Newspaper Archive of
The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
Lyft
November 10, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
PAGE 1     (1 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 1     (1 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
November 10, 1921
 

Newspaper Archive of The Ortonville Independent produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT 2 ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1921 NUMBER 27 0 BAILEY MAYOR BY 156 VOTES of Parties Shown Voters In Failure to ote Tickets "Straight." es Cast. of both cliques are victories in the general city held here on Tuesday at which largest number in the of city politics, was cast, re- in the election of James A. for mayor, O. A. Ostlind, N. J. and John Carlson for alder- W. E. Wellman and P. aldermen for the First J. Hausauer and R. F. Wal- for the Second Ward; MacMurphey for the posi- Judge. the endorsements and in- of both factions to "stick tickets,, the voters demonstra- that they had mind of and voted according to their splitting the tickets and Candidates they felt descry- vote. it is true that a large hum- sides "stuck," it was shown that the voters skip- and placed their mark the men who, in their judg- entitled to their vote, dis- .the petty fighting which m vogue in Ortonville for and which has done more the city than all failings of nature. citizens see In the of the new officers a body that tlifficult to sway at will and open minds desirous of in the best interests of the prejudice, fear or favor. feature was the of Wesley Evans as City us-j Won over L. A. Reynolds bYE after both had been in dark-I the day of election when] were brought to light by I ers by parties anxious humor into the serious- "fight." movies were defeated by a Taore than two to one. given by wards is as fol- 1st 2nd Total 251 167 418 170 82 2{rz 1st 2nd Total 387 242 629 1st 2nd 3rd 374 224 598 at Large-- 1st 2nd 3rd 240 119 359 241 126 367 220 127 347 183 135 318 241 167 408 0 0 1 First Ward-- 1st 2nd Total ................................ 235 ................................ 181 ...................................... 166 .................................. Ibo 2nd Ward- .................................... 138 ................................ 217 ..................................... 105 Judge-- 1st 2nd Total 116 68 183 286 172 458 0 3 8 0 1 1 1st 2nd Total 10 9 19 0 Y 7 Judge-- 0 6 6 1st 2nd Total 142 71 213 263 179 442 office of city Justice is in the city clrter, it is election of Evans is il- grounds that the position in the notice of election to law. This office for the past 8 due to the fact that no cases broughb in and that persons who were Years past refused to quail- that his election is tates that he is qualified fill the position; that justice of the peace for Minn., where a half section of land; from McGregoi" Iowa, and that he of the Spanish American s Book Week Re Nov. 13 to 18 Children's books will be the department stores of November 13 library for the a large se.leetian Gifts may be at the library p.m. All who invited. Armistice Day Program " For Ortonville Is Outlined Conforming with a program pre- pared by the local post of the American Legion, Ortonville, will celebrate Armistice bay, Friday in a fitting baY, and pay solemn and sincere tri- ute to the soldiers, sailors and mar- ines who gave their lives for Ameri- ca in the great world war. The pro- gram outlined is as follows: 11:00 a. m.--Stores close. ! 11:50 a. ,m.--Assemble at Orpheum. 12:00 m.--Attention. Silent Prayer. 12:02 p. m.--Taps. 12:05 p. m.Program. 30 minutes at Orpheum theatre. 1:00 to 5:00 p. m.--Open house at Legion Rooms. 3:00 p. m. Movie Matinee at Or- pheum theatre. 9:00 p. m.--Legion Dance. I. O. O. F. Hall. $1.10 per couple including tax. Everyone is expected to stop work wherever they are, at 12:00 m. sharp, and stand at attention for two min- utes, in honor to the unknown Ameri- ca soldier, killed in the World War, who will be buried in Arlington Me- morial Amphitheater in Washington at that hour. To overcome the differ- ence in timepieces, generally prevaqll - ing. the fire siren will be sounded at 12 o'clock noon, and again at 12:02 p. m, Aged Woman Attacked By Cow While Opening Gate Mrs. John Storiem, aged 78 years, was rendered unconscious about noon Sunday when she was attacked by a cow on their farm east of town after opening a gate to allow the cattle ac- cess to the pasture. Her injuries were ot of a serious nature ltho it was thought at first that she suffere| broken bones. The critter, after knocking her down attempted to gore her but members of the family who heard her cries for help arrived in time to save her from further injury. Fair Association Elects Officers for Coming Year Clinton, Minn.--Offeers elected at a meeting of the Big Stone County Agri- cultueaflm$, held on Tuesday at the Clinton State Bank, for  the coming SNOW SLIDE FOR CHILDREN PLAN OF CIVIC CLUB Council Asked to Share In Cost of Structure. Peti- tions Presented In Road Matters. Youngsters of this city may lay cPaim to the longest and fastest snow slide in this section of the state if plans which were laid before the council at its regular meeting Mon- day night materialize. Appearing before the council inbe: half of the Civic Club, Mrs. J. Kar and Mrs. Alvah Matthews requested assistance from the city in the con- struction of an approach from the bluff along the lake road to the lake for use as a snow slide for the chil- dren of the community, pointing out the recreational benefits and calling attention to the lessening of the haz- zard by the use of a proper slide loca- ted along the lakeshore instead of the use of hills in the business section where traffic interferes. As a result O. A. Ostlind and Dr. Chas: Bolsta were appointed to ascertain the prob- able expense and go over the grounds with reuresentatives of the Boy Scout organization and Civic Club for ' the purpose of deciding upon a suitable location. The committee is to report at the next regular meeting of the council. Two petitions were presented before the council elative to city streets. One asked for the extension of the street from the corner near the green houses east between b!ocks one and 2, SchoenJs second addition, north to east and west street in Westling's north along the north side of Let 25 and the other requested the city to vacate that portion of Minnesota ave- nue between lots 1, 2, 3, and 4 in block 5, Cook's Addition, and lots 5 and 6 in block 21, Orton's First Addition. This is the section of the street which las never been in use because of the ra- vine which intercepts the feasibility of extending the road from the corner by the L. P. Hess residence toward the residence of Ed. Shult. year are: J. C. Bender, president; A. Action on both petitions, which were M. Trebil, secretary; O. T. Harrison, signed by a large number of interest- treasurer. Affairs of the associatibn were ed property owners in the respective neighborhoods, will be had at the next found to be in good condition despite regular meeting. the loss which the association ex- A bill of $115 in favor of Hausauer perienced this year due to unfavor- abre weather during the three daYS set for the fair, according to reports of those in charge. AUTOS COLLIDE TWO INJURED Three Cars Badly Smashed On Road South of Bellingham. Two Per- sons Taken To Hospital. With three cars smashed and in the ditch, all within the radius of three miles, the K. T. Trail south of Bet- lingham, took the appearance of a race course Sunday evening. Two men in the hospital, injured, one car wrecked beyond repair, and three others badly wrecked, is the toll of the accidents that ocured at that place, all within an hour's time. The first accident happened about three ,miles south of Bellingham. when a Ford, carrying a man, his wife, and three childDen, one of them a baby, crashed heUong into a Maxwell car coming South, driven Ijy Ogis Tell, ac- companled by John Hessefinger, both of Fargo, N. D. The Maxwell was completely wrecked, with all four wheels broken to splinters and the rest of the car smashed beyond r@- pair. The two occupants of the Max- well who were injured were taken to the hospital at Madison, while the people in the Ford were unscratched, but all suffering from seveDe shock. The Ford was not damaged with ex- Brothers, being the difference between the .amount subscribed by individuals and that due for the graveling and blading of the road from the Minne- sota River Bridge to the State line was allowed. The total cost was $508. Aside from the allowance, of a few bills no other business was transacted. Game and Fish Depart- merit Issues Order Orders received today by Warden O. S. Briggs from the State Game and Fish department, dated at St. Paul, November 9, 1921, are as fol- I lows: " , I "Investigation having been made,. and it having been found that fish[ contained therein are in danger of smothering in dnter by reason of the shallowness o f t h e water, per- mission is hereby granted to Cake I such fish as may be found therein] from the followi'ng waters, in any manner, until April 1st, 1922, for do- mestic use only, as provided for in Chapter 400, General Laws, 1919: "Big Stone CountyKells Lake, 9 miles east of Ortonville; Otrey Lake, 6 miles east of Ortonville;Barr Lake, 2 miles southeast of Correll. "Kandiyohi County--Lake Eight, n Section 8, township S, New London, Henschion Lake. "Lac Qui Parle CountySlough, 6 miles northwest of Madison. "CARLOS AVERY, Ca/he and Fish Commissioner. (Seal) " St. Paul, Minnesota, November 9th, 1921." ception of broken "lights and radia- tor. Appearance of the cars which were over 15 feet apart after the crash, would indicat  that 'the Max- well was going at least 30 miles per hour. The force of the impact was beard at a farmhouse, one fourth mile away. An hour after this happened, a car going north, driven by a party of yeung men who it is said, had been imbibing too freely of liquor, "killed" the engine in the middle of the road. A gentleman driving a Ford coming from Bellingham, at a fair rate of speed, failed to see them in the dusk and to avert a collision, tried to turn quickly to the right. Being too near ihe steep embankment, his car went into the ditch, and thru a fence, wreck- ing his ear and breaking several fence .osts. This man was unhurt. The next accident was purely a case of too fast driving it is reported. A product of Henry Ford's plant taking 4:o the ditch for reasons of its own. A. W. McLane will attend the elec- trical lecture in St. Paul Thursday put on by the FairbanksMorse Com- pany for the benefit of their travel- ling salesmen and emploFees. "The Red Sross of Peace" At Orpheum November 12 Rehearsals by the cast of the Red Cross pageant, "The Red Cross of Peace," convince those in charge of the undertaking that it will be very well given. Those taking part have been de- voting themselves whole heartedly to their work, with the view of making it well, worth while seeing, expecting thereby to stimulate more active sup- port to that wonderful institution, the American Red Cross. The pageant will be given on Satur- day, November 12, at the Orpheum theatre in Ortonville, both afternoon (at 3:00 o'clock) and in the evening (a 8:00). No admission will be charged at either performance. hoot Deer Out " Of Season;Fined A venturesome deer met a V]olen$ end while passing thrutevens county about August 2... As a result Paul Goodell and Frank Hill, game war- dens of Grant and Pope counties brought five men beore Judge G. W. Beise on Tuesday morning. Two of them, Emil Augustson of Horon township and George Metzger of lien- cock were fined $50 and costs for shooting deer out of season. The rest of the quintet were released. The idea of a deer in Stevens coun- ty is almost unbeliebable, but the gentlemen who ate the venison and paid tim fines can testify hat the presence was actual. The animal was first ,seen in a cornfield of a farmer in Hrton township. The story was told and retold until it was almost forgotten around Hancock, but mean- while the wardens had gotten a clue which they worked patiently until they secmd sufficient evidence to act. A couple ot deer were seen east of Glenwood earlier in the season, and the deer shot here was probably one of them. Last winter a deer was seen near Niemakle's north of Donnelly, and two years ago there were a couple of deer near C. B. Kloos' farm north of Morris, most of the winter. ---Morris Tribune. Other Hunters Leave for North In Quest of Deer Ortonville will be well represented this fall in the north woods. The party of seven, including Emil Ost- lind, Wayne Kelly, Jimmie Smith, Otto Harris, Ed. Zehringer, Dr. D. M. O'Donnell and John Crippen, left on scheduled time Sunday morning for Big Forks, in Itaska county, via Re Speed Wagon, adequately covered to keep out the weather. Monday morning, R. U. Herzog and Roy Geier started for Brooten, Minne- sota, in Mr. Geier's car, with the in- intention of bringing back a deer apiece. At Brooten they will meet George Eastman of this city, who has a cabin near Opstead in Mille Lacs county, with whom they will hunt. Hold-up Men's Plans Fail When Autoist Speeds By On Sunday. night between eight and nine o'clock, an attempt was made by two unknown .men to hold up Ted Jack- son of Clinton. On his return from Ortonville near the gravel pit the strangers with drawn guns commanded him to stop but Mr. Jackson who surmised their purpose immediately speeded up and made his get-away. About the same time G. M, Johnson and party also of Clinton on their re- turn from Watertown nearly ran into a car which stood directly across the road at this place which was without lights and is now thought to have been the robbers' car.' Mrs. R. M. Lybarger of Fayette- ville, Arkansas, is here for about two weeks visiting relatives and friends and looking after a 240 acre tract of land owned by her in Stevens county. She was formerly Miss Irtie Matthews and is a sister of Mrs. Frank Finberg of Clinton. Celebrated Tenor and Pianist To Appear Nov. 17 Carsten Well and Miss Esther Er- hart Well, noted tenor and pianist, will gppear in concert at the high school auditorium on Thursday evem ing, November 17 at eight,o'clock, it was announced today by nembers of the Community Music Club of this city, under whose auspices they will appear. Mr. Victor Nielsson, critic, in th, Minneapolis Journal had this to sa of Mr. Well. "The drawing card of the vening's program was the tenor sger Carsten Well who in-his lyric! voice and clear diction sang songs by Grieg, Arlberg and Rosenfeld. His voice is of such a true tenor quality and his conceptions convincing." gOf Miss Esther Well, the Chicago Tribune says: "Esther Erhart Well displayed wlled fingers, a retie of genuine beauty and much variety as commendable taste." The Wiscon- sin State Journal says "Mrs. Woll is more than fortunate in her magne- tism, and charm of personality. She played beautifully with a clearness and fluency and singing tone that were truly delightful, transforming the in- strument into a living, breathing and thinking thing that takes absolute pos- session of the listener." While in Europe Mr. Well studied with teachers like Mine. Ottesen, Holst, Hansen, Yeatmen Griffith ann George Hamlin. He was selected as the soloist at the great Millennial celebration of Normandy, France, |n 1911. Lovers of phonograph m uslc are well aqminted with his voiob as he has prodweed records for the Vic- tor, Columbia and Edison companies. Tickets will be on sale at both Drug stores. The entertainment is being ofl'd by the club at 26 for children and 50c for adults. It is expected to draw a capacity house. STATE PARK FOR BOTTOMS IS PLAN OF REP. J. D. ROSS R. P. Chase, State Auditor, Inspects Grotmds and Of- fers Suggestions for Ira. provement. Aid Sought. Should plans of Representative J. D. Ross of this city be carried out the Minnesota River bottoms from the foot of Big Stone Lake to the railroad embankment, will within a few years, become a well platted and laid-out state park, instead of the "limberlost" that it now is. Favorable action for the establish- ment of an Inter-State Park on the bottoms is expected at the next ses- sion of the Legislature at which, it is intimated, that formal application will be made. 'With this view in mind, State Audi- tor R. P. Chase came to this city last Thursday and went over the gsoun0 in company with Mr. Ross and others and after his trip of inspection made the statement that it was his opinion that such a park could be designated. Mr. Chase appeared in his capacity a chairman of the State Park Board. "Planting of trees in proper season secured from the Forestry Department without waiting for the construction of the proposed dike and reservoir would be possible, Mr. Chase stated, if a small embankment or levee was thrown up along the river. This would keep the water within its na,ral channel when the stream backs up with the spring freshets, it was point- ed out, and when the reservoir and dike have been completed, in accord- ance with the State's project now un- der way, tbe park driveways, proposed athletic field and other improvements could be made. Mr. Chase was entertained by Representative J. D. Ross during his stay here. On Thursday afternoon he left for Graceville in company with Mr. Ross, enator F. L. Cliff and Dr. B. R Kern in the doctor's car. Beardsley Men Buy Holsteins. County Agent Roske, in company with Jake Frey of Beardsley, return- ed last week from Auburndale, Wis., with a carload of fine Holstein cows, six of them pure-breds and twenty-two high grades. Farmernear Barry and Beardsley pooled in making this pur- chase, dividing up the carload between them. Auburndale is the richest cheese manufacturing center in Wisconsin, and the cattle purchased are ;from some of the best herds there. BROWNS VALLEY ROAD GETS AID l Minnesota Highway Department To Continue Operations on Big Scale During Winter Season. Gravel surfacing of 23.4 miles on the Browns Valley-Johnson section of the Minnesota trunk high- way No. 28, estimated at $100,000 is part of the big winter program of highway construction announced by Charles M. Babcock, state highway commissioner, following action by congress to provide funds to carry out the "more work--better roads" plan to cut idleness and. build needed roads. Flyer No. 17 Loses Two Sleeping Cars in Mishap Coast-bound Milwaukee passenger train No. 17, due to arrive here at 3:32 a. m., met with an accident two .miles east of Appleton on Sunday morning, when a broken draw-bar fell to the track, throwing the two rear sleeping cars into the ditch. Not a person is reported to have received as much as a scratch, altho the train was traveUng at betwee thirty and forty miles per hour when th accident occured. Seven teachers from the Ortonville Public schools who were returning from the cities' after having been in attendance at the Educational Con- vention were among the passengers. They were the Misses Irgens, Cassel, Mealy, McBride and Rourke and , Messrs. J. M. Snesrud and T. N. Tragethon. Nothing was known of the mishap by the passengers riding in the cars which preceeded the two that@were ditched until they had been informed, according to statements. The train crew after having discovered the loss of the sleepers returned to the scene and aided the scantily clad victims i securing "comfy" quarters. The train then prceeded on its trip three hours late A wrecking crew from Monte- video arrived shortly afterwards, and the track was cleared without caus- ing delay to other trains. Rights of Auto Drivers- Threshed Out In Court The rights of automobile drivers in turning around at street intersections was threshed out in Municiual Court here Saturday, when the case of L. P. Satre, of Madison vs Dr. J. R. Cain, of this city, came on for trial, result- ig in a decision in favor of Dr. Cairn Institution of the proceedings grew out of an accident which occurred on June 29, 1921, when Dr. Cain, who was driving on second street toward the lake turned to the left at the in- tersection of Second street and Jack- son avenue, commencing to turn just before reaching the Park garage, an4 had, as Lewis J. Bailey testified, about three-fourths completed the turn when the car driven by the plaintiff struck the end of the bumper on the Cain car, tearing off the fenders on the left side and damaging it other- wise. The question involved was: "Who had the right-of-way ?, The Law pro- vides that "An operator intending turn his vehicle to the left shall drive along the center of the roadway, ex- tending his arm in a horizontal posi- tion and slow down. A vehicle shall have the right-of-way over another vehicle whic is approaching from the left in an intersecting highway, and shall give the right-of-way to an operator of a vehicle approaching from the right on an intersecting higaway. In cities or villages, or any place where traffic is large, or on streets unusually congested .with traffic of horse drawn vehicles or street ears, slow moving vehicles .must keep to the right curb, allowing those moving rapidly to keep nearer the center of the street. All vehicles must keep to the right of the center of the street." From the testimony offered relative to the position of the cars when the \\; accident happened, the court held that Dr. Cain had the right-of-way. Red Cross Drive Nov. U To 24. Solicitors for the American Red Cross will call upon all residents of the county from November 11 to 24. to receive contributions to the 5th an- Bids on this section of the road will ............. . " .....  . .. ...  nual 1O11 Lal! trla organization, ac- De receive(! a the omce o ne rllgn- . ..... . ,. cormng zo awce from donn way Department at St. Paul, on No-.., .......... ._ s vember 14, at which time Marti Lar- rea:rlY:ortB:lSst:Y'ct: w.7: kin of the Larkin-Schoen Constiuction . - g - Y' :,  urges mat everyone maze a specmt Company will represent the local corn-I .............. pany In case c'hey are successful in I enr to give reeiy o, ms tuna. ". ....... 7. t Big Stone County s allotment is securing the contrac rot me wnole ....... ^^ , ...... t ..... ki st .... at t'e taDu ,.t,,.mu.uu, nty per cen ot the s retcn ar. hal" U  a:e n n , _ ,  , , -- , om e -ed to m ke ran e I amount rmse to De remme zor worz c  puny !xpect . a a r g "]of the Red Cross in this county and merits tor me use ot a steam snoveh t ...... ..., . - -. .............. ,  I tne Durance sen r,o a;lOnat neaxtquar- lrle nrst llSt OI Z,I winter joos--zo| t rs miles of paving and 274 miles of e . gravel-surfacing estimated to cost Sic @ 687,000--is to be followed soon by oth- ers of grading and bridge work, also special team jobs to further relieve unemployed and especially the settlers and farmers of some districts, accord- ing to John I Mullen, assistant com- missioner and chief highway engin- eer. The tentative plan to use about $4,500,000 this winter or the dual purpose or reducing idleness. and im- proving roads. Special efforts are being made to spread the work that many, sections! may share in the benefits. Several roposed undertakings were postponed until next year because not adapted to cold weather operations. Work is expected to start about December 1. The state law requiring three weeks of advertising, first bids are to be c, pened November 29 to 30. Then the succesul bidders will be made pub- lic that job seekers may apply direct to them. The highway department: will have no jobs to fill. :rail Delegates Appointed. John Carlson and R. F. Walker were appointed by Mayor Schoen as dele- gates to the Eleventh Annual State Bob sleds are in general use. Meeting of the Yellowstone Trail As- seeiatia being held today at Olivia. @ ....... wIiTER ARRIVES. Nature donned her most beau- tiful of winter raiment in the first snow-fall of the season on Monday when a precipitation of three inches fell on the level, leaving the trees with the ap- pearance of a Fairyland and a scene that is nat often wit- nessed in this part of the state, Roses, sweet peas and apple blossoms were nipped in the bud and the second crpp of vege, tables defeated inlts effort to outdo all precedents of years gone by. Closets were  and wood-sheds turned topsy-turvy in an effort to find the proper attire to fit the weathe.--aud the sled. Following th mmw on Mon- day a general fup emme on Tuesday night whea: Big Stone Lake was eord with crust of ice exte Mmest to the center and today a light fall has been coming down. ] THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT 2 ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1921 NUMBER 27 0 BAILEY MAYOR BY 156 VOTES of Parties Shown Voters In Failure to ote Tickets "Straight." es Cast. of both cliques are victories in the general city held here on Tuesday at which largest number in the of city politics, was cast, re- in the election of James A. for mayor, O. A. Ostlind, N. J. and John Carlson for alder- W. E. Wellman and P. aldermen for the First J. Hausauer and R. F. Wal- for the Second Ward; MacMurphey for the posi- Judge. the endorsements and in- of both factions to "stick tickets,, the voters demonstra- that they had mind of and voted according to their splitting the tickets and Candidates they felt descry- vote. it is true that a large hum- sides "stuck," it was shown that the voters skip- and placed their mark the men who, in their judg- entitled to their vote, dis- .the petty fighting which m vogue in Ortonville for and which has done more the city than all failings of nature. citizens see In the of the new officers a body that tlifficult to sway at will and open minds desirous of in the best interests of the prejudice, fear or favor. feature was the of Wesley Evans as City us-j Won over L. A. Reynolds bYE after both had been in dark-I the day of election when] were brought to light by I ers by parties anxious humor into the serious- "fight." movies were defeated by a Taore than two to one. given by wards is as fol- 1st 2nd Total 251 167 418 170 82 2{rz 1st 2nd Total 387 242 629 1st 2nd 3rd 374 224 598 at Large-- 1st 2nd 3rd 240 119 359 241 126 367 220 127 347 183 135 318 241 167 408 0 0 1 First Ward-- 1st 2nd Total ................................ 235 ................................ 181 ...................................... 166 .................................. Ibo 2nd Ward- .................................... 138 ................................ 217 ..................................... 105 Judge-- 1st 2nd Total 116 68 183 286 172 458 0 3 8 0 1 1 1st 2nd Total 10 9 19 0 Y 7 Judge-- 0 6 6 1st 2nd Total 142 71 213 263 179 442 office of city Justice is in the city clrter, it is election of Evans is il- grounds that the position in the notice of election to law. This office for the past 8 due to the fact that no cases broughb in and that persons who were Years past refused to quail- that his election is tates that he is qualified fill the position; that justice of the peace for Minn., where a half section of land; from McGregoi" Iowa, and that he of the Spanish American s Book Week Re Nov. 13 to 18 Children's books will be the department stores of November 13 library for the a large se.leetian Gifts may be at the library p.m. All who invited. Armistice Day Program " For Ortonville Is Outlined Conforming with a program pre- pared by the local post of the American Legion, Ortonville, will celebrate Armistice bay, Friday in a fitting baY, and pay solemn and sincere tri- ute to the soldiers, sailors and mar- ines who gave their lives for Ameri- ca in the great world war. The pro- gram outlined is as follows: 11:00 a. m.--Stores close. ! 11:50 a. ,m.--Assemble at Orpheum. 12:00 m.--Attention. Silent Prayer. 12:02 p. m.--Taps. 12:05 p. m.Program. 30 minutes at Orpheum theatre. 1:00 to 5:00 p. m.--Open house at Legion Rooms. 3:00 p. m. Movie Matinee at Or- pheum theatre. 9:00 p. m.--Legion Dance. I. O. O. F. Hall. $1.10 per couple including tax. Everyone is expected to stop work wherever they are, at 12:00 m. sharp, and stand at attention for two min- utes, in honor to the unknown Ameri- ca soldier, killed in the World War, who will be buried in Arlington Me- morial Amphitheater in Washington at that hour. To overcome the differ- ence in timepieces, generally prevaqll - ing. the fire siren will be sounded at 12 o'clock noon, and again at 12:02 p. m, Aged Woman Attacked By Cow While Opening Gate Mrs. John Storiem, aged 78 years, was rendered unconscious about noon Sunday when she was attacked by a cow on their farm east of town after opening a gate to allow the cattle ac- cess to the pasture. Her injuries were ot of a serious nature ltho it was thought at first that she suffere| broken bones. The critter, after knocking her down attempted to gore her but members of the family who heard her cries for help arrived in time to save her from further injury. Fair Association Elects Officers for Coming Year Clinton, Minn.--Offeers elected at a meeting of the Big Stone County Agri- cultueaflm$, held on Tuesday at the Clinton State Bank, for  the coming SNOW SLIDE FOR CHILDREN PLAN OF CIVIC CLUB Council Asked to Share In Cost of Structure. Peti- tions Presented In Road Matters. Youngsters of this city may lay cPaim to the longest and fastest snow slide in this section of the state if plans which were laid before the council at its regular meeting Mon- day night materialize. Appearing before the council inbe: half of the Civic Club, Mrs. J. Kar and Mrs. Alvah Matthews requested assistance from the city in the con- struction of an approach from the bluff along the lake road to the lake for use as a snow slide for the chil- dren of the community, pointing out the recreational benefits and calling attention to the lessening of the haz- zard by the use of a proper slide loca- ted along the lakeshore instead of the use of hills in the business section where traffic interferes. As a result O. A. Ostlind and Dr. Chas: Bolsta were appointed to ascertain the prob- able expense and go over the grounds with reuresentatives of the Boy Scout organization and Civic Club for ' the purpose of deciding upon a suitable location. The committee is to report at the next regular meeting of the council. Two petitions were presented before the council elative to city streets. One asked for the extension of the street from the corner near the green houses east between b!ocks one and 2, SchoenJs second addition, north to east and west street in Westling's north along the north side of Let 25 and the other requested the city to vacate that portion of Minnesota ave- nue between lots 1, 2, 3, and 4 in block 5, Cook's Addition, and lots 5 and 6 in block 21, Orton's First Addition. This is the section of the street which las never been in use because of the ra- vine which intercepts the feasibility of extending the road from the corner by the L. P. Hess residence toward the residence of Ed. Shult. year are: J. C. Bender, president; A. Action on both petitions, which were M. Trebil, secretary; O. T. Harrison, signed by a large number of interest- treasurer. Affairs of the associatibn were ed property owners in the respective neighborhoods, will be had at the next found to be in good condition despite regular meeting. the loss which the association ex- A bill of $115 in favor of Hausauer perienced this year due to unfavor- abre weather during the three daYS set for the fair, according to reports of those in charge. AUTOS COLLIDE TWO INJURED Three Cars Badly Smashed On Road South of Bellingham. Two Per- sons Taken To Hospital. With three cars smashed and in the ditch, all within the radius of three miles, the K. T. Trail south of Bet- lingham, took the appearance of a race course Sunday evening. Two men in the hospital, injured, one car wrecked beyond repair, and three others badly wrecked, is the toll of the accidents that ocured at that place, all within an hour's time. The first accident happened about three ,miles south of Bellingham. when a Ford, carrying a man, his wife, and three childDen, one of them a baby, crashed heUong into a Maxwell car coming South, driven Ijy Ogis Tell, ac- companled by John Hessefinger, both of Fargo, N. D. The Maxwell was completely wrecked, with all four wheels broken to splinters and the rest of the car smashed beyond r@- pair. The two occupants of the Max- well who were injured were taken to the hospital at Madison, while the people in the Ford were unscratched, but all suffering from seveDe shock. The Ford was not damaged with ex- Brothers, being the difference between the .amount subscribed by individuals and that due for the graveling and blading of the road from the Minne- sota River Bridge to the State line was allowed. The total cost was $508. Aside from the allowance, of a few bills no other business was transacted. Game and Fish Depart- merit Issues Order Orders received today by Warden O. S. Briggs from the State Game and Fish department, dated at St. Paul, November 9, 1921, are as fol- I lows: " , I "Investigation having been made,. and it having been found that fish[ contained therein are in danger of smothering in dnter by reason of the shallowness o f t h e water, per- mission is hereby granted to Cake I such fish as may be found therein] from the followi'ng waters, in any manner, until April 1st, 1922, for do- mestic use only, as provided for in Chapter 400, General Laws, 1919: "Big Stone CountyKells Lake, 9 miles east of Ortonville; Otrey Lake, 6 miles east of Ortonville;Barr Lake, 2 miles southeast of Correll. "Kandiyohi County--Lake Eight, n Section 8, township S, New London, Henschion Lake. "Lac Qui Parle CountySlough, 6 miles northwest of Madison. "CARLOS AVERY, Ca/he and Fish Commissioner. (Seal) " St. Paul, Minnesota, November 9th, 1921." ception of broken "lights and radia- tor. Appearance of the cars which were over 15 feet apart after the crash, would indicat  that 'the Max- well was going at least 30 miles per hour. The force of the impact was beard at a farmhouse, one fourth mile away. An hour after this happened, a car going north, driven by a party of yeung men who it is said, had been imbibing too freely of liquor, "killed" the engine in the middle of the road. A gentleman driving a Ford coming from Bellingham, at a fair rate of speed, failed to see them in the dusk and to avert a collision, tried to turn quickly to the right. Being too near ihe steep embankment, his car went into the ditch, and thru a fence, wreck- ing his ear and breaking several fence .osts. This man was unhurt. The next accident was purely a case of too fast driving it is reported. A product of Henry Ford's plant taking 4:o the ditch for reasons of its own. A. W. McLane will attend the elec- trical lecture in St. Paul Thursday put on by the FairbanksMorse Com- pany for the benefit of their travel- ling salesmen and emploFees. "The Red Sross of Peace" At Orpheum November 12 Rehearsals by the cast of the Red Cross pageant, "The Red Cross of Peace," convince those in charge of the undertaking that it will be very well given. Those taking part have been de- voting themselves whole heartedly to their work, with the view of making it well, worth while seeing, expecting thereby to stimulate more active sup- port to that wonderful institution, the American Red Cross. The pageant will be given on Satur- day, November 12, at the Orpheum theatre in Ortonville, both afternoon (at 3:00 o'clock) and in the evening (a 8:00). No admission will be charged at either performance. hoot Deer Out " Of Season;Fined A venturesome deer met a V]olen$ end while passing thrutevens county about August 2... As a result Paul Goodell and Frank Hill, game war- dens of Grant and Pope counties brought five men beore Judge G. W. Beise on Tuesday morning. Two of them, Emil Augustson of Horon township and George Metzger of lien- cock were fined $50 and costs for shooting deer out of season. The rest of the quintet were released. The idea of a deer in Stevens coun- ty is almost unbeliebable, but the gentlemen who ate the venison and paid tim fines can testify hat the presence was actual. The animal was first ,seen in a cornfield of a farmer in Hrton township. The story was told and retold until it was almost forgotten around Hancock, but mean- while the wardens had gotten a clue which they worked patiently until they secmd sufficient evidence to act. A couple ot deer were seen east of Glenwood earlier in the season, and the deer shot here was probably one of them. Last winter a deer was seen near Niemakle's north of Donnelly, and two years ago there were a couple of deer near C. B. Kloos' farm north of Morris, most of the winter. ---Morris Tribune. Other Hunters Leave for North In Quest of Deer Ortonville will be well represented this fall in the north woods. The party of seven, including Emil Ost- lind, Wayne Kelly, Jimmie Smith, Otto Harris, Ed. Zehringer, Dr. D. M. O'Donnell and John Crippen, left on scheduled time Sunday morning for Big Forks, in Itaska county, via Re Speed Wagon, adequately covered to keep out the weather. Monday morning, R. U. Herzog and Roy Geier started for Brooten, Minne- sota, in Mr. Geier's car, with the in- intention of bringing back a deer apiece. At Brooten they will meet George Eastman of this city, who has a cabin near Opstead in Mille Lacs county, with whom they will hunt. Hold-up Men's Plans Fail When Autoist Speeds By On Sunday. night between eight and nine o'clock, an attempt was made by two unknown .men to hold up Ted Jack- son of Clinton. On his return from Ortonville near the gravel pit the strangers with drawn guns commanded him to stop but Mr. Jackson who surmised their purpose immediately speeded up and made his get-away. About the same time G. M, Johnson and party also of Clinton on their re- turn from Watertown nearly ran into a car which stood directly across the road at this place which was without lights and is now thought to have been the robbers' car.' Mrs. R. M. Lybarger of Fayette- ville, Arkansas, is here for about two weeks visiting relatives and friends and looking after a 240 acre tract of land owned by her in Stevens county. She was formerly Miss Irtie Matthews and is a sister of Mrs. Frank Finberg of Clinton. Celebrated Tenor and Pianist To Appear Nov. 17 Carsten Well and Miss Esther Er- hart Well, noted tenor and pianist, will gppear in concert at the high school auditorium on Thursday evem ing, November 17 at eight,o'clock, it was announced today by nembers of the Community Music Club of this city, under whose auspices they will appear. Mr. Victor Nielsson, critic, in th, Minneapolis Journal had this to sa of Mr. Well. "The drawing card of the vening's program was the tenor sger Carsten Well who in-his lyric! voice and clear diction sang songs by Grieg, Arlberg and Rosenfeld. His voice is of such a true tenor quality and his conceptions convincing." gOf Miss Esther Well, the Chicago Tribune says: "Esther Erhart Well displayed wlled fingers, a retie of genuine beauty and much variety as commendable taste." The Wiscon- sin State Journal says "Mrs. Woll is more than fortunate in her magne- tism, and charm of personality. She played beautifully with a clearness and fluency and singing tone that were truly delightful, transforming the in- strument into a living, breathing and thinking thing that takes absolute pos- session of the listener." While in Europe Mr. Well studied with teachers like Mine. Ottesen, Holst, Hansen, Yeatmen Griffith ann George Hamlin. He was selected as the soloist at the great Millennial celebration of Normandy, France, |n 1911. Lovers of phonograph m uslc are well aqminted with his voiob as he has prodweed records for the Vic- tor, Columbia and Edison companies. Tickets will be on sale at both Drug stores. The entertainment is being ofl'd by the club at 26 for children and 50c for adults. It is expected to draw a capacity house. STATE PARK FOR BOTTOMS IS PLAN OF REP. J. D. ROSS R. P. Chase, State Auditor, Inspects Grotmds and Of- fers Suggestions for Ira. provement. Aid Sought. Should plans of Representative J. D. Ross of this city be carried out the Minnesota River bottoms from the foot of Big Stone Lake to the railroad embankment, will within a few years, become a well platted and laid-out state park, instead of the "limberlost" that it now is. Favorable action for the establish- ment of an Inter-State Park on the bottoms is expected at the next ses- sion of the Legislature at which, it is intimated, that formal application will be made. 'With this view in mind, State Audi- tor R. P. Chase came to this city last Thursday and went over the gsoun0 in company with Mr. Ross and others and after his trip of inspection made the statement that it was his opinion that such a park could be designated. Mr. Chase appeared in his capacity a chairman of the State Park Board. "Planting of trees in proper season secured from the Forestry Department without waiting for the construction of the proposed dike and reservoir would be possible, Mr. Chase stated, if a small embankment or levee was thrown up along the river. This would keep the water within its na,ral channel when the stream backs up with the spring freshets, it was point- ed out, and when the reservoir and dike have been completed, in accord- ance with the State's project now un- der way, tbe park driveways, proposed athletic field and other improvements could be made. Mr. Chase was entertained by Representative J. D. Ross during his stay here. On Thursday afternoon he left for Graceville in company with Mr. Ross, enator F. L. Cliff and Dr. B. R Kern in the doctor's car. Beardsley Men Buy Holsteins. County Agent Roske, in company with Jake Frey of Beardsley, return- ed last week from Auburndale, Wis., with a carload of fine Holstein cows, six of them pure-breds and twenty-two high grades. Farmernear Barry and Beardsley pooled in making this pur- chase, dividing up the carload between them. Auburndale is the richest cheese manufacturing center in Wisconsin, and the cattle purchased are ;from some of the best herds there. BROWNS VALLEY ROAD GETS AID l Minnesota Highway Department To Continue Operations on Big Scale During Winter Season. Gravel surfacing of 23.4 miles on the Browns Valley-Johnson section of the Minnesota trunk high- way No. 28, estimated at $100,000 is part of the big winter program of highway construction announced by Charles M. Babcock, state highway commissioner, following action by congress to provide funds to carry out the "more work--better roads" plan to cut idleness and. build needed roads. Flyer No. 17 Loses Two Sleeping Cars in Mishap Coast-bound Milwaukee passenger train No. 17, due to arrive here at 3:32 a. m., met with an accident two .miles east of Appleton on Sunday morning, when a broken draw-bar fell to the track, throwing the two rear sleeping cars into the ditch. Not a person is reported to have received as much as a scratch, altho the train was traveUng at betwee thirty and forty miles per hour when th accident occured. Seven teachers from the Ortonville Public schools who were returning from the cities' after having been in attendance at the Educational Con- vention were among the passengers. They were the Misses Irgens, Cassel, Mealy, McBride and Rourke and , Messrs. J. M. Snesrud and T. N. Tragethon. Nothing was known of the mishap by the passengers riding in the cars which preceeded the two that@were ditched until they had been informed, according to statements. The train crew after having discovered the loss of the sleepers returned to the scene and aided the scantily clad victims i securing "comfy" quarters. The train then prceeded on its trip three hours late A wrecking crew from Monte- video arrived shortly afterwards, and the track was cleared without caus- ing delay to other trains. Rights of Auto Drivers- Threshed Out In Court The rights of automobile drivers in turning around at street intersections was threshed out in Municiual Court here Saturday, when the case of L. P. Satre, of Madison vs Dr. J. R. Cain, of this city, came on for trial, result- ig in a decision in favor of Dr. Cairn Institution of the proceedings grew out of an accident which occurred on June 29, 1921, when Dr. Cain, who was driving on second street toward the lake turned to the left at the in- tersection of Second street and Jack- son avenue, commencing to turn just before reaching the Park garage, an4 had, as Lewis J. Bailey testified, about three-fourths completed the turn when the car driven by the plaintiff struck the end of the bumper on the Cain car, tearing off the fenders on the left side and damaging it other- wise. The question involved was: "Who had the right-of-way ?, The Law pro- vides that "An operator intending turn his vehicle to the left shall drive along the center of the roadway, ex- tending his arm in a horizontal posi- tion and slow down. A vehicle shall have the right-of-way over another vehicle whic is approaching from the left in an intersecting highway, and shall give the right-of-way to an operator of a vehicle approaching from the right on an intersecting higaway. In cities or villages, or any place where traffic is large, or on streets unusually congested .with traffic of horse drawn vehicles or street ears, slow moving vehicles .must keep to the right curb, allowing those moving rapidly to keep nearer the center of the street. All vehicles must keep to the right of the center of the street." From the testimony offered relative to the position of the cars when the \\; accident happened, the court held that Dr. Cain had the right-of-way. Red Cross Drive Nov. U To 24. Solicitors for the American Red Cross will call upon all residents of the county from November 11 to 24. to receive contributions to the 5th an- Bids on this section of the road will ............. . " .....  . .. ...  nual 1O11 Lal! trla organization, ac- De receive(! a the omce o ne rllgn- . ..... . ,. cormng zo awce from donn way Department at St. Paul, on No-.., .......... ._ s vember 14, at which time Marti Lar- rea:rlY:ortB:lSst:Y'ct: w.7: kin of the Larkin-Schoen Constiuction . - g - Y' :,  urges mat everyone maze a specmt Company will represent the local corn-I .............. pany In case c'hey are successful in I enr to give reeiy o, ms tuna. ". ....... 7. t Big Stone County s allotment is securing the contrac rot me wnole ....... ^^ , ...... t ..... ki st .... at t'e taDu ,.t,,.mu.uu, nty per cen ot the s retcn ar. hal" U  a:e n n , _ ,  , , -- , om e -ed to m ke ran e I amount rmse to De remme zor worz c  puny !xpect . a a r g "]of the Red Cross in this county and merits tor me use ot a steam snoveh t ...... ..., . - -. .............. ,  I tne Durance sen r,o a;lOnat neaxtquar- lrle nrst llSt OI Z,I winter joos--zo| t rs miles of paving and 274 miles of e . gravel-surfacing estimated to cost Sic @ 687,000--is to be followed soon by oth- ers of grading and bridge work, also special team jobs to further relieve unemployed and especially the settlers and farmers of some districts, accord- ing to John I Mullen, assistant com- missioner and chief highway engin- eer. The tentative plan to use about $4,500,000 this winter or the dual purpose or reducing idleness. and im- proving roads. Special efforts are being made to spread the work that many, sections! may share in the benefits. Several roposed undertakings were postponed until next year because not adapted to cold weather operations. Work is expected to start about December 1. The state law requiring three weeks of advertising, first bids are to be c, pened November 29 to 30. Then the succesul bidders will be made pub- lic that job seekers may apply direct to them. The highway department: will have no jobs to fill. :rail Delegates Appointed. John Carlson and R. F. Walker were appointed by Mayor Schoen as dele- gates to the Eleventh Annual State Bob sleds are in general use. Meeting of the Yellowstone Trail As- seeiatia being held today at Olivia. @ ....... wIiTER ARRIVES. Nature donned her most beau- tiful of winter raiment in the first snow-fall of the season on Monday when a precipitation of three inches fell on the level, leaving the trees with the ap- pearance of a Fairyland and a scene that is nat often wit- nessed in this part of the state, Roses, sweet peas and apple blossoms were nipped in the bud and the second crpp of vege, tables defeated inlts effort to outdo all precedents of years gone by. Closets were  and wood-sheds turned topsy-turvy in an effort to find the proper attire to fit the weathe.--aud the sled. Following th mmw on Mon- day a general fup emme on Tuesday night whea: Big Stone Lake was eord with crust of ice exte Mmest to the center and today a light fall has been coming down. ] THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT BAILEY dAYOR BY 156 VOTES Parties Shown Voters In Failure to , ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1921 Armistice Day Program " For Or tonville Is Outlined Conforming with a progr p- pared by the local post of the American lgion, Orttoviile, will celebrate Aistlce ]Day, Friday in a fitting ay, and pay olemn and sin tri- ute zo the soldiers, sailo and m ines who gave their lives for Ameri- ca in the great world war. The p Tickets "Straight" gram outBn is , follows: 11:0o a. m.--Stores dose 2 Votes Csst 11:50 ..... Assemble at Orp/eum. __ 12:00 m.--Attentlo Sent Prayer. -.onL%s of both ellqs al 12:02p..--Taps. g vietori in the general city I 12:05 p. m.--Progrgm. 30 minutes gh aid he on Tuesday at which I at Orpheum Sheath. , the largest number in the I:00 to 5:00 p. re.--Open house at of city polities was ct  Legion Rooms. la the election of J A.I 3:OO p. m Movie Matinee at Or- fur m a "or, O. A. Osflind N. J.I pheum thesis.  an d John Carlson for aide 9:00 p. m.--Legion Dance. L O. O. t Jarge; W. E. WeLIman and P. F. HaiL. $1.10 per eonp]e including tax . J. Hausauer and R. F. Wai- whever they a, at 12:00 m. sharp, ta$1orn, aldermen fo the First Everyone is expected to top work [dernn for the Second Ward and stand at attention for two min- MoeMurphey far the post- Uses, in honor to the unknown Alert- Judge. ca soldlpr, killed in the World War, who will be buried in Arlington Me- minds of tg to their splitting t sides "stuck," itwas shown , in their udg- ,, dlo- .the petty fighting which n ia vogue in Ortonville oity than all failings of eltins see lu the 4 the now omee a body that qimcuit to sway minds desirous of In the best interests the wnu over L A. Reynolds by the day were bught to light by we defeated by a voe than two to one. by wards Is as ol- 1st 2rid 25I 167 1O 82 1st 2nd 387 242 1st 2nd 74 224 ge-- 1st 2rid 24O 119 241 I6 22O I27 183 I35 241 167 0 0 2rid e ........................ 16 2nd Ward- ......... er ........... lud est 2nd Total old 11 68 183 he 286 172 458 0 8 8 ,on o t 1 e-- 1st 2nd Total ds 0 7 7 eipt Jud ']sol o 6 6 es- let 2rid Total 14 71 213 h 268 179 442 the ufe o of elty usti ia tot in the 4ty sharter, it is tte eltion of Evans is il- R_. grounds that the position ht ?ed in the noti of dive.on t aCCording to taw. This ofce '.. t[hrtgarded f the pt 8 t ere due to the fact that .t bn no  bugh in |  that persons who we Years pt refused to quail- Amphitheater in Wmhingon To oveome the differ- ence in timepieces, geally pvi- hgthe fi siren will be sounded at , d again at 12:02 Aged Woman Attacked By Cow While Opening Gate M. John Storiem, aged 78 years, was nded unconscious about noon Sund#y when she was attacked by a cow on their fa east of to after opning a gate to allow the cattle - tess to the pasture. Her lnjmies we ,ot of a serlcl natul* ltho it was thought at first that she suffered kt uken bones. The critter, after knocking her down attempted to go her but members of the fily who heard her cries for hlp arrived in time to save her fm further irdury. Fair Association Elects Officers for Coming year Clinton ML, m,--Oifiee elted at a mting of the Big Ste County Agr - hed on Tuesday at the Clinn State Bank, for the mng year a: J. C. Bender, president; M. Trebi, stary; O. T. Harrisox Affai of the assclatlon wet mud to i good condition despite the loss which the aseiati ex- periend this year d to unfavo abi weath during the thee days set for the fair, aeding to por, in charge. AUTOS COLLIDE TWO INJUREB Cars Badly Smashed o. Road South of Bellingham. Two Per. ss Taken To Hos#tM. With thc cars smashed and in tilt ditch, all within the radius of three miles, the K. T, Trail south of BeL- lingham, took the appearance of a race course Sunday evening. Two men in the hpitaL injured, one ear wrecked beyond repair, and three others badly wz*ckedi is the toll of the accidents that oecud at that place, all within an heur's time. The first accident happened about a Fol, rrying a m, his wife, and three ehildtn, one of them a haby, clhed heaTdiong into a Maxwell car ming South, driven by ogis Tell, ac- companied by John Hessefinger. both of Fargo, N. D. The Maell was completely weked, with all four wbeels blokes to splinters and the rest of the car stashed beyond r# pair. The two occapants of the Max- 11 who we injured we taken to the hospital at Madison, while the people in the Ford were unmtohed, but all suffering from vel ShIL The Ford wq not damaged wth ex- ception of broken lights and radia- tor. Appeamn of the ea which were over 15 feet apart after the erh, wouM Indleat that 'the Max- B w ing at least 30 miles per hour. The force of the impact was heard at a farmhouse, one fourth mile away. An hour aster this happened, a car going north, rivn hy a party of eung men who It is id, had been imbibing tee freely of liquor, 'Bled" the engine in he middle of the road SNOW SLIDE FOR 'rhe Red Eross of Peace" qTATI At Orpheum November 12 Jxz-txx CHILDREN PLAN ............ he ..... . ..... Cross paget, "The Red Cross of OF CIVIC CLUB .... ' .................... f the undertaking that it will be very well given. Those taking par have been de Counei| Akto Shre In voting themlves whole heartedly to Cost of Structure. Peti- their work, with the vi of making Jt welb worth while seeing, expecting tioga 1;resented In ReRd theby to stimulate mo active sup- Matters. port to that wonderful institution, the America Red Cross. Youngsters of thi' city may lay The patent will be g}ven on Satur- eralm to the longest d ftest snow daY* November 12. at the Orphm theatre in Ortonvme, both afteovn slide in this stion of the state Jf (at a:00 o'clk) and in the evening plans which we lald befo the (a 8:). No admission will be council at it gular mshg Men- charged at either perfomance. day night materialize. Appearing before the counc in he- bali of the Civic Club, Mr J. Ka  hOt Der Out and Mrs. Alvab Matthews questd ' Of Season; Fined sistance from the city in the n- struction of an approach from the A ventresovee deer met a vo]en, bluff along the lake ad to the lal ad while passing thltevens eoupt for use as a snow tide for the ct- about August 2.. As a result Paul Gdel and Frank iIl, game war- (lien of the community, pointing out tile latJona] benefits d calling dens of Grant and ope countisa attention to the lesnlng of the haz- bught five men h Judge G. W. ard by the use of a proper slide Ioe- Belse on Tuesday morning. Two of ted along the lakeshore instead of the them. Emil Augastn of Hereto um of hlls in the business section township and George Metgger of Ha As a result cock we fined $50 and cosus for O. A. Ostlind and Dr. Ch." Bolsta shooting dr out of seato. The est were appointed to asrtain the preb- of the quintet were lead. able expenn a d go over the grounds The idea of a dr in Stevens eouc- m ........ . rhe omml .............................. ....... .... with remetatives of the Roy Scout ty m almost unbehebable, but the organization a Civic CLub for the gentlemen who ate the eni,a aud purpose of deciding upon a suitable paid tim fines can testify that the at the nex gular meeting of thefirst 2n in a ornfield of a farmer council lin Horton township. The story was Two petitions were presented befn] told and retold until it w almost the eonnell lative to city stts.l forg tten uml Hanek, but me- One asked for the extension of the I while the wardens had gotten a clue shet fl'om the comer near the green ] whmh they worked patiently untd hses est betwee blocks one nd they secured ufeiet edenee to act. 2, Schoen'e eond adltlon north to X couple o deer were seen east of st and west stxet in Westllng's Gtenwond earlier in the season, and north along the north side of LOt 2 the deer shot here was probably one and the other reqs the city to of them: Last wmter a deer Sln vacate that portion of Minneta ave- ne Nlemakle s ninth of anne y. nue between lots 1 2 3 and 4 in block and two yea ago the e a 5, Cook's Addition, and lots 8 and 6 in nple of deer near C. lB. Kloos farm Mock 21 Orton's First Addition. This no rth of Morris, most of the tauter. is the stlon of the sleet which hs --Morris Tribune. never been in u became of the ca- vim which lnteepts the feasibility of extending the ad from the ceraer by the L. P. Hess shence toward the sldenee of Ed. Shult. Action on both petitions, which we signed by a large number of inet- ed property owners in the respective neighhorheods, will be had at the next glar meeting. A bill of $115 in favor of Hausar Bthers, being the diffenee between the #mount subscribed by indlvidle and that due for the gveling and blading of the road fm the Minne- sota River Bridge to the State li was allowed. The total east was $5O8. Aside from the allowance of a few bills nn other business was transacted Game and Fish Depart- merit Issues Order Other Hunters Leave for North In Quest of Deer Oronille will be well presented is fl ill the north woods. The party of seven, includig EvMI Ost- Hndi Wayne Kelly, Jimmie Smith, Otto Harris, Ed. Zehringer, Dr. D. M. O'Donll d John Crippen, left on scheduled time Sunday moing for Big Forks, in Itaska unty, vla Re Speed Wagon adequately co.red to kp out the weather. Monday moing, IL U. Herzog and Roy Geler crafted for Brooten, Minn sota. in Mr. Geier's ear, with the in- intention of bringing back a deer apiece. At Boten they will meet George Etman of this city, who h a cabin near Opsteed in Mille La county, with whom they will hunt. Orde celvay hs Warden[ Hold-up Men's Plans Fail O. S. Briggs f the State Game] Wlofl Autoist Seds By and Fish department dated at St I __ -- - P l N vembe 9 1921 e fo I au, o r , , ar as On Sunday night between eight and lows, -, ] nine o'clock all attempt w made b I tlgatlo ha i g b made "an n vn n -,two unknown men to hold up Ted Jk- and it having been fod that fish on of Clinton nta ed h m a 1 da ger of] " " ill. .ere'. re 'n n t ' ou his tum flora Ortonvi['le heal smotherm m windy by reamn of hel the gravel pit the strange will hall o s f t h e atel per ] s. o1 .s o w , " drawn guns mmanded }tim to stop n/lgslon is helby granted to ake[ but Mr Jaekn who surmised their such fish as mawr be found therein [ pu/oge tamed ate y speeded up and flora the follow" g wa er "n ny I 1 s, i a made h s get.away tl[ Apt 1 1 t 1922 f d mann r. un i s, ', or 9- About tile same time G. M. Johon ! mesttc use only, a provMed for m am party also of Clinton o their - Clapt 400 GenetalIa s 1919: i .el. , , w, tu flm atertown nearly ran into Big St e C  Ke b ake 9 " on dun .-- s . ' ' a car which stood directly across the seas o nv ; , a at hs peewhteh waswthout mile t f Oto file Otrey Lake - . 6 mile east of Olon 1lie Barry Lake s v ; , ]ight. and is now thought to have 2 miles southeast of Corll. bn the robbers' ear" "Kdiyohi County--Lake Eight,  ........... Stion 8, towm-hip 8, New ].ondon, Mrs. R. M. Lybarger of Fayette- Hensehlon Lake, ville, Arkans, is het for about two (Send St. Paul, Minnesota, and is a sister of MI' Frank Flnberg "Lee Qui Parle County--Slough, 6 weeks visiting relatives and friends miles northwest of Madison. and Iking after a 240 a tet of "CARLOS AVERY,  land oed by her in Stevens county. Galas and Fish Conissioer. She was foerly Miss Irtie Matthewe November 9th. 1921." I of Clinto Celebrated Tenor'and Pianist To Appear Nov. 17 -- Carsten Well and Miss Esther Er- morn than fortunate in her magne hart Well. noted tenor d pianist, ti and charm of personality. She played beautifully with a oldness and will pear in concert at the high school auditoriam on Thursda ewm fluency d singing tone that were ;ng, November 17 at eight o'clock, It tig delightful, transfomhg the in- was noonced today by aemhe of strumeat Ito a living, breathing and the C0mmuvJty tmie Club of tMs thinking thing that tes absolute pos- session of the I eisner. PARK F0R BOTTOMS IS PLAN OF REP. J. D. ROSS R. P. Chase, State Audiinr, Inspects Grotmds and Of- fers Suggestions for Im- provement. Aid SoughL Shotdd plans of Representative J. D. Ross of this city be carried out the Minnesof4 River boLtoms fm the foot of Big Stone Lake to the railroad embankment, will within a few ye. bme a well platted and laid-out dtate park, instead of the "llmherlost,, that it now is. , Favorable aion for the establish- ment of mt Inter-State park on the bottoms is expected at the next se sion of the Legislature at which, it is intimated, that foal appiieatlon will be made. %Vith this view in mind, State Audi- tor R. P. Chae came to this ety last Thursday and went over the gmun in company with Mr. Ross and othe and after hs trip of inspeetinn made the statement that it w hie opinion that such a park could be designated. Mr. Chase appeared in his eapity a chai of the state Park Board. "Planting of tes in proper season secured from the Forestry Department dthout waiting for the eonstructlon of the pmpod dike and resenir would be posslble, ?4r. Lase stated, if a small embankment or levee w thrown up along the riwr. This would keep the water within its nt channel when the stream backs up with the spdng freshets, it was point- ed out, and wh the reseoir and dke have been completed, in accord- ance with the State's pject now un- der way, the park driveways, proposed athletic field and other impvements could be made. * ; Mr. Chase w enteained by Representative J, D. Ross during his stay here. On Thursday aften he left for Gvqlle in company wlth Mr, Ross, enator F. L Cliff and, Dr. B. R, Ka in the doctor's ear. Brdsley Men Buy Helstei Catty Agent Roke, in mpany wth Jake Frey of Brdstey. wt.rn- e /ast week fm Aaburndale, Wl& with a carload of fine Holstein cows, six of them pubrs and twenty-two high grades. Farmerear Baby and Beardsley pooled in making this pur- eha, dividing up the carload betn them. Aubuda]e is the rlcht shee manufturing center in Wlnsin, and the tle purehl are m me of the best herds the. BROWNS VALLEY ROAB GETS AID Minnta Highway Department Te Continue 0eratJs  Big Scale NUMBER 2 Flyer No. 17 Loses Two Sleeping Cars in Mishap Coast.bound Milwaukee passenger train No. 17, due to arrive he at 3:32  m., met with  accident t miIes east of Appleton ou Sundoay morning, when a bke draw-haw fell to the track, throng the two sleeping ca into the ditch. Not a person is perted to have ived  ch aa  rateh, dio the train was traelng at het thirty and forty miles per hr when the iden oured. en teaehe fm the 0rtonville Public hoels who we tur from the citles after hang been attend at the Edationai Con. vention we among the pg'r. They were the Mis lrgens, Cl. Mealy, McBride d Purke and Messy. J. M. Sneered and T. N. Tragethom Nothing was o of the mishap by he psenge riding in the em which peded the two thatewe ditched until they had been informed, rding to stutemenbs. The tin crew after having disoved the 1o$ of tha leepers retued to the scene ad aided the scantily Died viii I rintg "mty" quarter The traa then prO, ceded on its trip three hotrs late. A .eking ew fm Monte- video aived hortly ateard, the track w cleared without us- ins delay to other traJn. Rights of Auto Drivers-- Threshed Out In Court The rights of automobile drJve in tming around at stt interstiona was thshed out in Mtmicluai CoUrt he Saturday, when the ease of L. P. Sate, of Madison vs Dr. J. R. Cain, of this city, came on for trid, result ins in a deelsion in favor of Dr. Caib Institution of the proeeedlngs grew out of an accident wbleh ourred n June 29, 191, when Dr. Cain, who as driving on second street toward the lake blrned to the eft at th in- tersection of Second stet and Jack- son avenue, mmeneig to turn just before ain the Pk garJge, r hsd, as l,es J. Bley testified, abel three-fourths mpteted the tu when the r drin by the plaintiff arrack the end of the bper on the Cain car, tearing off the fde the left side and damaging it other. wiw. The question involved wa: "Who had the right-of-way V' Th Law p- tides that "An operator intending to tu his vehie to the tuft shall d along the nter of the adway, ex- tending his a in a horintal posi- tion and slow down. A vehlele shall have the right-of-way or another vehicle whlsh is apphing from the left Jn an interacting highway, and shah give the right-of-way to operator of a vshiele approaehilf fm the rIgkt on an intersecting hi,way - cities or villages, or any place where traffic is large, or on ethers unusually ngeeted with rafie of horse dra vehicles or street ca, slow moving vehicles mt k to tile During Winter Sea. fight curb, allowing tho moving rapldty to kp near the nter of .. , the street. All vehiel must keep to GI el suffacl g of 234 lie  h a ' n . i s .o the right of t e center of the street." he Br ns V Iley John e s : o . a - s n . o From the tesmony nffed relati f the Mmneota trunk hgh s " to the pnsitlon of the cars when the \\; way No. 28, ttmated at $I00,000 i aideat happened, the eour held that part of the bg w,nter program o Dr. Cain had the nght-e -way. Ilighway eonruetion annound by ad the ngh-e{-w Chartos M. Babcock. state highway Red Crs Dve Nov. 11 To 4. nmmissloner following ton by .. ' ' t Sohcto for he Aner Red g sst pro defu dst ca a son  o ' I n o ,,  Css w ca upon a side s of the more work--,eter road p an he county from November 11 to 24 o eat idleness and bmkl /,ceded ads. , " . . .... I to eewe contedmtlens to the 5th an Bid* on this sectlna of the road wt I e th H" h nusl Boil Call that orgamaa on. - be rcceltl at the omc ef e tg - cordin t vie fm J h n :ay Dep.enat St. Pa2tonNo: E. Pm.rof atdb'.ect,, Red r. x ember a tm M m w Ic 1 e treur f r Bi Stone counL o kin of the Larkia Schwa Constlaletion o g y, Comps 3  "l] pse t the 1 cal corn urge that everyone make a special n. ,1 h n o f I "n effort to glee fely to this fnd. pany. In ease t ey are success u i Big Stone County's anoLment Is securmg the contt for the whole t kin eta that the about $1,000.00, fifty per cent nf the s teh Mr. La ted amount raised to be tained for work company expected to make arrange- f of a steam hovel of the Red Css in this testy, and m nts o th se s e r . u . . the bala nt to Natleaal helqua The fit hst of 27 wmter jobs--g5 te miles of paving and 274 miles of " glvel sur fing estimated to eo $1.- -- 687,000is to be followl soon by oth- . R WINTER A RIVES. era of gradlng and bridge work, also special te obs to further relieve Nature ded her roost beau unemployed and especially the ttle tiful of winter raint in the and farme of rne distrlets, accord- first snow-fall of the sean on ins to John H, Mullen, assistant m- Monday when a precipitation of missioner and chief hl hway evgin- eel,, The tcntave plantee about $4,S00, thls winter for she dual purpo or reducing idlene.and ira- pr eying ds. Special eorts are being made to spread the work that mauy. secione may sha in the benefit Sevel ed undertakings we postpone until next year because not adapted to cold weather operatlons. Wk ie xpted to start about Deeemher 1 rhe ste law quiring thee wk of advertising, first bid are to th ihes fell on the level, leaving the trees with the ap- pearance of a Falryld and a sne that s not often wt- needed iu this peat of the state. Roses, swat peas d apple blosSsms were nipped tn th bud and the snd erp of vege- tables defeated ta its effort to outdo all precedents of years gone by. Civets were  and wood-sheds traed -turv-y A ge1eman driving a Ford coming flm Bellingh, at a fair rate of of the Spanish Ameriea speed, filed to see them in the d city, artier whose auspices they will and to avert a colllsion, toed to tu appea While in Europe Mr. Well studie cuiekly to she gh Being too n Mr Vict Nieisson cc in t with teaeksrs like Mme. Ottes ' !lhe steep embkment, his ear nl Mirmeapolis Joual had th to ) iHolst, Hansen, Yeatmen Gareth ant S 4k Week i i.to the dlteh, and thr & fence, wreck of r. Well "The drawing otrd ot I ,George Hamlin. He was sel,ecte4  in  affort to find the eer Nov. 13 to lllnghlecarandbredid.gveraifenc hevening's pgrm was the teno]the solmst at the gzeat mmenna opened November 29 to 30. Thenthe atti t *" th =*; of Childn's books wi I bet The next accident was purely a case voice and elr diction gang songs byt1911. Lovers of phonograph tousle lie she{ ob seekers may apply d[ret the sled.. of the departmt stores o too fast driving it ia reputed. A GHeg* Aflherg and Rosenfeld. His are wll equalnted with Ms voids  to them. The highway department Fotlnag the w en Mon- t the public library for the to the dltoh f ....... f iL ..... d his coneepti ...... indus." tot, Columbia and Edi .... p.l. __ Erie LakeYvm with t  eHng a large letbn of Miss Esther Well, the Chicago Tlekts wRl he on h at both Drug " [rail Delegates Appemted. croat f t ext  to Lalstmas Gifts may be A.W. McLane will attend the el Tribune says: '*Esther Eshart Wqll stog The entertainer is hair@ John Clson and R. F. Wdker we the ceter and ted  an a light fill trical lecture in St Pay] Thursday displayed wdFhohsd sga, atone offdbythednb at  forbildren appointed by Mayor Schoen  ele- h rain down. bery Hour at the ltbrary put  by the FaishankMorse Cam- of aeaulae beauty and much variety d 60e for adults. . gates to the Eleventh Annual State Bshbe4ed areola ra me. "aS 8:00 p.m. Alt who puny for the benefit of heir travel, as commendable taste." ..The Wise- It is ex to daw a capacity MeeUag of the Yellowstone Trmi.As- gewe e ladtedi , llng saleemn aad mptoyees, sin State ournsd aaya Mr Well Is house. t4ea beinff held today at Ohms.. O THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT 2 ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1921 NUMBER 27 0 BAILEY MAYOR BY 156 VOTES of Parties Shown Voters In Failure to ote Tickets "Straight." es Cast. of both cliques are victories in the general city held here on Tuesday at which largest number in the of city politics, was cast, re- in the election of James A. for mayor, O. A. Ostlind, N. J. and John Carlson for alder- W. E. Wellman and P. aldermen for the First J. Hausauer and R. F. Wal- for the Second Ward; MacMurphey for the posi- Judge. the endorsements and in- of both factions to "stick tickets,, the voters demonstra- that they had mind of and voted according to their splitting the tickets and Candidates they felt descry- vote. it is true that a large hum- sides "stuck," it was shown that the voters skip- and placed their mark the men who, in their judg- entitled to their vote, dis- .the petty fighting which m vogue in Ortonville for and which has done more the city than all failings of nature. citizens see In the of the new officers a body that tlifficult to sway at will and open minds desirous of in the best interests of the prejudice, fear or favor. feature was the of Wesley Evans as City us-j Won over L. A. Reynolds bYE after both had been in dark-I the day of election when] were brought to light by I ers by parties anxious humor into the serious- "fight." movies were defeated by a Taore than two to one. given by wards is as fol- 1st 2nd Total 251 167 418 170 82 2{rz 1st 2nd Total 387 242 629 1st 2nd 3rd 374 224 598 at Large-- 1st 2nd 3rd 240 119 359 241 126 367 220 127 347 183 135 318 241 167 408 0 0 1 First Ward-- 1st 2nd Total ................................ 235 ................................ 181 ...................................... 166 .................................. Ibo 2nd Ward- .................................... 138 ................................ 217 ..................................... 105 Judge-- 1st 2nd Total 116 68 183 286 172 458 0 3 8 0 1 1 1st 2nd Total 10 9 19 0 Y 7 Judge-- 0 6 6 1st 2nd Total 142 71 213 263 179 442 office of city Justice is in the city clrter, it is election of Evans is il- grounds that the position in the notice of election to law. This office for the past 8 due to the fact that no cases broughb in and that persons who were Years past refused to quail- that his election is tates that he is qualified fill the position; that justice of the peace for Minn., where a half section of land; from McGregoi" Iowa, and that he of the Spanish American s Book Week Re Nov. 13 to 18 Children's books will be the department stores of November 13 library for the a large se.leetian Gifts may be at the library p.m. All who invited. Armistice Day Program " For Ortonville Is Outlined Conforming with a program pre- pared by the local post of the American Legion, Ortonville, will celebrate Armistice bay, Friday in a fitting baY, and pay solemn and sincere tri- ute to the soldiers, sailors and mar- ines who gave their lives for Ameri- ca in the great world war. The pro- gram outlined is as follows: 11:00 a. m.--Stores close. ! 11:50 a. ,m.--Assemble at Orpheum. 12:00 m.--Attention. Silent Prayer. 12:02 p. m.--Taps. 12:05 p. m.Program. 30 minutes at Orpheum theatre. 1:00 to 5:00 p. m.--Open house at Legion Rooms. 3:00 p. m. Movie Matinee at Or- pheum theatre. 9:00 p. m.--Legion Dance. I. O. O. F. Hall. $1.10 per couple including tax. Everyone is expected to stop work wherever they are, at 12:00 m. sharp, and stand at attention for two min- utes, in honor to the unknown Ameri- ca soldier, killed in the World War, who will be buried in Arlington Me- morial Amphitheater in Washington at that hour. To overcome the differ- ence in timepieces, generally prevaqll - ing. the fire siren will be sounded at 12 o'clock noon, and again at 12:02 p. m, Aged Woman Attacked By Cow While Opening Gate Mrs. John Storiem, aged 78 years, was rendered unconscious about noon Sunday when she was attacked by a cow on their farm east of town after opening a gate to allow the cattle ac- cess to the pasture. Her injuries were ot of a serious nature ltho it was thought at first that she suffere| broken bones. The critter, after knocking her down attempted to gore her but members of the family who heard her cries for help arrived in time to save her from further injury. Fair Association Elects Officers for Coming Year Clinton, Minn.--Offeers elected at a meeting of the Big Stone County Agri- cultueaflm$, held on Tuesday at the Clinton State Bank, for  the coming SNOW SLIDE FOR CHILDREN PLAN OF CIVIC CLUB Council Asked to Share In Cost of Structure. Peti- tions Presented In Road Matters. Youngsters of this city may lay cPaim to the longest and fastest snow slide in this section of the state if plans which were laid before the council at its regular meeting Mon- day night materialize. Appearing before the council inbe: half of the Civic Club, Mrs. J. Kar and Mrs. Alvah Matthews requested assistance from the city in the con- struction of an approach from the bluff along the lake road to the lake for use as a snow slide for the chil- dren of the community, pointing out the recreational benefits and calling attention to the lessening of the haz- zard by the use of a proper slide loca- ted along the lakeshore instead of the use of hills in the business section where traffic interferes. As a result O. A. Ostlind and Dr. Chas: Bolsta were appointed to ascertain the prob- able expense and go over the grounds with reuresentatives of the Boy Scout organization and Civic Club for ' the purpose of deciding upon a suitable location. The committee is to report at the next regular meeting of the council. Two petitions were presented before the council elative to city streets. One asked for the extension of the street from the corner near the green houses east between b!ocks one and 2, SchoenJs second addition, north to east and west street in Westling's north along the north side of Let 25 and the other requested the city to vacate that portion of Minnesota ave- nue between lots 1, 2, 3, and 4 in block 5, Cook's Addition, and lots 5 and 6 in block 21, Orton's First Addition. This is the section of the street which las never been in use because of the ra- vine which intercepts the feasibility of extending the road from the corner by the L. P. Hess residence toward the residence of Ed. Shult. year are: J. C. Bender, president; A. Action on both petitions, which were M. Trebil, secretary; O. T. Harrison, signed by a large number of interest- treasurer. Affairs of the associatibn were ed property owners in the respective neighborhoods, will be had at the next found to be in good condition despite regular meeting. the loss which the association ex- A bill of $115 in favor of Hausauer perienced this year due to unfavor- abre weather during the three daYS set for the fair, according to reports of those in charge. AUTOS COLLIDE TWO INJURED Three Cars Badly Smashed On Road South of Bellingham. Two Per- sons Taken To Hospital. With three cars smashed and in the ditch, all within the radius of three miles, the K. T. Trail south of Bet- lingham, took the appearance of a race course Sunday evening. Two men in the hospital, injured, one car wrecked beyond repair, and three others badly wrecked, is the toll of the accidents that ocured at that place, all within an hour's time. The first accident happened about three ,miles south of Bellingham. when a Ford, carrying a man, his wife, and three childDen, one of them a baby, crashed heUong into a Maxwell car coming South, driven Ijy Ogis Tell, ac- companled by John Hessefinger, both of Fargo, N. D. The Maxwell was completely wrecked, with all four wheels broken to splinters and the rest of the car smashed beyond r@- pair. The two occupants of the Max- well who were injured were taken to the hospital at Madison, while the people in the Ford were unscratched, but all suffering from seveDe shock. The Ford was not damaged with ex- Brothers, being the difference between the .amount subscribed by individuals and that due for the graveling and blading of the road from the Minne- sota River Bridge to the State line was allowed. The total cost was $508. Aside from the allowance, of a few bills no other business was transacted. Game and Fish Depart- merit Issues Order Orders received today by Warden O. S. Briggs from the State Game and Fish department, dated at St. Paul, November 9, 1921, are as fol- I lows: " , I "Investigation having been made,. and it having been found that fish[ contained therein are in danger of smothering in dnter by reason of the shallowness o f t h e water, per- mission is hereby granted to Cake I such fish as may be found therein] from the followi'ng waters, in any manner, until April 1st, 1922, for do- mestic use only, as provided for in Chapter 400, General Laws, 1919: "Big Stone CountyKells Lake, 9 miles east of Ortonville; Otrey Lake, 6 miles east of Ortonville;Barr Lake, 2 miles southeast of Correll. "Kandiyohi County--Lake Eight, n Section 8, township S, New London, Henschion Lake. "Lac Qui Parle CountySlough, 6 miles northwest of Madison. "CARLOS AVERY, Ca/he and Fish Commissioner. (Seal) " St. Paul, Minnesota, November 9th, 1921." ception of broken "lights and radia- tor. Appearance of the cars which were over 15 feet apart after the crash, would indicat  that 'the Max- well was going at least 30 miles per hour. The force of the impact was beard at a farmhouse, one fourth mile away. An hour after this happened, a car going north, driven by a party of yeung men who it is said, had been imbibing too freely of liquor, "killed" the engine in the middle of the road. A gentleman driving a Ford coming from Bellingham, at a fair rate of speed, failed to see them in the dusk and to avert a collision, tried to turn quickly to the right. Being too near ihe steep embankment, his car went into the ditch, and thru a fence, wreck- ing his ear and breaking several fence .osts. This man was unhurt. The next accident was purely a case of too fast driving it is reported. A product of Henry Ford's plant taking 4:o the ditch for reasons of its own. A. W. McLane will attend the elec- trical lecture in St. Paul Thursday put on by the FairbanksMorse Com- pany for the benefit of their travel- ling salesmen and emploFees. "The Red Sross of Peace" At Orpheum November 12 Rehearsals by the cast of the Red Cross pageant, "The Red Cross of Peace," convince those in charge of the undertaking that it will be very well given. Those taking part have been de- voting themselves whole heartedly to their work, with the view of making it well, worth while seeing, expecting thereby to stimulate more active sup- port to that wonderful institution, the American Red Cross. The pageant will be given on Satur- day, November 12, at the Orpheum theatre in Ortonville, both afternoon (at 3:00 o'clock) and in the evening (a 8:00). No admission will be charged at either performance. hoot Deer Out " Of Season;Fined A venturesome deer met a V]olen$ end while passing thrutevens county about August 2... As a result Paul Goodell and Frank Hill, game war- dens of Grant and Pope counties brought five men beore Judge G. W. Beise on Tuesday morning. Two of them, Emil Augustson of Horon township and George Metzger of lien- cock were fined $50 and costs for shooting deer out of season. The rest of the quintet were released. The idea of a deer in Stevens coun- ty is almost unbeliebable, but the gentlemen who ate the venison and paid tim fines can testify hat the presence was actual. The animal was first ,seen in a cornfield of a farmer in Hrton township. The story was told and retold until it was almost forgotten around Hancock, but mean- while the wardens had gotten a clue which they worked patiently until they secmd sufficient evidence to act. A couple ot deer were seen east of Glenwood earlier in the season, and the deer shot here was probably one of them. Last winter a deer was seen near Niemakle's north of Donnelly, and two years ago there were a couple of deer near C. B. Kloos' farm north of Morris, most of the winter. ---Morris Tribune. Other Hunters Leave for North In Quest of Deer Ortonville will be well represented this fall in the north woods. The party of seven, including Emil Ost- lind, Wayne Kelly, Jimmie Smith, Otto Harris, Ed. Zehringer, Dr. D. M. O'Donnell and John Crippen, left on scheduled time Sunday morning for Big Forks, in Itaska county, via Re Speed Wagon, adequately covered to keep out the weather. Monday morning, R. U. Herzog and Roy Geier started for Brooten, Minne- sota, in Mr. Geier's car, with the in- intention of bringing back a deer apiece. At Brooten they will meet George Eastman of this city, who has a cabin near Opstead in Mille Lacs county, with whom they will hunt. Hold-up Men's Plans Fail When Autoist Speeds By On Sunday. night between eight and nine o'clock, an attempt was made by two unknown .men to hold up Ted Jack- son of Clinton. On his return from Ortonville near the gravel pit the strangers with drawn guns commanded him to stop but Mr. Jackson who surmised their purpose immediately speeded up and made his get-away. About the same time G. M, Johnson and party also of Clinton on their re- turn from Watertown nearly ran into a car which stood directly across the road at this place which was without lights and is now thought to have been the robbers' car.' Mrs. R. M. Lybarger of Fayette- ville, Arkansas, is here for about two weeks visiting relatives and friends and looking after a 240 acre tract of land owned by her in Stevens county. She was formerly Miss Irtie Matthews and is a sister of Mrs. Frank Finberg of Clinton. Celebrated Tenor and Pianist To Appear Nov. 17 Carsten Well and Miss Esther Er- hart Well, noted tenor and pianist, will gppear in concert at the high school auditorium on Thursday evem ing, November 17 at eight,o'clock, it was announced today by nembers of the Community Music Club of this city, under whose auspices they will appear. Mr. Victor Nielsson, critic, in th, Minneapolis Journal had this to sa of Mr. Well. "The drawing card of the vening's program was the tenor sger Carsten Well who in-his lyric! voice and clear diction sang songs by Grieg, Arlberg and Rosenfeld. His voice is of such a true tenor quality and his conceptions convincing." gOf Miss Esther Well, the Chicago Tribune says: "Esther Erhart Well displayed wlled fingers, a retie of genuine beauty and much variety as commendable taste." The Wiscon- sin State Journal says "Mrs. Woll is more than fortunate in her magne- tism, and charm of personality. She played beautifully with a clearness and fluency and singing tone that were truly delightful, transforming the in- strument into a living, breathing and thinking thing that takes absolute pos- session of the listener." While in Europe Mr. Well studied with teachers like Mine. Ottesen, Holst, Hansen, Yeatmen Griffith ann George Hamlin. He was selected as the soloist at the great Millennial celebration of Normandy, France, |n 1911. Lovers of phonograph m uslc are well aqminted with his voiob as he has prodweed records for the Vic- tor, Columbia and Edison companies. Tickets will be on sale at both Drug stores. The entertainment is being ofl'd by the club at 26 for children and 50c for adults. It is expected to draw a capacity house. STATE PARK FOR BOTTOMS IS PLAN OF REP. J. D. ROSS R. P. Chase, State Auditor, Inspects Grotmds and Of- fers Suggestions for Ira. provement. Aid Sought. Should plans of Representative J. D. Ross of this city be carried out the Minnesota River bottoms from the foot of Big Stone Lake to the railroad embankment, will within a few years, become a well platted and laid-out state park, instead of the "limberlost" that it now is. Favorable action for the establish- ment of an Inter-State Park on the bottoms is expected at the next ses- sion of the Legislature at which, it is intimated, that formal application will be made. 'With this view in mind, State Audi- tor R. P. Chase came to this city last Thursday and went over the gsoun0 in company with Mr. Ross and others and after his trip of inspection made the statement that it was his opinion that such a park could be designated. Mr. Chase appeared in his capacity a chairman of the State Park Board. "Planting of trees in proper season secured from the Forestry Department without waiting for the construction of the proposed dike and reservoir would be possible, Mr. Chase stated, if a small embankment or levee was thrown up along the river. This would keep the water within its na,ral channel when the stream backs up with the spring freshets, it was point- ed out, and when the reservoir and dike have been completed, in accord- ance with the State's project now un- der way, tbe park driveways, proposed athletic field and other improvements could be made. Mr. Chase was entertained by Representative J. D. Ross during his stay here. On Thursday afternoon he left for Graceville in company with Mr. Ross, enator F. L. Cliff and Dr. B. R Kern in the doctor's car. Beardsley Men Buy Holsteins. County Agent Roske, in company with Jake Frey of Beardsley, return- ed last week from Auburndale, Wis., with a carload of fine Holstein cows, six of them pure-breds and twenty-two high grades. Farmernear Barry and Beardsley pooled in making this pur- chase, dividing up the carload between them. Auburndale is the richest cheese manufacturing center in Wisconsin, and the cattle purchased are ;from some of the best herds there. BROWNS VALLEY ROAD GETS AID l Minnesota Highway Department To Continue Operations on Big Scale During Winter Season. Gravel surfacing of 23.4 miles on the Browns Valley-Johnson section of the Minnesota trunk high- way No. 28, estimated at $100,000 is part of the big winter program of highway construction announced by Charles M. Babcock, state highway commissioner, following action by congress to provide funds to carry out the "more work--better roads" plan to cut idleness and. build needed roads. Flyer No. 17 Loses Two Sleeping Cars in Mishap Coast-bound Milwaukee passenger train No. 17, due to arrive here at 3:32 a. m., met with an accident two .miles east of Appleton on Sunday morning, when a broken draw-bar fell to the track, throwing the two rear sleeping cars into the ditch. Not a person is reported to have received as much as a scratch, altho the train was traveUng at betwee thirty and forty miles per hour when th accident occured. Seven teachers from the Ortonville Public schools who were returning from the cities' after having been in attendance at the Educational Con- vention were among the passengers. They were the Misses Irgens, Cassel, Mealy, McBride and Rourke and , Messrs. J. M. Snesrud and T. N. Tragethon. Nothing was known of the mishap by the passengers riding in the cars which preceeded the two that@were ditched until they had been informed, according to statements. The train crew after having discovered the loss of the sleepers returned to the scene and aided the scantily clad victims i securing "comfy" quarters. The train then prceeded on its trip three hours late A wrecking crew from Monte- video arrived shortly afterwards, and the track was cleared without caus- ing delay to other trains. Rights of Auto Drivers- Threshed Out In Court The rights of automobile drivers in turning around at street intersections was threshed out in Municiual Court here Saturday, when the case of L. P. Satre, of Madison vs Dr. J. R. Cain, of this city, came on for trial, result- ig in a decision in favor of Dr. Cairn Institution of the proceedings grew out of an accident which occurred on June 29, 1921, when Dr. Cain, who was driving on second street toward the lake turned to the left at the in- tersection of Second street and Jack- son avenue, commencing to turn just before reaching the Park garage, an4 had, as Lewis J. Bailey testified, about three-fourths completed the turn when the car driven by the plaintiff struck the end of the bumper on the Cain car, tearing off the fenders on the left side and damaging it other- wise. The question involved was: "Who had the right-of-way ?, The Law pro- vides that "An operator intending turn his vehicle to the left shall drive along the center of the roadway, ex- tending his arm in a horizontal posi- tion and slow down. A vehicle shall have the right-of-way over another vehicle whic is approaching from the left in an intersecting highway, and shall give the right-of-way to an operator of a vehicle approaching from the right on an intersecting higaway. In cities or villages, or any place where traffic is large, or on streets unusually congested .with traffic of horse drawn vehicles or street ears, slow moving vehicles .must keep to the right curb, allowing those moving rapidly to keep nearer the center of the street. All vehicles must keep to the right of the center of the street." From the testimony offered relative to the position of the cars when the \\; accident happened, the court held that Dr. Cain had the right-of-way. Red Cross Drive Nov. U To 24. Solicitors for the American Red Cross will call upon all residents of the county from November 11 to 24. to receive contributions to the 5th an- Bids on this section of the road will ............. . " .....  . .. ...  nual 1O11 Lal! trla organization, ac- De receive(! a the omce o ne rllgn- . ..... . ,. cormng zo awce from donn way Department at St. Paul, on No-.., .......... ._ s vember 14, at which time Marti Lar- rea:rlY:ortB:lSst:Y'ct: w.7: kin of the Larkin-Schoen Constiuction . - g - Y' :,  urges mat everyone maze a specmt Company will represent the local corn-I .............. pany In case c'hey are successful in I enr to give reeiy o, ms tuna. ". ....... 7. t Big Stone County s allotment is securing the contrac rot me wnole ....... ^^ , ...... t ..... ki st .... at t'e taDu ,.t,,.mu.uu, nty per cen ot the s retcn ar. hal" U  a:e n n , _ ,  , , -- , om e -ed to m ke ran e I amount rmse to De remme zor worz c  puny !xpect . a a r g "]of the Red Cross in this county and merits tor me use ot a steam snoveh t ...... ..., . - -. .............. ,  I tne Durance sen r,o a;lOnat neaxtquar- lrle nrst llSt OI Z,I winter joos--zo| t rs miles of paving and 274 miles of e . gravel-surfacing estimated to cost Sic @ 687,000--is to be followed soon by oth- ers of grading and bridge work, also special team jobs to further relieve unemployed and especially the settlers and farmers of some districts, accord- ing to John I Mullen, assistant com- missioner and chief highway engin- eer. The tentative plan to use about $4,500,000 this winter or the dual purpose or reducing idleness. and im- proving roads. Special efforts are being made to spread the work that many, sections! may share in the benefits. Several roposed undertakings were postponed until next year because not adapted to cold weather operations. Work is expected to start about December 1. The state law requiring three weeks of advertising, first bids are to be c, pened November 29 to 30. Then the succesul bidders will be made pub- lic that job seekers may apply direct to them. The highway department: will have no jobs to fill. :rail Delegates Appointed. John Carlson and R. F. Walker were appointed by Mayor Schoen as dele- gates to the Eleventh Annual State Bob sleds are in general use. Meeting of the Yellowstone Trail As- seeiatia being held today at Olivia. @ ....... wIiTER ARRIVES. Nature donned her most beau- tiful of winter raiment in the first snow-fall of the season on Monday when a precipitation of three inches fell on the level, leaving the trees with the ap- pearance of a Fairyland and a scene that is nat often wit- nessed in this part of the state, Roses, sweet peas and apple blossoms were nipped in the bud and the second crpp of vege, tables defeated inlts effort to outdo all precedents of years gone by. Closets were  and wood-sheds turned topsy-turvy in an effort to find the proper attire to fit the weathe.--aud the sled. Following th mmw on Mon- day a general fup emme on Tuesday night whea: Big Stone Lake was eord with crust of ice exte Mmest to the center and today a light fall has been coming down. ]