ears from Angst lower rates,  , a fenee heId at heml- St Paul market qrters of the Minnesota tMs summer. None Too Early To Plan For lee" Cut DRIVE It fs ,,one to early to make plan for haestig ad storing the mng The farm ice upply ea often be gathered and stored at ligh Thorn ko ha the timt a hou with in Grain Growe walla holld wtie he ta headquarvs in s of ublieatons, uiversity fa, st., it s membehi p drv e Pul, for bleprist No. 171, pri 10 ets, showing plans for a 16,to. ea- aelty icehouse. "a u this state. farm bureau fedetion the national marketing e fana ; plane eonducta Is we go along," he am going to p marketing plan the farmer the hcds of selMg hi Wright's Underwear Wears Longer NDERWEAR, like U everytbing else, must eventually wear out, but its length of llfe should be sufficient to give yon the worth of your money. Wright% Underwear is made right from the right kind of material which insures a longer life than most any other kind. For Men mad Boy The Pioneer Store Co-Operative Co. $700, 51 head of these 1,236 pounds. still quotable at the saine price, seth. in aid for today's enough qlity $6.5O, tbs price bein paid for a part load, the best lot going at $6OO. Bulk of the gra hves cached $4.75, dol aund $4.0O to $4.5O. of the bt rass fat hetfe and IS to $6, with buk at $3,25 to $4.75. A few old shelly eanner .old am low as $2, buk ctters $2.25 to SZ. Pris of bologna bull range, rom 2.50 to $3.S0. balk $275 o $3.2n Bulk of t light veal ealves bught $10.0, a very few up to $10.50. Stack- ers d fders sold under a fairly rod deand at steady tu stronz pzee, bu}k at $4.OO to $5.25, tricb, g,, and choice kinds on up to aroam So00 Hogs adva,ced 15e te 2c Me.day, ,ane $5.7 to $7.4O, bulk $6.75 to $725. Bulk desirable pigs $8O to Lamb opened tron to 25c hher, uk gd and lambs $8.OO, hulk ood me- dium-welght ewes $375, some ghts $4.OO, good and choice western f,l ing lam quotable $6.75 to $7.OO. Hen House Should Be Well Ventilated Aording to N. E. Chapman, poul- try speeJallst for the state university , ventilation it be considered in buiiditg a pot]tr ith six panes each," he says, "c put in e t be opened as des) Ir wa weather. Lunch At The Eat Shop Where Everything " is home cooked. We serve a special dinner which includes meat, potatoeS, gravy, bread, butter, and coffee for 30c Try it--Yeuql Come Again. Our Pigs, cakes, doughnutg, cookies and sandwiches are all Home Made, and the coffee is the very best quality, with pure cream. The Eat Shop J. A. Jacobeon, Prop. Ir WITH OPE PU I W ilia E N iht t odelitlnre we' the, that's all For big jobs or small jol.lum- her wed to the proper lgth and wider--lumber for til priced. Boost Your Booster! Every one loves a booster, but every one is not always ready to boost for his booster. The booster is supposed to boost because he likes to do it.-and in a great measure that is so. The greatest booster in hlstory, however-- the home town paper--must combine with the atural liking for the boosting game, the re- wards the simplest rules of business requires for the continuance of the boosting spirit. The editor of your home town paper likes to be appreciated just as you like to be appr dated. And bow better may your appreciation be ex- preed than by the amount of money that goes through his cash register? Every one in this town and community will have an opportunity to show appreciation for the home town paper during the week of No- "ember 7-12, which will be observed in every state in the Union as "Subscribe for Your Home Town Paper Week" t Why not get the i BEST? When buying Meats get it at the City Meat Market You are sure then of getting only choice steaks, chops, roasts, stews, ere, LUNDSTROM & GEISEL, 0rtonville NOTICE To Our Patrons Beginning Tuesday, November I, we will sell for cash at the Mill door all feed flour and other goods we handle at greatly reduced prices. Apar- tial list at this time will show the amount of this reduction. Bran, ton ors ......... $19.00 Graham flour, lO0 ibm.. 4.50 Bu, lq ]h. lots ............. 1.1O Ghanl flour, 10 Ib ........... 50 Middlings, ton ............. 1.00 Co Meal lo0 Ibm .......... 3.00 Mhhlliags, lo0 lb ............ 1.20 Corn Meal, 10 Ihs ..... 35 Ground feed, ton 20.00 This meal and flour is home Gund fd, 100 [b ............. 1.15 manuftmd d fsh ground. Flour is too high for the price of wheat. We will grind your wheat, corn, rye, or buckwheat in- to fine meal or flour at ninety cents per 100 lbe. Bring in a bag or two and let us show whdt we can do; Everything will be sold in line with the above prices. See us before you buy flour. We will sell at the lowest price. Lake View Feed & Mill Co. (ORTOIr ILL FEED STORE) ED. SHULT, Imprietor. ii Professional and Business Directory I C. E. SIGLOH [or [xpert SERVICE WIRING REPAIRIN Pho 284-L Dr tanville, ]tli JOE BAYER & SON of the Ortoni[le Tailoring Co. All knda of dewing d presalag neatly done. Suits Made to Ord. Or toaville, ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP Shs repaired neatly and pr ly. o Work Gu(teed. GUS. E. ANDERSON. Pml JOHSPANYERS i Telephone 287 Ortonll,i PAUL DIRNBAUER / Brick Layer ai Plast Stone Ma d A Kins Cement Work.  , Ortville, Minn. It. P. PETERSON & SON Dray Line Big Stone Lake leo "hone 38 Or tonvin Kodak DEVLOPIIg I PRINTING ENLARGING ?mpt, qlits Sere, Mo4qna{ pre t THE REED STUDIO Oonviile Mi. 'DR. R. D. EIFENBARK ] OSTE OPATRC PRYSIL4.M One blk u ill fram GU' g Stor Vapor-Sulphur Cubist Treat tFor rheumatic, nouritm, t, t F. L. BROWN ThE JEWELleR 3r tonvil le, innam FOR TRUCK SERVICE ! d any kind of light lm h drariaz Hausauer Eros. PHONE 268 .ll Orders Givem Prompt A A. R. KAERCHER Attorney at Law Odd Fellows Euildin Ortonville, Min DR. F. W. DUNN. CHIROPRACTOR D. D. WHITE, D. * PH. . Spiegeplser 12-13-14-15-16 Shaker BI. Ortoane, Mtnn, Cal. Win. Wellendorf AUCTIOlqER 30 ye' eiee. No waeU ing ou yor y, Callow write  rly mad Bet in oa m emdy date. Oem'Bl MiaaNt .I.A. JOH-MSON PIANO TUIqI AND REPAIRING ltsmawm St * 41 AII Work Gmrtti Or tonvlH ]Mnneet WILL FINCH pieul Pslutr Phn 2-L Ali Work Guarteed ELMER SALSBURy ] *HE WELL DIGE" I?ifteen Yra' ]llmm Ortonville, Mln R. .D.1 We will pay the ftllmrll ! dces f ira&: Old Ir. gto te $10. pe tt Copper and heavy ]4c telk per p0ued. Old Raz  t p Wnm/. Old Ribber mul Ttre t ee te lt per prom& Pipe FItthtt  Omwh Beltisg sdd ISm earfled bt toelc Acetylme Wttq. The Ortonvi Foundry I 3, 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT e Farmers Corner ESPECIALLY TO THE ACq'IVITIES OF FARMERS AND FARMER'S CLUBS. SAVES FREIGHT RATE CUT $15,000.00 IS FARMER VICTORY Selling Agency Pays For Charges On Grain And Hay Ordered Stock Investment LoweredBureau Seeks Eleven Weeks. Further Reductions. livestock sales Organized farmers have won a de- by Minnesota pro-] cisive victory in their fight for lower he South St. Paul market lrailroad rates, the Minnesota Farm ago has saved the far-il Bureau Federation says in a report al cash, more than the l prepared to inform its members that of money they invested] the Interstate Commerce commission stock, has ordered sweeping reductions in the report issued today by j rates on wheat, coarse grains and hay department of the Bureau federation. Co-operative Cam- opened for bust- 8, it has saved its pa- by handling their live- commission rates, the report said. reductions in commission to more than $9,- Weeks, the central agency able to set aside approxi- cent of all commissions farm bureau statement surplus at $5,800. Co-operative Commis- has handled the larg- done by any firm on the an operating cost at least tha, the farmers of the have had to pay for volume of business Co-operative sales cam- Statement said. agency is charging f rates fixed by the I and warehouse commis- appeal to the courts dealers has pre- enforcement of the of the new schodule of charges put into effect company are be 20 to 35 per cent less rates. summarized the central livestock selling have ,invested $9,400 in Stock of the. association; savings to the estock 1 n reduced" handling greater than the capital Savings to the far- commission rates and accumulated by the co- COmPany are within $2,000 equal to the total amount capital stock and member- that 40,000 farmera of the co-operative ship- which have joined agency. The total in- farmers in the cen- ts less than 45 cents firm, altho- months old, is handling times as much business on the market. 8 to October 19 it head of livestock; its handled 43,784. period, it handled 18.- calves, 65,165 hogs, aheep The next largest business handled by any 16,516 cattle, 4,039 hogs and 14,500 sheep. this month, the co- received 81 of the on the market. It as high as 88 cats in a 1,144 cars from August 30, there are 20 firms St. Paul market which than that number in the months endig September DRIVE QRAIN GROWERS Co-operative Marketing Minnseot a Of- Up Members. Grain Growers, Inc., will headquarters in St. its membership drive l organization director Farm Bureau fed- cepted the "management rain Growers' organiza- gn iv this state. The di- farm bureau federation to conduct the mere- for the national co- marketing corpora- his position as farm bureau's organi- Planned to conduct a in St. Paul this to start on a small as we go along," he are going to pros- marketing plan of of Seventeen absolu- and see that every a member of the Inc., understands and knows exactly contract he signs will be the regular of the U. S. Grain the the farmer the methods of selling his central marketing sale, eonsignmeat and Following hearings in Washington, at which Thomas E. Cashman of Owa- tonna testified ag the official repre- senntative of the Minnesota Farm Bureau, the commission ordered rates reduced not later than November 20. The order directs that rates on wheat and hay be cut half as much as they were increased in August, 1920, and that rates on coarse grains be set 10 per cent below the new rates on wheat. It is estimated that the or- der means a reduction of 25 per cent on coarse grain, and that the average reduction on all commodities affec- ted amounts to 16 or 18 per cent. The rate came just after the Ameri- can Farm Bureau Federation took le- gal action to force "reductions, by fil- ing a formal petition with the Inter- state Commerce commission asking that successive cuts be ordered until the whole rate increase of 1920 is wiped out. The farm bureau will con- tinue its fight for lower rates, officers of both the state and national organi- zations assert. "The commission's order cutting rates on hay and grain is a victory for the farmers, because it means that the United States government admits our contention that high freight rates have penalized agriculture and vir- tually ceated a blockade between the falzner and his market," Mr. Cashman said. "The Interstate Commerce com- mission has recognized that rates must be reduced. Winning the fight for the principle of rate reduction is even more important to the farmer than the actual savings that may re- sult from this one order. Other re- ductions wffi follow. A large part of this year's grain crop already has been marketed, but the saving in freight on what is left on the farms is esti- mated at several million dollars for the northwest alone. Even that sav- ing will amount to many times the total amount of money the farmers have invested in the farm bureau. "Next year the actual cash saving should be tremendous; it is estimated at $50,000,000." The order for reduced rates is a step in the right direction, but only the first step, farm bureau federa- tion officials said. Further reductions must. be ordered until railroad rates are brought down to normal, they said. Cuts on freight rates are a direct benefit to the farmer, according to F. W. Peck, director of agriculturar ex- tension work at University farm. "Freight rates are a direct tax on the farmer's income," Mr. Peck said. "and. a decrease in freight charges means a direct increase in his re- turns." Mr .Peck also testified before the commission, urging rate reductions, The farm bureau federations of the middle west led the farmers' fight for lower rates, as a result of the midwest farm bureau conference held at head- quarters of the Minnesota federation this summer None Too Early To Plan For Ice" Cut It is ' none too early to make plans for harvesting and storing the coming crop of ice. The farm ice supply can often be gathered and stored at light expense. Those who have the time and means to build a house with in- sulated walls should write the office of publications, university farm, St. Paul, for blueprint No. 171, price 10 cents, showing plans for a 16,ton ca- pacity icehouse. i Wrights Underwear Wears Longer NDERWEAR, like everything e 1 s e, must eventually wear out, but its length of life should be sufficient to give you the worth of your money. Wrlght's Underwear is made right from the right kind of material which insures a longer life than most any other kind. For Men and Boy, WRIGHT'$ IIDSI I/N.WEAII The Pioneer Store Co-Operative Co. STRONG TO HIGHER LIVESTOCK TRADE Cattle Trade Strong At Week's Open- ingHogs Mostly 15c to 25c Higher, T o p $7.40. Monday's Closing-- Cattle II,000. Market closinff stea- dy tO strollg', grass beeves $4 to $7. bulk $4.75 to $5.75. Calves 900. Mar- ket steady to strong, bulk of besl lights $10.00. Hogs 9,400. Market 15c to 25c higher, bulk $6.75 to $7.25, top $7.40, bulk good pigs $8.50 to $8.60, Sheep 17,500. Fat lambs strong to 25c higher, bulk $8.00. bulk good me- dium-weight ewes $3.75. South St. Paul, Minn., October 31, 1921: Around 11,000 cattle were re- ceived for the week's opening trade, being mostly from the Dakotas and Montana, with a considerable number of Canadian origin. Well fatted Mon- tana beeves of choice beef breeding sold in Saturday's trade to packers az $7.00, 51 head of these averaging 1,236 pounds. Altho a like kind are still quotable at the same price, noth- ing arrived for today's trade with enough quality and fat to sell over $6.50, this price being paid for a part load, the best lot going at $6.00. Bulk of the grass beeves cashed from $4.75, a few of the commonest ones down around $4.00 to $4.50. A few of the best grass fat heifers and young cows sold from $5 to $6, with bulk at $3.25 to $4.75. A few old shelly canners sold as low as $2, bulk of canners and cutters $2.25 to $3. Prices of bologna bulls rangetl _rom. $2.50 to $3.50. bulk $2.75 zo $3.2- Bulk of best light veal calves brought $10.00, a very few up to $10.50. Stock- ers and feeders sold under a fairly broad demand at steady to  strong p15c.,, bulk at $4.00 to $5.25, strict y good and choice kinds on up to around $6.00. Hogs advanced 15c to 25c Monday, range $5.75 to $7.40, bulk $675 to $7.25. Bulk desirable pigs $8.50 to $.%60. Lambs opened strong to 25c higher, bulk good and choice native Dakota lambs $8.00, bulk good me- dium-weight ewes $3.75, some lights $4.00, good and choice western feed- ing lambs quotable $6.75 to $7.00. Hen House Should Be Well Ventilated According to N. E. Chapman, poul- try specialist for the state university and the farm bureau, ventilation is one of the most important factors to be considered in building a poultry house. "The windows should be of two sash with six panes each," he says, "so put in as to be opened as desired in warm weather. Transoms of muslin above the windows, or a louvred frame Lunch At The Eat Shop Where Everything is home cooked. We serve a special dinner which include meat, potatoes, gravy, bread, butter, and coffee for 30c Try itYou'll Come Again. Our Pis, cakes, doughnuts, cookies and sandwiches are all Home Made, and the coffee is the very b e s t quality, with pure cream. The Eat Shop J. A. Jacobson, Prop. ' HEN it comes to deliver- ing the goods on time we're there, that's all. For big jobs or small jobs--lum- ber sawed to the proper length and widthlumber for every practical purpose prac- tically priced. Geiet bmaber CO. Ortonviile Minn. ;i. beside the windows, will allow the frosty air to go out and fresh air to come in. The windows should go up to the plate to allow the sun to shine back in the house; thus louvred frames tside the windows will give best ven- tilation. Call on county agents for plans and specifications for poultry houses." Good Practice Now To Feed Cows Grain Campaigns for better feeding and dairy farmer can afford to feed grain v;hen a bushel of oats and a pound of butterfat are the same price. This year a pound cf butterfat is double the market value of a bushel of oats and other grain is lower than it ha:- been for years. "The success of a co-operative creamery depends upon three factors a sufficient amount of butterfat, the manufactme of a high quality of but- tcr. and good business management. it certainly is good business manage- :ent for every co-operative creamery ,sociation to urge good feeding this better dairy cows are in order at any fall and winter. time, but the present is an especially The bydroscope is a clever instru- opportune time for agitation and work ment by which the sea bottom can be of this kind, in the opinion of A. J. examined with a clearness hitherto im- McGuire of the agricultural exten- possible. It is similar to a huge tele- sign division of the state university.  scope, with a complex system of 12 "There has never been a time in the I lenses. A newspaper lying on the bot- history of dailT farming," says Mr. ] tom at a depth of 360 feet from the McGuire, when it will pay so well to / surface can be read by means of the feed grain liberally as at present. Abvdroscope by daylight. m i J " " i .m iH J.21 . Boost Your Booster! Every one loves a booster, but every one is not always ready to boost for his booster. The booster is supposed to boost because he likes to do it,---and in a great measure that is so. The greatest booster in history, however-- the home town paper--must combine with the natural liking for the boosting game, the re- wards the simplest rules of business requires for the continuance of the boosting spirit. The editor of your home town paper likes to be appreciated just as you like to be appre- ciated. And how better may your appreciation be ex- pressed than by the amount of money that goes through his cash register? Every one in this town and community will have an opportunity to show appreciation for the home town paper during the week of No- vember 7-12, which will be observed in every state in the Union as "Subscribe for Your Home Town Paper Week" Why not get the BEST? When buying Meats get it at the City Meat Market You are surb then of getting only choice steaks, chops, roasts, stews, etc. LUNDSTROM & GEISEL, Ortonville NOTICE To Our Patrons Beginning Tuesday, November 1, we will sell for cash at the Mill door all feed flour and other goods we handle at greatly reduced prices. A par- tial list at this time will show the amount of this reduction. Bran, ton lots .................... $19.00 Bran, 100 lb lots .................. 1.10 Middlings, ton .................... 21.00 Middlings, 100 lb ............. 1,20 Ground feed, ton .................. 20,00 Ground feed, 100 lb ............. 1A5 Graham flour, 100 lbs ....... 4.50 Graham flour, 10 lbs ................ 50 Corn Meal 100 lbs ............. 3.00 Corn Meal, 10 lbs ............ 35 This meal and flour is home manufactured and fresh ground. Flour is too high for the price of wheat. We will grind your wheat, corn, rye, or buckwheat in- to fine meal or flour at ninety cents per 100 lbs. Bring in a bag or two and let us show what we can de. Everything will be sold in line with the above prices. See us before you buy flour. We will sell at the lowest price. Lake View Feed & Mill Co. (ORTONVILLE FEED STORE) ED. SHULT, Proprietor. PAGE T. i Professional and ! .!. Business Directory C. E. SIGLOH SERVICE WIRING REPAIRINC Phone 284-L Ortonville, Mim O JOE BAYER & SON Of the Ortonville Tailoring Co. All kinds of cleaning and press/aS neatly done. Suits Made to Order. Ortonviile, Mim ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP Shoes repaired neatly and p- ly. Our Work Guaranteed. GUS. E. ANDERSON, Prop. @ JOHN SPANYERS Light Hauling of all Kinds Express and Baggage Telephone 287 Ortanvill 1 PAUL DIRNBAUER Brick Layer and Plasterer Stone Mason and Atl Kinds of Cement Work. Ortonville, Minn. R.F. PETERSON & SON Dray Line Big Stone Lake Ice i, Phone 38 Ortonville, ]bEau ' 0" Kodak DEVELOPING PRINTIN ENLARGING Prompt, Qua|ity Service, Modert Pri. THE REED STUDIO Ortonville Minn. , i'i DR. R. D. RIFENBARK ! OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN , One block uhill fraw Gunderma' ,rug Store Vapor-Sulphur Cabinet Treatment (For rheumatism, neuritis, etc.} F. L. BROWN THE JEWELER Ortonville. Minnesota @ FOR TRUCK SERVICE and any kind of light and hea draying Hausauer Bros. PHONE 268 All Orders Given Prompt Attenttes A. B. KAERCHER Attorney at Law Odd Fellows Building Ortonville, Minn. DR. F. W. DUNN. CHIROPRACTOR D. D. WHITE, D. C PEL C Spinographer 12-13-14-15-16 Shumaker Bldg. Ortonvqe, Minn. Col. Wm. Wellendorf AUCTIONEER 30 years' experience. No praeti mg on your property. Call ee write me early and get in on m early date. Ortonvflte. Mhtmm J. A. JOHNSON PIANO TUNING AND REPAIRING PHONES---Reaidenco 194 ' Fundtm'e Store - M 'All Work Guaranteed Ortonville, Mnnesot a. FINCH Experienced Painter Phone 235.L All Work Guaranteed ELMER SALSBURY !i aTHE WELL DIGGER" Fifteen Years' Exlrleaw Ortonville, Minn. R.F.D. We will pay the falbwlg prices for junk: Old Iron, $11.00 to $10.00 pe tm Copper and heavy ]kass,4e to 8 per poumL Old Rags,  cent Pe lmtmd. Old Rubbers mul  K seat to 1 cent lV immtd, Pipe Fittiap, Brus Belthtg and Hue earrted In stock. Acetyhme Wldhtg. The Ortonvii Foundry