Newspaper Archive of
The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
Lyft
November 10, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
PAGE 3     (3 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 3     (3 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
November 10, 1921
 

Newspaper Archive of The Ortonville Independent produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




NOVEMBER 10, i921 THE ORINVILLE INDEPENDENY PAGE 8 Independent EVERY THURSDAY by the & Merchants Printing Co. President Harris, Vice-president L. E. Lundgren, Secretary Walter Dinnell, Treasurer BOARD OF DIRECTORS Halls Walter Dirmell John Kaercher 01son L.E. Inndgren Grace F. Kaercher A. B. Kaercher 'Kaercher . Managing Editor as second-class matter 1920, at the post office at Minn., under the Act of 8, 1879. $2.00 PER YEAR Rates on Application Advt. Representative. SELECT LIST. Bank, St. Paul St., - - Minneapolis resentative THE BAD COMES GOOD. 0f the chaos and turbulance creation, the earth, the plan- SOlar system in all its regu- certainty, accuracy, precision, and glory. prehistoric cave men and tribes arose societies of men present semi-barbarous state oppression, war-fare. the present chaos of conflict selfishness of man will • a humane society of men that in one great family all the crucible eliminates the dregs the amalgamation of in- metals of the highest so the melting pot of modern will burn out the false, the the selfish, the wicked and estab|ish with ever "peace on earth toward men." faust learn that to best work they must work for of all. To do anythin less brings its penalty sooner or despot may rule for a time iron hand, but his down-fall of capitalist5 may ac'- the wealth of the world, and cause unspeakable and suffering, but it will only their elimination, and the re- the common people of their from God, so abundantly be- UPon all mankind. good thing% however, will Without sacrifices and hard- Persistent and eternal vigi- :he cau:e of truth, right and regardless of cliques, parties, pecuniary gain. and deceptions, even in words, are easily de- one is really in search of the INVESTMENTS. should be an act of congress once prohibiting the invest- money by citizens of the in foreign Permission of the cabinet the legal rate of interes United States and all of at 6 per cent, and mak- felony to charge over that directly or indirectly. the Civil War we had slavery man, ever since we have with ever increasing and severity*of lash, rhea of all colors by and YStera of usury and high il- ls sapping the nation of g a few im- and t-he masses mis- of interest is today one curses of this country real menace to society. Its effect can be seen evelT hand. It robs labor of toil, stunts the young the old; places a premium and a penalty on enter- DOLLAR" ROBBERS. duty of the pres- and all succeeding to bring before the all those criminals Who nation of billions of dol- war, and not only fur- Compel them to turn over to the government. in the form of govern- or other evidences of debt Confiscated. go scot-free and revel and ease, while the are being literally the earth under the great bt and of taxation caused war-time robber- short of compounding these thieves and cut Does the magni- robberies baffle the au- the thieves become POWelfful as to insure theil af the country will hound and the petty thief in- billion dollar burglar as oon as election is over. that there is n# hope, Justice and righteous- are involved, and money rules and justice and hides ? Indeterminate Sentence I A MEANS OF ESCAPE. The revenue bill recently reported from the Finance Committee of the Senate for the revision of the tax laws of the nation, contains a provision ex- empting from the taxation the in- comes, of citizens of the Unites States and domestic corporations re- ceived from trade or business abroad, providing that 80 per cent of the in- come of such person or corporation is derived from such foreign source. Clearly such legislation, if passed, would place a premium on foreign m- vestments by citizens of this country, and as drily men and corporations of great wealth can engage in foreign enterprises it is very evident that the purpose of this proposed legislation is to enabl the immensely wealthy people who profited most by the World War to escape the tremendous bur- den of taxation made necessary by it. The foreign war-stricken countries offer great opportunities for men of means to make fabulous profits on l their investments and to permit them to either exploit these helpless peo- ples or to escape taxation they so richly deserve would be nothing short of a crime. If this bill becomes a law billions of dollars will be invested in foreign lands by men who made their money out of the war to escape taxa£ tion here and rob people over there. Not only this, but these arch eni- mies of society will want armies and navies to protect their ill-gotten gains across the seas, which will mean more war. Furthermore, taking these billions out of circulation in this country would further raise the rate of inter- est. Where are our statesmen? The World War debt should be fund- ed and payment extended over a long period of years, except all that por- tion thereof which is held by War profiteers and those who robbed the treasury of the United States thru War contracts and otherwise, this should be cancelled. It is enough for the people to pay their honest debts, and for those of the present genera- tion to have induced the hardships and nrivations of war--times and rehabili- :tare the world. "A good story against himself is being told by a divine of the severe old school, who, however, is not with- out a sense of humor. He was travel- ing north. Just before he got to ht destination he opened the car window, with the result that he got a piece of grit in his eye. He rubbed it and did all the usual things, but it still trou- bled him, and every now and again he had voluntarily to wink. When he got to his town he went into the buffet and asked for a glass of milk. This being served, he gulped it down, and then realizing that some- thing was wrong, he said to the bar- maid, "That wasn't milk, was it?" "No, sir, rum and milk." "But I asked you for milk." "Yes, sir, but you tipped me the wink." "Who was that gentleman you just spoke to ?" "I don't know his real name." "You don't? You seemed very friendly with him. yhy didn't you introduce me to him. "I didn't care to have you know him." "You didn't. I could see that. Yet you were as nice as pie to him your- self." "Yes, my dear. He's one of the town's greatest bootleggers and I may need something from him some day." Captain."And why do you want to sell your nightshirt?" P. K. (the base drummer)--"And what use hay I for it? I work nights now and sleep day time." Some men are poor because they are h0est and some men are honest because they are rich and can afford to be. Do N I His name is "Jimmie." He is fiw years old. And he has never walked nor even moved himself in the bed. But he smiles and smiles and smiles. "Tubercular spine" was the doctor's verdict. The /feart-broken parents, poor as the proverbial "Job's turkey," investigated the hospitals where chil- dren such as Jimmie are treated and cured. But they learned.the cost was prohibitive. Then the doctor suggested that per- haps the State Hospital for Crippled Children might have room. Buoyed up by their hopes they made appli- cation in the usual form and in a day or two they were notified that the hospital was full but that Jimmie would be placed on the waiting list and that his place was one hundred and seventy-eight. Take a visit to Jimmie's bedroom. Because he needs so much care his couch is in the kitchen of a small cot- tage on the outskirts of a fairly large city. The vontilation is poor, there is nothing to look at except the smoke grimed, cooking stained kitchen and a couple of garish calendars hanging tipsoly on th wall. Covering his flaccid little form is a ragged but clean comforter. Ol the covering is a doll whose face is spot- ted with the loving caresses of the ,young "father." By the pillow is a soiled toy horse, whose tail is nearly as ragged as his name. And with these two playthings Jim- mie passes the long hours. At times he plays with the sunght that sooth- ingly kisses his wrinkled white hands and smooths over his rumpled golden hair, crowning him with-irridecent jewels. But it's pretty tiresome. Nobody to play with the mother so busy with her housework that she can't spare but a hurried moment once in a while to tell a story. There are more than 200 Jimmies and Janes in Minnesota who are pa- tiently "waiting their opportunity to get into the State Hospital. Two htm- dred aching bodies that need, and are getting, medical care and tender effi- cient nursing. • Before Michael Dowling, Minneso- ta's "gamest boy," banker and jour- nalist, died a short time ago he said, "the crippled child needs mental train- ing by motherly women, physical at- tention and surgical care by experts if those who are whole in body and mind are to justify their existance. In order to eliminate the waiting list of "Jimmies and Janes" it is pa- posed to construct a "Michael Do@l- ing" addition to the State Hospital for ' Them Nay " 'WLdf'] / QJ Crippled Children. For this purpose the Minnesota Editorial Association, the Minnesota Bankers' Association, and the Minnesota Elks are conduct- ing a campaign to raise $100,000. Of this sum $25,000 has already been pledged. If *he most modern medical and sur- gical science can restore these crip- pled children to a healthy normal life it is done. And the service is given free to the poor families who are un- able to pay the fees charged by the high grade specialists. These same specialists give their services free to these children at this hospital. The committee in charge of the gen- eral solicitation has issued this ap- peal. "If your child was a cripple and you didn't have the money to cure him or her, wouldn't you think the world was cruel and heartless to swing by in its healthy carefree manner and ignore your child' pathetic appeal for help ? We know that Micheal Down- big gave his life in the service of cripplesl In order that his memory may live as long as brick and stone stand and do good the memorial addi- tion is proposed. Will you help us to help them ?" Your contributions should be made at once to the following committee: A. B. Kaercher, chairman, Orton- ville; O. J. Loftus, Beardsley; M. S. Stevens, Graceville; J. H. Erickson, Clinton; J. H. Thomas, Odessa; Lynn Woods, Corre]l; F. L. Collins, BmTy; Earl Johnson, Browns Valley town- ship; A. J. Douglas, Foster; Mel Heg- gie, Big Stone; H. H. Tyler, Malta; K. C. Hanson, Otrey, and Charles Mathi- son, Artichoke. Contribution boxes should be put in- to every school house in the county, the teacher to account to the nearest committeeman. Societies and organiza- tions of all kinds shouhl unite in help- mg to raise Big Stone County's allot- ment of $1100. Just a little from every individual wilt do it. "Do it now." for your poultry, veal, but- ter, eggs a n d when you ship to the and Pa. -___= s j -= 7 c o =-- _ t s E o = _ El E -- i / _ 10th STREET AT FOURTH AVENUE MINNEAPOLIS The Northwest's Largest and Mot Beautiful Hos#lry . All Room° are Outside and Each Room ha. Private Bath ----- TARIFF: _ -- 75 Rooms (Private Baths) Single at $2.00--Double $3.00 325 Rooms (Private Baths) Sintzle at $2.50--Double $3.50 200 R)ms (Private Baths) Single a $300--Double $4.00 "=" Others from $4.00 to $15.00 " I A singing motorman is winning the hearts of many car riders on a Sev- enth avenue surface line in New York City. He sings only the old songs in a clear, melodious tenor voice. He was once a member of a famous min- strel troupe end despite the many warnings of inspectors he continues to sing at his work. A man always imagines that he wants the earth until he gets sick. From the Cradle to the Grave the Home Town Paper Touches Your Life. SUBSCRIBE FORYOt HOMETOWN PAPER WEEK, NOVEMBER 7- 12 ?9 Coming I Aluminum Sale Biggest Bargains ever .offered in Big Stone County See Date, Prices and Description of Articles in Next Week's Papers Tyler's Variety Store OrtonviHe, Minn. Furnaces A Furnace not only means greater comfort for the cold weather, but it insures better health for you and your family. Selected in the size fit- ted for the amount of space to be heated and properly installed it will keeP your entire home at an even temperate warmth. The prices for the Em- porer Furnace alone---in- stalling cost will be given, without obligation on your part. AUGUST LINDERT, Ort0nville i i Courteous Service Promptly Rendered In addition to the satisfaction of knowing that all Groceries you get from this store are of the best quality, you can depend upon prompt and courteous service at all times. Call 37 and your order will receive our careful-attention. NOVEMBER 10, i921 THE ORINVILLE INDEPENDENY PAGE 8 Independent EVERY THURSDAY by the & Merchants Printing Co. President Harris, Vice-president L. E. Lundgren, Secretary Walter Dinnell, Treasurer BOARD OF DIRECTORS Halls Walter Dirmell John Kaercher 01son L.E. Inndgren Grace F. Kaercher A. B. Kaercher 'Kaercher . Managing Editor as second-class matter 1920, at the post office at Minn., under the Act of 8, 1879. $2.00 PER YEAR Rates on Application Advt. Representative. SELECT LIST. Bank, St. Paul St., - - Minneapolis resentative THE BAD COMES GOOD. 0f the chaos and turbulance creation, the earth, the plan- SOlar system in all its regu- certainty, accuracy, precision, and glory. prehistoric cave men and tribes arose societies of men present semi-barbarous state oppression, war-fare. the present chaos of conflict selfishness of man will • a humane society of men that in one great family all the crucible eliminates the dregs the amalgamation of in- metals of the highest so the melting pot of modern will burn out the false, the the selfish, the wicked and estab|ish with ever "peace on earth toward men." faust learn that to best work they must work for of all. To do anythin less brings its penalty sooner or despot may rule for a time iron hand, but his down-fall of capitalist5 may ac'- the wealth of the world, and cause unspeakable and suffering, but it will only their elimination, and the re- the common people of their from God, so abundantly be- UPon all mankind. good thing% however, will Without sacrifices and hard- Persistent and eternal vigi- :he cau:e of truth, right and regardless of cliques, parties, pecuniary gain. and deceptions, even in words, are easily de- one is really in search of the INVESTMENTS. should be an act of congress once prohibiting the invest- money by citizens of the in foreign Permission of the cabinet the legal rate of interes United States and all of at 6 per cent, and mak- felony to charge over that directly or indirectly. the Civil War we had slavery man, ever since we have with ever increasing and severity*of lash, rhea of all colors by and YStera of usury and high il- ls sapping the nation of g a few im- and t-he masses mis- of interest is today one curses of this country real menace to society. Its effect can be seen evelT hand. It robs labor of toil, stunts the young the old; places a premium and a penalty on enter- DOLLAR" ROBBERS. duty of the pres- and all succeeding to bring before the all those criminals Who nation of billions of dol- war, and not only fur- Compel them to turn over to the government. in the form of govern- or other evidences of debt Confiscated. go scot-free and revel and ease, while the are being literally the earth under the great bt and of taxation caused war-time robber- short of compounding these thieves and cut Does the magni- robberies baffle the au- the thieves become POWelfful as to insure theil af the country will hound and the petty thief in- billion dollar burglar as oon as election is over. that there is n# hope, Justice and righteous- are involved, and money rules and justice and hides ? Indeterminate Sentence I A MEANS OF ESCAPE. The revenue bill recently reported from the Finance Committee of the Senate for the revision of the tax laws of the nation, contains a provision ex- empting from the taxation the in- comes, of citizens of the Unites States and domestic corporations re- ceived from trade or business abroad, providing that 80 per cent of the in- come of such person or corporation is derived from such foreign source. Clearly such legislation, if passed, would place a premium on foreign m- vestments by citizens of this country, and as drily men and corporations of great wealth can engage in foreign enterprises it is very evident that the purpose of this proposed legislation is to enabl the immensely wealthy people who profited most by the World War to escape the tremendous bur- den of taxation made necessary by it. The foreign war-stricken countries offer great opportunities for men of means to make fabulous profits on l their investments and to permit them to either exploit these helpless peo- ples or to escape taxation they so richly deserve would be nothing short of a crime. If this bill becomes a law billions of dollars will be invested in foreign lands by men who made their money out of the war to escape taxa£ tion here and rob people over there. Not only this, but these arch eni- mies of society will want armies and navies to protect their ill-gotten gains across the seas, which will mean more war. Furthermore, taking these billions out of circulation in this country would further raise the rate of inter- est. Where are our statesmen? The World War debt should be fund- ed and payment extended over a long period of years, except all that por- tion thereof which is held by War profiteers and those who robbed the treasury of the United States thru War contracts and otherwise, this should be cancelled. It is enough for the people to pay their honest debts, and for those of the present genera- tion to have induced the hardships and nrivations of war--times and rehabili- :tare the world. "A good story against himself is being told by a divine of the severe old school, who, however, is not with- out a sense of humor. He was travel- ing north. Just before he got to ht destination he opened the car window, with the result that he got a piece of grit in his eye. He rubbed it and did all the usual things, but it still trou- bled him, and every now and again he had voluntarily to wink. When he got to his town he went into the buffet and asked for a glass of milk. This being served, he gulped it down, and then realizing that some- thing was wrong, he said to the bar- maid, "That wasn't milk, was it?" "No, sir, rum and milk." "But I asked you for milk." "Yes, sir, but you tipped me the wink." "Who was that gentleman you just spoke to ?" "I don't know his real name." "You don't? You seemed very friendly with him. yhy didn't you introduce me to him. "I didn't care to have you know him." "You didn't. I could see that. Yet you were as nice as pie to him your- self." "Yes, my dear. He's one of the town's greatest bootleggers and I may need something from him some day." Captain."And why do you want to sell your nightshirt?" P. K. (the base drummer)--"And what use hay I for it? I work nights now and sleep day time." Some men are poor because they are h0est and some men are honest because they are rich and can afford to be. Do N I His name is "Jimmie." He is fiw years old. And he has never walked nor even moved himself in the bed. But he smiles and smiles and smiles. "Tubercular spine" was the doctor's verdict. The /feart-broken parents, poor as the proverbial "Job's turkey," investigated the hospitals where chil- dren such as Jimmie are treated and cured. But they learned.the cost was prohibitive. Then the doctor suggested that per- haps the State Hospital for Crippled Children might have room. Buoyed up by their hopes they made appli- cation in the usual form and in a day or two they were notified that the hospital was full but that Jimmie would be placed on the waiting list and that his place was one hundred and seventy-eight. Take a visit to Jimmie's bedroom. Because he needs so much care his couch is in the kitchen of a small cot- tage on the outskirts of a fairly large city. The vontilation is poor, there is nothing to look at except the smoke grimed, cooking stained kitchen and a couple of garish calendars hanging tipsoly on th wall. Covering his flaccid little form is a ragged but clean comforter. Ol the covering is a doll whose face is spot- ted with the loving caresses of the ,young "father." By the pillow is a soiled toy horse, whose tail is nearly as ragged as his name. And with these two playthings Jim- mie passes the long hours. At times he plays with the sunght that sooth- ingly kisses his wrinkled white hands and smooths over his rumpled golden hair, crowning him with-irridecent jewels. But it's pretty tiresome. Nobody to play with the mother so busy with her housework that she can't spare but a hurried moment once in a while to tell a story. There are more than 200 Jimmies and Janes in Minnesota who are pa- tiently "waiting their opportunity to get into the State Hospital. Two htm- dred aching bodies that need, and are getting, medical care and tender effi- cient nursing. • Before Michael Dowling, Minneso- ta's "gamest boy," banker and jour- nalist, died a short time ago he said, "the crippled child needs mental train- ing by motherly women, physical at- tention and surgical care by experts if those who are whole in body and mind are to justify their existance. In order to eliminate the waiting list of "Jimmies and Janes" it is pa- posed to construct a "Michael Do@l- ing" addition to the State Hospital for ' Them Nay " 'WLdf'] / QJ Crippled Children. For this purpose the Minnesota Editorial Association, the Minnesota Bankers' Association, and the Minnesota Elks are conduct- ing a campaign to raise $100,000. Of this sum $25,000 has already been pledged. If *he most modern medical and sur- gical science can restore these crip- pled children to a healthy normal life it is done. And the service is given free to the poor families who are un- able to pay the fees charged by the high grade specialists. These same specialists give their services free to these children at this hospital. The committee in charge of the gen- eral solicitation has issued this ap- peal. "If your child was a cripple and you didn't have the money to cure him or her, wouldn't you think the world was cruel and heartless to swing by in its healthy carefree manner and ignore your child' pathetic appeal for help ? We know that Micheal Down- big gave his life in the service of cripplesl In order that his memory may live as long as brick and stone stand and do good the memorial addi- tion is proposed. Will you help us to help them ?" Your contributions should be made at once to the following committee: A. B. Kaercher, chairman, Orton- ville; O. J. Loftus, Beardsley; M. S. Stevens, Graceville; J. H. Erickson, Clinton; J. H. Thomas, Odessa; Lynn Woods, Corre]l; F. L. Collins, BmTy; Earl Johnson, Browns Valley town- ship; A. J. Douglas, Foster; Mel Heg- gie, Big Stone; H. H. Tyler, Malta; K. C. Hanson, Otrey, and Charles Mathi- son, Artichoke. Contribution boxes should be put in- to every school house in the county, the teacher to account to the nearest committeeman. Societies and organiza- tions of all kinds shouhl unite in help- mg to raise Big Stone County's allot- ment of $1100. Just a little from every individual wilt do it. "Do it now." for your poultry, veal, but- ter, eggs a n d when you ship to the and Pa. -___= s j -= 7 c o =-- _ t s E o = _ El E -- i / _ 10th STREET AT FOURTH AVENUE MINNEAPOLIS The Northwest's Largest and Mot Beautiful Hos#lry . All Room° are Outside and Each Room ha. Private Bath ----- TARIFF: _ -- 75 Rooms (Private Baths) Single at $2.00--Double $3.00 325 Rooms (Private Baths) Sintzle at $2.50--Double $3.50 200 R)ms (Private Baths) Single a $300--Double $4.00 "=" Others from $4.00 to $15.00 " I A singing motorman is winning the hearts of many car riders on a Sev- enth avenue surface line in New York City. He sings only the old songs in a clear, melodious tenor voice. He was once a member of a famous min- strel troupe end despite the many warnings of inspectors he continues to sing at his work. A man always imagines that he wants the earth until he gets sick. From the Cradle to the Grave the Home Town Paper Touches Your Life. SUBSCRIBE FORYOt HOMETOWN PAPER WEEK, NOVEMBER 7- 12 ?9 Coming I Aluminum Sale Biggest Bargains ever .offered in Big Stone County See Date, Prices and Description of Articles in Next Week's Papers Tyler's Variety Store OrtonviHe, Minn. Furnaces A Furnace not only means greater comfort for the cold weather, but it insures better health for you and your family. Selected in the size fit- ted for the amount of space to be heated and properly installed it will keeP your entire home at an even temperate warmth. The prices for the Em- porer Furnace alone---in- stalling cost will be given, without obligation on your part. AUGUST LINDERT, Ort0nville i i Courteous Service Promptly Rendered In addition to the satisfaction of knowing that all Groceries you get from this store are of the best quality, you can depend upon prompt and courteous service at all times. Call 37 and your order will receive our careful-attention. • i921 THE ORTDWILLIg INDJPEND]gNT PAB 0rtonvine Independent A singing motom is winning the E*trERy by the Prlatlng Co. t Harris, Vice-preshient Walter Dmnell John Knher Olsoa L.E. handgren Grace F. Kaenher A. B. Kaerehez . /danaglng Editor as edla )20, the post omee st under the Act of PER YEAR Application Advt. Representative. Bank, - - . - - Mieapolis Indeterminate Sentence plan- certainty, aracy, pIsion, ad glory. cave men t tbes ae sieties of men Psent seLflshne of giant ftly metals of the r, o the Itlng pot of mode r ll bur n out the false, th selfish, the wicked itablish with evel g perfUan "pe on eart they To its penalty sooner ol ay le for a tim* d, but hls down-fMl ,f capitalists may ar- the wealth of the world, Y, and cause unspeakabl* sufferlng but it will only dr elimination, and the - te common people of their rm God, so abundantly be on all mankind. ze good thlng, however, dll wi bout sun'rices and hard- [ persistent and eterr the eause of ruth, ti ardless of cliques, parti, and deption, even in one is aly INVESTMENTS. be an act of  ,n )bJbitng the in' " by citins of in foreign of the blnet, leg at of intent ted States and all of Ls at 6 per cent, and mak- ny to charge over that dretly indirtly. calais by and high sapping the a few maaez today one country al mennce to society. Its seen every hand. of oil stun s e young enalt on enter- DOLLAR" ROBBERS. to bring befo m gwwt • A MEANS OF ESCAPE. The revue bill ently from the Fin Sonata for the revision of th I the nation, contains a pvislon ex- mmpng from the taxation the in. of ©itizens of the Unite from trade or business abroad, providing that 80 per ear* of the In. come of such person or corporation i derived fm sh foi, sou. Clearly such legislation, if paed, would pa a premium on foreign m vtments by dtizens of this country ad as nly men and corpntions of great wIth e engage in foign enterprise it is very evident that the purpose of this proposed jegislation is to enabl the mmensely withy people who profited most by the Wnrld War to espe the den nf taxation mde necessary hy iL The foign war-stricken countries offer gat upportunies for men of means to make fabulous profits on their investments and to permit them to either exploit thee helptess pen- plea or to escape taxation they so richly derve would be nothing short If this bill becomes a law be nvested in war to escape ta: b people over there. Not only this, roles of eety navies to protect their ill gotten gains s  ,e seas, which will mean mo rt re, tat ug the billions of circulation in this country the rate of inter- Where al our state,men? period of years, except all that tin° thereof which is held by War pmeers and those who robbed the tasnry of the U, td, War enatract and othl should he cancelled. It is the pple to pay their honest debts, and for these of the paint genera- tare the world. "A good stale aa n h mself i being told by a'dlvlne of the vere nld school, who, however, is not with- ng north¸ Just befo he got to hs destination he oened the ear window. with the sult that he got a pie of grit in his eye• He rubbed it and did usual things, but it still trou- bled him, and every now and al he had voluntarily to wink. When he ot to a glass This being served, he gulped it do, and then allzng that me- thing wa wrong, he said to the ar n,aid, "That wasn't milk, was ?" "No, slr, m and milk." Do No00ay-Ther00 His name is "Jimmie" He is fl Cripplt Children. For this years old• And he h never walked the Minnesota Editelat Aiatinn, ant even moved himself in the bed. the Minnesota Banke' Association, But he smiles and smiles and smiles¸ nd the Minnesota Elks are eondt "Tubenular splae" w the tor' lug a ©ampaign to rai $100.000. Of verdict• The Iart-bken pnts, this sam $25,OO0 has already pr as the proverbial "Job's turkey," #edged. investigated the hospitals gleal seien can store these crip- pled ehildn to a healthy normal life prnMbltlve, it is dane. And the service is gven Then the dtor suggested that per- f to the poor familie who  un- haps the State Hospital for Crippled able to pay the fees chged by the Childr n might have om. Buoyed hgh grade spiatlste. Thee same up by their hopes tey made appli specialists gi their ervlees fe to these ehildn at this hpital. in a day . The committee in charge of the gun- they were notified that the erat snlieitatlon h issued this ap- hospital wa fult but would be placed on the waiting ist and peal. "If your child was a orpple and you didn't have the money to eum hm that hi pla was one hundd a, or her, wouldn't you think 'entyight. and hrtle to swinl by Take a visit to Jimmie's bedrm, in r healthy ¢ardree manner and Because he needs sn ignore your ehild' pathetic appeal for ¢oh is in the ldtehen of a smal( ( help ? We know that Micheal Dow. tape on the outskirts of a fairly large hg gave hs life in the seice of city. The v,ntJtatiou is pr, there is erlyples[ In order that his memory nothing to Ik at except the smoke my Ifve a long as brick and stone grimed, cooking stained stand and do good the memorial a couple of g tins is proposed• Will you help us to tip,ely on th walt. hep them?" Covering h,s flid Your ntribut ons should be made comforter¸ O the e to the folio in c " i ' o ¸ ac h ¸ one r w .n i : .Vomg father." By the pll!nw is a Stevens, Graceville; J. H. Erieksen soiled toy hoRSe, who taft is nely ClJnton; J. H. Thomas, Odessa; Lym as ragged  hlS name. Wds, Coell; F. L. Collins, Baby; 'no plays with the sunlight that oth #'e B  St. W t ', , ... " i ] k .... [ l ,  ne; ...... tyler, malta; y tsse hl Wlnk white hands C Hansofi o re and Charl ad smooths over hi rsmpled golden ' AI, l Y' es Matl- .... sen lc nke. ar, cwmng him wlth ,irrldeeent Contribution boxes should be put in- WeulS'  to every school house n he county B t it pretty txome. Nobody e teacher n nearest lay wtth the mother so busy with ga i a that she n't spare tions of 1 kinds shnuh omer : on e in a while mg to raise Big Stone County's allot- to tell a st°ry" meat of $II00. Jus t a little from There are more than tOO eor' individual wfl o it. "Do it n Minnesota who now." tient]y "waiting their opportunity to get into the State ltpitab qXvo hma. dred aching bodies that ileal, and an zettlng, dent nuing. • Befm'e Michael Dowling, Mnlles ta's "gamest boy," hanker and our- nalst, died a short time ago he said "th ei ppled child nds mental traln itn¢ 1 lug hy motherly women, lahysieal at- ea by experts an whole in body and Receivers to jqtify their exitanee. In order to eliminate the waitin pd to co°street a "Michael Doi- ing" addition to the State Hospital for  "But 1 asl,ed yon for milk." :Compel them to tu over nk." mffi E oney to the gove,ment .... " it in the fan° of govel- "Who was that gentleman you jus X  R or other evidences of debt spoke to?" .   V eOnseated. "I don't know his real name."  I /lff go seot-fne and vel "You don't? You smed very y a ....... ho the 'ren,y th h,n. Wh ddn't ,o   c o are being lit*rally ;°traduce me to him?" E O earth under the gat h "l didn, t cam to have you know IN and of taxation caused E sale. war time robber- "you didn't. I could see that. Yet R short of compomdlng 1 we as nice as pie to him your  N thieves and eat )£ the country will heum and the petty thief in the billion dollar burglal that there is n hope,[ ustlce and righteous are involved, and[ money roles and justic and hides ? "Yes, my deal.. He's one of the town's gatest bootleggers and I may need mething from him mine day," i i lr (Puffin/otl IOth STREET AT FOURTH AVZNU Captain.--"And why do you want' to sell your nightshirt?" P. K. (the base dmmmer)--"And, now and sleep day time•" Some mTo i blINNAPOLtS The Northwest ' La?geat and Mot Beautiful Hostelry AU R,.,...* O,.d* *od E*h Roe= h p.;.o,. Seth TARIFF.. 75 Rn, (Private B,,th ingle at $2 00--Doulle $3 O0 " 25 RlnS Pr vae Bathsl ine al $2 5n--Double $3.$0 00 R.., P[vat 8alh S,,gh j Ot Ler fro., $4 O to $1S.O of ninny r riders on a ev- enth avenue sf line in New York He sings only the strel tmupe nd despite the many warnings of inspectors he continues to sing t his work. h- A man ]ways imagines til he gts sek. Ctadis t the Grave the [ Home Town Pap¢, Touches Your Life• strescme t rosterows : PAPER WEX. NOVEMBER 7 - lg Coming Aluminum Sale Biggest Bargains ever offered in Big Stone County See Date, Prices and Description of Articles in Next Week's Papers Tyler's Variety Store Ortonville, Mnn. Furnaces A Fua not only means gtr comfort for the eoM wther, but it insures better health for you and your famil Selected in the site fit- ted for the ount of svaee to be heated and pgerly italled it will kp your enti home at an ¸ even tempest® warmth. • The prices for the Era- por Furnace alone--in- stalling st will be given, without obligation o your par AUGUST LINDERT, Ortonville d °, L .. Courteous Service Promptly Rendered In addition to the satisfaction of knowing that all Groceries you get from this store are of the best quality, you can depend upon prompt and courteous service at all times. Call 37 and your order will receive our careful-attention. NOVEMBER 10, i921 THE ORINVILLE INDEPENDENY PAGE 8 Independent EVERY THURSDAY by the & Merchants Printing Co. President Harris, Vice-president L. E. Lundgren, Secretary Walter Dinnell, Treasurer BOARD OF DIRECTORS Halls Walter Dirmell John Kaercher 01son L.E. Inndgren Grace F. Kaercher A. B. Kaercher 'Kaercher . Managing Editor as second-class matter 1920, at the post office at Minn., under the Act of 8, 1879. $2.00 PER YEAR Rates on Application Advt. Representative. SELECT LIST. Bank, St. Paul St., - - Minneapolis resentative THE BAD COMES GOOD. 0f the chaos and turbulance creation, the earth, the plan- SOlar system in all its regu- certainty, accuracy, precision, and glory. prehistoric cave men and tribes arose societies of men present semi-barbarous state oppression, war-fare. the present chaos of conflict selfishness of man will • a humane society of men that in one great family all the crucible eliminates the dregs the amalgamation of in- metals of the highest so the melting pot of modern will burn out the false, the the selfish, the wicked and estab|ish with ever "peace on earth toward men." faust learn that to best work they must work for of all. To do anythin less brings its penalty sooner or despot may rule for a time iron hand, but his down-fall of capitalist5 may ac'- the wealth of the world, and cause unspeakable and suffering, but it will only their elimination, and the re- the common people of their from God, so abundantly be- UPon all mankind. good thing% however, will Without sacrifices and hard- Persistent and eternal vigi- :he cau:e of truth, right and regardless of cliques, parties, pecuniary gain. and deceptions, even in words, are easily de- one is really in search of the INVESTMENTS. should be an act of congress once prohibiting the invest- money by citizens of the in foreign Permission of the cabinet the legal rate of interes United States and all of at 6 per cent, and mak- felony to charge over that directly or indirectly. the Civil War we had slavery man, ever since we have with ever increasing and severity*of lash, rhea of all colors by and YStera of usury and high il- ls sapping the nation of g a few im- and t-he masses mis- of interest is today one curses of this country real menace to society. Its effect can be seen evelT hand. It robs labor of toil, stunts the young the old; places a premium and a penalty on enter- DOLLAR" ROBBERS. duty of the pres- and all succeeding to bring before the all those criminals Who nation of billions of dol- war, and not only fur- Compel them to turn over to the government. in the form of govern- or other evidences of debt Confiscated. go scot-free and revel and ease, while the are being literally the earth under the great bt and of taxation caused war-time robber- short of compounding these thieves and cut Does the magni- robberies baffle the au- the thieves become POWelfful as to insure theil af the country will hound and the petty thief in- billion dollar burglar as oon as election is over. that there is n# hope, Justice and righteous- are involved, and money rules and justice and hides ? Indeterminate Sentence I A MEANS OF ESCAPE. The revenue bill recently reported from the Finance Committee of the Senate for the revision of the tax laws of the nation, contains a provision ex- empting from the taxation the in- comes, of citizens of the Unites States and domestic corporations re- ceived from trade or business abroad, providing that 80 per cent of the in- come of such person or corporation is derived from such foreign source. Clearly such legislation, if passed, would place a premium on foreign m- vestments by citizens of this country, and as drily men and corporations of great wealth can engage in foreign enterprises it is very evident that the purpose of this proposed legislation is to enabl the immensely wealthy people who profited most by the World War to escape the tremendous bur- den of taxation made necessary by it. The foreign war-stricken countries offer great opportunities for men of means to make fabulous profits on l their investments and to permit them to either exploit these helpless peo- ples or to escape taxation they so richly deserve would be nothing short of a crime. If this bill becomes a law billions of dollars will be invested in foreign lands by men who made their money out of the war to escape taxa£ tion here and rob people over there. Not only this, but these arch eni- mies of society will want armies and navies to protect their ill-gotten gains across the seas, which will mean more war. Furthermore, taking these billions out of circulation in this country would further raise the rate of inter- est. Where are our statesmen? The World War debt should be fund- ed and payment extended over a long period of years, except all that por- tion thereof which is held by War profiteers and those who robbed the treasury of the United States thru War contracts and otherwise, this should be cancelled. It is enough for the people to pay their honest debts, and for those of the present genera- tion to have induced the hardships and nrivations of war--times and rehabili- :tare the world. "A good story against himself is being told by a divine of the severe old school, who, however, is not with- out a sense of humor. He was travel- ing north. Just before he got to ht destination he opened the car window, with the result that he got a piece of grit in his eye. He rubbed it and did all the usual things, but it still trou- bled him, and every now and again he had voluntarily to wink. When he got to his town he went into the buffet and asked for a glass of milk. This being served, he gulped it down, and then realizing that some- thing was wrong, he said to the bar- maid, "That wasn't milk, was it?" "No, sir, rum and milk." "But I asked you for milk." "Yes, sir, but you tipped me the wink." "Who was that gentleman you just spoke to ?" "I don't know his real name." "You don't? You seemed very friendly with him. yhy didn't you introduce me to him. "I didn't care to have you know him." "You didn't. I could see that. Yet you were as nice as pie to him your- self." "Yes, my dear. He's one of the town's greatest bootleggers and I may need something from him some day." Captain."And why do you want to sell your nightshirt?" P. K. (the base drummer)--"And what use hay I for it? I work nights now and sleep day time." Some men are poor because they are h0est and some men are honest because they are rich and can afford to be. Do N I His name is "Jimmie." He is fiw years old. And he has never walked nor even moved himself in the bed. But he smiles and smiles and smiles. "Tubercular spine" was the doctor's verdict. The /feart-broken parents, poor as the proverbial "Job's turkey," investigated the hospitals where chil- dren such as Jimmie are treated and cured. But they learned.the cost was prohibitive. Then the doctor suggested that per- haps the State Hospital for Crippled Children might have room. Buoyed up by their hopes they made appli- cation in the usual form and in a day or two they were notified that the hospital was full but that Jimmie would be placed on the waiting list and that his place was one hundred and seventy-eight. Take a visit to Jimmie's bedroom. Because he needs so much care his couch is in the kitchen of a small cot- tage on the outskirts of a fairly large city. The vontilation is poor, there is nothing to look at except the smoke grimed, cooking stained kitchen and a couple of garish calendars hanging tipsoly on th wall. Covering his flaccid little form is a ragged but clean comforter. Ol the covering is a doll whose face is spot- ted with the loving caresses of the ,young "father." By the pillow is a soiled toy horse, whose tail is nearly as ragged as his name. And with these two playthings Jim- mie passes the long hours. At times he plays with the sunght that sooth- ingly kisses his wrinkled white hands and smooths over his rumpled golden hair, crowning him with-irridecent jewels. But it's pretty tiresome. Nobody to play with the mother so busy with her housework that she can't spare but a hurried moment once in a while to tell a story. There are more than 200 Jimmies and Janes in Minnesota who are pa- tiently "waiting their opportunity to get into the State Hospital. Two htm- dred aching bodies that need, and are getting, medical care and tender effi- cient nursing. • Before Michael Dowling, Minneso- ta's "gamest boy," banker and jour- nalist, died a short time ago he said, "the crippled child needs mental train- ing by motherly women, physical at- tention and surgical care by experts if those who are whole in body and mind are to justify their existance. In order to eliminate the waiting list of "Jimmies and Janes" it is pa- posed to construct a "Michael Do@l- ing" addition to the State Hospital for ' Them Nay " 'WLdf'] / QJ Crippled Children. For this purpose the Minnesota Editorial Association, the Minnesota Bankers' Association, and the Minnesota Elks are conduct- ing a campaign to raise $100,000. Of this sum $25,000 has already been pledged. If *he most modern medical and sur- gical science can restore these crip- pled children to a healthy normal life it is done. And the service is given free to the poor families who are un- able to pay the fees charged by the high grade specialists. These same specialists give their services free to these children at this hospital. The committee in charge of the gen- eral solicitation has issued this ap- peal. "If your child was a cripple and you didn't have the money to cure him or her, wouldn't you think the world was cruel and heartless to swing by in its healthy carefree manner and ignore your child' pathetic appeal for help ? We know that Micheal Down- big gave his life in the service of cripplesl In order that his memory may live as long as brick and stone stand and do good the memorial addi- tion is proposed. Will you help us to help them ?" Your contributions should be made at once to the following committee: A. B. Kaercher, chairman, Orton- ville; O. J. Loftus, Beardsley; M. S. Stevens, Graceville; J. H. Erickson, Clinton; J. H. Thomas, Odessa; Lynn Woods, Corre]l; F. L. Collins, BmTy; Earl Johnson, Browns Valley town- ship; A. J. Douglas, Foster; Mel Heg- gie, Big Stone; H. H. Tyler, Malta; K. C. Hanson, Otrey, and Charles Mathi- son, Artichoke. Contribution boxes should be put in- to every school house in the county, the teacher to account to the nearest committeeman. Societies and organiza- tions of all kinds shouhl unite in help- mg to raise Big Stone County's allot- ment of $1100. Just a little from every individual wilt do it. "Do it now." for your poultry, veal, but- ter, eggs a n d when you ship to the and Pa. -___= s j -= 7 c o =-- _ t s E o = _ El E -- i / _ 10th STREET AT FOURTH AVENUE MINNEAPOLIS The Northwest's Largest and Mot Beautiful Hos#lry . All Room° are Outside and Each Room ha. Private Bath ----- TARIFF: _ -- 75 Rooms (Private Baths) Single at $2.00--Double $3.00 325 Rooms (Private Baths) Sintzle at $2.50--Double $3.50 200 R)ms (Private Baths) Single a $300--Double $4.00 "=" Others from $4.00 to $15.00 " I A singing motorman is winning the hearts of many car riders on a Sev- enth avenue surface line in New York City. He sings only the old songs in a clear, melodious tenor voice. He was once a member of a famous min- strel troupe end despite the many warnings of inspectors he continues to sing at his work. A man always imagines that he wants the earth until he gets sick. From the Cradle to the Grave the Home Town Paper Touches Your Life. SUBSCRIBE FORYOt HOMETOWN PAPER WEEK, NOVEMBER 7- 12 ?9 Coming I Aluminum Sale Biggest Bargains ever .offered in Big Stone County See Date, Prices and Description of Articles in Next Week's Papers Tyler's Variety Store OrtonviHe, Minn. Furnaces A Furnace not only means greater comfort for the cold weather, but it insures better health for you and your family. Selected in the size fit- ted for the amount of space to be heated and properly installed it will keeP your entire home at an even temperate warmth. The prices for the Em- porer Furnace alone---in- stalling cost will be given, without obligation on your part. AUGUST LINDERT, Ort0nville i i Courteous Service Promptly Rendered In addition to the satisfaction of knowing that all Groceries you get from this store are of the best quality, you can depend upon prompt and courteous service at all times. Call 37 and your order will receive our careful-attention.