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The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
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November 10, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
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November 10, 1921
 

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PAGE 2 . I i r ii lUll III II RED GROSS HAS 62 NURSES IN MINNESOTA Splendid Reauite Obtained Through- Out Gtate In Publi Health Nursing.  ITITH 62 lle V V Cross Public Health nurses pro- moting better living conditions in connec- tion with the other activities of the 91 Chapters of the American Red Cross hrre in Minnesota, the importance of the work is of unusual interest. Tne rural program has been found well adapted to this state, and many lcalltlu have been reached by this department of activity during the past 7ear for the first time. Physical In- election of the children in the rural hoolm is one of the most important phase of this work. They are ln- pected for defective teeth, eyesight, Ilad hearing. Weighing and measur- ing are a pirt of this health program, Jnd frequently nutrition classes are anlc.ad to help undernourished chil- dren reach a normal development. In nearly every county, clinics are eld with the nur co-operating with local physicians and dentists, or with apeelalists sent by the Minnesota Pub- lie Health association. t(.Tes in Home Hygiene and Care of Sick have an important place In the public health nursing program of the American Red Cross. Travel- ing instructors give these lessons, teaching the women the essentials of correctly coping with minor illnesses, They are also instructed howo assist physicians when a graduate nurse is not available. This work by no means takes the place of a physician&apos;s serv- Ice, but is designed to aid in making home hygiene better known and thus minimizing illness and contagion. Public Health nurses frequently Mare adult classes in Home Hygiene as well as classes in the schools, there- by extending their service beyond rou- tine of school inspection. During the Imst year, 3,610 women have passed the examinations and received certl- cates in Home Hygiene and care of the Sick. Professional visits are made to many homes This is an important factor in both rural and city nursing. In same sections there is but one phy- $1dan to a county, and the servlcea Of the Red Cross nurse are a vital help in various emergencle which 'lse. In both city and country communi- ties the Red Cross has a clearly-de* lued program which may be adapted to local needa. That 22 Chapters Since last year have realized the need this work and extended their pro- 8ram to ln.clllde this very practical ac- tivity proves the growing appreciation for this endeavor. On Arralstice day, November 11, the innual Roll Call of the Red Cross will be launched. Membership dollars will enable the Red Cros not only to tarry on the valuable service It is already rendering, but expand Its work to reach a wider field. l ! ............ la ......... ..s B00EN !1 EXPENDED IN THE CARE II OF EX-SERVICE MEN II AND THEIR FAMILIES BY II ,n 748 CH.TERS OF THE II AMZmCAN RED CROSS II HERE IN CENTRAL DIVISION. j[ MORE THAN TEN MmLIONS II IS BEING SPENT ANNUALLY II FOR THESE SOLDIERS II THROUGHOUT THE NATION. Ii YOUR MEMBERSHIP II DOLLASS WILL HELP TO II CARRY ON THIS WORK. II AErNUAL ROLL CALL ARMI- II STICE DAY TO THANKS- II GIVING (NOV. II TO 24). II RE-MEMBER and RE-ENROLL. l[ q OHIEF JUSTICE TAFT STATES PURPOSES OF RED CROSS. Oallo on Americans to Re-Enll=t tn the Greatest Peace-Time Army Ever Known. atlon wide services of the Ameri- can Red Cross were cttl by Chief $ustice Wllltam Howard Taft as meriting the support of every Ameri- can. In a personal message to delegates attending the national convention of the Red Oross held In Columbus, 1,ecently. Mr. Taft after summing up the past achievements of this great organization made the following appeal : "Let us turn to the future. Tha ]Red Cross has a great mission in the days of peace as well as in the turmoll of war. First of all. our duty is to the disabled ex.servlce men. Every day they must carry the burden of their services to our country. We must help them bear It. 'ore than this, humanity in general is ton frequently subject t'o disaster and destruction. The call for sudden help aver recurs, it lm imperative when it comes and is often of so great rtent as to require a rescuing agency great means and power to be at hand. The Red C'ross must not fail to heed these calls. "I am confident that the people of our country will continue to answer the roll call of the Red Cross and that thus will be enliated the greatest ]p4mee time army ever known for ImmvieY" ,rellel ml nMfering ha- manila." THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT THURSDAY, N()VEMBER Farmers To Determine Grain ,Grower Policies Northwest Selling Facilities Will Be Satisfactory to Membership, Says C. H. Gustafsan, President, U. S. Grain Growers. Farmers of Mnnesota who become members of the U. S. Grain Growers, Inc., will determine the question of permanent sales facilities as well as other matters of policy relative to local problem.% declared C. H. Gus- tafson, president of the farmers' na- tional cooperative grain marketing company in six addresses in this state the last of which was delivered at Fergus Falls this week. Special significance was attached to Mr. Gustafson's addresses in view of the many difficulties that have been encountered in getting the Minnesota drive under way. Mr. Gustafson, Secretary Frank M. Myers and Treas- urer Wm. G.Eckhardt are now in di- rect charge of the Minnesota cam- paign. J.S. Jones, organization di- rector for the state, is working entire- ly under their direction. "The U. S. Grain Growers, Inc.," said Mr. Gustafon, "is purely demo- cratic. Our membership will hold loc- al, sectional and finally a national convention, this last to meet in Chica- go in March, before another crop be- gins to move. At that time, every producer who signs one of our con- tracts will have the right and the op- portunity, to express his preference as td the channels through which his grain shall pass." Pleading for cooperation as between the membership of the different coop- erative organizations, Mr. Gustafson pointed out that the greatest stumb- ling block in the path of cooperative development is the unwillingness of different farmer organizations to con- sder their problems practically and adjust their differences purely from the standpoint of what is best for all farmers. "We farmers have been disorgan- ized for too long and the time is now at hand when we must combine our efforts, forget our local differences and go'along together," Mr. Gustafson said, "When farmer organizations in any local county,district or state have differences or even an actual fight and one of them comes out the victor, about the only result that can be shown in the long run is personal sat- isfaction on the part of the leaders who come out ahead. "But what about the man on the farm, h:s he gained anything ? Can he show any more profits at the end of -the year? If only all of these little parades can be combined into one, we farmers can put on a show that wil be well worth the effort." With particular reference to the situation in Minnesota, Mr Gustafson declared that the U. S. Grain Growers, Inc.., would set up sales connections in the Twin Cities that would be satis- factory to the farmer membership "Permanency is the one big thing which we, as your servants in start- ing off this national farmers company, are keeping continually in our minds. Some of our very best friends have criticized us most severely for being too slow. We have been ' making haste slowly. We have been trying not to take a step or determine a pol- icy until we could be sure that it was right. We dd not want to go back and build over again. Furthermore, when it comes to the first annual meeting, we want the structure to be in such shape that we can say, 'here it is. It has been built solid and safe. You wont have to waste time in tear- ing down a part and rebuilding.' "There have been many differences of opinion in some states. It has been our aim to find out what the wishes of the grain growers really are before we decide what should be done in any such case. Whenever we are sure what the rank and file of grain growers want, then we know what to do. We believe it is better to go slow in those cases than to act too hastily and make a serious mistake. Our efforts have been rewarded an it is with considerable pleasure to me that I am able to tell you that in the states of Oklahoma, Colorado, Nebras- ka, South Dakbta, Missouri and Indi- ana, every farmers organization is out in the feld and giving active support to organization work of the U. S. Grain Growers, Inc. "We are just getting started in our organization work. So far we have just learned how to go about it and in learning we have more than 22,000 members and something like 45,000,- 000 bushels of grain under contract. When our first annual meeting is called in March we are certain to have a membership of more than 50,000 and more than 100,000,000 bushels of grain to market in 1922. And if Minnesota farmers give this organi- zation the support which I believe they will, we will have a great deal more than that. "Our organization work in Minne- sota will be conducted under the di- rection of the pesident, secretary and treasurer of the U. S. Grain Growers. We wish to be friendly with every farmers organization in the state as well as in the nation and we trust that they will recognize that our policy of what is best for all farmers organiza- tion will induce all of them to give us their active support." President Gustafson is a Nebraska farmer who has attained national prominence as a farmer leader and who has gained the name among farm paper edito of "a co-operator who is willing to cooperate." He organized, was elected president of and develop- ed the Farmers Union cooperative. in Nebraska, including the Farmers Livestoik Commission Company of Omaha, which is now doing more than $40,000,000 business annually and re- turning more than 50 per cent of the of the national grain marketing corn- commision charges to its patrons. pany. "It would be presumptious for He stated that he believes in a gospel me or any other officer of this farm- of cooperation as betwen cooperative ers company to dictate to the farmers organizations and declared that the of Minnesota what they shall do and test of a cooperative was: first, does it what they shall not do with reference help the farmers?; second, will it to local arrangements,"Mr. Gustafson work with other farmers organiza- said. "This is a farmer-owned and tions who are trying to do the same farmer-controlled company and every grain grower who becomes a member will assist in determining our policies and the course which we will pursue. "One of the first principles adopted by the Committee of Seventeen was that the manageknent of the local farmers elevator and the perfecting of local arrangements in every com- munity for handling grain from that shipping point would not be disturbed by tre national association. The same policy must be applied with reference to district sales connections and espec- ially is this true where there is a wide difference of opinion relative to thing?; third, is it built on a safe and sane foundation ? With the recklessness of a cowboy, Albert B. Fall, Secretary of the In- terior, joined in with "cowpunchers" and assisted in stemming a buffalo stampede at the buffalo farm in Yel- lowstone Park. Only an expert horse- man would attempt this, as stampeded buffalos become blnd with fright and fury and charge at anything. Mrs. Drum--"I heard you talking to yourself while you were taking terminal agencies, your bath, Major. That's a bad cus- 'The only thing which we can do is tom." to proceed with our membership drive Major--"I wasn't talking to my- and then allow the grain growers self; I was talking to the soap; I slip- themseles to solve their local pro- ped on it and fell." blems for each district. When the farmers of Minnesota do make their decisiou. I hope that they will not al- low anything to stand in the way and prevent them from making the deci- sion that will be best for all Minne- sota farmers. "Most of all. farmers should not lose sight of the fact that this move- ment must go far beyond district sales agencies or terminal elevator associations if it is to accomplish the purpose which the Committee of Sev- enteen outlined as our national mar- keting plan. We have farmers termin- al marketing associations at several points which have been quite success- fulat Cleveland, Ohio, Hutchinson, Kansas., Imsas City, Mo., Omaha, Nob., and at our market, St. Paul. They have been successful in a degree but to obtain the results that all far- mers are demanding, we must go much farther. "it v-as the ;lea of the Committee of ,cventeen to u:e those agencies al- re: "! established as a foundation for their uit'mate development a;(1 hat policy wi]! e nursue:J so far as ih existing agencies a'ce willing to work and fit into the national marketing program. We want to co-operate with all existing farmers marketinf agencies. We plead in the name of coperation that we may be the big brother of them all. That is the policy which we must pursue because if we take the broader view of what is best for all farmers,, that is the on- Sturdy Boy Wagon Just as the name implies All steel except handle 20x9x3 inches (Inside Box Measurements) $1.95 each Iyler's Yeriety Store Extent and Reduction Foods To Use When Of the Civil Service Condition Is Anemic The United States Civil Service When the human system needs a C - i-sion toda- issued its semi an = tonic diet, in other words, a diet high ornH) , y  ." - - nual statement relardin the extent/ in iron, to meet anemic conditions, of the Federal executive civil service the use of some of the following tem. and reductions therein as follows" t of food is recommended bv health and , . . . , . . . ....... . ......... : [ nutrition specahsts of the Umverstv Tne eflera= executive C]%/1| AOYC lit] . a. * ., . . . . .  , .. - ,,OI lVllnnesota. llC lJlsl;rlct ol olumDla was re(tuce<t I  .  . . ....... . ._ trea(ls: Jton brown, entire wheat, Dy ll,OU, employees ourmg tne year . 5 granam. ended July 31, 1921, and by 38,89 ............ wereals: l;:)lle<l oas, rolie(1 wnea, <luring the period from November 11, 1918 to July 31, 1921. The reduction cracked wheat, shredded wheat. thruout the United States, including the District of Columbia, was 93,634 for the year ended July 31, 1921, and more than 300,000 during the period fzom November 11, 1918, to July 31, 1921 . The reductions continue steadi- ly, but now, ofcourse, more slowly. On June 30, 1916, there were 39,259 employees in the District of Colum- bia, and 400,539 in branches outside the District of Columbia, making the total on that date 439,798. On No- vember 11, 1918, at the height of the war expansion, the number of em- ployees in the District of Columbia was 117,760. Owing to rapid fluctua- tions at distant places of employ- ment, it was found impractical to com- pile strictly accurate figures for the force outside the District of Columbia during the war period As near as can be estimated, the force outside the District of Columbia numbered ap- proximately 800,000 on November 11, 1918. This is a conservative estimate; it is probably too low. Adding the number in the District of Columbia ou that date, the approximate total number of employees on the date the armistice was signed was 917,760. On July 31, 1920, there were 90,559 Fed- eral civil employees in the District of Columbia and 600,557 in branches ou- side the District of Columbia, making the total on that (late 691,116. tn July 31, 1921 there were 7,865 em- ployees in the District of Columbi: and 518.67 in branches outside, the total on that date being 597,482. All figures named include Federa executive positions classified under the civil service law and those not so classified. Vegetables: Spinach, lettuce, swiss chard, asparagus, dandelion, rhubarb, cabbage, brussels sprouts, string beans, celery, radishes, cauliflower dried beans, kohlrabi, eggplant, toma- toes, yeas, potatoes, beets, carrots, squash, turnips, onions, pumpkins.. Fruits: Strawberries, raisins, cran- berries, pineapples, blueberries, black- berries, prunes, figs, watermelon dates. Protein rich: Eggs, lean beef, fowl, fish, iamb, milk, buttermilk foods, al- monds, hazelnuts. Sugars: Molasses, maple syrup. Ingratitude is always ready to offer some kind of excuse. MICKIE SAYS No Work is to intricate for us to handle when it comes to Machine Re- pairing. We have the equipment to handle this work promptly and efficiently. The lightning bug probably himself up that way so he an excuse to give Mrs. Bug for out nights. Some people's arguments hard to get head or tail of as a ing affair in a moving picture. THE W HOTEL Minneapolis, Minnesota. Following t h e trend in prices is now ing rooms at--- $1.50 to $2.00--Without $2.00 to $5.00---With Bath With Moderate Priced --Cafe-- In Connection The new Granite taken from our quarries recently ed near Odessa will be called Ortonville Ruby Red I I We can recommend this Granite as the most beautiful snd finest for tombstones and other purposeswhere Granite is If interested see our display. S00nd for Our Designs See Our Prices Bdore 0RI000VIL[[ MONUM[NT JOHNSON & LINDHOM, Props. 00gou know one sucesfful wh0 spend s he makes!No? Then savinq mu"sL" be necessanl '[o success.WhaLuoU save ]s t'he I00efi[0n 00our bbor. i00juhr eeposil00.Wi. Keep 9our.00,n00,=,00,unt neal|hq ann ) Bring It In A. S. HALLS Ortonviile IIIIIIllitlllllllllllllll IIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliillillllllllllllllllllllllllllllll , i Overhauling Take your car to Wm. Overhauling or Repair Work. be in competent hands and will be right. WM. CUMMENS, Ortonvi: Agency for CHEVROLET CARS Z PAGE 2 . I i r ii lUll III II RED GROSS HAS 62 NURSES IN MINNESOTA Splendid Reauite Obtained Through- Out Gtate In Publi Health Nursing.  ITITH 62 lle V V Cross Public Health nurses pro- moting better living conditions in connec- tion with the other activities of the 91 Chapters of the American Red Cross hrre in Minnesota, the importance of the work is of unusual interest. Tne rural program has been found well adapted to this state, and many lcalltlu have been reached by this department of activity during the past 7ear for the first time. Physical In- election of the children in the rural hoolm is one of the most important phase of this work. They are ln- pected for defective teeth, eyesight, Ilad hearing. Weighing and measur- ing are a pirt of this health program, Jnd frequently nutrition classes are anlc.ad to help undernourished chil- dren reach a normal development. In nearly every county, clinics are eld with the nur co-operating with local physicians and dentists, or with apeelalists sent by the Minnesota Pub- lie Health association. t(.Tes in Home Hygiene and Care of Sick have an important place In the public health nursing program of the American Red Cross. Travel- ing instructors give these lessons, teaching the women the essentials of correctly coping with minor illnesses, They are also instructed howo assist physicians when a graduate nurse is not available. This work by no means takes the place of a physician's serv- Ice, but is designed to aid in making home hygiene better known and thus minimizing illness and contagion. Public Health nurses frequently Mare adult classes in Home Hygiene as well as classes in the schools, there- by extending their service beyond rou- tine of school inspection. During the Imst year, 3,610 women have passed the examinations and received certl- cates in Home Hygiene and care of the Sick. Professional visits are made to many homes This is an important factor in both rural and city nursing. In same sections there is but one phy- $1dan to a county, and the servlcea Of the Red Cross nurse are a vital help in various emergencle which 'lse. In both city and country communi- ties the Red Cross has a clearly-de* lued program which may be adapted to local needa. That 22 Chapters Since last year have realized the need this work and extended their pro- 8ram to ln.clllde this very practical ac- tivity proves the growing appreciation for this endeavor. On Arralstice day, November 11, the innual Roll Call of the Red Cross will be launched. Membership dollars will enable the Red Cros not only to tarry on the valuable service It is already rendering, but expand Its work to reach a wider field. l ! ............ la ......... ..s B00EN !1 EXPENDED IN THE CARE II OF EX-SERVICE MEN II AND THEIR FAMILIES BY II ,n 748 CH.TERS OF THE II AMZmCAN RED CROSS II HERE IN CENTRAL DIVISION. j[ MORE THAN TEN MmLIONS II IS BEING SPENT ANNUALLY II FOR THESE SOLDIERS II THROUGHOUT THE NATION. Ii YOUR MEMBERSHIP II DOLLASS WILL HELP TO II CARRY ON THIS WORK. II AErNUAL ROLL CALL ARMI- II STICE DAY TO THANKS- II GIVING (NOV. II TO 24). II RE-MEMBER and RE-ENROLL. l[ q OHIEF JUSTICE TAFT STATES PURPOSES OF RED CROSS. Oallo on Americans to Re-Enll=t tn the Greatest Peace-Time Army Ever Known. atlon wide services of the Ameri- can Red Cross were cttl by Chief $ustice Wllltam Howard Taft as meriting the support of every Ameri- can. In a personal message to delegates attending the national convention of the Red Oross held In Columbus, 1,ecently. Mr. Taft after summing up the past achievements of this great organization made the following appeal : "Let us turn to the future. Tha ]Red Cross has a great mission in the days of peace as well as in the turmoll of war. First of all. our duty is to the disabled ex.servlce men. Every day they must carry the burden of their services to our country. We must help them bear It. 'ore than this, humanity in general is ton frequently subject t'o disaster and destruction. The call for sudden help aver recurs, it lm imperative when it comes and is often of so great rtent as to require a rescuing agency great means and power to be at hand. The Red C'ross must not fail to heed these calls. "I am confident that the people of our country will continue to answer the roll call of the Red Cross and that thus will be enliated the greatest ]p4mee time army ever known for ImmvieY" ,rellel ml nMfering ha- manila." THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT THURSDAY, N()VEMBER Farmers To Determine Grain ,Grower Policies Northwest Selling Facilities Will Be Satisfactory to Membership, Says C. H. Gustafsan, President, U. S. Grain Growers. Farmers of Mnnesota who become members of the U. S. Grain Growers, Inc., will determine the question of permanent sales facilities as well as other matters of policy relative to local problem.% declared C. H. Gus- tafson, president of the farmers' na- tional cooperative grain marketing company in six addresses in this state the last of which was delivered at Fergus Falls this week. Special significance was attached to Mr. Gustafson's addresses in view of the many difficulties that have been encountered in getting the Minnesota drive under way. Mr. Gustafson, Secretary Frank M. Myers and Treas- urer Wm. G.Eckhardt are now in di- rect charge of the Minnesota cam- paign. J.S. Jones, organization di- rector for the state, is working entire- ly under their direction. "The U. S. Grain Growers, Inc.," said Mr. Gustafon, "is purely demo- cratic. Our membership will hold loc- al, sectional and finally a national convention, this last to meet in Chica- go in March, before another crop be- gins to move. At that time, every producer who signs one of our con- tracts will have the right and the op- portunity, to express his preference as td the channels through which his grain shall pass." Pleading for cooperation as between the membership of the different coop- erative organizations, Mr. Gustafson pointed out that the greatest stumb- ling block in the path of cooperative development is the unwillingness of different farmer organizations to con- sder their problems practically and adjust their differences purely from the standpoint of what is best for all farmers. "We farmers have been disorgan- ized for too long and the time is now at hand when we must combine our efforts, forget our local differences and go'along together," Mr. Gustafson said, "When farmer organizations in any local county,district or state have differences or even an actual fight and one of them comes out the victor, about the only result that can be shown in the long run is personal sat- isfaction on the part of the leaders who come out ahead. "But what about the man on the farm, h:s he gained anything ? Can he show any more profits at the end of -the year? If only all of these little parades can be combined into one, we farmers can put on a show that wil be well worth the effort." With particular reference to the situation in Minnesota, Mr Gustafson declared that the U. S. Grain Growers, Inc.., would set up sales connections in the Twin Cities that would be satis- factory to the farmer membership "Permanency is the one big thing which we, as your servants in start- ing off this national farmers company, are keeping continually in our minds. Some of our very best friends have criticized us most severely for being too slow. We have been ' making haste slowly. We have been trying not to take a step or determine a pol- icy until we could be sure that it was right. We dd not want to go back and build over again. Furthermore, when it comes to the first annual meeting, we want the structure to be in such shape that we can say, 'here it is. It has been built solid and safe. You wont have to waste time in tear- ing down a part and rebuilding.' "There have been many differences of opinion in some states. It has been our aim to find out what the wishes of the grain growers really are before we decide what should be done in any such case. Whenever we are sure what the rank and file of grain growers want, then we know what to do. We believe it is better to go slow in those cases than to act too hastily and make a serious mistake. Our efforts have been rewarded an it is with considerable pleasure to me that I am able to tell you that in the states of Oklahoma, Colorado, Nebras- ka, South Dakbta, Missouri and Indi- ana, every farmers organization is out in the feld and giving active support to organization work of the U. S. Grain Growers, Inc. "We are just getting started in our organization work. So far we have just learned how to go about it and in learning we have more than 22,000 members and something like 45,000,- 000 bushels of grain under contract. When our first annual meeting is called in March we are certain to have a membership of more than 50,000 and more than 100,000,000 bushels of grain to market in 1922. And if Minnesota farmers give this organi- zation the support which I believe they will, we will have a great deal more than that. "Our organization work in Minne- sota will be conducted under the di- rection of the pesident, secretary and treasurer of the U. S. Grain Growers. We wish to be friendly with every farmers organization in the state as well as in the nation and we trust that they will recognize that our policy of what is best for all farmers organiza- tion will induce all of them to give us their active support." President Gustafson is a Nebraska farmer who has attained national prominence as a farmer leader and who has gained the name among farm paper edito of "a co-operator who is willing to cooperate." He organized, was elected president of and develop- ed the Farmers Union cooperative. in Nebraska, including the Farmers Livestoik Commission Company of Omaha, which is now doing more than $40,000,000 business annually and re- turning more than 50 per cent of the of the national grain marketing corn- commision charges to its patrons. pany. "It would be presumptious for He stated that he believes in a gospel me or any other officer of this farm- of cooperation as betwen cooperative ers company to dictate to the farmers organizations and declared that the of Minnesota what they shall do and test of a cooperative was: first, does it what they shall not do with reference help the farmers?; second, will it to local arrangements,"Mr. Gustafson work with other farmers organiza- said. "This is a farmer-owned and tions who are trying to do the same farmer-controlled company and every grain grower who becomes a member will assist in determining our policies and the course which we will pursue. "One of the first principles adopted by the Committee of Seventeen was that the manageknent of the local farmers elevator and the perfecting of local arrangements in every com- munity for handling grain from that shipping point would not be disturbed by tre national association. The same policy must be applied with reference to district sales connections and espec- ially is this true where there is a wide difference of opinion relative to thing?; third, is it built on a safe and sane foundation ? With the recklessness of a cowboy, Albert B. Fall, Secretary of the In- terior, joined in with "cowpunchers" and assisted in stemming a buffalo stampede at the buffalo farm in Yel- lowstone Park. Only an expert horse- man would attempt this, as stampeded buffalos become blnd with fright and fury and charge at anything. Mrs. Drum--"I heard you talking to yourself while you were taking terminal agencies, your bath, Major. That's a bad cus- 'The only thing which we can do is tom." to proceed with our membership drive Major--"I wasn't talking to my- and then allow the grain growers self; I was talking to the soap; I slip- themseles to solve their local pro- ped on it and fell." blems for each district. When the farmers of Minnesota do make their decisiou. I hope that they will not al- low anything to stand in the way and prevent them from making the deci- sion that will be best for all Minne- sota farmers. "Most of all. farmers should not lose sight of the fact that this move- ment must go far beyond district sales agencies or terminal elevator associations if it is to accomplish the purpose which the Committee of Sev- enteen outlined as our national mar- keting plan. We have farmers termin- al marketing associations at several points which have been quite success- fulat Cleveland, Ohio, Hutchinson, Kansas., Imsas City, Mo., Omaha, Nob., and at our market, St. Paul. They have been successful in a degree but to obtain the results that all far- mers are demanding, we must go much farther. "it v-as the ;lea of the Committee of ,cventeen to u:e those agencies al- re: "! established as a foundation for their uit'mate development a;(1 hat policy wi]! e nursue:J so far as ih existing agencies a'ce willing to work and fit into the national marketing program. We want to co-operate with all existing farmers marketinf agencies. We plead in the name of coperation that we may be the big brother of them all. That is the policy which we must pursue because if we take the broader view of what is best for all farmers,, that is the on- Sturdy Boy Wagon Just as the name implies All steel except handle 20x9x3 inches (Inside Box Measurements) $1.95 each Iyler's Yeriety Store Extent and Reduction Foods To Use When Of the Civil Service Condition Is Anemic The United States Civil Service When the human system needs a C - i-sion toda- issued its semi an = tonic diet, in other words, a diet high ornH) , y  ." - - nual statement relardin the extent/ in iron, to meet anemic conditions, of the Federal executive civil service the use of some of the following tem. and reductions therein as follows" t of food is recommended bv health and , . . . , . . . ....... . ......... : [ nutrition specahsts of the Umverstv Tne eflera= executive C]%/1| AOYC lit] . a. * ., . . . . .  , .. - ,,OI lVllnnesota. llC lJlsl;rlct ol olumDla was re(tuce<t I  .  . . ....... . ._ trea(ls: Jton brown, entire wheat, Dy ll,OU, employees ourmg tne year . 5 granam. ended July 31, 1921, and by 38,89 ............ wereals: l;:)lle<l oas, rolie(1 wnea, <luring the period from November 11, 1918 to July 31, 1921. The reduction cracked wheat, shredded wheat. thruout the United States, including the District of Columbia, was 93,634 for the year ended July 31, 1921, and more than 300,000 during the period fzom November 11, 1918, to July 31, 1921 . The reductions continue steadi- ly, but now, ofcourse, more slowly. On June 30, 1916, there were 39,259 employees in the District of Colum- bia, and 400,539 in branches outside the District of Columbia, making the total on that date 439,798. On No- vember 11, 1918, at the height of the war expansion, the number of em- ployees in the District of Columbia was 117,760. Owing to rapid fluctua- tions at distant places of employ- ment, it was found impractical to com- pile strictly accurate figures for the force outside the District of Columbia during the war period As near as can be estimated, the force outside the District of Columbia numbered ap- proximately 800,000 on November 11, 1918. This is a conservative estimate; it is probably too low. Adding the number in the District of Columbia ou that date, the approximate total number of employees on the date the armistice was signed was 917,760. On July 31, 1920, there were 90,559 Fed- eral civil employees in the District of Columbia and 600,557 in branches ou- side the District of Columbia, making the total on that (late 691,116. tn July 31, 1921 there were 7,865 em- ployees in the District of Columbi: and 518.67 in branches outside, the total on that date being 597,482. All figures named include Federa executive positions classified under the civil service law and those not so classified. Vegetables: Spinach, lettuce, swiss chard, asparagus, dandelion, rhubarb, cabbage, brussels sprouts, string beans, celery, radishes, cauliflower dried beans, kohlrabi, eggplant, toma- toes, yeas, potatoes, beets, carrots, squash, turnips, onions, pumpkins.. Fruits: Strawberries, raisins, cran- berries, pineapples, blueberries, black- berries, prunes, figs, watermelon dates. Protein rich: Eggs, lean beef, fowl, fish, iamb, milk, buttermilk foods, al- monds, hazelnuts. Sugars: Molasses, maple syrup. Ingratitude is always ready to offer some kind of excuse. MICKIE SAYS No Work is to intricate for us to handle when it comes to Machine Re- pairing. We have the equipment to handle this work promptly and efficiently. The lightning bug probably himself up that way so he an excuse to give Mrs. Bug for out nights. Some people's arguments hard to get head or tail of as a ing affair in a moving picture. THE W HOTEL Minneapolis, Minnesota. Following t h e trend in prices is now ing rooms at--- $1.50 to $2.00--Without $2.00 to $5.00---With Bath With Moderate Priced --Cafe-- In Connection The new Granite taken from our quarries recently ed near Odessa will be called Ortonville Ruby Red I I We can recommend this Granite as the most beautiful snd finest for tombstones and other purposeswhere Granite is If interested see our display. S00nd for Our Designs See Our Prices Bdore 0RI000VIL[[ MONUM[NT JOHNSON & LINDHOM, Props. 00gou know one sucesfful wh0 spend s he makes!No? Then savinq mu"sL" be necessanl '[o success.WhaLuoU save ]s t'he I00efi[0n 00our bbor. i00juhr eeposil00.Wi. Keep 9our.00,n00,=,00,unt neal|hq ann ) Bring It In A. S. HALLS Ortonviile IIIIIIllitlllllllllllllll IIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliillillllllllllllllllllllllllllllll , i Overhauling Take your car to Wm. Overhauling or Repair Work. be in competent hands and will be right. WM. CUMMENS, Ortonvi: Agency for CHEVROLET CARS Z ' ,MAGE SMALLTQWNPAPERS ,NO ALL CemENT COPYR,GHTE0 ALL mGHTS RESERVe0 USE SUSJECT TO L,CENSE AGREEMENT REPRO0UCT,ON 0,SSEM,NAT,ON STORAGE mSTmSUT,ON PROH,S,TE0 PAGE It THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT TH[RSDAY. NOVEMBER 10, REO CROSS HAS 62 NURSES IN MINNESOTA 8pdld Resultl Obtained ThrOugh- t state t. p.bl Hlth N.ln. W " Cs.  Health nus pr . motmg better ,vtnR dJtlons In connec tlon with the other activities of the 91 Chaptern of the [acre In Mlanetm. the tmpor[snee of the WOI I| of unuSUaL Lntet wet[ sdapto to thin IocltRt hate  rched by thil eunt of acvlts drn me past for the flt time. Fhy,dL in- i*tt  lm one of the most Important ga ot tbJa wk. They a m- for dtl tth. eyesLghh d hearing. Wetghn| and in| lind frequemti 7 imtrltl classes r* ged to help undnoutished chL]* eh nal development. In nrly ery CountY, eZlnts n ]d with tt anvme opetlng with I1 phyMe[an| and dentlltS, or Ii[lflWtl nt b. tl e Minutia lic Hlm latlou. in H Hyg[e end  te Sick have  lmportont ka the public health nulng pgm ell the American Red Cram..Travel- lng [nstct gve the lesson, teaching the women the esse,tIals oZ correctly coping with mnor IRne*se They s al Instructed ho'.yo lst lyicana wheu a graduate tint avaHable tak the peace of physician's t, h. Is esgned to am m ome lmLnmlng Unes and contagion. Public Health nudes frequently Ifave aduLt classes [n b extending their el beyond fine of SChOOl Inspection. During the lmst yr, 8,e10 women have paaed te aminlttton$ snd lved certb lento in Home Hygiene and ere o the Sick. proe/onal visits a msde to msny I*me. Thl I an important 1'astor la both rnrkl snd city nnrslng, n cttons th in to oty. end of the Red Oro nne help In rla emergonet atqm. In both eit and entry e0Jnmuul- lined rm which y be apted to lOCl ud Thnt 22 C'hapte e tht tbrRy pv the gwing ppltLon tr this endears. ilnnul RoB C1I of the Will bt ]nched. Membehtp dolls etrey  me valuable ] It 1. Ilrady drng, but expand il w0k to aeh Wder field. $1,121,818 ][[AS BEEN  ,PENDED IN THE CAR OF reX-SERVICE MEN AND TIR FAMILIES BY cHAPTERS OF THE AERIOAN RED CROBS i HERE Ilq" CENTRAL DIVISION, IORE THAN TEN MILLIONS BEINO SPENT ANNUALLy FOR THESE SOLDIERS THROUOHOUT THE NATION. MEMBERSHIP DOLLARS WILL HELP TO CARRY ON THIS WORK. ANNUAL ROLL CALL ARMI. 8TICE DAY TO THANKS. GIVING (NOV. II TO 4). CHIEF JUSTICE TAFT TATES PURPOSES OF RED CROSS, Gragltao' psaTime A n Red  we t] h h,t WllUam Hnwrd Tn metl,g the uvp' of every Amefl- *ttond te ntlonnl nve.tlon of the Red Oos held in (lmbns, ently. Mr. T ttor summing up tte p nchlemen of lhl great ltUon me te fnlinwJal pa] : "Let  turn to the ltu. h* R CSS ae a trent mis+lon In d war. 1r of all, r d,ty Is tO t* disbl l men. Every d h must rr the urden of r + tn onr ot. We mt hp them bear It. Mor thn . humnnr n e.erel If too tent]y mbJn t help *r . It la imperUve sat u to rat lng age,cy grmt mns ,a power to be at tbm "I am eonfidt tt*t the p]e of unr/ will flne to tl mU 1I  e Red  rid Ii for W d hw r  Tx -- I Extont and Reductmn Foods To Use When farmers In Le[ermlne . 1 o the Civil Service Condition Is Anemic  Thn Un e States Civil Service i When Lhe human system needs Gram Grower Pohcms .... so0 o I .................................  I " Y " " :" ilon t m0et anemic  Northwest lliag Facilities Will Be[ "Permanency is the one big thing Sa s or] to Membe sh p, Sgs C W hich we? as your mgo th, mona H. Gustaf, Prld U. S. G a n are kping continually in Grnwers. Some of our very best -- eritiozed us most everely for being Farmnrs nf M3anesota who become too low. We have been" making of the U. S, Grmn Gwers, hastlowly. We have been trying luc,. will determine the question of not to take a step or deermlnn a pol+ pe/anent sal facilltles as well as icy nl we could he sure that it was other matters nf penny relative to rght. We dd not want to go hk local problems, declared C. H. Gu- and huUd over again. Furtheore, talon, psdent nf the farmers' ha- when it comes to the first annua cooperative grain marketing meetiug, in six addvss in this state, in aueh shape that we san say, 'be the last of which was deLivered at it i it t Fergus Falls this w ' Ynu wont have to waste time Special sign[fiance wM attached ink down a part and building.' to Mr. Gtafson's adds in /ew "There have been many diffenc ef the tony dimculties that have besn of opinion n some state. in getting the aim to find ou what drive under way. Mr, Gustafn, the grnin growers a]ly Seetary Frank M, Mye and Tr we decide what hould be do in any such ease. rt charge nf the palgn. J.S. Jones, organization di- grain growers want, then we know is working entire- what to do. We believe it is better to ly er their dietion, go slow in tho ces th to "The U. S. Grin hastily d make L, ". puly dome- Our efforts have been warded Our membership wilt hold Ioc- it is with considerable plensure ts me ]. sectional and flnaUy a that I am able to tell you that in the .nventinn, I ,is la t to m et , Colorado, Nebras- go in Malh. befo another p be ka, South Dabta, Missouri and farmer orga.izatio, is ou gns to move. m the fwkl and g ,,ill have the right and the op- lo organization wnrk of the portunty, to express his preferce Grain Gwe. Iuc. as to" the channels through which "We a just getting started grain shall pass." wnrk. So far we just learned how to gn abnut it aml in the membership of the different coop+ ]earnin we have mnre that, 22,OOO erai.'e organlzatlon. Mr. Gustalon and smething ike 45,OOO+- poi,,tl out that the greatest stumb- 000 b ling block m the pat ef cooperative Whe our dsvelep.,e,tt i a membership of more than der their prnhlems p,'actlnaly and 1,000,000 bushels oI ad ut their differences purely from grain to market in 1922. And if e ta dpolnt of 'hat s best for a Minnesota farmers give this organi- I zation the support hich I believe rmers "We faers have been dsorgan-,theyl will, we will have a groat deal long mut combine "Our organization efforts, forget nut Ial eta will be conducted under the di and go alon together,' rection oI the pslden seeta and said, "When farmer organizations in ,. nee noun vistriet or state have to he friendly with every ght and faers orga.lmatlon in the state a+ nne nf them enm out the victor, about the only su]t that san be they wilt ngni that nut policy nf Inng ru. is persnnal t- + nn the give us who some oat ahead, their aetlve uppnrt." "Bnt what abo.t the man on the Ps dent Gustaf on f h hcgai el ything Can he - arm, as n < an ? f farmer who has attained ho  le prnfit at he end o om e e w anworth" mtheleffoIL''s t l'ttle paper p' n ne as a faer leader a.d .he ar? on y all of. hess t who h gained the nan amnng fa parade nan be mbinedhlnto n.e, edlto of "a operator who i, faers ca p t nas n that w+ .... n n o w wfihng to cooperate. He org]zed wa+ elected president of ad develop. With particular refence to th ed the Farmers Union conperatve* i. L. Mr Gustaf Nebraska, including the Commission [no..,wou]d set.p sale onneeUons ir Oha, the Tw ( ties hat would be satin $40,000,000 husines annually and re- ftory to the faer memberhis turning mnre than 0 per sent of th grain marketing corn, puny, "It would be presumpous fol me or any other officer of this fa-' of Minnesnta what they what they shah said. 'hls is a farmer-owned faer-contlled company d every grain grower who become* a member will assist in determining our policies and the course which we will "One of the 6rst principles adopted by the Committee of Seventn wa that the manageknent of the Ioeal farmers elevator and the perftlng of I1 aangements ]n every eom+ munity for handling grain from that shipping point would not be disturbed by tre natinzmi assiatinn. poli> ially is this true of opinio, relative to terminal agencies, 'The only thing which we n do is to ped with nut membership drive and then allow the grain growers themse]es to solve their Iol pro- Wheu the deciinn, I hope that they will nnt a low anything to stand in the way and pvent then, fm king sJon that will be "Most of all, farme lose sigh :7 ...... *at b.ond . age.eies if it is to aomplsh the charges to its patrons He stated that he belies in of cooperatlnn as betwen cooperativ( and declared test ot a cooperative was: first, does i the farmers?; second, will it other faem organlza- ying to do the +ame th+ng?; third, is it built on a fe and With the eklessness of a cowboy, Fall, Stary of the In- terior, joined iu vdth "eowpunehem" and asstod in +tom ing a bnffalo tampede at the buffalo fa in Yel- Only an xpert hor buffalos become bl{nd with fright d fry d charge at a.ythln. M. Dmm--"I heard ynu talking to ynurlf while you we taking your bath, Major. That's a bad tom." Major--"I wasn't talkiag tn my- self; l waa tatMng tn the soap; I stlp- pod on it and felL" o Sturdy Boy Wagon al marketing polats WhiCh have been quite suss- fl--at Cleveland, Ohto, Htehinn. Kansas. lmas City. Zo., Omaha, Neb. and at nut market. They . we must go mueb "T ..as l,e lcn of of .venteen to u.e those agendes ai- rs: .! heir utt mate development policy existing agencies pe llng to wor and fit into the national marketln pgram. We want to eo+operat with al erSsting farmers marketh, agencies. We plead that we rAay be the big of them all. policy pursue because the broader view of what that s the o,- ]y ]ogil pnliey. Just as the name implies All steel except handle 20x9x3 inches (Inside Box Meurements) $1.95 each Store o nights+ Some people's argumeats ,I the use of smc of the f]lowing item ing affair in a moving picture. I of food b r 11,694 empLoyees dining the year ended Jul 31. 1921, and hy 38fi05 during the peril from Nevember II, 1918 to Jnly 31, I21. The duction United States, including the D+strict of Columbia, w 9.64 for the year ended July 31, 1921, and morn th 800.0 durh,g the period 19t8. to July i, course, mo slewly. On June 30, 1916. there were 3959 bia. nd the Diric nf Col,bla. making the total nn lhat date 489,798, On N vemher If, 1918, at the heigh nf the war expansion, the namber ployees in the w 117,760. Owing to rapid fiuet- finns at distant places of employ- meat, figures for estlmated, the force outside nf Columbia numbered prnxlmatel 8OO,OOO el Noveme I918. Thls  a censer atie esti. tt is probably ton low. Adding th ,,umber ie the Distrie of n that date, the appximato total umher ef employees en the date th igned was 917,760. On; i n . 92 there were 959 Fd esa e pyees a the Dstr n Dstrc e Combn ak,,g th eta nn bt date j6 J , , 2 thee were 7 oee n the Dsrct n ,i 67  ranehss nde, the tna on that dte heng 7,2 A figns naed ncde eee pns ,on as fid c ece a an hne eae MiCKIE SAYS rmtlition specialists of the Universlt3 f Minnesota Breads: Bto, brow,, entire wheat g.,a ham . Cera ..... lied .......... d ........ ........................... H O T E L Vegetables: Spinach, lettuce, swiss chard, asparagus, dandelion, 5innepolLs. Minnet cabbage, bsels sprouts, string  bems, celezy, radishes, cauliflower, dried beans, kohlrabi, eggplant, toma Following t he Lo, >e, potatoes, beets, carrot, ta.d in prima is squash, turnips, onions, ppkins., ing rms a- Fruits: " " berries, pineapples, blueheies, black- SZ.00 to $.00--With Bath berries, prunes, figs, wateeIon, Pr te n rich Egg can beef, fowl With fish, amb, milk, buttermilk foods, a$- Moderato Priced monds, hazehluts. _Cafe___ Sgars: Molses, maple syrup, In Cntien The new ti near Od*a will be rolled Ort.__oonville Ruby Re___dd We en mmend thia Granite as the most e& finest for tombsthn and olher purpowhere Granite is u If interled see our display. Send [0r Our Pesi,ns See OUl Pikes Before ORIOr00VlLL[ MONL]M[00I JOHNSON & LINDHOM, Props. No Work is to intricate for us to handle when it comes to Machine Re- pairing. We have the equipment to handle this work promptly and efficiently. Bring It In A. S. HALLS Ortonville 00yo. kpo,.,, 0 SUCSSTU I man who spends 'all he make#.Nd ben sevinq m[" necessarq o s.00ss.Whd.ou ,s the your hbo,:.,,, uhr oepos00.w,. 00eep Hour..sermon.cored 5eallhq and faF.. WM. Take your + Overhauling or Repair Work. be in competent hands and will be right. , PAGE 2 . I i r ii lUll III II RED GROSS HAS 62 NURSES IN MINNESOTA Splendid Reauite Obtained Through- Out Gtate In Publi Health Nursing.  ITITH 62 lle V V Cross Public Health nurses pro- moting better living conditions in connec- tion with the other activities of the 91 Chapters of the American Red Cross hrre in Minnesota, the importance of the work is of unusual interest. Tne rural program has been found well adapted to this state, and many lcalltlu have been reached by this department of activity during the past 7ear for the first time. Physical In- election of the children in the rural hoolm is one of the most important phase of this work. They are ln- pected for defective teeth, eyesight, Ilad hearing. Weighing and measur- ing are a pirt of this health program, Jnd frequently nutrition classes are anlc.ad to help undernourished chil- dren reach a normal development. In nearly every county, clinics are eld with the nur co-operating with local physicians and dentists, or with apeelalists sent by the Minnesota Pub- lie Health association. t(.Tes in Home Hygiene and Care of Sick have an important place In the public health nursing program of the American Red Cross. Travel- ing instructors give these lessons, teaching the women the essentials of correctly coping with minor illnesses, They are also instructed howo assist physicians when a graduate nurse is not available. This work by no means takes the place of a physician's serv- Ice, but is designed to aid in making home hygiene better known and thus minimizing illness and contagion. Public Health nurses frequently Mare adult classes in Home Hygiene as well as classes in the schools, there- by extending their service beyond rou- tine of school inspection. During the Imst year, 3,610 women have passed the examinations and received certl- cates in Home Hygiene and care of the Sick. Professional visits are made to many homes This is an important factor in both rural and city nursing. In same sections there is but one phy- $1dan to a county, and the servlcea Of the Red Cross nurse are a vital help in various emergencle which 'lse. In both city and country communi- ties the Red Cross has a clearly-de* lued program which may be adapted to local needa. That 22 Chapters Since last year have realized the need this work and extended their pro- 8ram to ln.clllde this very practical ac- tivity proves the growing appreciation for this endeavor. On Arralstice day, November 11, the innual Roll Call of the Red Cross will be launched. Membership dollars will enable the Red Cros not only to tarry on the valuable service It is already rendering, but expand Its work to reach a wider field. l ! ............ la ......... ..s B00EN !1 EXPENDED IN THE CARE II OF EX-SERVICE MEN II AND THEIR FAMILIES BY II ,n 748 CH.TERS OF THE II AMZmCAN RED CROSS II HERE IN CENTRAL DIVISION. j[ MORE THAN TEN MmLIONS II IS BEING SPENT ANNUALLY II FOR THESE SOLDIERS II THROUGHOUT THE NATION. Ii YOUR MEMBERSHIP II DOLLASS WILL HELP TO II CARRY ON THIS WORK. II AErNUAL ROLL CALL ARMI- II STICE DAY TO THANKS- II GIVING (NOV. II TO 24). II RE-MEMBER and RE-ENROLL. l[ q OHIEF JUSTICE TAFT STATES PURPOSES OF RED CROSS. Oallo on Americans to Re-Enll=t tn the Greatest Peace-Time Army Ever Known. atlon wide services of the Ameri- can Red Cross were cttl by Chief $ustice Wllltam Howard Taft as meriting the support of every Ameri- can. In a personal message to delegates attending the national convention of the Red Oross held In Columbus, 1,ecently. Mr. Taft after summing up the past achievements of this great organization made the following appeal : "Let us turn to the future. Tha ]Red Cross has a great mission in the days of peace as well as in the turmoll of war. First of all. our duty is to the disabled ex.servlce men. Every day they must carry the burden of their services to our country. We must help them bear It. 'ore than this, humanity in general is ton frequently subject t'o disaster and destruction. The call for sudden help aver recurs, it lm imperative when it comes and is often of so great rtent as to require a rescuing agency great means and power to be at hand. The Red C'ross must not fail to heed these calls. "I am confident that the people of our country will continue to answer the roll call of the Red Cross and that thus will be enliated the greatest ]p4mee time army ever known for ImmvieY" ,rellel ml nMfering ha- manila." THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT THURSDAY, N()VEMBER Farmers To Determine Grain ,Grower Policies Northwest Selling Facilities Will Be Satisfactory to Membership, Says C. H. Gustafsan, President, U. S. Grain Growers. Farmers of Mnnesota who become members of the U. S. Grain Growers, Inc., will determine the question of permanent sales facilities as well as other matters of policy relative to local problem.% declared C. H. Gus- tafson, president of the farmers' na- tional cooperative grain marketing company in six addresses in this state the last of which was delivered at Fergus Falls this week. Special significance was attached to Mr. Gustafson's addresses in view of the many difficulties that have been encountered in getting the Minnesota drive under way. Mr. Gustafson, Secretary Frank M. Myers and Treas- urer Wm. G.Eckhardt are now in di- rect charge of the Minnesota cam- paign. J.S. Jones, organization di- rector for the state, is working entire- ly under their direction. "The U. S. Grain Growers, Inc.," said Mr. Gustafon, "is purely demo- cratic. Our membership will hold loc- al, sectional and finally a national convention, this last to meet in Chica- go in March, before another crop be- gins to move. At that time, every producer who signs one of our con- tracts will have the right and the op- portunity, to express his preference as td the channels through which his grain shall pass." Pleading for cooperation as between the membership of the different coop- erative organizations, Mr. Gustafson pointed out that the greatest stumb- ling block in the path of cooperative development is the unwillingness of different farmer organizations to con- sder their problems practically and adjust their differences purely from the standpoint of what is best for all farmers. "We farmers have been disorgan- ized for too long and the time is now at hand when we must combine our efforts, forget our local differences and go'along together," Mr. Gustafson said, "When farmer organizations in any local county,district or state have differences or even an actual fight and one of them comes out the victor, about the only result that can be shown in the long run is personal sat- isfaction on the part of the leaders who come out ahead. "But what about the man on the farm, h:s he gained anything ? Can he show any more profits at the end of -the year? If only all of these little parades can be combined into one, we farmers can put on a show that wil be well worth the effort." With particular reference to the situation in Minnesota, Mr Gustafson declared that the U. S. Grain Growers, Inc.., would set up sales connections in the Twin Cities that would be satis- factory to the farmer membership "Permanency is the one big thing which we, as your servants in start- ing off this national farmers company, are keeping continually in our minds. Some of our very best friends have criticized us most severely for being too slow. We have been ' making haste slowly. We have been trying not to take a step or determine a pol- icy until we could be sure that it was right. We dd not want to go back and build over again. Furthermore, when it comes to the first annual meeting, we want the structure to be in such shape that we can say, 'here it is. It has been built solid and safe. You wont have to waste time in tear- ing down a part and rebuilding.' "There have been many differences of opinion in some states. It has been our aim to find out what the wishes of the grain growers really are before we decide what should be done in any such case. Whenever we are sure what the rank and file of grain growers want, then we know what to do. We believe it is better to go slow in those cases than to act too hastily and make a serious mistake. Our efforts have been rewarded an it is with considerable pleasure to me that I am able to tell you that in the states of Oklahoma, Colorado, Nebras- ka, South Dakbta, Missouri and Indi- ana, every farmers organization is out in the feld and giving active support to organization work of the U. S. Grain Growers, Inc. "We are just getting started in our organization work. So far we have just learned how to go about it and in learning we have more than 22,000 members and something like 45,000,- 000 bushels of grain under contract. When our first annual meeting is called in March we are certain to have a membership of more than 50,000 and more than 100,000,000 bushels of grain to market in 1922. And if Minnesota farmers give this organi- zation the support which I believe they will, we will have a great deal more than that. "Our organization work in Minne- sota will be conducted under the di- rection of the pesident, secretary and treasurer of the U. S. Grain Growers. We wish to be friendly with every farmers organization in the state as well as in the nation and we trust that they will recognize that our policy of what is best for all farmers organiza- tion will induce all of them to give us their active support." President Gustafson is a Nebraska farmer who has attained national prominence as a farmer leader and who has gained the name among farm paper edito of "a co-operator who is willing to cooperate." He organized, was elected president of and develop- ed the Farmers Union cooperative. in Nebraska, including the Farmers Livestoik Commission Company of Omaha, which is now doing more than $40,000,000 business annually and re- turning more than 50 per cent of the of the national grain marketing corn- commision charges to its patrons. pany. "It would be presumptious for He stated that he believes in a gospel me or any other officer of this farm- of cooperation as betwen cooperative ers company to dictate to the farmers organizations and declared that the of Minnesota what they shall do and test of a cooperative was: first, does it what they shall not do with reference help the farmers?; second, will it to local arrangements,"Mr. Gustafson work with other farmers organiza- said. "This is a farmer-owned and tions who are trying to do the same farmer-controlled company and every grain grower who becomes a member will assist in determining our policies and the course which we will pursue. "One of the first principles adopted by the Committee of Seventeen was that the manageknent of the local farmers elevator and the perfecting of local arrangements in every com- munity for handling grain from that shipping point would not be disturbed by tre national association. The same policy must be applied with reference to district sales connections and espec- ially is this true where there is a wide difference of opinion relative to thing?; third, is it built on a safe and sane foundation ? With the recklessness of a cowboy, Albert B. Fall, Secretary of the In- terior, joined in with "cowpunchers" and assisted in stemming a buffalo stampede at the buffalo farm in Yel- lowstone Park. Only an expert horse- man would attempt this, as stampeded buffalos become blnd with fright and fury and charge at anything. Mrs. Drum--"I heard you talking to yourself while you were taking terminal agencies, your bath, Major. That's a bad cus- 'The only thing which we can do is tom." to proceed with our membership drive Major--"I wasn't talking to my- and then allow the grain growers self; I was talking to the soap; I slip- themseles to solve their local pro- ped on it and fell." blems for each district. When the farmers of Minnesota do make their decisiou. I hope that they will not al- low anything to stand in the way and prevent them from making the deci- sion that will be best for all Minne- sota farmers. "Most of all. farmers should not lose sight of the fact that this move- ment must go far beyond district sales agencies or terminal elevator associations if it is to accomplish the purpose which the Committee of Sev- enteen outlined as our national mar- keting plan. We have farmers termin- al marketing associations at several points which have been quite success- fulat Cleveland, Ohio, Hutchinson, Kansas., Imsas City, Mo., Omaha, Nob., and at our market, St. Paul. They have been successful in a degree but to obtain the results that all far- mers are demanding, we must go much farther. "it v-as the ;lea of the Committee of ,cventeen to u:e those agencies al- re: "! established as a foundation for their uit'mate development a;(1 hat policy wi]! e nursue:J so far as ih existing agencies a'ce willing to work and fit into the national marketing program. We want to co-operate with all existing farmers marketinf agencies. We plead in the name of coperation that we may be the big brother of them all. That is the policy which we must pursue because if we take the broader view of what is best for all farmers,, that is the on- Sturdy Boy Wagon Just as the name implies All steel except handle 20x9x3 inches (Inside Box Measurements) $1.95 each Iyler's Yeriety Store Extent and Reduction Foods To Use When Of the Civil Service Condition Is Anemic The United States Civil Service When the human system needs a C - i-sion toda- issued its semi an = tonic diet, in other words, a diet high ornH) , y  ." - - nual statement relardin the extent/ in iron, to meet anemic conditions, of the Federal executive civil service the use of some of the following tem. and reductions therein as follows" t of food is recommended bv health and , . . . , . . . ....... . ......... : [ nutrition specahsts of the Umverstv Tne eflera= executive C]%/1| AOYC lit] . a. * ., . . . . .  , .. - ,,OI lVllnnesota. llC lJlsl;rlct ol olumDla was re(tuce<t I  .  . . ....... . ._ trea(ls: Jton brown, entire wheat, Dy ll,OU, employees ourmg tne year . 5 granam. ended July 31, 1921, and by 38,89 ............ wereals: l;:)lle<l oas, rolie(1 wnea, <luring the period from November 11, 1918 to July 31, 1921. The reduction cracked wheat, shredded wheat. thruout the United States, including the District of Columbia, was 93,634 for the year ended July 31, 1921, and more than 300,000 during the period fzom November 11, 1918, to July 31, 1921 . The reductions continue steadi- ly, but now, ofcourse, more slowly. On June 30, 1916, there were 39,259 employees in the District of Colum- bia, and 400,539 in branches outside the District of Columbia, making the total on that date 439,798. On No- vember 11, 1918, at the height of the war expansion, the number of em- ployees in the District of Columbia was 117,760. Owing to rapid fluctua- tions at distant places of employ- ment, it was found impractical to com- pile strictly accurate figures for the force outside the District of Columbia during the war period As near as can be estimated, the force outside the District of Columbia numbered ap- proximately 800,000 on November 11, 1918. This is a conservative estimate; it is probably too low. Adding the number in the District of Columbia ou that date, the approximate total number of employees on the date the armistice was signed was 917,760. On July 31, 1920, there were 90,559 Fed- eral civil employees in the District of Columbia and 600,557 in branches ou- side the District of Columbia, making the total on that (late 691,116. tn July 31, 1921 there were 7,865 em- ployees in the District of Columbi: and 518.67 in branches outside, the total on that date being 597,482. All figures named include Federa executive positions classified under the civil service law and those not so classified. Vegetables: Spinach, lettuce, swiss chard, asparagus, dandelion, rhubarb, cabbage, brussels sprouts, string beans, celery, radishes, cauliflower dried beans, kohlrabi, eggplant, toma- toes, yeas, potatoes, beets, carrots, squash, turnips, onions, pumpkins.. Fruits: Strawberries, raisins, cran- berries, pineapples, blueberries, black- berries, prunes, figs, watermelon dates. Protein rich: Eggs, lean beef, fowl, fish, iamb, milk, buttermilk foods, al- monds, hazelnuts. Sugars: Molasses, maple syrup. Ingratitude is always ready to offer some kind of excuse. MICKIE SAYS No Work is to intricate for us to handle when it comes to Machine Re- pairing. We have the equipment to handle this work promptly and efficiently. The lightning bug probably himself up that way so he an excuse to give Mrs. Bug for out nights. Some people's arguments hard to get head or tail of as a ing affair in a moving picture. THE W HOTEL Minneapolis, Minnesota. Following t h e trend in prices is now ing rooms at--- $1.50 to $2.00--Without $2.00 to $5.00---With Bath With Moderate Priced --Cafe-- In Connection The new Granite taken from our quarries recently ed near Odessa will be called Ortonville Ruby Red I I We can recommend this Granite as the most beautiful snd finest for tombstones and other purposeswhere Granite is If interested see our display. S00nd for Our Designs See Our Prices Bdore 0RI000VIL[[ MONUM[NT JOHNSON & LINDHOM, Props. 00gou know one sucesfful wh0 spend s he makes!No? Then savinq mu"sL" be necessanl '[o success.WhaLuoU save ]s t'he I00efi[0n 00our bbor. i00juhr eeposil00.Wi. Keep 9our.00,n00,=,00,unt neal|hq ann ) Bring It In A. S. HALLS Ortonviile IIIIIIllitlllllllllllllll IIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliillillllllllllllllllllllllllllllll , i Overhauling Take your car to Wm. Overhauling or Repair Work. be in competent hands and will be right. WM. CUMMENS, Ortonvi: Agency for CHEVROLET CARS Z