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Ortonville, Minnesota
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November 17, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
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November 17, 1921
 

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THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1921 NUMBER 28 VE WITNESS CROSS PLAY of Interest In Cross Roll Call Seen of Efforts Made pants. Pageant, "The Red Cross of given to capacity houses afternoon and evening of performances being es- showing there prepara- part of the persons in the ;houghtful work by those in the players were all very to the parts assigned to their work was highly ap- by the audience, as evi- the intense interest with pageant was received. of the work was to pic- the public, the spirit of the and its activities from the organization, down to the f . . including its peacetxme vork in community disas- of the Red Cross were pictured in the first action, Cross workers collected on around a wounded soldier, on a stretcher, his wounds by the doctors and Red This touching scene was followed by the singing great Recessional Hymn, Forget." work of this organiza- s shown in part two, divided in the first showing how the administers to health needs Public health nursing service; pictured the Red Cross ac- behalf of the ex-service family; the third showed work in community dis- the fourth action showed Red Cross working for the World Over." impossible to mention to Whom credit is due for the of the pageant. All of the Parts, Humanity, by Mrs. D. the Red Cross of War, The Red Cross Vivian Martlnson; Col- Garvey; Florence Night- Marguerite Gallagly of Barton, Mrs. Ed. Mrs. J. Karn; Albert Orton, were interpretation. Mention made of the song "Moth- so well sung by Leonard the singing by the mixed of P. J. Boekoven, Miss Mary Shuma- ss Edna Shumaker, the singers adding so much and impressiveness of that the actions would so effective without interest in the annual roll Big Stone County Red Without question, be stimu- put forth by those in the production of this iart from Clinton owe, Mrs. H. M. W. L. Ross, Mrs. A D. Josie Olson, Mrs. Alton Johnson, Irta Fin- Larson and Donald and They were superin- M. Betty. SEEKS FARM RELIEF Convention Studies Wayt/ Individual Farmer lnfluenee Nov. 17.--How to give the on the most distant a real vdice and in- in agricultural and was the problem studied rePresentatives who met L the ninth annual state ex- farm bureau conference. the township unit--the Stone of the farm bureau make it a real factor every rural community," answer to the in the state was invi- Peck, director of agri- at University farm, at the confer- and home demon- the and sec- farm bureaus and were especially addition to staying meth- farm conditions by carried out by the themselves, the production and feeding, land improvement, boys' and and the busines farm and the home. from various coun- on the program as lead- included many tings. greatness, be- China's Delegates to Arms Conference Thru Here Suen Han Leigh, Conseiller due Cab- inet, of Pekin and Chow Tsuchi, of Tientsin, China, president of the larg- est banking establishment of that em- pire, passed thru Ortonville Sunday afternoon on the Ol:mpian, enroute to Washington to attend the Disar- mament Conference as representa- tives of China. Mr. Tsuchi for twelve years, from 1896 to 1908, was Chief Councellor of China, with headquarters in New York City. His daughter is attending school at Wash- ington, D. C., and his wife has been visiting her there for the past two months. The Chinese dignataries were ac- cotnpanied from Ortonvtlle to Minne- apolis by John W. Hausauer of this cit, special agent of the C. M. & St. P. Ry. Co., where he was relieved by another company detective, ' special at- tention having been provided for them from the moment they landed at the American Steamship LineDock at Se- a'ttle until they will reach their desti- nation. Mr: Hausauer, who also accompan- ied the Japanese representatives, 45 men and 2 Japanese women, in the special train thru here a few weeks ago, says that both of the gentlemen from China spoke fluent English. That Mr. Tsuhi was especially talkative and stated that he was only 53 years old. Marked Duck Shot. Duck No. 50, one of the 500 birds marked by the anitoba Trading Company to discover the migratory course-taken by ducks, was killed at Albany, Wis.,, recently. The tag was sent to officials of the company with information as to where the duck was killed. This is one of the first of the tagged ducks that has been reported. Monte Duck Hunters Arraigned In Court T. J. Thompson and Hjalmer Wick, both of Montevideo, were arrested on Sunday, November 6th, by Game War- den Briggs, charged with shooting ducks twenty-four minutes after sun- down. The hunters were apprehen- ded by Mr. Briggs at Watson's slough in Artichoke and upon being brot be- fore Judge MacMurphey, demanded a jury trial. Their attorney Mr. Trple came up from Montevideo, and took charge of the case for the defense. Trial was held Monday evening in Judge MacMurphey's Court and the outcome of the case was a disagree- ment of the jury. The case will come up for a re-hearing in the near future, and will also be taken into Federal Couit. The jury of eight, stood six for conviction and two for acquittal. Game Warden Briggs also arrested another party from Montevideo on the Lac qui Parle bridge for fishing with more than one pole. This party plead guilt in the Montevideo Justice Court and paid a fine of $10.00 and costs. FREE SHIPMENT FOR GIFT GRAIN ASSURED Minnesota Farm Bureau Relief Coam Saving Hundreds of Lives ha South Russia. Free transportation is guaranteed for every bllshel of grain given by Big Stone county farmers to save the lives of children now starving in southern Russia. The Near East Retief, which is ap pealing to farmers of this county for 2,532 bushels of grain for the famine sufferers, sent. this announcement to the county farm bureau this week. "All the food made from the far- mer's gift grain is being hauled fram the mills to the seaports free f charge by the railroads," the letter says. In addition to this service, equal to tens of thousands of dollars, many rail- roads have offered to haul the corn and wheat, without one cent pay, from the county elevators to the mills. Even where free transportation has not been arranged, friends of the Near East famine victims have guaranteed to pay the freight. This means that every bushel of wheat or corn given by farmers in your county, or its full equivalent in col*n old, wheat products, will reach the starving women ann children. "Fa,d milled from the corn donated by Minnesota farmers thru the farm bureau last spring has already saved hundreds Of lives. It iq being eaten today by villagers in Transcaucasia and Armenia who would have died if it had not arrived." / American Legion To Give Oyster Feed and Smoker Invitations have been sent out to all ex-service men of the county by the Ortonville post to an oyster supper and smoker, to be given at the Legion Club Rooms on Tuesday evening, No- vember 22, at eight o'clock. All ex- service ,men are invited, whether American Legion members or not. Entertainment for guests will be pro- vided, and it is not to cost them a cent. Read the ads---it will pay you. " PUBLIC SCHOOLS RECEIVE LARGE APPROPRIATION State Auditor Distributes Largest Amount of Spe- cial School Aid Ever Ap- propriated by Legislature. R. P. Chase, state auditor, thi.s week distributed $3,387,129.75, the largest amount of special public school aid ever appropriated by a Minnesota leg- islature. The distribution is in ac- cordance with Chapter 473 of the laws enacted by the last legislature. The money is in aid of the various public schools and is distributed on certification of the state board of edu- cation under provision of Chapter 467, Laws 1921. Every county in the state is participating, 242 schools and spe- cial departments receiving $1,344,566 while 269 graded schools receive $440-- 301, consolidated school districts $756,294, and rural schools $855,968.- 75. Big Stone county's share of this money is $28,392.00 and the apportion- ent among our several public school units is: High Schools $9,227.00, Con- solidated Schools $3,795.00, Semi- graded Schools $600.00, Class "B" Schools $693.00, Graded Schools $9,- 313.00, Class "A" Rural Schools $4,- 764.00. Another Carload of Catffe For Big Stone County County Agent M. P. Roske, left Monday night for Wisconsin, in com- pany with several farmers from near Graceville, to purchase another car- load of dairy cattle. This is the sec- ond carload to be shipped into the county during the past month, and it would appear that the farmers here are at last waking up to the fact that dairying is the most profitable phase of farmin DAIRY AGENCY PICKS FIRST OF FIELD ME Service Agent Chosen By United Creameries As Step Toward Statewide Marketing. Co-operative creameries which have joined the Minnesota Co-operative Creameries association, Inc., backed by the Minnesota Farm Bureau fed- eration, were informed this week that District No. 2 has picked the first field service agent to be appointed in carry- ing out plans to unite all co-operative creameries into a statewide service and marketing organization. David C. Berg, operator of the Grove City Co-operative creamery in VIeeker county, has been selected by the directors of cooperative cream- eries in Chisago, Pine, Isanti, Kana- bec and Mille Lacs counties as field man for the creameries in their dis- trict. District No. 1, including creameries of Meeker, Wright and Kandiyohl Child Welfare Committee Seeks Clothing fdr Needy The nearness of Thanksgiving Day brings thoughts of the many things we are thankful for; for the blessings we have and the Christmas so near to us. In this year of stress and hardship, should we not think of those in our midst who are in need, thru unem-! ploynent, and otherwise, and especial- ly the little children who are not warmly clothed ? The Child Welfare Committee of theVoman's Relief Corps are asking thathe citizens of Ortonville give any articles they have in clothing, i which can be used in its present con- i dition, or made over, to be distributed by them to needy people who this year are unable to provide adequate cov- ering for their children. Shoes, stock- ins, underwear, cloaks, sweaters, mittens, dresses and suits for the lit- tle folkfrom 7 to 12 years of age especially. Articles so donated, may be left at Corps rooms in the base- ment of the courthouse. Do not give this a mere passing thought. Go thru your closets at once and see that OrtonviJle "kiddies" are dressed warm this winter. "Inasmuch as ye have done it un- to one of the least of these, ye have done it unto Me." Prior School Children Give To Dowling Fund Children of Farm Club members of Sunnyside, School-District No. 62, near Foster, gave a basket social last Friday evening, for the benefit of the Dowling Memorial Fund. An enjoy- able time was had and the neat sum of $13.50 raised for the fund. Golden Prairie, District No. 20, and Stephney District No. 16, will also take the matter up with the view of raisinK money for the Memorial. Erfl'est Douglas, son of A. J. Doug- las, came out from St. Paul, and gave splendid talks on the subject at all three schools. Mr. A. J. Douglas is committeman for the Dowling Me- morial Fund in that district. SUPPORT HOME TOWN PAPER, SAYS BUREAU Country Press Dese'---es Co-operation Of Farmers, Says State Federation. The Minnesota Farm Bureau Fed- eration observed aHome Town Paper Week" last week by urging county farm bureaus and their 1200 township units thruout the state to co-operate with the newspapers in their communi- ties. "It is only fair to say that the kind of support given to the farm bureau ,movement by the county newspapers of Minnesota merits real support for I the 'home town paper' by" the far- mers," the Farm Bureau News Ser- vice says in a letter received by the County farm bureau. "Farm news is printed because it's news, and of interest to readers. It doesn't mean charity. But it does mean that the home papers, in almost every case, are giving their frmer readers accurate news of the big far- counties, has been functioning for sev- mers' organization in Minnero'ate eral months in standardizing products, farm bureau federation with 73,0b0 carlot shipping and wholesale pur- members. chasing. Mr. Berg, however, is the "If.  means, too, that thru this sup- first field service men to be appointed since the formal organization of the state association. Several other dis- tricts are to begin work within a few weeks. H. A. Fredrickson Moves Tire Shop to Ortonvilie H. A. Fredrickson, who has been operating a tire vulcanizing shop at Clinton, i$ moving his equipment to Ortonville, and will open a vulcaniz- ing and retreading shop in the build- ing recently vacatedJby the Ol, tonville Star. Mr. Fredriekson has equipment with which he can do a ull retread ing job on any tire. Rooms have been procured by him for his family, over the Bottling eom- puny building. Sho'w GORearoke; Palm Buys Live Leoard -\\; A beautiful Leopard kitten is the latest addition to ill Palm's mena- gerie this ffiek. ]Bill received a tele- phone call from a liy in Big Stone City last vek whQ said that her hus- band had discontinged his show busi- ness,and had setj her a number ot the animals left. Realitg the value of keeping up an interesting show port the home town papers are mak- ing it easier for the farm bureau to do work of real benefit to agriculture and therefore to the state as a whole." / School Lad Has Narrow v/ Escape From Drowning Anton Beck, eleven year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Nels Beck narrowly es- caped death from drowning Monday afternoon at about 4:30 p. m. Young Beck along with some other lads had entured far out towards the middle of the lake . On stopping to adjust his skates which had become loose, the ice gave way and he went down twice before he was rescued by two boys from Big Stone who were skat- ing near him. Farm Bureau Annual Meeting At Clinton Dec.l The Big Stone County Farm Bu- reau will hold its annual meeting at Clinton on Thursday; December 1, starting at 10:00 o'clock in the mor- ning. The  annual report of County Agent Roske will he given, and plans for 1922 fully discussed. Mr. Roske urges that everyone attend this meet- ing, which will le of vital importance to the farmers of Big Stone county. window, Mr. Palm bought the "t" and is trying to make himself well Entertain Past Worthy Matrons. enough, acquainted with Thomas to The Past Worthy Matrons of Lau.,rel re-tie a" ribbon around its neck, that Crown Chapter of the oroe.r, o;me h,rm ,,til ahn.tlv t" h re- Eastern tar were entertaine y mrs. i,  q,h .... to ,,,,t ..... r J" Arthur Matthews, Monday af ?'J" ;" :".:.".," .... "." " #. noon at "500" The Past Matrons, in- ore, ano spits like me regular parlor I rl,;,, tho "ht,/o m M,tm, vaety of tom, cat. - _ . . Ien B Sa'rvis"Hayen-F'reneh,""Jo-hn o one as yet has onered to netPl Crippen, R: B. Hudson, A. B. Kaer- Bill tie the ribbon o. | thor. Philip Miller, M. J. Whiting, El- The Leopard will be on display in[ la Newell, and Solon Salls of Orten- the Palm Jewelry window soon | ville and Mesdames Frank Finberg ". ....... " | and Frank Watkins of Clinton. Mrs. Martin oen and Alfred 0stlind| Irtie Matthews Lybarger of Fayette- drove to Minneapolis Tuesday morn-[ ville, Ark., was guest of honor. The ing. Mr. Otld will go to Chicago] Clinton ladies won the two prizes of- in the former  ear-from there on a / fered. A two course luncheon was business trip ....  ,. t i::: : .... 'served. BE NEIGHBORLY URGES MAYOR- ELECT BAILEY Requests A-pirit of True Friendship and Co-opera- tion In His Speech At the Orpheum Theatre. Pledging himself to see that the )resent city ordinances will be strict- ly obeyed by all, and urging the towns- people of Ortonville to forget any past differences, feelings of dislike, or even hatred between one another Mayor-Elect James A. Bailey, Mon- day night gave a very interesting talk to a packed house at the Orpheum theatre, his subject being, "The Re- construction of Ortonville." Speaking on that topic, Mr. Bailey explained by the reconstruction of Or- tonville, he did not mean that the, change should be in a physical way, but that the citizens themselves, should reconstruct themselves in a so- cial way, and develop a spirit of true l friendshi p nd co-operation for the common weal. Mr. Bailey's talk came as a surprise to many, as the nature of his criti- cisims and recommendations were ex- pected by some to  with reference to the financial condition of the city, and record of the present council. No adverse reference owever was made to matters of this kind, the gist of his speech being that all past feelings of bitterness between the citizens of the city be laid aside, and all eiaergy bent upon making friends again of neigh- bors and townspeople who had been formerly counted as such. The sincerity of Mr. Bailey in the suggestions ,made for the betterment of the social condition of the city wa plainly apparent thruout his speech, and his arguments and words of advice were well received by his listeners as shown by the intense interest display- ed, the audience showing that they were wholeheartedly in harmony with the ideas and thoughts expressed by him. The entire audience was deeply im- pressel when the climax to the speech came, with the playing of "America" and the entrance upon-the stage of four young OrtonvilIe ladies, repre- sentating four different nationalities, each leading by the hand a little child, to show the spirit of friendship and trust that should prevail among all families in owr midst, and appropri- ate appeals by the speaker for such a spirit among all the citizens of Or- tonville from this time' on, in order that such little children would not be- come imbued with the idea of personal jealousy, distrust, hatred and mean feeling that has been rampant in the city among certain elements. The outstanding feature of Mr. Bai- ley's speech was his homely, sincerity of purpose and largeness of heart up- on the question so feelingly discussed by him, and the spirit of friendliness with which his talk was received. HIGHWAY SAFETY IS CONTEST TOPIC Local School Teachers and Pupils to Try for Valuable National and State Prizes. ' Ortonville girls and boys and their teachers may win in cash prizes, free trips to Washington, and gold and sil- ver loving cups and medals in new contests announced by the Highway and Highway Transport Educational Hunters Return With Deer Apiece; No S____kunk In Ig ] The deerslayers special returned to [ Ortonville today at 3:00 o'clock p. m., ! carrying Wayne Kelly, Dr. D. M. O'- Donnell, Ed. Zehringer, Jamie %mith, !John Crippen, Otto Harris, and Pilot Emil Ostlind, with the baggage com- partment completely filled with slain deer, seven of them in all, each mem- ber of the party having shot his one- seventh share of the entire bag. Rumors were heard the fore part of the week to the" effect that Dr. O'o Donnel 1 had killed a squirrel and a skunk, but however true this may have been, he is credited with having shot one of the two antlered buck that were brought back, Wayne Kelly being the other lucky hunter. Clin- ton Crippen, a member of the party, also shot a deer. The trip to the hunting grounds in the Rexo speed wagon was made on schedul time, but the heavy snow, made the return a very slow and difl cult matter. A thrilling incident was related by the boys on their return with refer- ence to a hunter from another camp who became lost ln the woods. A party of other hunters were camped nearby, and one night about nine o'clock, heard a shot. Tldnking R queer that anyone would shoot at that tiptoe of night, one of the party gave a call, and was answered by a man i the woods, who continued to use his voice until located. He proved to be a hunter who had become sepirated from his companions and could not find his way back to camp. He had been roaming around from early that morning, completely lost, and suffer- ing badly from exposure and want of food. When fgand he was almost crazed .-;ith fear. He did not even have a match to light a fire and had used all of his shells but one, in an effort to signal for help. Chairman for Red Cross Roll Call Are Named John E. Palmer, treasurer of the Big Stone County Red Cross, announces that the following have been appoint- ed local county chairmen, to have charge of the Red Cross Drive in their respective districts: Cities and villages--Beardsley, Su- perintendent of city schools; Barry, F. L. Collins; Graceville, Mr. Byhro; Johnson, C. N. Evans; Clinton, Alvin Gongoll; Ortonviile, H. N. Tragethon; Odessa, H. H. Reindl; Correll, A. H. Granger. Townships---Big Stone town- ship, J. W. Hipple; Otrey, Miriam Hanson; Artichoke, Rev. Jurgenson Akron, J. W. Frizzell; Odessa, Ed. Gerber; Ortonville, A. F. Seaton; Moonshine, Jack Luchsinger; Graco- ville, Ed. Utley; Malta, Frank Mor- rill; Almond, Emil Swenson; East Prior, Ckarles Callberg; West Prier, Ben Stegner, Jr.; Browns Valley, E. A. Smith; Toqua, Miss Toner, Cornelisen Boys Bag Nice Bunch Of Mallards Here Sunday morning, Chester and "CON ton" Cornelisen, hied themselves to the bottoms at the foot of the lake, with the view of picking up, a stray duck or two. It happened that with the strong cold wind blowing, and the lake practically closed, large numbers of belated mallards were striking for the open water in the river at the spo where they had sta- tioned themselves. The ducks com- ing down the lake, swung around so nicely that the boys shot their limit of 15 birds each all within an hour's time, All were mallards. committee, Washington. Charles M. Babcock, state commis- sioner of highways, indorsed the plan to promote safety on public highways, and the school features have been ap- proved by J. M. McConnell, Minneso-t ta commissioner of education. All girls and boys under 14 years in Minnesotasehool may try for the grand national awards and eleven are sure to shat  the state prizes for the best essay of about 500 words on "How I Can Make the Highways More Safe." The three national prizes are: 1--A gold watch and a trip to Washington with all expenses pd; 2---a gold lov- ing cup; 3---a sliver loving cup. In addition there are eleven Minnesota prizes; la gold medal and $15 in cash; 2a silver medal and $10 in cash; 3nine awards, bronze medals arm $5 cash with each. Shool teachers submitting the three best mdel lessons teaching children safe behavior on the highways will receive the following prizes: 1 500 in cash and a trip to ashington with all expenses paid; --$800 in Cash; 3--$200 in cash. Circulars giving the rules for each contest and other details are being mailed to all local school superinten- dents and they and the principals will give full particulars, the committee announces. Inquiries about the con- test should be addresSed to the High: way Transport Educational committee, Wiilard building, Washington, D. C Essays should ie in the hands of school principals by December 10 and announcement of the winners is to be sent to state gnd local superintendents of education and to this newspaper. GRAIN GROWERS GET UNANIMOUS BACKING I County Farm Bureau Resolutions I Pledge Support to Farmer.Cmt. trolled Marketing  Agency. County farm bureaus in Minnesota are giving unanimous endomenent to the U. S. Grain Growers, Inc., where- ever the national co-operative market- ing plan is presented to them, accord- ing to reports from state farm bureau headquarters. "The U. S. Gain Growers, Inc., is purely democratic, each member hav- ing the right and opportunity to take an equal share in determining the pol- ies of the organization," the Palk and Otter Tail County Farm Bureau Ass'n. declared in resolutions passed without a dissenting vote. "We here- by endorse the plan of the U. S. Grain (}rowers and urgethat all farmers in the county join the Grain Growers, as soon_as organization work begins in this territory, to the end that the grain producers of this county may play their rightful part in determining the future policies of the national mar- keting agency." The Polk county resolution was signed by Carl Berg, bureau presi- dent and O. K. Berget, secretary; and the Ottertail county resolution by A. R. Knutson, president and J. G. Nor- by, secretary. The Lyon county farm bureau, thru tts*4mg commit- tee, also has ne on cord in sup- port of the U. S. Grain Growers. The Grain Growers:opened north- west headquarters this week at 504 Commerce bilding, St. Pd. THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1921 NUMBER 28 VE WITNESS CROSS PLAY of Interest In Cross Roll Call Seen of Efforts Made pants. Pageant, "The Red Cross of given to capacity houses afternoon and evening of performances being es- showing there prepara- part of the persons in the ;houghtful work by those in the players were all very to the parts assigned to their work was highly ap- by the audience, as evi- the intense interest with pageant was received. of the work was to pic- the public, the spirit of the and its activities from the organization, down to the f . . including its peacetxme vork in community disas- of the Red Cross were pictured in the first action, Cross workers collected on around a wounded soldier, on a stretcher, his wounds by the doctors and Red This touching scene was followed by the singing great Recessional Hymn, Forget." work of this organiza- s shown in part two, divided in the first showing how the administers to health needs Public health nursing service; pictured the Red Cross ac- behalf of the ex-service family; the third showed work in community dis- the fourth action showed Red Cross working for the World Over." impossible to mention to Whom credit is due for the of the pageant. All of the Parts, Humanity, by Mrs. D. the Red Cross of War, The Red Cross Vivian Martlnson; Col- Garvey; Florence Night- Marguerite Gallagly of Barton, Mrs. Ed. Mrs. J. Karn; Albert Orton, were interpretation. Mention made of the song "Moth- so well sung by Leonard the singing by the mixed of P. J. Boekoven, Miss Mary Shuma- ss Edna Shumaker, the singers adding so much and impressiveness of that the actions would so effective without interest in the annual roll Big Stone County Red Without question, be stimu- put forth by those in the production of this iart from Clinton owe, Mrs. H. M. W. L. Ross, Mrs. A D. Josie Olson, Mrs. Alton Johnson, Irta Fin- Larson and Donald and They were superin- M. Betty. SEEKS FARM RELIEF Convention Studies Wayt/ Individual Farmer lnfluenee Nov. 17.--How to give the on the most distant a real vdice and in- in agricultural and was the problem studied rePresentatives who met L the ninth annual state ex- farm bureau conference. the township unit--the Stone of the farm bureau make it a real factor every rural community," answer to the in the state was invi- Peck, director of agri- at University farm, at the confer- and home demon- the and sec- farm bureaus and were especially addition to staying meth- farm conditions by carried out by the themselves, the production and feeding, land improvement, boys' and and the busines farm and the home. from various coun- on the program as lead- included many tings. greatness, be- China's Delegates to Arms Conference Thru Here Suen Han Leigh, Conseiller due Cab- inet, of Pekin and Chow Tsuchi, of Tientsin, China, president of the larg- est banking establishment of that em- pire, passed thru Ortonville Sunday afternoon on the Ol:mpian, enroute to Washington to attend the Disar- mament Conference as representa- tives of China. Mr. Tsuchi for twelve years, from 1896 to 1908, was Chief Councellor of China, with headquarters in New York City. His daughter is attending school at Wash- ington, D. C., and his wife has been visiting her there for the past two months. The Chinese dignataries were ac- cotnpanied from Ortonvtlle to Minne- apolis by John W. Hausauer of this cit, special agent of the C. M. & St. P. Ry. Co., where he was relieved by another company detective, ' special at- tention having been provided for them from the moment they landed at the American Steamship LineDock at Se- a'ttle until they will reach their desti- nation. Mr: Hausauer, who also accompan- ied the Japanese representatives, 45 men and 2 Japanese women, in the special train thru here a few weeks ago, says that both of the gentlemen from China spoke fluent English. That Mr. Tsuhi was especially talkative and stated that he was only 53 years old. Marked Duck Shot. Duck No. 50, one of the 500 birds marked by the anitoba Trading Company to discover the migratory course-taken by ducks, was killed at Albany, Wis.,, recently. The tag was sent to officials of the company with information as to where the duck was killed. This is one of the first of the tagged ducks that has been reported. Monte Duck Hunters Arraigned In Court T. J. Thompson and Hjalmer Wick, both of Montevideo, were arrested on Sunday, November 6th, by Game War- den Briggs, charged with shooting ducks twenty-four minutes after sun- down. The hunters were apprehen- ded by Mr. Briggs at Watson's slough in Artichoke and upon being brot be- fore Judge MacMurphey, demanded a jury trial. Their attorney Mr. Trple came up from Montevideo, and took charge of the case for the defense. Trial was held Monday evening in Judge MacMurphey's Court and the outcome of the case was a disagree- ment of the jury. The case will come up for a re-hearing in the near future, and will also be taken into Federal Couit. The jury of eight, stood six for conviction and two for acquittal. Game Warden Briggs also arrested another party from Montevideo on the Lac qui Parle bridge for fishing with more than one pole. This party plead guilt in the Montevideo Justice Court and paid a fine of $10.00 and costs. FREE SHIPMENT FOR GIFT GRAIN ASSURED Minnesota Farm Bureau Relief Coam Saving Hundreds of Lives ha South Russia. Free transportation is guaranteed for every bllshel of grain given by Big Stone county farmers to save the lives of children now starving in southern Russia. The Near East Retief, which is ap pealing to farmers of this county for 2,532 bushels of grain for the famine sufferers, sent. this announcement to the county farm bureau this week. "All the food made from the far- mer's gift grain is being hauled fram the mills to the seaports free f charge by the railroads," the letter says. In addition to this service, equal to tens of thousands of dollars, many rail- roads have offered to haul the corn and wheat, without one cent pay, from the county elevators to the mills. Even where free transportation has not been arranged, friends of the Near East famine victims have guaranteed to pay the freight. This means that every bushel of wheat or corn given by farmers in your county, or its full equivalent in col*n old, wheat products, will reach the starving women ann children. "Fa,d milled from the corn donated by Minnesota farmers thru the farm bureau last spring has already saved hundreds Of lives. It iq being eaten today by villagers in Transcaucasia and Armenia who would have died if it had not arrived." / American Legion To Give Oyster Feed and Smoker Invitations have been sent out to all ex-service men of the county by the Ortonville post to an oyster supper and smoker, to be given at the Legion Club Rooms on Tuesday evening, No- vember 22, at eight o'clock. All ex- service ,men are invited, whether American Legion members or not. Entertainment for guests will be pro- vided, and it is not to cost them a cent. Read the ads---it will pay you. " PUBLIC SCHOOLS RECEIVE LARGE APPROPRIATION State Auditor Distributes Largest Amount of Spe- cial School Aid Ever Ap- propriated by Legislature. R. P. Chase, state auditor, thi.s week distributed $3,387,129.75, the largest amount of special public school aid ever appropriated by a Minnesota leg- islature. The distribution is in ac- cordance with Chapter 473 of the laws enacted by the last legislature. The money is in aid of the various public schools and is distributed on certification of the state board of edu- cation under provision of Chapter 467, Laws 1921. Every county in the state is participating, 242 schools and spe- cial departments receiving $1,344,566 while 269 graded schools receive $440-- 301, consolidated school districts $756,294, and rural schools $855,968.- 75. Big Stone county's share of this money is $28,392.00 and the apportion- ent among our several public school units is: High Schools $9,227.00, Con- solidated Schools $3,795.00, Semi- graded Schools $600.00, Class "B" Schools $693.00, Graded Schools $9,- 313.00, Class "A" Rural Schools $4,- 764.00. Another Carload of Catffe For Big Stone County County Agent M. P. Roske, left Monday night for Wisconsin, in com- pany with several farmers from near Graceville, to purchase another car- load of dairy cattle. This is the sec- ond carload to be shipped into the county during the past month, and it would appear that the farmers here are at last waking up to the fact that dairying is the most profitable phase of farmin DAIRY AGENCY PICKS FIRST OF FIELD ME Service Agent Chosen By United Creameries As Step Toward Statewide Marketing. Co-operative creameries which have joined the Minnesota Co-operative Creameries association, Inc., backed by the Minnesota Farm Bureau fed- eration, were informed this week that District No. 2 has picked the first field service agent to be appointed in carry- ing out plans to unite all co-operative creameries into a statewide service and marketing organization. David C. Berg, operator of the Grove City Co-operative creamery in VIeeker county, has been selected by the directors of cooperative cream- eries in Chisago, Pine, Isanti, Kana- bec and Mille Lacs counties as field man for the creameries in their dis- trict. District No. 1, including creameries of Meeker, Wright and Kandiyohl Child Welfare Committee Seeks Clothing fdr Needy The nearness of Thanksgiving Day brings thoughts of the many things we are thankful for; for the blessings we have and the Christmas so near to us. In this year of stress and hardship, should we not think of those in our midst who are in need, thru unem-! ploynent, and otherwise, and especial- ly the little children who are not warmly clothed ? The Child Welfare Committee of theVoman's Relief Corps are asking thathe citizens of Ortonville give any articles they have in clothing, i which can be used in its present con- i dition, or made over, to be distributed by them to needy people who this year are unable to provide adequate cov- ering for their children. Shoes, stock- ins, underwear, cloaks, sweaters, mittens, dresses and suits for the lit- tle folkfrom 7 to 12 years of age especially. Articles so donated, may be left at Corps rooms in the base- ment of the courthouse. Do not give this a mere passing thought. Go thru your closets at once and see that OrtonviJle "kiddies" are dressed warm this winter. "Inasmuch as ye have done it un- to one of the least of these, ye have done it unto Me." Prior School Children Give To Dowling Fund Children of Farm Club members of Sunnyside, School-District No. 62, near Foster, gave a basket social last Friday evening, for the benefit of the Dowling Memorial Fund. An enjoy- able time was had and the neat sum of $13.50 raised for the fund. Golden Prairie, District No. 20, and Stephney District No. 16, will also take the matter up with the view of raisinK money for the Memorial. Erfl'est Douglas, son of A. J. Doug- las, came out from St. Paul, and gave splendid talks on the subject at all three schools. Mr. A. J. Douglas is committeman for the Dowling Me- morial Fund in that district. SUPPORT HOME TOWN PAPER, SAYS BUREAU Country Press Dese'---es Co-operation Of Farmers, Says State Federation. The Minnesota Farm Bureau Fed- eration observed aHome Town Paper Week" last week by urging county farm bureaus and their 1200 township units thruout the state to co-operate with the newspapers in their communi- ties. "It is only fair to say that the kind of support given to the farm bureau ,movement by the county newspapers of Minnesota merits real support for I the 'home town paper' by" the far- mers," the Farm Bureau News Ser- vice says in a letter received by the County farm bureau. "Farm news is printed because it's news, and of interest to readers. It doesn't mean charity. But it does mean that the home papers, in almost every case, are giving their frmer readers accurate news of the big far- counties, has been functioning for sev- mers' organization in Minnero'ate eral months in standardizing products, farm bureau federation with 73,0b0 carlot shipping and wholesale pur- members. chasing. Mr. Berg, however, is the "If.  means, too, that thru this sup- first field service men to be appointed since the formal organization of the state association. Several other dis- tricts are to begin work within a few weeks. H. A. Fredrickson Moves Tire Shop to Ortonvilie H. A. Fredrickson, who has been operating a tire vulcanizing shop at Clinton, i$ moving his equipment to Ortonville, and will open a vulcaniz- ing and retreading shop in the build- ing recently vacatedJby the Ol, tonville Star. Mr. Fredriekson has equipment with which he can do a ull retread ing job on any tire. Rooms have been procured by him for his family, over the Bottling eom- puny building. Sho'w GORearoke; Palm Buys Live Leoard -\\; A beautiful Leopard kitten is the latest addition to ill Palm's mena- gerie this ffiek. ]Bill received a tele- phone call from a liy in Big Stone City last vek whQ said that her hus- band had discontinged his show busi- ness,and had setj her a number ot the animals left. Realitg the value of keeping up an interesting show port the home town papers are mak- ing it easier for the farm bureau to do work of real benefit to agriculture and therefore to the state as a whole." / School Lad Has Narrow v/ Escape From Drowning Anton Beck, eleven year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Nels Beck narrowly es- caped death from drowning Monday afternoon at about 4:30 p. m. Young Beck along with some other lads had entured far out towards the middle of the lake . On stopping to adjust his skates which had become loose, the ice gave way and he went down twice before he was rescued by two boys from Big Stone who were skat- ing near him. Farm Bureau Annual Meeting At Clinton Dec.l The Big Stone County Farm Bu- reau will hold its annual meeting at Clinton on Thursday; December 1, starting at 10:00 o'clock in the mor- ning. The  annual report of County Agent Roske will he given, and plans for 1922 fully discussed. Mr. Roske urges that everyone attend this meet- ing, which will le of vital importance to the farmers of Big Stone county. window, Mr. Palm bought the "t" and is trying to make himself well Entertain Past Worthy Matrons. enough, acquainted with Thomas to The Past Worthy Matrons of Lau.,rel re-tie a" ribbon around its neck, that Crown Chapter of the oroe.r, o;me h,rm ,,til ahn.tlv t" h re- Eastern tar were entertaine y mrs. i,  q,h .... to ,,,,t ..... r J" Arthur Matthews, Monday af ?'J" ;" :".:.".," .... "." " #. noon at "500" The Past Matrons, in- ore, ano spits like me regular parlor I rl,;,, tho "ht,/o m M,tm, vaety of tom, cat. - _ . . Ien B Sa'rvis"Hayen-F'reneh,""Jo-hn o one as yet has onered to netPl Crippen, R: B. Hudson, A. B. Kaer- Bill tie the ribbon o. | thor. Philip Miller, M. J. Whiting, El- The Leopard will be on display in[ la Newell, and Solon Salls of Orten- the Palm Jewelry window soon | ville and Mesdames Frank Finberg ". ....... " | and Frank Watkins of Clinton. Mrs. Martin oen and Alfred 0stlind| Irtie Matthews Lybarger of Fayette- drove to Minneapolis Tuesday morn-[ ville, Ark., was guest of honor. The ing. Mr. Otld will go to Chicago] Clinton ladies won the two prizes of- in the former  ear-from there on a / fered. A two course luncheon was business trip ....  ,. t i::: : .... 'served. BE NEIGHBORLY URGES MAYOR- ELECT BAILEY Requests A-pirit of True Friendship and Co-opera- tion In His Speech At the Orpheum Theatre. Pledging himself to see that the )resent city ordinances will be strict- ly obeyed by all, and urging the towns- people of Ortonville to forget any past differences, feelings of dislike, or even hatred between one another Mayor-Elect James A. Bailey, Mon- day night gave a very interesting talk to a packed house at the Orpheum theatre, his subject being, "The Re- construction of Ortonville." Speaking on that topic, Mr. Bailey explained by the reconstruction of Or- tonville, he did not mean that the, change should be in a physical way, but that the citizens themselves, should reconstruct themselves in a so- cial way, and develop a spirit of true l friendshi p nd co-operation for the common weal. Mr. Bailey's talk came as a surprise to many, as the nature of his criti- cisims and recommendations were ex- pected by some to  with reference to the financial condition of the city, and record of the present council. No adverse reference owever was made to matters of this kind, the gist of his speech being that all past feelings of bitterness between the citizens of the city be laid aside, and all eiaergy bent upon making friends again of neigh- bors and townspeople who had been formerly counted as such. The sincerity of Mr. Bailey in the suggestions ,made for the betterment of the social condition of the city wa plainly apparent thruout his speech, and his arguments and words of advice were well received by his listeners as shown by the intense interest display- ed, the audience showing that they were wholeheartedly in harmony with the ideas and thoughts expressed by him. The entire audience was deeply im- pressel when the climax to the speech came, with the playing of "America" and the entrance upon-the stage of four young OrtonvilIe ladies, repre- sentating four different nationalities, each leading by the hand a little child, to show the spirit of friendship and trust that should prevail among all families in owr midst, and appropri- ate appeals by the speaker for such a spirit among all the citizens of Or- tonville from this time' on, in order that such little children would not be- come imbued with the idea of personal jealousy, distrust, hatred and mean feeling that has been rampant in the city among certain elements. The outstanding feature of Mr. Bai- ley's speech was his homely, sincerity of purpose and largeness of heart up- on the question so feelingly discussed by him, and the spirit of friendliness with which his talk was received. HIGHWAY SAFETY IS CONTEST TOPIC Local School Teachers and Pupils to Try for Valuable National and State Prizes. ' Ortonville girls and boys and their teachers may win in cash prizes, free trips to Washington, and gold and sil- ver loving cups and medals in new contests announced by the Highway and Highway Transport Educational Hunters Return With Deer Apiece; No S____kunk In Ig ] The deerslayers special returned to [ Ortonville today at 3:00 o'clock p. m., ! carrying Wayne Kelly, Dr. D. M. O'- Donnell, Ed. Zehringer, Jamie %mith, !John Crippen, Otto Harris, and Pilot Emil Ostlind, with the baggage com- partment completely filled with slain deer, seven of them in all, each mem- ber of the party having shot his one- seventh share of the entire bag. Rumors were heard the fore part of the week to the" effect that Dr. O'o Donnel 1 had killed a squirrel and a skunk, but however true this may have been, he is credited with having shot one of the two antlered buck that were brought back, Wayne Kelly being the other lucky hunter. Clin- ton Crippen, a member of the party, also shot a deer. The trip to the hunting grounds in the Rexo speed wagon was made on schedul time, but the heavy snow, made the return a very slow and difl cult matter. A thrilling incident was related by the boys on their return with refer- ence to a hunter from another camp who became lost ln the woods. A party of other hunters were camped nearby, and one night about nine o'clock, heard a shot. Tldnking R queer that anyone would shoot at that tiptoe of night, one of the party gave a call, and was answered by a man i the woods, who continued to use his voice until located. He proved to be a hunter who had become sepirated from his companions and could not find his way back to camp. He had been roaming around from early that morning, completely lost, and suffer- ing badly from exposure and want of food. When fgand he was almost crazed .-;ith fear. He did not even have a match to light a fire and had used all of his shells but one, in an effort to signal for help. Chairman for Red Cross Roll Call Are Named John E. Palmer, treasurer of the Big Stone County Red Cross, announces that the following have been appoint- ed local county chairmen, to have charge of the Red Cross Drive in their respective districts: Cities and villages--Beardsley, Su- perintendent of city schools; Barry, F. L. Collins; Graceville, Mr. Byhro; Johnson, C. N. Evans; Clinton, Alvin Gongoll; Ortonviile, H. N. Tragethon; Odessa, H. H. Reindl; Correll, A. H. Granger. Townships---Big Stone town- ship, J. W. Hipple; Otrey, Miriam Hanson; Artichoke, Rev. Jurgenson Akron, J. W. Frizzell; Odessa, Ed. Gerber; Ortonville, A. F. Seaton; Moonshine, Jack Luchsinger; Graco- ville, Ed. Utley; Malta, Frank Mor- rill; Almond, Emil Swenson; East Prior, Ckarles Callberg; West Prier, Ben Stegner, Jr.; Browns Valley, E. A. Smith; Toqua, Miss Toner, Cornelisen Boys Bag Nice Bunch Of Mallards Here Sunday morning, Chester and "CON ton" Cornelisen, hied themselves to the bottoms at the foot of the lake, with the view of picking up, a stray duck or two. It happened that with the strong cold wind blowing, and the lake practically closed, large numbers of belated mallards were striking for the open water in the river at the spo where they had sta- tioned themselves. The ducks com- ing down the lake, swung around so nicely that the boys shot their limit of 15 birds each all within an hour's time, All were mallards. committee, Washington. Charles M. Babcock, state commis- sioner of highways, indorsed the plan to promote safety on public highways, and the school features have been ap- proved by J. M. McConnell, Minneso-t ta commissioner of education. All girls and boys under 14 years in Minnesotasehool may try for the grand national awards and eleven are sure to shat  the state prizes for the best essay of about 500 words on "How I Can Make the Highways More Safe." The three national prizes are: 1--A gold watch and a trip to Washington with all expenses pd; 2---a gold lov- ing cup; 3---a sliver loving cup. In addition there are eleven Minnesota prizes; la gold medal and $15 in cash; 2a silver medal and $10 in cash; 3nine awards, bronze medals arm $5 cash with each. Shool teachers submitting the three best mdel lessons teaching children safe behavior on the highways will receive the following prizes: 1 500 in cash and a trip to ashington with all expenses paid; --$800 in Cash; 3--$200 in cash. Circulars giving the rules for each contest and other details are being mailed to all local school superinten- dents and they and the principals will give full particulars, the committee announces. Inquiries about the con- test should be addresSed to the High: way Transport Educational committee, Wiilard building, Washington, D. C Essays should ie in the hands of school principals by December 10 and announcement of the winners is to be sent to state gnd local superintendents of education and to this newspaper. GRAIN GROWERS GET UNANIMOUS BACKING I County Farm Bureau Resolutions I Pledge Support to Farmer.Cmt. trolled Marketing  Agency. County farm bureaus in Minnesota are giving unanimous endomenent to the U. S. Grain Growers, Inc., where- ever the national co-operative market- ing plan is presented to them, accord- ing to reports from state farm bureau headquarters. "The U. S. Gain Growers, Inc., is purely democratic, each member hav- ing the right and opportunity to take an equal share in determining the pol- ies of the organization," the Palk and Otter Tail County Farm Bureau Ass'n. declared in resolutions passed without a dissenting vote. "We here- by endorse the plan of the U. S. Grain (}rowers and urgethat all farmers in the county join the Grain Growers, as soon_as organization work begins in this territory, to the end that the grain producers of this county may play their rightful part in determining the future policies of the national mar- keting agency." The Polk county resolution was signed by Carl Berg, bureau presi- dent and O. K. Berget, secretary; and the Ottertail county resolution by A. R. Knutson, president and J. G. Nor- by, secretary. The Lyon county farm bureau, thru tts*4mg commit- tee, also has ne on cord in sup- port of the U. S. Grain Growers. The Grain Growers:opened north- west headquarters this week at 504 Commerce bilding, St. Pd. b THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 17, 1921 NUMBER 28 China's Delegates to Arms Conference Thru Here -- i Suen Han Leigh, Conseiller due Cab- Enet, of Pekin aad Chow Tsuehi, of CROSS PLAYI .............. est baking establishment of that era- of Interest In Roll Call Sen "The Red Cross given to eapad ig el part of the pemons In th y fito in players work w highly up- by the audience,  i- the inten intense with pie- pcetim in counlty the fit ttan, Cross workers collected on around a wounded soldier, h on a stitcher, his wounds by the pire, paed fternoon on the Couferen  repseta- tires of Chiua. Mr. Tsuchi foe yea, from 1896 to 1908 was Chief headquarters in New York Cty. Hi daughter is attending school at Wash- iugt, D. C., visiting her the for the past The Chinese digaatartes fnparded from Ortonvlle to Minne- by Haauer P. Ry. Co., im the moment they landed at the America Stelsdp LineDoek at S Katie until the nat on. Mr: Haauer, who ai aerompkn- 2 thr here a few weeks gentlest from China spoke fluent English. That Mr. Tshi was peially and stated that he was only 58 yea Marked Duck Shot. Duck No 5O. erie marked by the by the siging Company to discover the Forget" of rganiza- g how the a aminieter s to heath need t pictud behalf of the ! work n emun y ds- i h fourth aetlon showed Red the pageant. All )y bits. D ; Col- '. Gamey; lon Night. Barton, M. Ed Ly, Mrs. J. Kay; Albert Often, wer interpretattem g "Moth. , il sung by Edna Shmaker, the m singers adding  muc ty and impssivene o , that the actions wou| sQ eetive tho r ducks, Albany, Wis.,, recently. The tag w officials of the company with tagged ducks that has been reported, Monte Duck Hunters Arraigned In Court T. J. Thompson d HjsJmer Wick, Suudayt Novemb 6th, by Game War- den Briggs, charged ducks twenty-four minutes hnntera were apphen- deal by Mr. Brlggs at War son's slough bt b- fo Judg MMurphoy, demanded a jury trial Their attorney Mr. Ten.pie me up  Montevideo. mad to charge of the ot for the defense Trial w held Monday evening in Sudge MacMurphey's Court d the outcome of the case w a disagree- meat of the jury, The  vdtl me up f a re-he.ring in the  future, d will also be tak into Federad Cout. The jury of eight. :for conviction and two for equittaL Game Warden Briggs also mother party lterest in the annual roll Big Stone Cnty t efforts put forth by those They re superi- re htdivldua I Faer Nov. 17.--HOW to give the a ttl vdlee and in- t was the phlem t udled who ttev of the n meke it a real ftor every to ty fn the stxe wa in'l- of aSd. eonditlo b) y tM themselves, ld PUBLIC SCHOOLS RECEIVE LARGE APPROPRIATION State Auditor Distributes Largest Amount of Spe- cial School Aid Ever Ap- propriated by Legislature. R. P. Cha, state auditor, this week disCrlhuted $3,387,129.75, the lgesl ouut of spial ever appropriated by a Mlnnett leg. iatu The enacted by the last legilature The money is in aid of the various public cation under proision o Chapter 467 is participating, ial department while 269 graded schools rive $440-. 301, conlidated $756,294, 75Big Stone county's share of thi t L $28,392.00 and the apportion. units is: High Schools $9,227.00,'Con. soidated Schools $3,79E00, Semi. graded 8chris $00., Cls "B' Schoots $693,OO, Graded Schls $9,. 1.00, Class "A" Rural School $4,- Another Carload of Catt(e For Big Stone County County Agent M. P. Reke, lef Monday nig} Grville, to purchase another r- load of dairy ttle. This is end carload t b shipped into the county dining the pt month, and it appear that the dairying i the moat pfltable pha of faming DAIRYAGENCY PICI FIRST OF FIELD MEN Agent Chosen By United Cees AS Step Toward ta. Mark*tg. .operative cmees wblch have joined the Minsota Co-operative Crees soclatlon, Le, backed by the MEanesota F Bureau fed- emtlon, were informed this week that Dishict No. 2 ha* picked the flt flel agent lobe appointed in carry- ing out plans to uaie all co-opetw" star,wide and marklug organization. L qui Parle bqdge f flsdng vt David C. Brg, opetor of the mo th one pole. Clty Co-operatl emery lr gil in the Monte-deo Justice Mocker eoanty, has been elted by Court and paid a fine nf $10. he directors of eooperave m- t " cries in Ciao, Pine, Isanti, Kana. Mille Lass unties as field L  in their FREE HIPMENt FOR trict, ee GIFT GRAIN ASSUREE District Nm I, including cre -- af Mker, Wright and Kandiyok F Bau Relief Corn ounties. h been functioning for v. Sawing HUndreds of Liv ral months in standardizing products In South Russia carlnt shipping and -- chasing Mr. Berg, however, Fe transportation is grteed ppointed for eery hpahel o gtn given by Big Stone unty fers to  the lives of childn now starving in utber Ri  eeks. The Nr E*: Relief, which is ap pealing to farmers of this county for H. A. Fredriekson Sov 2'532 bushels of grmn for the famine Tire Shop to Ortonvine suffe, nt this nouneement to the nnty fa bu this week. "All the food made from the f- H.A. Fredriekn, who operating a tire [niing shop at meres gift grain is being hasted frown Clinton, i moving his equlpmeut *o Ortonville, 4 wilt open aliz- by the hdlads," the letter ins and tadlng shop in e build- ing eentiy vacatoeby the Ogeuville of t  tuipmeat roads have offered to and vheat. lug jeh on y t. the mtty elevatom to the Roorn ht been procured by him Even who free transportation has not been arranged, friends of the Nr for his family, aranteed pty bmldlug. to pay the fighL o hoat or o #yen Show G0ee ]lyoke; Palm by faners in your uty, ot it full elly8 J Live LdDaed equivalent In eo e* whe prodts, wl] reach the sng womn \\; betutitul LeoM ia th* children, te t addition tq ill Palm's mena- "Fo mllll from the orn donated grie t.hiek. ll resolved a te- b: Minnesota faers th phone *:all fm a Iky in Big Stone buru i irpring City ]get wbek wh* hundreds 05 II It i bng eate today by vIMge in Tuseaueaais ness,4 had ,dd have died fl ImllM the vaI of keeping lap  iff4rzn OW window, Mr. palm bought the 'fl AmeT"ican Legion To Give  i. trying Oyster Feed and Smokel nouttaeqtnted with Toma rte a bon aund its Invitations haveteutto beee tled shortly  he ex-serviee men of the unty by the Thom is vout peat to aU oyster supper old, d pit like the regular parlor and smoker, to be given at the Legion variety of to cab y over'rig, No- No one as yet has offered to help vember 22, at eight o'loek. All ex* Bill tie the ribbon on. are Ifivlted, whether The Leopard win be on dlsplay Legion the Palm Jewelry wizIow oon. . Martin 8sheen vided, and it la not to cost them a to Mirm Its Tuesday rn- Ing. Mr will o to Chlttlf "  tnthofath a Read th Mf--it Will dty y. - bunea 9 ta - 6  :X Child Welfare Committee Seeks Clothing fdr Needy The nearness of Thaksgivlng Day bringiz thoughts o f the my things we a thankful for; for the we have and to us. In this year of stress and ha.ehip, of those in our midst who a in need, th ployrqent, and othei, d especial- ly the ilttie sildmn who a, no1 wally clothed? The Child Welfa Citte oJ dzens of mdes they have in clothing ts pnt eon- itlon, or made over y them to needy people who this yeal are unable to provide adequate coy- ' ering for their childm Shoes, stk- trigs, de, loaks, eate rMttens, dres d suits for the li folk f 7 to 12 yea of age be left at Cor the urtho. De not gi this thought. Go thru 3 "Inasmuch  ye ha done it an- least of these, ye Bays Prior School Children GiveTo Dowling Fund Children Snyeide, School "DiStrict No. 62, near Foster, gave a bket social last Friday evening, for the benefit of the Dowling Memorial Fund. An enjoy- of $13,0 raised fOR' the fund. Golden Prairie, District No, 20, and Stephney Distrlct No. 16, raisinloK money for the Memorial. Ert Dougi, son of A. J. Doug- las, came out fm St. Paul, and gave saiendld talks on the sub3t at all th hls. Mr. A. J. Douglas is for the Dowllng Me- in that district. SUPPORT HOME TOWN PAPER, SAYS BUREAU Country Pr Dervm C-opati of Fers. Says State Federation. The Minsota Forts Buau Fed- eration chocked dHome To Paper by urging county f bure and their 1200 townthJp units thout the state to -epemts with the newspape in their mnznl- tl 'It is only fair to any that the ]dud of Support given to te f ,movent by the ounty spapers paper" mere," the Fa vies says in a letter received by the oty fvm bureau. "F ws is printed use it's news, and of Laterest to aders. It mean eharlty, But it doe pper, in almosl very ee,  giving their fel g fa men' organization in MJeeota-- e fedetion with 75, "If means, t, that th this sup. pen the home to papers are mak. rleultu School Lad Has Narrow Escap Anion Beck, eleven year old Mr. and M. Nels ped death from drowging Mday afternoon at about 4:30 p. m. Youug Beck along entured far out towd of the lake. On stopping to his skates whleh had become I, the 1 gave way nd he wen d twi befo he was msd t boys fm Big Stone who  skat- ing near him. Farm Bureau Annual Meeting At Clinton Dec31 The Big Stone testy Fm Bu- reau will hold its annual reciting at on Thursday; December 1, starting at lo:0o e'ele*k in he mor- ning. The' annual port of County Agent ]ake will he givvn. 1 gi for 1922 fully diseuam Mr. Reeks urges that eryo attend  meet. e of vital imporan to the armer$ of Big Stone eotmty. Itertth Put Worthy Matea L Arthur Mattl : the hostess, wen Mesdames of vile and Medames Frank nberg and Frank Walk'us of Glinton. M. true Mattws Lybarger of Fayette- villa, Ark. was geat ef honor. The Clinton lles wen the tw6 priea of- ferv A two eourN lunthm wu BE NEIGHBORLY URGES MAYOR- ELECT BAILEY Requests Apirit of Trm Friendship and Co-opera, tion In His Speech At tht Orpheum Theatre. pledging himself to see prwent city ordinvacea will ly obeyed by vii. and argiug the towns. pple of Ortonvl/e to forget past diffens, f]ings of dislike ev hatred betecn one other: Myor-Eleet Jes A Bailey, Mon- day rdght gave a very intesting talk to a Imked hoe at the Orphe theatre, Ms subt being, "The speaking on explained by ton-Alle, he did not me that the chge should be in a physll way, but that the dtlns themselv shod nstrot themlv in a so- cial way, and develop a spirit of t friendship d co-opera'on for mmon weal. Mr. Ralley to many.  the natu of eisim and r co: peered by some wlvee ferenee ower w made to matters of this k]ud, the gist of hi speech being that all past flings of city be ]aid ide, and all ehergy bent apou making friends agn of neigh who had formerly ountl as such. sinrlty of Mr. Bailey in of the social condltiou of the city w. plainly apparent thruout his speech, and his arguments and words of advi shown by the intense intost d]splay- ed the audience showing that they were wholeheartedly in haoy with and thoughts expssed by him. The.entire audience was deply lm- pssed when the climax to fhe speech came, with the playing of "America" an4 the catrmce upon-the stage of fotzr yozmg Ortonvlffe ladies. p tativg fur different nationalities, ea lding by the hand a little eld, to show the spit of fe:ship d tr that should prevail among all families in o midst, and appropri- ate apIals by the speaker for such a pirit among l the eiti of Or- tonvi[le from this tim4  on. in order me imhned with the idea of pensl ]ealoy, distt, hatred d mean feling that  been pant In the dry among ertaln eleent by him, d the s with which his talk was ied. HIGHWAy SAFETY IS Local Schl Teaehe and Pupils tc Try for Valuable National and State Prizes. Ortonville girls and boys taehe may win in cash prs, f trips to Washington, and gold and sil- ver loving cups and medals in new by the Highway and Highway Trgnspor committee, Washington. Charles . Babcock, sion of highways, indorsed the plan to pmte afet pve by J, M. All girls and boys under 14 yea I1 y try for the grind natietafl award* dmmq the tate prz eu I  Make ho Highways ]do Safe_" lp to Whington vit all ttpeautes pd;  gold ey- ing p; 3-t diver loving cup. In thei are eleven Minnesota prltes; 1 gold medal and $16 in h;  ilr medal and $10 in wash; *-ni awards, bn medals md $5  with troth. Sehl tnehe ht modai le*sons ill receive the following pd: 1-- 60 in cash ad a trip to [eahleahlng-b with all expends paid; ]--00 it :ash; 8--$200 in . - Cila iving the 1 for ea contest au ether deti are bin school supernten dents and they and the principals will give fun patriciate, te mmittee noune Inquires test should'be aded to Wahingt on, D. Essa in the hands school prireipals hy Dtember o edoatlcn e.d to thin nespper, Hunters Return With Deer Apiece; No Skunk In Bag The drslayers special tued to OrtonviI[e today at 3:00 o'clk p. , carrying Wayne Kel]y Dr. D. M. O' Donnell, F Zehringer, Jamie Sdth, John Crippen, Otto Harris, and Filet Emil Otiind, with the baggage evm- partment completely filled with elafn r, seven of them in all, eh m- her of the party having shot his one- entire bag. Rmors were eard the fore pvxt of Deceit had killed a squirrel and a skank, but however true this ha been, he ia erUted with having of the two atlered bud being the other lucky hunter, clin- ton Crlppen. a member of the party, The trip to the hthag gunis in the Po speed wagon was rnae on sehodmte trots, but the heavy new, A thrilling incident w lated by the boys on their tum th taler- who became Itdn the woods. A party of oer hters were mpd nearby, av one night at ntn o'dk, heard a shot *rhnk]ng it qur thatanyonewouldshoot at tme of night, one of the party gave a e-all, d w swed by a ma iz the wds, who ntinued to us* hi* voJ until Ioated. He proved to be a huuter who had bome prated fm his companions mad culd not find h s way hack to mp. Heha been rming and fm rly that morning, completely lt, and suffer* ins badly from exposu and want of food. When fnd he was almost crazed with fear. He did not even to light a fire and had usl all of his shells but one, in signal for help. Chairman for Red Cross Boll Call Are Named John E. Pmer, treasurer of the Big Stone County Red Cm, annour that the following have been appoint- ed ll county chaldea, to have che of the Red Cross Drive in their CRies and VillgeBrdsey, SW perlnteadent of ty schoo]s; Barryt F, L. ColliM; GviHe, Mr. Byh; Joh, C. N. Eves; clinton, Alvin Odessa. H. H. Reidl; Corral, A. H. Gnger. Towahlp--Big Stone town. ship, J. W. Hippie; Otrey. Mirlm Hson; Artlehoke, Roy. $urgnm Akron, J. W. Frisl]; Ods Gerber; Ortonville, A. F. Sutoa; Mnshine, Jack Luchsiger; G vise, FL Uthw; Mtt, Frnk ]Ko- nlh Almond, Emil Snn; Eat Prior, C'brles Clbrg; West prr. en Stegner, Jr; Bwns Valley, Ek A. Smith; Toqu Mi Toner. Cornelisen Boys Bag Nice BUnch Of Mallards Here Stmday morning, Chester and "Cot- ton" Celieen, hie themelwes to the bttome at the ft of the ]ke, picking np a stay It pped that with the etng cold wivd blowing, and the ]ve practically closed, large numbers of belated mallards we striking for the opeR water in the ver at the open wem they had sta- inned themseis. The ducks m- Ing dow the lake, 8wng arced hilly that the boys shot their limit of 15 ]irds each al ithin  hour's All we mallards* GRAIN GROWERS GET UNANIMOUS BACKING County Farm Btteeam Remlttte pledge S# t@ Fmer.Con* trolled Marketing' A gaey. Cty f bureaus i NLtm-ot giving almoua endearment to the U. S. Grain Ce, In where- ever the national pemti market- ins p is presented to the, aord- ing to rorts from stto fltrm bareatt hadqarte . "The U. S. Grain Gwe, Ine, i puly democratic,  member hav- ig te lght and opportunity to take qg the psi- ides of the organhmtion," the Paik dlad in rho ped without a dissenting vot. "We here- by endorse the p] of the U. S. Greta (]owe aml mlat all farm in the eoty joL U Grain Growers, a on as gsaian work  in this terrltory, to tw rl t]mt the grai.n preducer of tkis eonty my play lr rightful part in dtrmlntho future po]ei of the nateuld mar- keting agency." The Polk comfy reoluti wu gned by Carl Berg. bureau pres- dt and O. K. Be mmttry; md the Creole.all unt utlon by A. . Kauta, aldat, aad J. G, N by, retary. The Lve eounT farm human, thra Itmmltg commit- tee. also bx gem t ter in p- port  the U.  @wer , The Grain Grewmd net-- st h  week at THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1921 NUMBER 28 VE WITNESS CROSS PLAY of Interest In Cross Roll Call Seen of Efforts Made pants. Pageant, "The Red Cross of given to capacity houses afternoon and evening of performances being es- showing there prepara- part of the persons in the ;houghtful work by those in the players were all very to the parts assigned to their work was highly ap- by the audience, as evi- the intense interest with pageant was received. of the work was to pic- the public, the spirit of the and its activities from the organization, down to the f . . including its peacetxme vork in community disas- of the Red Cross were pictured in the first action, Cross workers collected on around a wounded soldier, on a stretcher, his wounds by the doctors and Red This touching scene was followed by the singing great Recessional Hymn, Forget." work of this organiza- s shown in part two, divided in the first showing how the administers to health needs Public health nursing service; pictured the Red Cross ac- behalf of the ex-service family; the third showed work in community dis- the fourth action showed Red Cross working for the World Over." impossible to mention to Whom credit is due for the of the pageant. All of the Parts, Humanity, by Mrs. D. the Red Cross of War, The Red Cross Vivian Martlnson; Col- Garvey; Florence Night- Marguerite Gallagly of Barton, Mrs. Ed. Mrs. J. Karn; Albert Orton, were interpretation. Mention made of the song "Moth- so well sung by Leonard the singing by the mixed of P. J. Boekoven, Miss Mary Shuma- ss Edna Shumaker, the singers adding so much and impressiveness of that the actions would so effective without interest in the annual roll Big Stone County Red Without question, be stimu- put forth by those in the production of this iart from Clinton owe, Mrs. H. M. W. L. Ross, Mrs. A D. Josie Olson, Mrs. Alton Johnson, Irta Fin- Larson and Donald and They were superin- M. Betty. SEEKS FARM RELIEF Convention Studies Wayt/ Individual Farmer lnfluenee Nov. 17.--How to give the on the most distant a real vdice and in- in agricultural and was the problem studied rePresentatives who met L the ninth annual state ex- farm bureau conference. the township unit--the Stone of the farm bureau make it a real factor every rural community," answer to the in the state was invi- Peck, director of agri- at University farm, at the confer- and home demon- the and sec- farm bureaus and were especially addition to staying meth- farm conditions by carried out by the themselves, the production and feeding, land improvement, boys' and and the busines farm and the home. from various coun- on the program as lead- included many tings. greatness, be- China's Delegates to Arms Conference Thru Here Suen Han Leigh, Conseiller due Cab- inet, of Pekin and Chow Tsuchi, of Tientsin, China, president of the larg- est banking establishment of that em- pire, passed thru Ortonville Sunday afternoon on the Ol:mpian, enroute to Washington to attend the Disar- mament Conference as representa- tives of China. Mr. Tsuchi for twelve years, from 1896 to 1908, was Chief Councellor of China, with headquarters in New York City. His daughter is attending school at Wash- ington, D. C., and his wife has been visiting her there for the past two months. The Chinese dignataries were ac- cotnpanied from Ortonvtlle to Minne- apolis by John W. Hausauer of this cit, special agent of the C. M. & St. P. Ry. Co., where he was relieved by another company detective, ' special at- tention having been provided for them from the moment they landed at the American Steamship LineDock at Se- a'ttle until they will reach their desti- nation. Mr: Hausauer, who also accompan- ied the Japanese representatives, 45 men and 2 Japanese women, in the special train thru here a few weeks ago, says that both of the gentlemen from China spoke fluent English. That Mr. Tsuhi was especially talkative and stated that he was only 53 years old. Marked Duck Shot. Duck No. 50, one of the 500 birds marked by the anitoba Trading Company to discover the migratory course-taken by ducks, was killed at Albany, Wis.,, recently. The tag was sent to officials of the company with information as to where the duck was killed. This is one of the first of the tagged ducks that has been reported. Monte Duck Hunters Arraigned In Court T. J. Thompson and Hjalmer Wick, both of Montevideo, were arrested on Sunday, November 6th, by Game War- den Briggs, charged with shooting ducks twenty-four minutes after sun- down. The hunters were apprehen- ded by Mr. Briggs at Watson's slough in Artichoke and upon being brot be- fore Judge MacMurphey, demanded a jury trial. Their attorney Mr. Trple came up from Montevideo, and took charge of the case for the defense. Trial was held Monday evening in Judge MacMurphey's Court and the outcome of the case was a disagree- ment of the jury. The case will come up for a re-hearing in the near future, and will also be taken into Federal Couit. The jury of eight, stood six for conviction and two for acquittal. Game Warden Briggs also arrested another party from Montevideo on the Lac qui Parle bridge for fishing with more than one pole. This party plead guilt in the Montevideo Justice Court and paid a fine of $10.00 and costs. FREE SHIPMENT FOR GIFT GRAIN ASSURED Minnesota Farm Bureau Relief Coam Saving Hundreds of Lives ha South Russia. Free transportation is guaranteed for every bllshel of grain given by Big Stone county farmers to save the lives of children now starving in southern Russia. The Near East Retief, which is ap pealing to farmers of this county for 2,532 bushels of grain for the famine sufferers, sent. this announcement to the county farm bureau this week. "All the food made from the far- mer's gift grain is being hauled fram the mills to the seaports free f charge by the railroads," the letter says. In addition to this service, equal to tens of thousands of dollars, many rail- roads have offered to haul the corn and wheat, without one cent pay, from the county elevators to the mills. Even where free transportation has not been arranged, friends of the Near East famine victims have guaranteed to pay the freight. This means that every bushel of wheat or corn given by farmers in your county, or its full equivalent in col*n old, wheat products, will reach the starving women ann children. "Fa,d milled from the corn donated by Minnesota farmers thru the farm bureau last spring has already saved hundreds Of lives. It iq being eaten today by villagers in Transcaucasia and Armenia who would have died if it had not arrived." / American Legion To Give Oyster Feed and Smoker Invitations have been sent out to all ex-service men of the county by the Ortonville post to an oyster supper and smoker, to be given at the Legion Club Rooms on Tuesday evening, No- vember 22, at eight o'clock. All ex- service ,men are invited, whether American Legion members or not. Entertainment for guests will be pro- vided, and it is not to cost them a cent. Read the ads---it will pay you. " PUBLIC SCHOOLS RECEIVE LARGE APPROPRIATION State Auditor Distributes Largest Amount of Spe- cial School Aid Ever Ap- propriated by Legislature. R. P. Chase, state auditor, thi.s week distributed $3,387,129.75, the largest amount of special public school aid ever appropriated by a Minnesota leg- islature. The distribution is in ac- cordance with Chapter 473 of the laws enacted by the last legislature. The money is in aid of the various public schools and is distributed on certification of the state board of edu- cation under provision of Chapter 467, Laws 1921. Every county in the state is participating, 242 schools and spe- cial departments receiving $1,344,566 while 269 graded schools receive $440-- 301, consolidated school districts $756,294, and rural schools $855,968.- 75. Big Stone county's share of this money is $28,392.00 and the apportion- ent among our several public school units is: High Schools $9,227.00, Con- solidated Schools $3,795.00, Semi- graded Schools $600.00, Class "B" Schools $693.00, Graded Schools $9,- 313.00, Class "A" Rural Schools $4,- 764.00. Another Carload of Catffe For Big Stone County County Agent M. P. Roske, left Monday night for Wisconsin, in com- pany with several farmers from near Graceville, to purchase another car- load of dairy cattle. This is the sec- ond carload to be shipped into the county during the past month, and it would appear that the farmers here are at last waking up to the fact that dairying is the most profitable phase of farmin DAIRY AGENCY PICKS FIRST OF FIELD ME Service Agent Chosen By United Creameries As Step Toward Statewide Marketing. Co-operative creameries which have joined the Minnesota Co-operative Creameries association, Inc., backed by the Minnesota Farm Bureau fed- eration, were informed this week that District No. 2 has picked the first field service agent to be appointed in carry- ing out plans to unite all co-operative creameries into a statewide service and marketing organization. David C. Berg, operator of the Grove City Co-operative creamery in VIeeker county, has been selected by the directors of cooperative cream- eries in Chisago, Pine, Isanti, Kana- bec and Mille Lacs counties as field man for the creameries in their dis- trict. District No. 1, including creameries of Meeker, Wright and Kandiyohl Child Welfare Committee Seeks Clothing fdr Needy The nearness of Thanksgiving Day brings thoughts of the many things we are thankful for; for the blessings we have and the Christmas so near to us. In this year of stress and hardship, should we not think of those in our midst who are in need, thru unem-! ploynent, and otherwise, and especial- ly the little children who are not warmly clothed ? The Child Welfare Committee of theVoman's Relief Corps are asking thathe citizens of Ortonville give any articles they have in clothing, i which can be used in its present con- i dition, or made over, to be distributed by them to needy people who this year are unable to provide adequate cov- ering for their children. Shoes, stock- ins, underwear, cloaks, sweaters, mittens, dresses and suits for the lit- tle folkfrom 7 to 12 years of age especially. Articles so donated, may be left at Corps rooms in the base- ment of the courthouse. Do not give this a mere passing thought. Go thru your closets at once and see that OrtonviJle "kiddies" are dressed warm this winter. "Inasmuch as ye have done it un- to one of the least of these, ye have done it unto Me." Prior School Children Give To Dowling Fund Children of Farm Club members of Sunnyside, School-District No. 62, near Foster, gave a basket social last Friday evening, for the benefit of the Dowling Memorial Fund. An enjoy- able time was had and the neat sum of $13.50 raised for the fund. Golden Prairie, District No. 20, and Stephney District No. 16, will also take the matter up with the view of raisinK money for the Memorial. Erfl'est Douglas, son of A. J. Doug- las, came out from St. Paul, and gave splendid talks on the subject at all three schools. Mr. A. J. Douglas is committeman for the Dowling Me- morial Fund in that district. SUPPORT HOME TOWN PAPER, SAYS BUREAU Country Press Dese'---es Co-operation Of Farmers, Says State Federation. The Minnesota Farm Bureau Fed- eration observed aHome Town Paper Week" last week by urging county farm bureaus and their 1200 township units thruout the state to co-operate with the newspapers in their communi- ties. "It is only fair to say that the kind of support given to the farm bureau ,movement by the county newspapers of Minnesota merits real support for I the 'home town paper' by" the far- mers," the Farm Bureau News Ser- vice says in a letter received by the County farm bureau. "Farm news is printed because it's news, and of interest to readers. It doesn't mean charity. But it does mean that the home papers, in almost every case, are giving their frmer readers accurate news of the big far- counties, has been functioning for sev- mers' organization in Minnero'ate eral months in standardizing products, farm bureau federation with 73,0b0 carlot shipping and wholesale pur- members. chasing. Mr. Berg, however, is the "If.  means, too, that thru this sup- first field service men to be appointed since the formal organization of the state association. Several other dis- tricts are to begin work within a few weeks. H. A. Fredrickson Moves Tire Shop to Ortonvilie H. A. Fredrickson, who has been operating a tire vulcanizing shop at Clinton, i$ moving his equipment to Ortonville, and will open a vulcaniz- ing and retreading shop in the build- ing recently vacatedJby the Ol, tonville Star. Mr. Fredriekson has equipment with which he can do a ull retread ing job on any tire. Rooms have been procured by him for his family, over the Bottling eom- puny building. Sho'w GORearoke; Palm Buys Live Leoard -\\; A beautiful Leopard kitten is the latest addition to ill Palm's mena- gerie this ffiek. ]Bill received a tele- phone call from a liy in Big Stone City last vek whQ said that her hus- band had discontinged his show busi- ness,and had setj her a number ot the animals left. Realitg the value of keeping up an interesting show port the home town papers are mak- ing it easier for the farm bureau to do work of real benefit to agriculture and therefore to the state as a whole." / School Lad Has Narrow v/ Escape From Drowning Anton Beck, eleven year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Nels Beck narrowly es- caped death from drowning Monday afternoon at about 4:30 p. m. Young Beck along with some other lads had entured far out towards the middle of the lake . On stopping to adjust his skates which had become loose, the ice gave way and he went down twice before he was rescued by two boys from Big Stone who were skat- ing near him. Farm Bureau Annual Meeting At Clinton Dec.l The Big Stone County Farm Bu- reau will hold its annual meeting at Clinton on Thursday; December 1, starting at 10:00 o'clock in the mor- ning. The  annual report of County Agent Roske will he given, and plans for 1922 fully discussed. Mr. Roske urges that everyone attend this meet- ing, which will le of vital importance to the farmers of Big Stone county. window, Mr. Palm bought the "t" and is trying to make himself well Entertain Past Worthy Matrons. enough, acquainted with Thomas to The Past Worthy Matrons of Lau.,rel re-tie a" ribbon around its neck, that Crown Chapter of the oroe.r, o;me h,rm ,,til ahn.tlv t" h re- Eastern tar were entertaine y mrs. i,  q,h .... to ,,,,t ..... r J" Arthur Matthews, Monday af ?'J" ;" :".:.".," .... "." " #. noon at "500" The Past Matrons, in- ore, ano spits like me regular parlor I rl,;,, tho "ht,/o m M,tm, vaety of tom, cat. - _ . . Ien B Sa'rvis"Hayen-F'reneh,""Jo-hn o one as yet has onered to netPl Crippen, R: B. Hudson, A. B. Kaer- Bill tie the ribbon o. | thor. Philip Miller, M. J. Whiting, El- The Leopard will be on display in[ la Newell, and Solon Salls of Orten- the Palm Jewelry window soon | ville and Mesdames Frank Finberg ". ....... " | and Frank Watkins of Clinton. Mrs. Martin oen and Alfred 0stlind| Irtie Matthews Lybarger of Fayette- drove to Minneapolis Tuesday morn-[ ville, Ark., was guest of honor. The ing. Mr. Otld will go to Chicago] Clinton ladies won the two prizes of- in the former  ear-from there on a / fered. A two course luncheon was business trip ....  ,. t i::: : .... 'served. BE NEIGHBORLY URGES MAYOR- ELECT BAILEY Requests A-pirit of True Friendship and Co-opera- tion In His Speech At the Orpheum Theatre. Pledging himself to see that the )resent city ordinances will be strict- ly obeyed by all, and urging the towns- people of Ortonville to forget any past differences, feelings of dislike, or even hatred between one another Mayor-Elect James A. Bailey, Mon- day night gave a very interesting talk to a packed house at the Orpheum theatre, his subject being, "The Re- construction of Ortonville." Speaking on that topic, Mr. Bailey explained by the reconstruction of Or- tonville, he did not mean that the, change should be in a physical way, but that the citizens themselves, should reconstruct themselves in a so- cial way, and develop a spirit of true l friendshi p nd co-operation for the common weal. Mr. Bailey's talk came as a surprise to many, as the nature of his criti- cisims and recommendations were ex- pected by some to  with reference to the financial condition of the city, and record of the present council. No adverse reference owever was made to matters of this kind, the gist of his speech being that all past feelings of bitterness between the citizens of the city be laid aside, and all eiaergy bent upon making friends again of neigh- bors and townspeople who had been formerly counted as such. The sincerity of Mr. Bailey in the suggestions ,made for the betterment of the social condition of the city wa plainly apparent thruout his speech, and his arguments and words of advice were well received by his listeners as shown by the intense interest display- ed, the audience showing that they were wholeheartedly in harmony with the ideas and thoughts expressed by him. The entire audience was deeply im- pressel when the climax to the speech came, with the playing of "America" and the entrance upon-the stage of four young OrtonvilIe ladies, repre- sentating four different nationalities, each leading by the hand a little child, to show the spirit of friendship and trust that should prevail among all families in owr midst, and appropri- ate appeals by the speaker for such a spirit among all the citizens of Or- tonville from this time' on, in order that such little children would not be- come imbued with the idea of personal jealousy, distrust, hatred and mean feeling that has been rampant in the city among certain elements. The outstanding feature of Mr. Bai- ley's speech was his homely, sincerity of purpose and largeness of heart up- on the question so feelingly discussed by him, and the spirit of friendliness with which his talk was received. HIGHWAY SAFETY IS CONTEST TOPIC Local School Teachers and Pupils to Try for Valuable National and State Prizes. ' Ortonville girls and boys and their teachers may win in cash prizes, free trips to Washington, and gold and sil- ver loving cups and medals in new contests announced by the Highway and Highway Transport Educational Hunters Return With Deer Apiece; No S____kunk In Ig ] The deerslayers special returned to [ Ortonville today at 3:00 o'clock p. m., ! carrying Wayne Kelly, Dr. D. M. O'- Donnell, Ed. Zehringer, Jamie %mith, !John Crippen, Otto Harris, and Pilot Emil Ostlind, with the baggage com- partment completely filled with slain deer, seven of them in all, each mem- ber of the party having shot his one- seventh share of the entire bag. Rumors were heard the fore part of the week to the" effect that Dr. O'o Donnel 1 had killed a squirrel and a skunk, but however true this may have been, he is credited with having shot one of the two antlered buck that were brought back, Wayne Kelly being the other lucky hunter. Clin- ton Crippen, a member of the party, also shot a deer. The trip to the hunting grounds in the Rexo speed wagon was made on schedul time, but the heavy snow, made the return a very slow and difl cult matter. A thrilling incident was related by the boys on their return with refer- ence to a hunter from another camp who became lost ln the woods. A party of other hunters were camped nearby, and one night about nine o'clock, heard a shot. Tldnking R queer that anyone would shoot at that tiptoe of night, one of the party gave a call, and was answered by a man i the woods, who continued to use his voice until located. He proved to be a hunter who had become sepirated from his companions and could not find his way back to camp. He had been roaming around from early that morning, completely lost, and suffer- ing badly from exposure and want of food. When fgand he was almost crazed .-;ith fear. He did not even have a match to light a fire and had used all of his shells but one, in an effort to signal for help. Chairman for Red Cross Roll Call Are Named John E. Palmer, treasurer of the Big Stone County Red Cross, announces that the following have been appoint- ed local county chairmen, to have charge of the Red Cross Drive in their respective districts: Cities and villages--Beardsley, Su- perintendent of city schools; Barry, F. L. Collins; Graceville, Mr. Byhro; Johnson, C. N. Evans; Clinton, Alvin Gongoll; Ortonviile, H. N. Tragethon; Odessa, H. H. Reindl; Correll, A. H. Granger. Townships---Big Stone town- ship, J. W. Hipple; Otrey, Miriam Hanson; Artichoke, Rev. Jurgenson Akron, J. W. Frizzell; Odessa, Ed. Gerber; Ortonville, A. F. Seaton; Moonshine, Jack Luchsinger; Graco- ville, Ed. Utley; Malta, Frank Mor- rill; Almond, Emil Swenson; East Prior, Ckarles Callberg; West Prier, Ben Stegner, Jr.; Browns Valley, E. A. Smith; Toqua, Miss Toner, Cornelisen Boys Bag Nice Bunch Of Mallards Here Sunday morning, Chester and "CON ton" Cornelisen, hied themselves to the bottoms at the foot of the lake, with the view of picking up, a stray duck or two. It happened that with the strong cold wind blowing, and the lake practically closed, large numbers of belated mallards were striking for the open water in the river at the spo where they had sta- tioned themselves. The ducks com- ing down the lake, swung around so nicely that the boys shot their limit of 15 birds each all within an hour's time, All were mallards. committee, Washington. Charles M. Babcock, state commis- sioner of highways, indorsed the plan to promote safety on public highways, and the school features have been ap- proved by J. M. McConnell, Minneso-t ta commissioner of education. All girls and boys under 14 years in Minnesotasehool may try for the grand national awards and eleven are sure to shat  the state prizes for the best essay of about 500 words on "How I Can Make the Highways More Safe." The three national prizes are: 1--A gold watch and a trip to Washington with all expenses pd; 2---a gold lov- ing cup; 3---a sliver loving cup. In addition there are eleven Minnesota prizes; la gold medal and $15 in cash; 2a silver medal and $10 in cash; 3nine awards, bronze medals arm $5 cash with each. Shool teachers submitting the three best mdel lessons teaching children safe behavior on the highways will receive the following prizes: 1 500 in cash and a trip to ashington with all expenses paid; --$800 in Cash; 3--$200 in cash. Circulars giving the rules for each contest and other details are being mailed to all local school superinten- dents and they and the principals will give full particulars, the committee announces. Inquiries about the con- test should be addresSed to the High: way Transport Educational committee, Wiilard building, Washington, D. C Essays should ie in the hands of school principals by December 10 and announcement of the winners is to be sent to state gnd local superintendents of education and to this newspaper. GRAIN GROWERS GET UNANIMOUS BACKING I County Farm Bureau Resolutions I Pledge Support to Farmer.Cmt. trolled Marketing  Agency. County farm bureaus in Minnesota are giving unanimous endomenent to the U. S. Grain Growers, Inc., where- ever the national co-operative market- ing plan is presented to them, accord- ing to reports from state farm bureau headquarters. "The U. S. Gain Growers, Inc., is purely democratic, each member hav- ing the right and opportunity to take an equal share in determining the pol- ies of the organization," the Palk and Otter Tail County Farm Bureau Ass'n. declared in resolutions passed without a dissenting vote. "We here- by endorse the plan of the U. S. Grain (}rowers and urgethat all farmers in the county join the Grain Growers, as soon_as organization work begins in this territory, to the end that the grain producers of this county may play their rightful part in determining the future policies of the national mar- keting agency." The Polk county resolution was signed by Carl Berg, bureau presi- dent and O. K. Berget, secretary; and the Ottertail county resolution by A. R. Knutson, president and J. G. Nor- by, secretary. The Lyon county farm bureau, thru tts*4mg commit- tee, also has ne on cord in sup- port of the U. S. Grain Growers. The Grain Growers:opened north- west headquarters this week at 504 Commerce bilding, St. Pd.