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The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
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November 10, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
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November 10, 1921
 

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NOVEMBER 10, 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE 7 Farmers Corner ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF FARMERS AND FARMER&apos;S CLUBS. For Show Ready Show Pavilion Remodeled; : Men Peased by Changes. stable and an en- with a new heating llew seating arrangements and waiting for the Junior Livestock Show, at South St. Paul on No- Of the Minnesota Livestock association and the Minne- Bureau federation, who the improvements dur- few days, say they are the changes. The has complied with pro- stable ,fo by show light and ventila- and partitions ar- off all the stock to the has been enlarged a new heating plant talled. Bankers Meet To Study Credit Law "No Red Tape About It," War Fi- nauce Official Tells Farm Loan Conference. The billion dolla farm credit law authorizing the United States gov- ernment's War Finance corporation to loan money for agricultural purposes! was passed "to relieve country bank- ers of the necessity of compelling far- mers to sell their products at prices which will not even pay their debts, and to permit farmers to buy young livestock." That was the explanation of the new federal credit law, Tmade by members of the War Finance corporation's northwest agricultural committee, to country bankers at a conference in Minneapolis last week, called to study methods of obtaining loans under the new law. The speakers at the conference emphasized the fact that the federal loan does not mean "easy money." It (ions not provide for additional credit to farmers except upon ade- quate security; and speakers indica- Many Pi00s Arrive At Start Of Week Snow and Colder Weather Tend To In- Crease Run of Young Stock. Bnlk of Pigs $8.50. Monday's Closing-- Cattle 13,000. Malket closing steady to strong. Best grass beeves quotable $7.00, bulk $5.00 to $6.00. Calve: I1,000. Closing steady to 50c lower, bulk best lights $9.00, some $9.50. Hogs 16,500. Market closing steady to 25c lower, bulk $6.60 to $/.09, top $7.25, bulk ;ood pigs $8.50. Sheep i4,000. Market steady to 25c lower, bulk desirable lambs $7.75 to $8.00, bulk good ewes $3.00 to $3.50. So. St. Paul, Nov. 7, 1921.--Some snow and colder weather in North Da- kota and other northwest sections tended to increase the run of pigs here at the week's opening, "5,000 being estimated for today. Bulk of desirable kinds sold at $8.50. Hogs were steady to 25e lower. Range $5.75 to $7.25, bulk $6.60 to $7.09. After a slow start, the cattle market finally worked out along fully steady to strong and feeders, and some ship- ping demand developed by news of a Steady to. strong market at Chicago. Best grass beeves are quotable from $6.00 to $7.00, and a few individuals and small lots brought such prices to- day, altho no load lot sold over $5.85, packers paying this price for a four- load string of South Dakotas, averag- ing around 1,200 pounds. Bulk of the beef steers cashed between this price company has more ted that the War Finance corpora--_..., ,. , ....... ,. ...... n-load tations " L E Pot I .............. a.a o.v,, m.e u .e cum,,u er , " " " tlOll Wlll De more liberal wlgn loans . . . . ,, .....  . - of the s *-* farm bu i ............ lOtS going a ,,.za to 4..3. tucnev ac - I EO nel'ml, the 9urcnase oi llVeSl;OCg tO . . . , , , , . .... dire   she STOCK SOlU mrgely irom o.o o ctor of the state hve-t consume the cheap feed now on farms . nn ,,l: ...... ,. ,h i., n;oo associatmn said after h 1 n for , . m the northwest than wff oa s --. , .,. ,,.. I , " Canners ad cutters went largely at ';ae a,nLpavna:on- ' ?.w i mt otaer purposes: ...... [,$2.25 to $3.00. Bologna bulls cashed -,y anu gJrt uv I lne greatest oenent oI tile agrlcUl- ] o e. L .' n  t lt 9 7 . ,art, and bring in their [ tural credit act to the farmers, it was[ ;,.,5 *utlk LOof"%et iTht''vealer"  )ers and quality that will ] said, will come as a result of the fi-I '...'i4., ,ana . -,, ",. ..... ' ........ ,, hold up their end of]nanclal rehef to country banks, by I at .9 50 Stocl-ers and feeders old enabling them to renew loans instead/ '-',"   ,,..:..,'  -k " ; , t .... .. ,. ... ,. . , . . . . la_'gelv irorfl q.no EO D,Z --no loa(l Inow Wlll De tne climax ot oelng compelleO to lns1sl on llquloa- 1.o .,1 ...... n. cK K/' AI} eriotiw s in which 1,o00 boys tion. Loans amounting to $300000 h-ic, kinds are -uotable to around been takmg partdurmg have been approved for Minnesota ean Judging begins on No- and the Dakotas by the Washington *'bout 10,000 of today's generous and there will be an aucz office of the War Finance corporation. November 18, the last day M.O. Grangaard, secretary of the Easy to In Minnesota is ideally equipped for says Philip A. An- division of Minnesota. well husbanded," he successful than large cared for nicely on most of the twin cities. The sheep are kept are more weeds, neee.csary to care for a negligible during most lambing season gen- when the farm work is Fencing has been the cost being but a very constructed of three Wire with two or three on top. The housing: need not be board walls with a s all that is needed, a, be protected from the the snow, rain ant! northwest committee of the corpora- tion, said that applications were be- ing approved in Washington within a week after they left Minneapolis. "The whole process has been sim- plified as much as possible," he said. "There is no red tape about it." Flu-Cholera Combine Perils Swine Herds An epizootic of "flu" among swine in certain sections of-southeastern Minnesota has been recognized in sev- eral herds associated with hog chol- era and iternal 13arisites, according to Dr. H. C. H. Kernkamp, assistant professor of veterinary medicine of the University of Minnesota, who in- spected the affected herds. "The losses by death in herds where only 'flu' exists is small, but losses have been heavy where hog choler is also present," Dr. Kern- kamp says. "The presence of one disease accelerates the other, with the result that it makes either disease difficult to control satisfactorily." Dr. Kernkamp strongly advises the use of hog cholera serum alone t where both diseases occur in the same be produced cheaply herd, and that virus be withheld un- feed prices and.til all indications of "flu" have sub- attractive enterprise." I sided. Jn00ss ' Musde George E.Fu]ler of more than was made today by company at Charles vaanufacturers of Hart- Which are well known er 1 they an; reduction in models of their tractors of the Hart-Parr "30," )ast year has been re- f. o. b. factory, is now cash, f. o. b. factory. "20," which was le- am $1,195 to $99 cash, 945, cash f. o. . fac- are absolutely the these Hart-Parr trac- sold. War when prices on al ' Were shooting sky-high, company held their little over a year ago aid no longer do this the price of the "30" of about 14 per price quoted has not Hart-Parr "30" to but practically one below the prewar of reduced Hart-Parr Company, Oldest tractor company and the founders of the Will do much to sta- latices. Axioms. is on the way. Wont cool your engine. A well built and well cared-for.man or tractor is not hurt by hard work. Knocking never did anybody any good, especially when the knock is in the engine. Oil in the crank case is not enough. It must be clean oil and of the right grade. If you own a Ford and a lighting plant, don't imagine yourself an elec- trical engineer and try to rebuild the magneto on your tractor. THE TRACTOR. The tractor on the farm arose Before the dawn at four; It drove up cows and washed the clothes, And finished every chore. Then forth it went, into the field, Just at the break of day; It reaped and threshed the golde yield, And hauled it all away. It plowed the field that afternoon, And when the job was thru, It hummed a pleasant little tune, And churned the butter, too. And pumped the water for the stock, And ground a crib of corn, And hauled the baby round the block, To still its cries forlorn. Thus ran the busy hours away, By many a labor blest; And yet, when fell the twilight gray The tractor did not rest. For while the farmer, peaceful- eyed, Read by the Tungston's glow, The patient tractor stood outside, And ran the dynamo. --George Fitch. run of sheep and lambs were on sale, lambs selling largely from $7.75 to $8.00, fat ewes $3.00 to $3.75. Very few feeders arrived. How Tuberculosis Of Poultry Spreads County Agents of Minnesota are be- ing called upon frequently nowadays to id'mtify tuberculosis in poultry flocks, and to suggest methods of con- trol and eradication. It is reliably re- ported that more than 25 per cent of the poultry in so,me sections is infec- ted with tuberculosis. Identification and spread of the dis- ease, symptoms, and methods of con- tiol are subjects which ought to be mastered by poultry keepers. There is no cure for tuberculosis, and a few tvbereular fowls may eventually in oculate entire flocks. Dr. W. A. Bil- lings of the division of veterinary medicine, Unive.'sity of Minnesota, gives the following explanation of Wrights Underwear Wears Longer NDERWEAR, like everything e l s e, must eventually wear out, but its length of life should be sufficient to give you the worth of your moley. Wright's Underwear is made right from the right kind of material which insures a longer life than most any other kind. For Men mad Boys WRIGHT'$ "SPRING 11" NEEDLE The Pioneer Store Co-Operative Co. hcw the disease spreads: fection and the disease is easily picked "The germ can only be seen under up by healtlw birds. It is generally the miscrocope. Since the liver, spleen believed that poultry do not become vrM "ntestinzs are the organs cam- infected from cattle or hogs, but this manly affected and as the organs is not definitely known. Birds dead empty into the intestines, the drop- of tuoerculosis should be burned for plngs which pass from the birds con-Ithe carcusses may be a source of in- tain millions of these minute germs, fection to the others. It may be also h, this way, the soil and floor of the that certain of our wild birds carry chicken house become laden with in- infection from flock to flock. .... I I Not a Th,:00 But a Serwce -The Home Town Paper OME folks make the mistake of thinking of the home town newspaper as a thing, a contrivance of ink and paper, sometimes not a great quantity of either, when compared with big city papers. But the home town newspaper is not a thing, it is a serv- ice, just the same as is the telephone. And just as the $12 or $15 a year which we pay for the telephone service seems not too much, so is the $2 or $3, which at most is charged for the home town paper, trifling, compared with the real service which the paper, itself an institution, retiders to all the other institutions of the community. Subscribe to Your Home Town Paper Week, November 7-12 Why not get the BEST? When buying Meats get it at the City Meat Market You are sure then of getting only choice steaks, chops, roasts, stews, etc. LUNDSTROM & GEISEL, 0rtonville Proper Care of Battery in Winter Local Vesta Dealer Gives Ad- vice Regarding Methods of Storage Battery in Winter Winter storage for your Battery is a vastly different problem from merely storing your car for the winter. Your battery is an electro- chemical combination, and must have special at- tention:  according to Mr. Ostlind, manager of the local Vesta Station. There aretwo methods of battery storage, wet and dry, states Mr. Ostlind. In wet storage the battery is left just the way it is taken out of the car. It must be kept at safe temperature, watered and charged at least once a month and otherwise kept under competent supervision. Chemical action takes place during the winter months, and the life of the battery is naturally somewhat shortened. Dry Storage is a far better method. The i Professional and Business Directory C. E. SIGLOH [0[ WIRINGSERVIcEELECTRIC REPAIRING Phone 284-L Qrtonville, Minn. JOE BAYER & SON Of the Ortonville Tailoring Co. All kinds of cleaning and pressing neatly done. Suits Made to Order. Ortonville, Minn. ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP Shoes repaired neatly and prompt- ly. Our Work Guaranteed. GUS. E. ANDERSON, Prop. JOHN SPANYERS Light Hauling of all Kinds Express and Baggage Telephone 287 Ortonville, Minn. PAUL DIRNBAUER Brick Layer and Plasterer Stone Mason and AI Kinds of Cement Work. Ortonville, Minn. R.F.D. PETEISON & SON i' Dray Line Big Stone Lake Ice I Phone 38 Ortonville, Minn Kodak DEVELOPING PRINTING ENLARGING . Prompt, Quality Service, Moderate Prices. THE REED STUDIO Ortonville Minn. DR. R. D. RIFENBARK OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN One block ujhill frora Gunderson's "rug Store Vapor-Sulphur Cabinet Treatments (For rhenmatism, neuritis, etc.) F. L. BROWN THE JEWELER Ortonville, Minnesota FOR TRUCK SERVICE and any kind of light and heavy draying Hausauer Bros. PHONE 268 All Orders Given Prompt Attention A. B. KAERCHER Attorney at Law Odd Fellows Building Ortenville, Minn. DR. F. W. DUNN. CHIROPRACTOR D. D. WHITE, D. C, PH. C Sptnographer 12-13-14-15-16 Shumaker Bldg. Ortonville, Minn. Col. Win. Wellendorf T AUCTIONEER  30 years' experienek, No praetie- [ ing on your property: Call or[ write me early and get in on tin' early date, Ortonville, Minnesota J. A. JOHNSON PIANO TUNING AND REPAIRING PHONES---Residence - 194 Furniture Store - {18 All Work Guaranteed Ortanville, Mlmqta. WILL FINCH Experienced Painter Phone 285-L All Work Guaranteed ELMER SALSBURY 'qIE WELL DIGGER" Fifteen Years' Experi Ortonville, Minn. R.F.D. t Itl separators are taken out of the battery and the .... _. .. . WHEN it comes to delivero plates are stored dry. All chemical action is  ing the goods on tim, |[| suspended, so that the battery does not deterior- we're there, that's all. For Ill ate during winter. When it is reassembled in ri f,rJu: | big jobs or small jobs---lure- Ill the spring, new separators are used which makes Old Iron, $.00 to $10.00 per tea [ Copper d heavy BraM,4e to 8 her sawed to the proper I11 this method slightly more expensive, but the ad- _.r_ ,d:  levgtt and width--lumber for I/I deal life given to the battery makes it cheaper in Old Rags,  etmt per pound. I' every practical purpose prac- |]| the long run. Old Rubbers and Tire,  am(  - tically priced. to 1 cent per pound.  Belting and Hue carried la IS:" Geie00 b.00mber Co. The ark Garage Osthnd & Karn, Props. The Ortonvll Foun I[ Ortonville Minn. /11 NOVEMBER 10, 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE 7 Farmers Corner ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF FARMERS AND FARMER'S CLUBS. For Show Ready Show Pavilion Remodeled; : Men Peased by Changes. stable and an en- with a new heating llew seating arrangements and waiting for the Junior Livestock Show, at South St. Paul on No- Of the Minnesota Livestock association and the Minne- Bureau federation, who the improvements dur- few days, say they are the changes. The has complied with pro- stable ,fo by show light and ventila- and partitions ar- off all the stock to the has been enlarged a new heating plant talled. Bankers Meet To Study Credit Law "No Red Tape About It," War Fi- nauce Official Tells Farm Loan Conference. The billion dolla farm credit law authorizing the United States gov- ernment's War Finance corporation to loan money for agricultural purposes! was passed "to relieve country bank- ers of the necessity of compelling far- mers to sell their products at prices which will not even pay their debts, and to permit farmers to buy young livestock." That was the explanation of the new federal credit law, Tmade by members of the War Finance corporation's northwest agricultural committee, to country bankers at a conference in Minneapolis last week, called to study methods of obtaining loans under the new law. The speakers at the conference emphasized the fact that the federal loan does not mean "easy money." It (ions not provide for additional credit to farmers except upon ade- quate security; and speakers indica- Many Pi00s Arrive At Start Of Week Snow and Colder Weather Tend To In- Crease Run of Young Stock. Bnlk of Pigs $8.50. Monday's Closing-- Cattle 13,000. Malket closing steady to strong. Best grass beeves quotable $7.00, bulk $5.00 to $6.00. Calve: I1,000. Closing steady to 50c lower, bulk best lights $9.00, some $9.50. Hogs 16,500. Market closing steady to 25c lower, bulk $6.60 to $/.09, top $7.25, bulk ;ood pigs $8.50. Sheep i4,000. Market steady to 25c lower, bulk desirable lambs $7.75 to $8.00, bulk good ewes $3.00 to $3.50. So. St. Paul, Nov. 7, 1921.--Some snow and colder weather in North Da- kota and other northwest sections tended to increase the run of pigs here at the week's opening, "5,000 being estimated for today. Bulk of desirable kinds sold at $8.50. Hogs were steady to 25e lower. Range $5.75 to $7.25, bulk $6.60 to $7.09. After a slow start, the cattle market finally worked out along fully steady to strong and feeders, and some ship- ping demand developed by news of a Steady to. strong market at Chicago. Best grass beeves are quotable from $6.00 to $7.00, and a few individuals and small lots brought such prices to- day, altho no load lot sold over $5.85, packers paying this price for a four- load string of South Dakotas, averag- ing around 1,200 pounds. Bulk of the beef steers cashed between this price company has more ted that the War Finance corpora--_..., ,. , ....... ,. ...... n-load tations " L E Pot I .............. a.a o.v,, m.e u .e cum,,u er , " " " tlOll Wlll De more liberal wlgn loans . . . . ,, .....  . - of the s *-* farm bu i ............ lOtS going a ,,.za to 4..3. tucnev ac - I EO nel'ml, the 9urcnase oi llVeSl;OCg tO . . . , , , , . .... dire   she STOCK SOlU mrgely irom o.o o ctor of the state hve-t consume the cheap feed now on farms . nn ,,l: ...... ,. ,h i., n;oo associatmn said after h 1 n for , . m the northwest than wff oa s --. , .,. ,,.. I , " Canners ad cutters went largely at ';ae a,nLpavna:on- ' ?.w i mt otaer purposes: ...... [,$2.25 to $3.00. Bologna bulls cashed -,y anu gJrt uv I lne greatest oenent oI tile agrlcUl- ] o e. L .' n  t lt 9 7 . ,art, and bring in their [ tural credit act to the farmers, it was[ ;,.,5 *utlk LOof"%et iTht''vealer"  )ers and quality that will ] said, will come as a result of the fi-I '...'i4., ,a na . -,, ",. ..... ' ........ ,, hold up their end of]nanclal rehef to country banks, by I at .9 50 Stocl-ers and feeders old enabling them to renew loans instead/ '-',"   ,,..:..,'  -k " ; , t .... .. ,. ... ,. . , . . . . la_'gelv irorfl q.no EO D,Z --no loa(l Inow Wlll De tne climax ot oelng compelleO to lns1sl on llquloa- 1.o .,1 ...... n. cK K/' AI} eriotiw s in which 1,o00 boys tion. Loans amounting to $300000 h-ic, kinds are -uotable to around been takmg partdurmg have been approved for Minnesota ean Judging begins on No- and the Dakotas by the Washington *'bout 10,000 of today's generous and there will be an aucz office of the War Finance corporation. November 18, the last day M.O. Grangaard, secretary of the Easy to In Minnesota is ideally equipped for says Philip A. An- division of Minnesota. well husbanded," he successful than large cared for nicely on most of the twin cities. The sheep are kept are more weeds, neee.csary to care for a negligible during most lambing season gen- when the farm work is Fencing has been the cost being but a very constructed of three Wire with two or three on top. The housing: need not be board walls with a s all that is needed, a, be protected from the the snow, rain ant! northwest committee of the corpora- tion, said that applications were be- ing approved in Washington within a week after they left Minneapolis. "The whole process has been sim- plified as much as possible," he said. "There is no red tape about it." Flu-Cholera Combine Perils Swine Herds An epizootic of "flu" among swine in certain sections of-southeastern Minnesota has been recognized in sev- eral herds associated with hog chol- era and iternal 13arisites, according to Dr. H. C. H. Kernkamp, assistant professor of veterinary medicine of the University of Minnesota, who in- spected the affected herds. "The losses by death in herds where only 'flu' exists is small, but losses have been heavy where hog choler is also present," Dr. Kern- kamp says. "The presence of one disease accelerates the other, with the result that it makes either disease difficult to control satisfactorily." Dr. Kernkamp strongly advises the use of hog cholera serum alone t where both diseases occur in the same be produced cheaply herd, and that virus be withheld un- feed prices and.til all indications of "flu" have sub- attractive enterprise." I sided. Jn00ss ' Musde George E.Fu]ler of more than was made today by company at Charles vaanufacturers of Hart- Which are well known er 1 they an; reduction in models of their tractors of the Hart-Parr "30," )ast year has been re- f. o. b. factory, is now cash, f. o. b. factory. "20," which was le- am $1,195 to $99 cash, 945, cash f. o. . fac- are absolutely the these Hart-Parr trac- sold. War when prices on al ' Were shooting sky-high, company held their little over a year ago aid no longer do this the price of the "30" of about 14 per price quoted has not Hart-Parr "30" to but practically one below the prewar of reduced Hart-Parr Company, Oldest tractor company and the founders of the Will do much to sta- latices. Axioms. is on the way. Wont cool your engine. A well built and well cared-for.man or tractor is not hurt by hard work. Knocking never did anybody any good, especially when the knock is in the engine. Oil in the crank case is not enough. It must be clean oil and of the right grade. If you own a Ford and a lighting plant, don't imagine yourself an elec- trical engineer and try to rebuild the magneto on your tractor. THE TRACTOR. The tractor on the farm arose Before the dawn at four; It drove up cows and washed the clothes, And finished every chore. Then forth it went, into the field, Just at the break of day; It reaped and threshed the golde yield, And hauled it all away. It plowed the field that afternoon, And when the job was thru, It hummed a pleasant little tune, And churned the butter, too. And pumped the water for the stock, And ground a crib of corn, And hauled the baby round the block, To still its cries forlorn. Thus ran the busy hours away, By many a labor blest; And yet, when fell the twilight gray The tractor did not rest. For while the farmer, peaceful- eyed, Read by the Tungston's glow, The patient tractor stood outside, And ran the dynamo. --George Fitch. run of sheep and lambs were on sale, lambs selling largely from $7.75 to $8.00, fat ewes $3.00 to $3.75. Very few feeders arrived. How Tuberculosis Of Poultry Spreads County Agents of Minnesota are be- ing called upon frequently nowadays to id'mtify tuberculosis in poultry flocks, and to suggest methods of con- trol and eradication. It is reliably re- ported that more than 25 per cent of the poultry in so,me sections is infec- ted with tuberculosis. Identification and spread of the dis- ease, symptoms, and methods of con- tiol are subjects which ought to be mastered by poultry keepers. There is no cure for tuberculosis, and a few tvbereular fowls may eventually in oculate entire flocks. Dr. W. A. Bil- lings of the division of veterinary medicine, Unive.'sity of Minnesota, gives the following explanation of Wrights Underwear Wears Longer NDERWEAR, like everything e l s e, must eventually wear out, but its length of life should be sufficient to give you the worth of your moley. Wright's Underwear is made right from the right kind of material which insures a longer life than most any other kind. For Men mad Boys WRIGHT'$ "SPRING 11" NEEDLE The Pioneer Store Co-Operative Co. hcw the disease spreads: fection and the disease is easily picked "The germ can only be seen under up by healtlw birds. It is generally the miscrocope. Since the liver, spleen believed that poultry do not become vrM "ntestinzs are the organs cam- infected from cattle or hogs, but this manly affected and as the organs is not definitely known. Birds dead empty into the intestines, the drop- of tuoerculosis should be burned for plngs which pass from the birds con-Ithe carcusses may be a source of in- tain millions of these minute germs, fection to the others. It may be also h, this way, the soil and floor of the that certain of our wild birds carry chicken house become laden with in- infection from flock to flock. .... I I Not a Th,:00 But a Serwce -The Home Town Paper OME folks make the mistake of thinking of the home town newspaper as a thing, a contrivance of ink and paper, sometimes not a great quantity of either, when compared with big city papers. But the home town newspaper is not a thing, it is a serv- ice, just the same as is the telephone. And just as the $12 or $15 a year which we pay for the telephone service seems not too much, so is the $2 or $3, which at most is charged for the home town paper, trifling, compared with the real service which the paper, itself an institution, retiders to all the other institutions of the community. Subscribe to Your Home Town Paper Week, November 7-12 Why not get the BEST? When buying Meats get it at the City Meat Market You are sure then of getting only choice steaks, chops, roasts, stews, etc. LUNDSTROM & GEISEL, 0rtonville Proper Care of Battery in Winter Local Vesta Dealer Gives Ad- vice Regarding Methods of Storage Battery in Winter Winter storage for your Battery is a vastly different problem from merely storing your car for the winter. Your battery is an electro- chemical combination, and must have special at- tention:  according to Mr. Ostlind, manager of the local Vesta Station. There aretwo methods of battery storage, wet and dry, states Mr. Ostlind. In wet storage the battery is left just the way it is taken out of the car. It must be kept at safe temperature, watered and charged at least once a month and otherwise kept under competent supervision. Chemical action takes place during the winter months, and the life of the battery is naturally somewhat shortened. Dry Storage is a far better method. The i Professional and Business Directory C. E. SIGLOH [0[ WIRINGSERVIcEELECTRIC REPAIRING Phone 284-L Qrtonville, Minn. JOE BAYER & SON Of the Ortonville Tailoring Co. All kinds of cleaning and pressing neatly done. Suits Made to Order. Ortonville, Minn. ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP Shoes repaired neatly and prompt- ly. Our Work Guaranteed. GUS. E. ANDERSON, Prop. JOHN SPANYERS Light Hauling of all Kinds Express and Baggage Telephone 287 Ortonville, Minn. PAUL DIRNBAUER Brick Layer and Plasterer Stone Mason and AI Kinds of Cement Work. Ortonville, Minn. R.F.D. PETEISON & SON i' Dray Line Big Stone Lake Ice I Phone 38 Ortonville, Minn Kodak DEVELOPING PRINTING ENLARGING . Prompt, Quality Service, Moderate Prices. THE REED STUDIO Ortonville Minn. DR. R. D. RIFENBARK OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN One block ujhill frora Gunderson's "rug Store Vapor-Sulphur Cabinet Treatments (For rhenmatism, neuritis, etc.) F. L. BROWN THE JEWELER Ortonville, Minnesota FOR TRUCK SERVICE and any kind of light and heavy draying Hausauer Bros. PHONE 268 All Orders Given Prompt Attention A. B. KAERCHER Attorney at Law Odd Fellows Building Ortenville, Minn. DR. F. W. DUNN. CHIROPRACTOR D. D. WHITE, D. C, PH. C Sptnographer 12-13-14-15-16 Shumaker Bldg. Ortonville, Minn. Col. Win. Wellendorf T AUCTIONEER  30 years' experienek, No praetie- [ ing on your property: Call or[ write me early and get in on tin' early date, Ortonville, Minnesota J. A. JOHNSON PIANO TUNING AND REPAIRING PHONES---Residence - 194 Furniture Store - {18 All Work Guaranteed Ortanville, Mlmqta. WILL FINCH Experienced Painter Phone 285-L All Work Guaranteed ELMER SALSBURY 'qIE WELL DIGGER" Fifteen Years' Experi Ortonville, Minn. R.F.D. t Itl separators are taken out of the battery and the .... _. .. . WHEN it comes to delivero plates are stored dry. All chemical action is  ing the goods on tim, |[| suspended, so that the battery does not deterior- we're there, that's all. For Ill ate during winter. When it is reassembled in ri f,rJu: | big jobs or small jobs---lure- Ill the spring, new separators are used which makes Old Iron, $.00 to $10.00 per tea [ Copper d heavy BraM,4e to 8 her sawed to the proper I11 this method slightly more expensive, but the ad- _.r_ ,d:  levgtt and width--lumber for I/I deal life given to the battery makes it cheaper in Old Rags,  etmt per pound. I' every practical purpose prac- |]| the long run. Old Rubbers and Tire,  am(  - tically priced. to 1 cent per pound.  Belting and Hue carried la IS:" Geie00 b.00mber Co. The ark Garage Osthnd & Karn, Props. The Ortonvll Foun I[ Ortonville Minn. /11 L 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE 7 ................. 7 ..... Farmers Corner THE AIIVITIES OF FARMERS Many Pis Arrive .............. , .................... il l and -  "The germ can ouly be Keen un(Im up by healthy bir s s genera y the miserope. Since the Tiver, spleenl belie*l that poultry do Bttsiness Directory At Start 0f Week ............................... , ................................. nmly affected and  the organs[is nut definitely ko. :Bankers Meet To ....... u, ......... Catlle 18/)00 Makef elo,inr steady to strong. Best gras beeves quotable Sh0w Ready Study Credit Law ............ cns,ng" ............ stead, Bbe--[i wPavi Remodeled;"No Red Tapeut It," War Fi. bulk bet light $9.00, otue $950 Men p, by [ nanee Uffieial Tells Farm Loan Hogs 16,500. Market closing stead to 25e lower, bulk $660 to $7.@), top Change. I Conference" $7.25 , bulk ood pigs $q,50. Sheep -- The billlon dollar  fa edlt law Market teady lambs $7.75 to $8.00, authorizing the United States guy- bul k good ewe8 $3.00 to $3.50. and waiting for the loan money for agricultural purposes o- St. Paul, Nov. 7, main Livesto k Show wa pad 'to liev e country bk- kota and other northwest t South St. Paul on era of the necesslty of compelling fa tended to increase the Bm of pis here me to sel their priuets at prs h e M' . t wh eh w no even pay he ebts week's opening, "5,OOO being nneta Liv k , Bulk of deMrable c at , and to perm t fathers to buy young Ion and the Mlnne- ,, Hogs ere stezdy Brea federat on who hvestoek, . Range $5.7b to $7.2b, , . , ! explanatmn of the new 'bemproemeW u< .... , .............  ......... $ ..... changes, Finance corporation' finally wolkl out along ftly stead 3 to strong and fders, and some ship- country bankers at ping demand developed by news of a Minneag steely to strong of obtaining Best gras beeves are quotable from The speakers at the $7.00, and emphasized the feet that the P rices to day, a o no oad o an d over $5,g5 ]mlq does not mean "easy money' t doe no pray e for a t one g plant credit to farmers except Upon ado. tale load strin of South lag around lfi00 pounds. k " i,luate secullty; and speakers indl, s cashed between this prie yards ,s mo! ted that the War Finance corpora told $5,0), moe ofthe comm,mer /on{ expectations," L. E. Pot- tion will be more liberal with loan* goin at $L25 to $4.75. 9re.chase of livestock to he stock sold largely" flmm $3.25 tc said $500, nothing over the latter price m,d euttc xnt ge]v at ,avi/Jon. "Now too, t nt'lel, purpose. $3.0. d #rls' clubs I The greatest benefit of the agrieul- $&',0. hulk $2.75 to and bng in their ral ere,lit act to the farmers t was $:.Z5. Balk ,,f be*t light ealers ad quality that will I said, i]l come as a lesu]t of the fl- brought $9O3, xith some to parrots hokl up their end ot naacia lief to country backs, by at $95fl. St,,,ker at,,/ feedels i e,,ahllng them to new loans instead lazgely flora 8100 to $52 - m, a glow will be the climax of being compelled to insist on ]iquida- lots today over $5.5fl. Althu trletly 1,500 boys, tion Loans' amounting to $300,000 ,in m o ,pore tom 11 of sheep and lambs were on sale M O Grangrd secretary of the i b II I I f -- ' tlon, sal, a app a ons  th a[ few feeders urr veal E to ,ing approved in Washington n in , op asy , !week aftee the' left Minneapolis, IHow T urow In Mmnesolaipliea;,ee,;sebe; 2 Of Poultry Spreads t ideally e(llpped Ior I ' There is no red tape about ,t. r County Agents of Minnesota are be- on says Phllp A. An-] --- . e divis'o f M" esot . ling called upon fquentlv nowaday , " Flu Cholera Combine to id ntf " I " o ltr s i n o inn. ! .....  y tuercu ores m p u v - well husbanded, he . ' " - aor , t  h  I Perils Swine Held$ flks, and to suggest methods of con- _ eess_n. _..an .argo I Ic t It I bl y ea . , -- tin and ela( i a ton. is in m y re o,red for ptee[', on re=oat An cp,znotm of "flu" among swine ported that more than 5 per cent of ,no w,n mrleS, tne I in rain stons of southeastern the It kep a ran'e, - ' in sen pou ry Minnesota has been eogmzed - el herds associated with hog ehol- eecsary to care era and iterl arisites eollng to na methods of con- C, H. Kekamp. assistst tlol a subjects which ought to be lambing season professor of vetelinury mlieine of mastered by ouItry keepers. the University of Minnesota, who in , and a few Fencing has been spoored the affected herds. y evtntually in being "The losses by death in herds DI W. A, Bil verj whe ovly 'flu  exist is small, but Iings of the dv]son of veterlnar: three ]ses have been heavy where hog medicine, Unlvelity of Minnesota t Wire ith two or th eholer s also plsent," Dr. Kern- glxes the following explanatlon toe. The housing kamp says. "The presence of one '. with the n need not be d walls with a that it ma Wright's that is needed, aald feult to control uatisftorily." t be 9teeed fromthel Dr. Kernkamp strongly ave the snow, rain anithe use of hog herd, pris ndicatnns nf ,~ .L,.s Mua'c]e Oore E Fuller -- empty into the intestines, the drop-of taulosis shouM be burned for p;ags which pas from the birds con-[ the eareusses may be a source of in- Crease Run of Youn Stack. tan milliona nf these minute germs. feetion te the others, n may he also Butk nl Pis $8.0. h, this way, the soil and floor of the tbut certain of nur wild birds house become laden with hniinfeeUoe from flock to flock. Undervear Wears Longer NDERWEAR, like V evirything else, must eventually wear out, but its length of life should be sufficient to give you the worth of your raomey. Wright'* Underwear is made right from the right kind of material which insures a longer life than most any other kind. For Men d Boys WRIG HY'$ The Pioneer Store Co-Operave Co. IF IT'5 6001) I YOU NEED--WffLL FURNISH IT WITH POPER 3PED I today byl or tractor is not hur by hd work. at Charles] Knocking never did anybody any wh s of Hart- ROOd, especially when the knock i in , . leh a well known the engine. ubstantlal hetion i grade. surety. Ol in the crank ease is not enough. 'ovember 1 they an It must be clean oil end uf the right th models of their tractors If you own a Ford d a lighting of Ihe Hart-Parr magneto on ynur tractor, b. ftory, is now THE TRACTOR. "20." Before the dawn at four; It dve up cows and washed the elnthes, Aud finished every hare. t went, into the field, Wan When prices on ar Just at the break of day; Iaped and threshed the golden COmpany yield, I And hauled it all away. no tonger ,In this, It plowed the field that afternoon, a0" And when the job was the, per It hummed a pleasant little tune, quoted h ant And eluded the butter, too. "3O" to And pumped the water for the stock, And gronnd a erlb *f eo, the To still its cri forint. of ;y hours away, tartPa Compnny, By many a labor blot; And yet, when fell the twight gray The tractor did not s V, Will do much For while the famvr, peaceful. eyed, Read by the Tungston's gl, AXioms, The patient tractor stood uutide, Ad ran the dynamo. --Course Pitch. we're ther that's all. For big jobs or small jobum- bet sawed to the ipro!sr Igt[ d width--lumber for every pracU] ppoe prac- tically priced. Geie bmlber Co. O0.on-dlh  -The Home Town Paper OME folks make the mistake o thinking of the S home toa newspaper as a thing, a oontrin of ink and paper. metimes not a great quantity ef either, when compared with big city papera. But the home to newpaper Ia not s thing, it  a |ev- Ice, lut the me as Is the telephone. And just  th $12 or $16 a year which we pay for the telephone serv/ee seems not too much, so is the $2 or $$, which at mint is charged for the home to paper, trifling, ompad with the real service which the paper, itself an institution, nde to all the ether iaetltutitns o$ the community. $ub*cn%e toYour Home Town PAP*" Week, November 7.12 Why not get the BEST? When buying Meats get it at the City Meat Market You are sure then of getting only choice steaks, chops, roasts, stews, etc. LUNDSTROM & GEISEL, Ortonville Proper Care of Battery in Winter Local Vesta Dealer Gives Ad- vice Regarding Methods of Storage Battery in Winter Winter storage for your Battery is a vastly different problem from merely storing your car for the winter. Your battery is an electro- chemical combination, and must have special at- tention, according to Mr. Ostlind, manager of the local Vesta Station. There are two methods of battery storage, wet and dry, states Mr. Ostlind. In wet storage the battery is left just the way it is taken out of the car. It must be kept at safe temperature, watered and charged at least once a month and otherwise kept under competent supervision. Chemical action takes place during the winter months, and the life of the battery is naturally soinewhat shortened. Dry Storage is a far better method. The separators are taken out of the battery and the plates are stored dry. An chemical action is suspended, so that the battery does not deterior- at during winter. When it is reassembled in the spring, new separators are used which makes this method slightly more expensive, but the ad- ded life given to the battery makes it cheaper in the long run. The Park Garage Ostlind & Karn, Props. C. E. SIGLOH [ ELECTRIC . SERVICE [orhoett ...... I | REPAIRING Phone 84-L @Or tonville, Mina. JOE BAYER & SON Of the Orionvllle Tailoring Co. 1duds of eloping d pssin neatly done. Suite Made In Order. Ortville, Mia ELECRIC SHOE SHOP hs repaile neatly and prornp ]y. Our Work Clated. GUS. E. ANDERSON, Pm. JOHN SPANYERS Light auliu of all Kid gxp and Bagag ['eIephone 287 Ortonvi][e, Mi PAUL DIRNBAUER Brck Layer and Plasterer Stone Man and AR Kin&, of Cemt Werl )rtonviUe, Minn. R.F. B PETESOI  SON Dray Line [ Big Stone Lake lee Or tonvllle, Mi Kdak ......... O i 0 PRINTIN ENLARGINO Pmpt, Quality Service, Moderates  Prices. l! THE REED STUDIO Or t onville Mtm* ;I DR. R. D. RIFENBARK !, OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN i Dne hleek ill f Gden' Uhr Store Or tenville, FOR TRUCK SERVICE d y kind of light draying Hausauer Bros. PHON 264 A 0000ERCHER l Attorney at Law Odd Fellows Building Ortonville, Mi J ,k DR. F. W. DUNN. CHIROPRACTOR D. D. WHITE, D. C* PH. C, S#tmrapher 12-13-14-15-18 hker BI. Ortonville, Mlnm CoL Win. Wellendorf AUCTIONEER P I in on o aerty. Cell wite roe early sad tt*t lm ea m/ early date, Ortonvlne. Mlnneots PIANO TUJq]G AND REPAIRING  PHONa.e . 194 l " art Store. All Werk Gum'lm,l WILL FINCH 1. Iperlen-.d Palntsr phone 2-h All Work Guarteed ELMER SALSBURY "1'HE WELL DICEIt  Ortsnvill  I i. D.  We will pay the prieee foe lank: Old  $6.00 t $1o.oe per ted Copper and hesYy Bram,4e toc per pored. Old Rags,  eeat per potmd. Old Rabbers real Tlru,  ceat to 1 emt per pmmd. Pipe FItffm Beum Geeds,' Beab and Hem stoek NOVEMBER 10, 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE 7 Farmers Corner ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF FARMERS AND FARMER'S CLUBS. For Show Ready Show Pavilion Remodeled; : Men Peased by Changes. stable and an en- with a new heating llew seating arrangements and waiting for the Junior Livestock Show, at South St. Paul on No- Of the Minnesota Livestock association and the Minne- Bureau federation, who the improvements dur- few days, say they are the changes. The has complied with pro- stable ,fo by show light and ventila- and partitions ar- off all the stock to the has been enlarged a new heating plant talled. Bankers Meet To Study Credit Law "No Red Tape About It," War Fi- nauce Official Tells Farm Loan Conference. The billion dolla farm credit law authorizing the United States gov- ernment's War Finance corporation to loan money for agricultural purposes! was passed "to relieve country bank- ers of the necessity of compelling far- mers to sell their products at prices which will not even pay their debts, and to permit farmers to buy young livestock." That was the explanation of the new federal credit law, Tmade by members of the War Finance corporation's northwest agricultural committee, to country bankers at a conference in Minneapolis last week, called to study methods of obtaining loans under the new law. The speakers at the conference emphasized the fact that the federal loan does not mean "easy money." It (ions not provide for additional credit to farmers except upon ade- quate security; and speakers indica- Many Pi00s Arrive At Start Of Week Snow and Colder Weather Tend To In- Crease Run of Young Stock. Bnlk of Pigs $8.50. Monday's Closing-- Cattle 13,000. Malket closing steady to strong. Best grass beeves quotable $7.00, bulk $5.00 to $6.00. Calve: I1,000. Closing steady to 50c lower, bulk best lights $9.00, some $9.50. Hogs 16,500. Market closing steady to 25c lower, bulk $6.60 to $/.09, top $7.25, bulk ;ood pigs $8.50. Sheep i4,000. Market steady to 25c lower, bulk desirable lambs $7.75 to $8.00, bulk good ewes $3.00 to $3.50. So. St. Paul, Nov. 7, 1921.--Some snow and colder weather in North Da- kota and other northwest sections tended to increase the run of pigs here at the week's opening, "5,000 being estimated for today. Bulk of desirable kinds sold at $8.50. Hogs were steady to 25e lower. Range $5.75 to $7.25, bulk $6.60 to $7.09. After a slow start, the cattle market finally worked out along fully steady to strong and feeders, and some ship- ping demand developed by news of a Steady to. strong market at Chicago. Best grass beeves are quotable from $6.00 to $7.00, and a few individuals and small lots brought such prices to- day, altho no load lot sold over $5.85, packers paying this price for a four- load string of South Dakotas, averag- ing around 1,200 pounds. Bulk of the beef steers cashed between this price company has more ted that the War Finance corpora--_..., ,. , ....... ,. ...... n-load tations " L E Pot I .............. a.a o.v,, m.e u .e cum,,u er , " " " tlOll Wlll De more liberal wlgn loans . . . . ,, .....  . - of the s *-* farm bu i ............ lOtS going a ,,.za to 4..3. tucnev ac - I EO nel'ml, the 9urcnase oi llVeSl;OCg tO . . . , , , , . .... dire   she STOCK SOlU mrgely irom o.o o ctor of the state hve-t consume the cheap feed now on farms . nn ,,l: ...... ,. ,h i., n;oo associatmn said after h 1 n for , . m the northwest than wff oa s --. , .,. ,,.. I , " Canners ad cutters went largely at ';ae a,nLpavna:on- ' ?.w i mt otaer purposes: ...... [,$2.25 to $3.00. Bologna bulls cashed -,y anu gJrt uv I lne greatest oenent oI tile agrlcUl- ] o e. L .' n  t lt 9 7 . ,art, and bring in their [ tural credit act to the farmers, it was[ ;,.,5 *utlk LOof"%et iTht''vealer"  )ers and quality that will ] said, will come as a result of the fi-I '...'i4., ,ana . -,, ",. ..... ' ........ ,, hold up their end of]nanclal rehef to country banks, by I at .9 50 Stocl-ers and feeders old enabling them to renew loans instead/ '-',"   ,,..:..,'  -k " ; , t .... .. ,. ... ,. . , . . . . la_'gelv irorfl q.no EO D,Z --no loa(l Inow Wlll De tne climax ot oelng compelleO to lns1sl on llquloa- 1.o .,1 ...... n. cK K/' AI} eriotiw s in which 1,o00 boys tion. Loans amounting to $300000 h-ic, kinds are -uotable to around been takmg partdurmg have been approved for Minnesota ean Judging begins on No- and the Dakotas by the Washington *'bout 10,000 of today's generous and there will be an aucz office of the War Finance corporation. November 18, the last day M.O. Grangaard, secretary of the Easy to In Minnesota is ideally equipped for says Philip A. An- division of Minnesota. well husbanded," he successful than large cared for nicely on most of the twin cities. The sheep are kept are more weeds, neee.csary to care for a negligible during most lambing season gen- when the farm work is Fencing has been the cost being but a very constructed of three Wire with two or three on top. The housing: need not be board walls with a s all that is needed, a, be protected from the the snow, rain ant! northwest committee of the corpora- tion, said that applications were be- ing approved in Washington within a week after they left Minneapolis. "The whole process has been sim- plified as much as possible," he said. "There is no red tape about it." Flu-Cholera Combine Perils Swine Herds An epizootic of "flu" among swine in certain sections of-southeastern Minnesota has been recognized in sev- eral herds associated with hog chol- era and iternal 13arisites, according to Dr. H. C. H. Kernkamp, assistant professor of veterinary medicine of the University of Minnesota, who in- spected the affected herds. "The losses by death in herds where only 'flu' exists is small, but losses have been heavy where hog choler is also present," Dr. Kern- kamp says. "The presence of one disease accelerates the other, with the result that it makes either disease difficult to control satisfactorily." Dr. Kernkamp strongly advises the use of hog cholera serum alone t where both diseases occur in the same be produced cheaply herd, and that virus be withheld un- feed prices and.til all indications of "flu" have sub- attractive enterprise." I sided. Jn00ss ' Musde George E.Fu]ler of more than was made today by company at Charles vaanufacturers of Hart- Which are well known er 1 they an; reduction in models of their tractors of the Hart-Parr "30," )ast year has been re- f. o. b. factory, is now cash, f. o. b. factory. "20," which was le- am $1,195 to $99 cash, 945, cash f. o. . fac- are absolutely the these Hart-Parr trac- sold. War when prices on al ' Were shooting sky-high, company held their little over a year ago aid no longer do this the price of the "30" of about 14 per price quoted has not Hart-Parr "30" to but practically one below the prewar of reduced Hart-Parr Company, Oldest tractor company and the founders of the Will do much to sta- latices. Axioms. is on the way. Wont cool your engine. A well built and well cared-for.man or tractor is not hurt by hard work. Knocking never did anybody any good, especially when the knock is in the engine. Oil in the crank case is not enough. It must be clean oil and of the right grade. If you own a Ford and a lighting plant, don't imagine yourself an elec- trical engineer and try to rebuild the magneto on your tractor. THE TRACTOR. The tractor on the farm arose Before the dawn at four; It drove up cows and washed the clothes, And finished every chore. Then forth it went, into the field, Just at the break of day; It reaped and threshed the golde yield, And hauled it all away. It plowed the field that afternoon, And when the job was thru, It hummed a pleasant little tune, And churned the butter, too. And pumped the water for the stock, And ground a crib of corn, And hauled the baby round the block, To still its cries forlorn. Thus ran the busy hours away, By many a labor blest; And yet, when fell the twilight gray The tractor did not rest. For while the farmer, peaceful- eyed, Read by the Tungston's glow, The patient tractor stood outside, And ran the dynamo. --George Fitch. run of sheep and lambs were on sale, lambs selling largely from $7.75 to $8.00, fat ewes $3.00 to $3.75. Very few feeders arrived. How Tuberculosis Of Poultry Spreads County Agents of Minnesota are be- ing called upon frequently nowadays to id'mtify tuberculosis in poultry flocks, and to suggest methods of con- trol and eradication. It is reliably re- ported that more than 25 per cent of the poultry in so,me sections is infec- ted with tuberculosis. Identification and spread of the dis- ease, symptoms, and methods of con- tiol are subjects which ought to be mastered by poultry keepers. There is no cure for tuberculosis, and a few tvbereular fowls may eventually in oculate entire flocks. Dr. W. A. Bil- lings of the division of veterinary medicine, Unive.'sity of Minnesota, gives the following explanation of Wrights Underwear Wears Longer NDERWEAR, like everything e l s e, must eventually wear out, but its length of life should be sufficient to give you the worth of your moley. Wright's Underwear is made right from the right kind of material which insures a longer life than most any other kind. For Men mad Boys WRIGHT'$ "SPRING 11" NEEDLE The Pioneer Store Co-Operative Co. hcw the disease spreads: fection and the disease is easily picked "The germ can only be seen under up by healtlw birds. It is generally the miscrocope. Since the liver, spleen believed that poultry do not become vrM "ntestinzs are the organs cam- infected from cattle or hogs, but this manly affected and as the organs is not definitely known. Birds dead empty into the intestines, the drop- of tuoerculosis should be burned for plngs which pass from the birds con-Ithe carcusses may be a source of in- tain millions of these minute germs, fection to the others. It may be also h, this way, the soil and floor of the that certain of our wild birds carry chicken house become laden with in- infection from flock to flock. .... I I Not a Th,:00 But a Serwce -The Home Town Paper OME folks make the mistake of thinking of the home town newspaper as a thing, a contrivance of ink and paper, sometimes not a great quantity of either, when compared with big city papers. But the home town newspaper is not a thing, it is a serv- ice, just the same as is the telephone. And just as the $12 or $15 a year which we pay for the telephone service seems not too much, so is the $2 or $3, which at most is charged for the home town paper, trifling, compared with the real service which the paper, itself an institution, retiders to all the other institutions of the community. Subscribe to Your Home Town Paper Week, November 7-12 Why not get the BEST? When buying Meats get it at the City Meat Market You are sure then of getting only choice steaks, chops, roasts, stews, etc. LUNDSTROM & GEISEL, 0rtonville Proper Care of Battery in Winter Local Vesta Dealer Gives Ad- vice Regarding Methods of Storage Battery in Winter Winter storage for your Battery is a vastly different problem from merely storing your car for the winter. Your battery is an electro- chemical combination, and must have special at- tention:  according to Mr. Ostlind, manager of the local Vesta Station. There aretwo methods of battery storage, wet and dry, states Mr. Ostlind. In wet storage the battery is left just the way it is taken out of the car. It must be kept at safe temperature, watered and charged at least once a month and otherwise kept under competent supervision. Chemical action takes place during the winter months, and the life of the battery is naturally somewhat shortened. Dry Storage is a far better method. The i Professional and Business Directory C. E. SIGLOH [0[ WIRINGSERVIcEELECTRIC REPAIRING Phone 284-L Qrtonville, Minn. JOE BAYER & SON Of the Ortonville Tailoring Co. All kinds of cleaning and pressing neatly done. Suits Made to Order. Ortonville, Minn. ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP Shoes repaired neatly and prompt- ly. Our Work Guaranteed. GUS. E. ANDERSON, Prop. JOHN SPANYERS Light Hauling of all Kinds Express and Baggage Telephone 287 Ortonville, Minn. PAUL DIRNBAUER Brick Layer and Plasterer Stone Mason and AI Kinds of Cement Work. Ortonville, Minn. R.F.D. PETEISON & SON i' Dray Line Big Stone Lake Ice I Phone 38 Ortonville, Minn Kodak DEVELOPING PRINTING ENLARGING . Prompt, Quality Service, Moderate Prices. THE REED STUDIO Ortonville Minn. DR. R. D. RIFENBARK OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN One block ujhill frora Gunderson's "rug Store Vapor-Sulphur Cabinet Treatments (For rhenmatism, neuritis, etc.) F. L. BROWN THE JEWELER Ortonville, Minnesota FOR TRUCK SERVICE and any kind of light and heavy draying Hausauer Bros. PHONE 268 All Orders Given Prompt Attention A. B. KAERCHER Attorney at Law Odd Fellows Building Ortenville, Minn. DR. F. W. DUNN. CHIROPRACTOR D. D. WHITE, D. C, PH. C Sptnographer 12-13-14-15-16 Shumaker Bldg. Ortonville, Minn. Col. Win. Wellendorf T AUCTIONEER  30 years' experienek, No praetie- [ ing on your property: Call or[ write me early and get in on tin' early date, Ortonville, Minnesota J. A. JOHNSON PIANO TUNING AND REPAIRING PHONES---Residence - 194 Furniture Store - {18 All Work Guaranteed Ortanville, Mlmqta. WILL FINCH Experienced Painter Phone 285-L All Work Guaranteed ELMER SALSBURY 'qIE WELL DIGGER" Fifteen Years' Experi Ortonville, Minn. R.F.D. t Itl separators are taken out of the battery and the .... _. .. . WHEN it comes to delivero plates are stored dry. All chemical action is  ing the goods on tim, |[| suspended, so that the battery does not deterior- we're there, that's all. For Ill ate during winter. When it is reassembled in ri f,rJu: | big jobs or small jobs---lure- Ill the spring, new separators are used which makes Old Iron, $.00 to $10.00 per tea [ Copper d heavy BraM,4e to 8 her sawed to the proper I11 this method slightly more expensive, but the ad- _.r_ ,d:  levgtt and width--lumber for I/I deal life given to the battery makes it cheaper in Old Rags,  etmt per pound. I' every practical purpose prac- |]| the long run. Old Rubbers and Tire,  am(  - tically priced. to 1 cent per pound.  Belting and Hue carried la IS:" Geie00 b.00mber Co. The ark Garage Osthnd & Karn, Props. The Ortonvll Foun I[ Ortonville Minn. /11