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The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
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November 24, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
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November 24, 1921
 

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ORT(00]?00ILLE INDEPENDE00,00T ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1921 h NUMBER 29 . I F'rtners' and Homemakers' UI] Week Speaker Praised qTART00I00 i High praise for Dr. Caroline A. Hed - a.PZgLZLa.dA. [ger, of the Elizabeth McCormick D I ] It P lJ r l Memorial Fund, who has been an- l__ ][ 1] ][ ][ 1 t|" nounced, as one of the speakers at the eighth annual Farmers' and Home- Chairman Gives Out of Donators To Dew- Memorial Fund; Men- In Daily. Notwithstanding the fact tha4 ready cash seems to be scarce with almost everyone, liberal donations to the Dowling are being received by of the county. name stands out in as one of the biggest State of Minnesota has pro-i Crippled and handicapped in Way, but with hopeful heart, Won an education and finan- for himself, but never career did he forget others, working for the betterment and children suffering a to say, were Mr. Dowling he would be still devot- [ time in the interests of the Memorial Fund of raised in the state by to be used in the a school for crippled chil- be not only a fitting tribute of Mr. Dowling, but a boon to the little children crippled and deformed as to attend regular public is a list of donations week. See that your on this list. Mail your sub- With check to A. B. Kaer- chairman, or to The .Or- )endent. National Bank ....... 20.00 aional Bank ............ 20.00 .................. 10.00 w" & Bolsta ............ 10.00 *' ,Ista & Karn .............. 10.00 " Independent ........ 5.00 '/ ........................ 5.00-"  & Chrisman ........ 5.00  hoen ...................... 5.00 .I 1.00  .............................. 1.00  1.00 ' .................... 1.00 -' and Stephney ................................ 17.05 ........................ 5.00 ............................ 5.00 Garage .................. 5.00 ............................ 5.00 ...................... 5.00 ...................... 3.00 Lumber Co ........... 8.00 2.00 ...................... 2.00 2.00 ei-;ann :ZZ:Z:: 200 ........................ 2.00 .............. i ....... 2.00 .......................... 1.00 ........................ 1.00 ............................ 1.00 O'Brien ................. 1.00 .............................. 1.0 1.00 .............. 1.00 .......................... 1.00 ............................ 1.O0 Strong ................ 1.00 ........................ 1.00 1.00 . ........................ 1.00  .............................. 1.00" .................... 1.00  .................................. $169.05 Robs Bank At Wheaton of $4,213 Olson, an ex-service man studying banking at Bank under the di- Federal Vocatiohal Bu- past two months walked before Armistice Day of the bank's currency'. assisted in closing the evening and car- to the vault. Instead of he placed it on a con- outside where he could the evening. The theft until Saturday was a holiday. a car late Thursday went to Fergus Falls lived, giving the liveryman that his sis- He stayed in Fergus 2:30 Saturday morning but did not go near his he took a train fo Min- there on all trace is Gazette, New Cashier Bank At Odessa of Phil H. Thomas of the Farmers & Mer- lank of Odessa, Minn., November 18, the board of directors well known resi- n, who was interested in appointed to take his Makers' week is given by Dr. Walter C. Coffey, dean of the department of agriculture of the University of'Min- nesota and other members of the de- partment who heard her address a group of nutrition specialists at Uni- xersity Farm recently. "Here was one of the most signifi- cant lectures I have ever heard on the nutrition and hygiene of adolescence," says Dr. Coffey. "She is a woman who speaks with remarkable force and what she has to say will be sure to grip the interest of her entire audi-i ence." Beginning Monday noon, January 2, and ending Saturday noon, January 7, the short course will include two or three programs of class for home- makers and six for men. Class room work will be so arranged that special atteption can be given to home prob- lems in which /hen and women have joint responsibilities. i A farm bureau mass meeting will be addressed by J. R. Howard, presi- dent of the American Farm Bureau federation and other speakers of na- tional reputation on Farm Bureau day, Tuesday, January 3. Dr. A. V. Storm, director, has arranged special days for the livestock breeders of the state and an evening banquet for the home- makers and farmers. Mass meetings will te held at noon and inothe even- ing. Horse, swine and sheep breeders of the state will meet separately Jan- uary 4. The Minnesota Livestock Breeders association, parent organiza- tion to various breed associations, will present a strong program at its con- vention Friday, January 6. Meetings are also being planned by various farm organizations at University Farm the same week. HIGH SCHOOL DEBATES WITH MORRIS DEC. 16 Debaters Chosen To Repre- sent the Ortonville High School--Much Interest Is Shown In Discussions. Work i n connection with the State High School" Debating Contest has just commenced in the local high school, the debaters chosen to represent Orton- ville being Benny Hess, Harold Shult, and Marice Randall, and while prep- aration has been much delayed this season for unavoidable reasons, H. N. Tragetthon, who is coaching the team, expects this trio to make a creditable showing. The topic for debate this year will be, "Resolved that the United States Government should regulate the price of coa in peace time, constitutionality granted." If this question were left to the judges to decide, from the standpoint of the average householder there is no doubt but that it woul( be decided unanimously in favor of th affirmative. However, the matter of oratory, delivery, and quickness of mind in bringing out salient points in favor of or against the subject treat- ed must came into the decisions made, and it remains to be seen what our local boys can do with the question. The first debate of the season will be with the Morris High School, at that place on December 16. Ortonville was defeated there last year. Declamation and discussion work seems to interest the high school stu- dents this year, more than debating, their attention having been drawn to that phase of public speaking no doubt by the special prizes offered by local men, and the American Legion. Amerl'cnn Ltfr|an v(]ive*" I A uniform medal is to be given to ,7, ..... :,.,,, --'Y"*, . {the winner of the three highest hon- upper Well Attenaeo ors in each of the three contests to be held, namely Senior High School De- About fifty ex-service men were en-] clamation Contest, Senior High School tertained by the Ralph Spink post of ! Discussion Contest, and the Senior the American Legion Tuesday evening I HiE h School Declamation Contest, the at the Legion club rooms, the event medals to be made of gold, for first Miss Huggins, Deaf, Blind, THEATRE GOERS Outrivals Helen Keller Madison, Wis.-----Demonstrating her TO SEE SPECIAL ability to pick out colors, altho she is blind, to recognize friends from stran- gers, altho they do not speak, and, tho SHOW FRIDAY stone deaf, to receive accurately a telephone message by placing her L fingers on the membrane of the trans- Ornheum Theatre Books Ex- mitter, Willetta Huggins, a 16-year- --r ....... old girl from the state school for the ceptionally Good Program blind at Jesville, Wis., astounded physicians and psychologists in Madi- son this week. She "sees" with her nose and "hears" with her fingers, outrivaling Helen Keller. In the office of Dr. C. A. Harper, di- rector of the Wisconsin state board i of health, she 'read" a telephone me-I sage with perfect accuracy and with I no mechanical contrivance of any sort! to aid her. "We consider Miss Huggins' pe- culiar talents one of the most won- derful instances of hyperdeveloped nervous sensitiveness in receiving im- pressions that I have ever heard of," Dr. Harper said today. "When Miss Huggins is brought in- to a room where there are a number of persons she picks out those she knows and those who are strangers without anyone either moving or speaking," Dr. Harper said. "I do not happen to have been present when this was done but I am convinced of it in my mind on the authority of persons wh0s word I have no reason to doubt. "Apparently she uses her hyprde- veloped sense of smell for this pur- pose." Ability to tell the color of a piece of cloth, by smelling it is another bi- zarre accomplishment attributed to Willetta Huggins. "The girl was not always blind and deaf, I believe," said Dr. Harper. "Whether her former ability to re- ceive ocular and sound impressions ha anything to do with her present abili- ties I cannot say." In addition to her ability to read a telephone message by placing her fin- gers on the membrane of the receiver, Miss Huggins can carry on a conver- sation thru the vibrations of a wooden pole resting on the head of the persons with whom she is speaking. Cream Separators To Be Repaired Without Charge The DeLaval Cream Separator Corn- For Friday,.November 25. No Advance In Price. The Orpheum Theatre is fortunate to be able to offer one of the finest shows on the road this week, Friday, November 25, according to information receivec from the McCarthy interests thro whom these shows are booked. This show is recommended by them as one of special merit, and only showing in the larger cities, but on account of the break in the circuit and the fact that the date was open, are enabled to stop at Ortonville. Four good acts comprise the pro- gram with the psual snappy three-reel comedy. Bassett & Bailey, European Novelty Artists, appear in "The Un- expected." Menke Sisters give songs and dances that are "different." The Nifty Trio, put over a mirth provok- ing frolic of song, dance, music and patter, and the Pam,peii Five, "A Night in Venice." The management announces that this show will be given for the same price of admission as usual. ' . This bill was shown at Fargo for an entire week to packed houses each afternoon and evening. Legion Basketball Game Here Thanksgiving Day Basketball season will be opened here Thursday, November 24th, when the Milan Independents met the Or- tonville Legion team. The game was played at the High school gymnasium at eight o'clock p. m. Eleven aspirants to the Legion quint have been out practising. They are Glenn Bertelson, Ray Gowan, Pat Loy, Harry Geier, Roy Geier, W. E. Slegner, Ralph Gunderson Clarence Beckman, Paul Runnings, Joe Petrick and Walter Smith. being an Oyster feed to which all ex- service men ere invited. After the oysters were made away with, interesting short talks were made by Rev. Bockoven, E. M. Pike, and Elmer Schoen, and the evening was spent in playing cards, talking over war experiences, and listening to music furnished by David Lundin, con- eertina player who had given a con- celt at the Orphetm, with pictures and scenes in Sweden, arlier in the evening. Mr. Lundin was assisted by Mr. ordin, a violin player who ac- companies him. The boys report that a genuine good time was had by ev- eryone, the music being especially ap- preciated. "Devil Dogs" Now Guard Mail Thru Ortonville All trains carrying valuable :re.all on the Milwaukee road thru Ortonville, now carry U. S. Marine soldiers, to guard against train bandits who have been so active of late, the Postal De- partment having decided that this ex- pense was warranted on account of enormous losses incurred thru such robberies. These guards are all sharp- ,shooters and have orders to shoot to kilt. The valuable mail will be sent on only a few of the trains instead of every train as heretofore. Only trains No. 3 and No. 4 thru Ortonville, will carry such mail, and the first Marine guards went thru here on those trains last week on Wednesday. Terminals and mail stations thru- out the country are also guarded. Mail car robberies have been so fre- quent the past year, and losses so great that the government is' going the limit in resolving to make it a more hazardous occupation. As evidence of this, notices have been posted in post- offices thruout the country, offering a standing reward of $5,000 for appre- hension of postoffice and mail car ban- dits, to be paid to any person who cap- lures anyone committing such a crime, to be paid when the accused is found guilty in court, or the sum of $5,000 is offered to any one capturing or kill- ing any person caught in the act of robbing the U. S. Mails. The National Educational Associa- tion and The American Legion have joined together to hold an American Education Week December 4 to 10, 1921. Commercial clubs, chambers of com- merce, fraternal, patriotic and civic bodies have not 0nly signified their willingness to help, but have asked The American Legion to take the lead: and show the way. Our National Americanism committee has mapped out the general plan. More than elev- en thousand Legion pots will put it across. The Orton Hotel was closed Friday for the winter sea.on and Mrs. erthn Davis, proprietress, left for Minne- apolis for two or three weeks stay. pride, silver fo; second prize and bronze for third prize. The American Legion of Ortonville furnishes the medals for the Junior High School Declamation Contest; Ray G. Farrington, the medals for the Senior High School Discussion Con- test, and A. B. Kaercher, those for the Senior High School Declamation Con. test. These contests are to be held each year here, this to lye the first annua  contest under the arrangement. pany have instituted a very novel and liberal follow-up plan with the sal made by them in the past of cream separators, in offering to overhaul and repair free of charge, any cream sep- arators out of order that may be brot into the local dealer, we are advised by Alvah I. Matthews, their salesman here. The service man of the DeLaval Company will be at the Alvah I. Mat- hews implement store, on December 15 to do this work for those who bring :heir cream separators in on that date. Claud Gowan is managing the team, and expect to develop a snappy bunch i ,f basket getters from the materia, i in sight. Big Dance Here December 3. People wh6 enjoy good dance music will have a treat on Saturday, Decem- ber 3, when the famous Dream Or- chestra will give a dance at the Odd Fellows Hall. Prizes will be given and a real time is assured to every- one attending. IID THOU sl-,alt keep the feast of weeks unto the Lord th9 God with a tribute of a freewill offering of thine hand, which thou shalt give unto the Lord th9 God, according as the Lord th:9 God hath blessed thee. AND thou shalt roice before the Lord th: God, thou, and th: son, and th: daughter, and th: manservant, and thJ mai&er'aent, and the Levite that is within th: gates, and the stranger, and the fatherless, and the wido, that are among you, in the place which the Lord th: God has ch, to place his tame th. ANI5 thou $1mlt remember that thou wast a bondman in Egypt; and thou. shah observe and do these statutes. THOU ,hilt d,., the feast of terncles seven days, aer that t .lu. hast gathered in th corn and th wine; AND thou ,halt rejoice in th: ast, thou. and th9 and th9 d., and th9 m,rvant. ,t th ,,i- ant, and the Lite, the stnr, and th# ftlrless, and the kt, that m ithia th te. Lord th:  in.the place which the Lord shall cl; tm d' Lord :9 God dl| bl thee in l thy in. cram, and in all tl works of tle ImP. tlrfom thou ,halt rarely ioi. --D.UTRONOMY, CH. ,6, ,. ,. SAVES BROTHER, BUT LOSES OWN LIFI/ !I Fifteen-Year-Old Bentson Is Drown- > In Chippewa River At Monte- video, Friday Afternoon. Trying to save the life of his .Young,  er brother, and succeeding, Lloxt Bentson lost his own life Friday af-  ternoon in the Chippewa river. After helping ten-year-old Bert Bentson out of the cold water Lloyd found the ice * too thin to support his own weight and as he struggled he became nttmb with cold. After making a brave fight he went down in about ten feet of wa- ter. His .comrades, unable to save him heard him praying the Lord's ' Prayer in his final s:lrug'gles. With Ernest Kolstad and his broth- er, Harold Bents0n, Lloyd had gone' up river, about a mile and half from town, to set trapsf Bert was on the other side of the river and they warn, ' ed him not to cross but he started, and the ice gave way. Lloyd jumped ' in and helped his brother get on" the .... . ice and crawl ashore, but it would not : hold his heavier weight. Mr. and Mrs. Frank Person calne in response to cries for help, andheld out poles and :t: rope, but his hands had become t0@i! numb to grasp and hold them. The :' fire department was called and the '*" body brought to the surface after hay- '' ing been under water about 45 min- utes or an hor. eral services re held. in Our " Savior's Lutheran church Monday af-. ternoon, Rev. J. M. Mason officiatingi  : the large church being filled with friends of the young lad and his rel - ' atives. Membersof the junior high school were present in a body, and  their girls' glee club sang, "Nearer ' My God to Thee." Thor Graves and Ester Soderstrom sang, "Beautiful  Isle of Somewhere." Lloyd Melvin Bentson was born September 25, 1906, in Montevideo, the ': son of Mr. and Mrs. P. F. Bentson. He was a pupil in the junior high schnel, a member of Our Saviour's Sunday school and a very likable young lad ' of fifteen years. He leaves to mourn ` his loss his parents; five sisters, Mrs. Kenneth Conright, Mrs. Lester Peter- son, Palma, Margaret and Elaine; four brothers, Harold, Bert, Clifford and Palmer. The family home is in Thompson's addition and 1Wr. Bentson : is employed at the roundh0use.' Montevideo News. FLOOD CONTROL PLANS O. K. Minnesota, North Dakota Scheme On-  iy Way War Department Says. Reservoir and channel improvement control, now being worked out by North Dakota and Minnesota are the' natural and only means of preventing floods, according to the formal report of the War Department engineers rel-' ative to flood control measures in the  Red River valley and their relations to Canada, received at the state flood ': control office in Fargo. The war Department acted on the i request of Secretary Hughes who in ' turn acted on the joint request of the : North Dakota and Tri-State Flood Control associations, and the North : Dakota legislature.--Minneapolis gout-  nal. Senator F. B. Kellogg . Loses His Left Eye/e Senator F. B. Kellog of Minnesota, s recovering in a Minneapolis ho-' t)ital from an operation in which his left eye, which has been sightless for several years, was removed. The ' operation was advised, it is said, be- " cause of the fear that the sig'ht of the other eye, which now is unimpaired, might become affected. The Senator is reported to be in good condition ': and is improving rapidly. The Kolah Club will hold its next meeting at the home of Mrs. Jackson Zummach on Wednesday, Nover0ber 30. Mrs. E. L. Zehringer and Mrs. Zummach will be hostesses, and pro- gram will be in charge of the club officers. All members are urged to attend, and each one to bring a baby picture of theraselves, or at least a picture taken in early childhood. Members are warned not to attempt to pass off I a picture of one of their children in " lieu of their own. A kitchen shower in honor of Miss Marga.ct Gowan was given by M.s Florence Michell at the latter's hoe Saurda ftearnoon. The young ladies spent the afternoon hemming towels, after which a luncheon was served. The marriage of Miss Gowan and M. Robert Moe will take place at the Catholic church in this city Saturday morning at 10:30, Fr. J. A. Sullivan )erforming the ceremony Swedish Lutheran Ladies' Aid will sold their annual bazaar at the Sam Barr Electrical Shop Saturday after- noon, commencing at 3.)0 o'clock p. m. and continuing thruout the after- noon and evening.. I.unch will be served during this time and candy will Mso 1)e on sale. Rev. L. G! Edgren will hold services in the Swedish M. E. church Sunday. November 27 at 10:30 a. m., and 7:30 p.m. Lll are welcome. THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDE00,IT FUND STARTED 69 PLEDGED Chairman Gives Out of Donators To Dow- al Fund; Mon- In Daily. Notwithstanding the fact t haJc ready cash seems to be scarce with almost everyone, liberal donations to the Dowling are being received by of the county. name stands out in as one of the biggest State of Minnesota has pro- Crippled and handicapped in Way, but with hopeful heart, an education and finan- for hmself, but never career did he forget others, rkir g for the betterment and children suffering a to say, were Mr. Dowling he would be still devot- time in the interests of the Memorial Fund of raised in the state by to be used in the a school for crippled chil- be not only a fitting tribute of Mr. Dowling, but a boon to the little children crippled and deformed as to attend regular public is a list of donations week. See that your on this list. Mail your sub- 'with check to A. B. Kaer- chairman, or to The Or- )endent. National Bank ....... 20.00 Bank ............ 20.00 .................. 10.00 t," & Bolsta ............ 10.00 " & Karn .............. 10.00 v Independent ........ 5.00 v ........................ 5.00*" & Chrisman ........ 5.00 '1 8ehoen ...................... 5.00  ........................ 1.00" .............................. 1.00  LO0"--' .................... 1.00 "I and Stephney ................................ 17.05 w" ........................ 5.00 ............................ 5.00 Garage .................. 5.00 ............................ 5.00 ...................... 5.00 ...................... 3.00 Lumber Co ........... 8.00 2.00 ...................... 2.00 .......................... 2.00 tteimann. ............... 2.00 ........................ 2.00 .............. i ....... 2.00 .......................... 1.00 ........................ 1.00 via ............................ 1.00 O'Brien ................. 1.00 .............................. 1.00 1.00 .............. 1.00 .......................... 1.00 ............................ 1.00 Strong ................ 1.00 ........................ 1.00 1.00 . ........................ 1.00 .............................. 1.OO .................... 1.00  .................................. $169.05 Robs Bank At Wheaton of I,213 Olson, an ex-service man studying banking at Bank under the di- Federal Vocatiohal Bu- past two months walked before Armistice Day of the bank's currency'. assisted in closing the evening and car- to the vault. Instead of he placed it on a con- outside where he could the evening. The theft until Saturday was a holiday. a car late Thursday went to Fergus Falls lived, giving the liveryman that his sis- He stayed in Fergus 2:30 Saturday morning but did not go near his he took a train for MiD- there on all trace is Gazette, New Cashier Bank At Odessa of Phil H. Thomas of the Farmers & Mer- lank of Odessa, Minn., November 18, the board of directors, well known real- who was interested in appointed to take his ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1921 NUMBER 29 ! t'Z HIG Fa"rkuers' and Homemakers' H SCHOOL Miss Huggins, Deaf, Blind, Outrivals Helen Ke|ler THEATRE GOERS ._4_ --- DEBATES WITH ,soo wis.----Demonstrating her TO SEE SPECIAL ability to pick out colors, altho she is l Week Speaker Praised High praise for Dr. Caroline A. Hed- ger, of the Elizabeth McCormick Memorial Fund, who has been an- nounced as one of the speakers at the eighth annual Farmers' and Home- Makers' week is given by Dr. Walter C. Coffey, dean of the department of agriculture of the University of'Min- nesota and other members of the de- partment who heard her address a group of nutrition specialists at Uni- versity Farm recently. "Here was one of the most signifi- cant lectures I have ever heard on the nutrition and hygiene of adolescence," says Dr. Coffey. "She is a woman who speaks with remarkable force and what she has to say will be sure to grip the interest of her entire audi- ence." Beginning Monday noon, January 2, and ending Saturday noon, January 7, the short course will include two or three programs of class for home- makers and six for men. Class room work will be so arranged that special atteption can be given to home prob- lems in which men and women have joint responsibilities. A farm bureau mass meeting will be addressed by J. R. Howard, presi- dent of the American Farm Bureau federation and other speakers of na- tional reputation on Farm Bureau day, Tuesday, January 3. Dr. A. V. Storm, director, has arranged special days for the livestock breeders of the state and an evening banquet for the home- makers and farmers. Mass meetings will Fe held at noon and in,the even- ing. Horse, swine and sheep breeders of the state will meet separately Jan- uary 4. The Minnesota Livestock Breeders association, parent organiza- tion to various breed associations, will present a strong program at its con- vention Friday, January 6. Meetings are also being planned by various farm organizations at University Farm the same week. American Legion Oyster Supper Well Attended About fifty ex-service men were en- tertained by the Ralph Spink post of the American Legion Tuesday evening at the Legion club rooms, the event being an Oyster feed to which all ex- service men ere invited. After the oysters were made away with, interesting short talks were made by Rev. Bockoven, E. M. Pike, and Elmer Schoen, and the evening was spent in playing cards, talking over war experiences, and listening to music furnished by David Lundin, con- certina player who had given a con- ce at the Orphettm, with pictures and scenes in Sweden, arlier in the evening. Mr. Lundin was assisted by Mr. ordin, a violin player who ac- companies him. The boys report that a genuine good time was had by ev- eryone, the music being especially ap- preciated. "Devil Dogs" Now Guard Mail Thru Ortonville All trains carrying valuable mail on the Milwaukee road thru Ortonville, now carry U. S. Marine soldiers, to guard against train bandits who have been so active of late, the Postal De- partment having decided that this ex- pense was warranted on account of enormous losses incurred thru such robbetdes. These guards are all sharp- .shooters and have orders to shoot to kilt. The valuable mail will be sent on only a few of the trains instead of every train as heretofore. Only trains No. 3 and No. 4 thru Ortonville, will carry such mail, and the first Marine guards went thru here on those trains last week on Wednesday. Terminals and mail stations thru- out the country are also guarded. Mail car robberies have been so fre- quent the past year, and losses so great that the government is' going the limit in resolving to make it a more hazardous occupation. As evidence of this, notices have been posted in post- offices thruout the country, offering a standing reward of $5,000 for appre- ! hension of postoffice and mail car ban- dits, to be paid to any person who cap- lures anyone committing such a crime, to be paid when the accused is found guilty in court, or the sum of $5,000 is offered to any one capturing or kill- mg any person caught in the act of robbing the U. S. Mails. The National Educational Associa- tion and The American Legion have joined together to hold an American Education Week December 4 to 10, 1921. Commerclal clubs, chambers of com- merce, fraternal, patriotic and civic bodies have not 0nly signified their willingness to help, but have asked The American Legion to take the lead and show the way. Our National Americanism committee has mapped out the general plan. More than elev- en thousand Legion pots will put it across. The Orton Hotel was closed Friday for the winter sea.on and Mrs. Bertha Davis, proprietress, left for Minne-! apulia for two or three weeks stay. MORRIS DEC. 16 Debaters Chosen To Repre- sent the Ortonville High School--Much Interest Is Shown In Discussions. Work i n connection with the State High School" Debating Contest has just commenced in the local high school, the blind, to recognize friends from stran- SHOW FRIDAY gers, altho they do not speak, and, tho stone deaf, to receive accurately a telephone message by placing her i fingers on the membrane of the trans- Orpheum Theatre Books Ex- mitter, .zWilletta Huggins, a 16-year- old girl from' the state school for the ceptionally Good Program blind at Jesville, Wis., astounded physicians and psychologists in Madi- son this week. She "sees" with her nose and "hears" with her fingers, outrivaling Helen Keller. In the office of Dr. C. A. Harper, di- rector of the Wisconsin state board of health, she 'read" a telephone me- sage with perfect accuracy and with For Friday, gNovember 25. No Advance In Price. The Orpheum Theatre is fortunate to be able to offer one of the finest shows on the road this week, Friday, November SAVES BROTHER, BUT LOSES OWN LIFE !I Fifteen-Year-Old Bentson Is Drown-  In Chippewa River At Monte- video, Friday Afternoon. Trying to save the life of his" young, .... er brother, and succeeding, Lloyd Benison lost his own life Friday af-  ; ternoon in the Chippewa river. After helping ten-year-old Bert Bentson out of the cold water Lloyd found the ice * too thin to suppor his own weight and as he struggled he became nttmb with cold. After making a brave fight he went down in about ten feet of wa- ter. His .comrades, unable to save i' him heard him praying the Lord's Prayer in his final strug'gles. debaters chosen to represent Orton- ville being Benny Hess, Harold Shult, and Marice Randall, and while prep- aration has been much delayed this season for unavoidable reasons, H. N. Tragehon, who is coaching the team, expects this trio to make a creditable showing. The topic for debate this year will be, "Resolved that the United States no mechanical contrivance of any sort to aid her. "We consider Miss Huggins' pe- culiar talents one of the most won- derful instances of hyperdeveloped nervous sensitiveness in receiving im- pressions that I have ever heard of," Dr. Harper said today. "When Miss Huggins is brought in- to a room where there are a number of .... With Ernest Kolstad and his broth- 25, accoraing to imormaion receiveo er Harold Bents0n Llo d had ...... from the McCarthy interests thro ' . . , y gone .......... l up river, aooa a mile and half from whom mese snows are DOOKe'(I. "l'nlS ....  . . ...... . i[own) o se rapg er was on me snow is recommenDeD vV mem as one l .. ., . .. . merit," and only- showing" I other Sltle oi me river and hey warn,  ' of special m'ed him not to cr sbu ....... e OS I; ne sr, al- the larg r cities, but on account of the l ....... . i break in the circuit and the fact that l. an(/ ne lee gave way. ,.loyd jumpea m ann neJpeu nis Dromer get on" the the date was open, are enabled to stop, ......... ice ann crawl asnore, one i woum not : at Ortonville.  ........... Four good acts comprise the pro- nora ms neavier welghL Mr. and Mrs. Government should regulate the price of coal. in peace time, constitutionality granted." If this question were left to the judges to decide, from the standpoint of the average householder, there is no doubt but that it would be decided unanimously in favor of th affirmative. However, the matter of oratory, delivery, and quickness of mind in bringing out salient points in favor of or against the subject treat- ed must came into the decisions made, and it remains to be seen what our local boys can do with the question. The first debate of the season will be with the Morris High School, at that place on December 16. Ortonville was defeated there last year. Declamation and discussion work seems to interest the high school stu- dents this year, more than debating, their attention having been drawn to that phase of public speaking no doubt by the special prizes offered by local men, and the American Legion. A uniform medal is to be given to the winner of the three highest hon- ors in each of the three contests to be held, namely Senior High School De- clamation Contest, Senior High School: Discussion Contest, and the Senior High School Declamation Contest, the medals to be made of gold, for first pride, silver for second prize and bronze for third prize. The American Legion of Ortonville furnishes the medals for the Junior High School Declamation Contest; Ray G. Farrington, the ,medals for the Senior High School Discussion Con- test, and A. B. Kaercher, those for the Senior High School Declamation Con. test. These contests are to be held each year here, this to lye the first annua  contest under the arrangement. persons she picks out those she knows and those who are strangers without i anyone either moving or speaking," Dr. Harper said. "I do not happen to have been present when this was done but I am convinced of it in my mind on the authority of persons whos word I have no reason to doubt. "Apparently she uses her hyprde- veloped sense of smell for this pur- pose." ! Ability to tell the color of a piece of cloth, by smelling it is another bi- zarre accomplishment attributed to Willetta Huggins. "The girl was not always blind and deaf, I believe," said Dr. Harper. "Whether her former ability to re- ceive ocular and sound impressions ha anything to do with her present abili- ties I cannot say." In addition to her ability to read a telephone message by placing her fin- gers on the membrane of the receiver, Miss Huggins can carry on a conver- sation thru the vibrations of a wooden pole resting on the head of the persons with whom she is speaking. Cream Separators To Be Repaired Without Charge The DeLaval Cream Separator Com- pany have instituted a very novel and liberal follow-up plan witk the sal made by them in the past of cream separator, in offering to overhaul and repair free of charge, any cream sep- arators out of order that may be brot into the local dealer, we are advised by Alvah I. Matthews, their salesman here. The service man of the DeLaval Company will be at the Alvah I. Mat- hews implement store, on December 15 to do this work for those who bring :heir cream separators in on that date. gram with the tsual snappy three-reel comedy. Bassett & Bailey, European Novelty Artists, appear in "The Un- expected." Menke Sisters give songs and dances that are "different." The Nifty Trio, put over a mirth provok- ing frolic of song, dance, music and patter, and the Pam,peii Five, "A Night in Venice." The management announces that this show will be given for the same price of admission as usual. ' . This bill was shown at Fargo for an entire week to packed houses each afternoon and evening. Legion Basketball Game Here Thanksgiving Day Basketball season will be opened here Thursday, November 24th, when the Milan Independents met the Or- tonville Legion team. The game was played at the High school gymnasium at eight o'clock p. m. Eleven aspirants to the Legion quint have been out practising. They are Glenn Bertelson, Ray Gowan, Pat Loy, Harry Geier, Roy Geier, W. E. Slegner, Ralph Gunderson Clarence Beckman, Paul Runnings, Joe Petriek, and Walter Smith. Claud Gowan is managing the team, and expect to develop a snappy bunch ,f basket getters from the materia, in sight. Big Dance Here December 3. People who enjoy good dance music will have a treat on Saturday, Decem- ber 3, when the famous Dream Or- chestra will give a dance at the Odd Fellows Hall. Prizes will be given and a real time is assured to every- one attending. 00hanks00ivin00 ND TFIOU skalt keep the feast of meelo unto the Lord th:9 God with a tribute of a freewill offering of thine hand, which thou shah give unto the Lord th:9 God, according as the Lord th:9 God hath blessed thee. lx/D thou shah rejoice Ix, fore the Lord th) God, thou, and th: son, and th:9 daughter, and th: manservant, and th: maidsernt, and the Lvite that is within th: gates, and the stranger, and the fatherless, and the widow, that are among you, in the place which the Lord th: God has chosen to place his name AND thou slmlt remember that thou west a bondma in Egypt; and thou. shalt observe and do these statutes. THOU shall ol the feast of trnw.l seven days, aft that t ha.. hast gathar.d in # corn and th ina; ant, and the I.ite, the , and tint  fatharls, and the ktt, that m ithia th# t,. Lord th:  in.the place which the Lord shall cloo; because tha' Lord ,: God shall hies_ th in all thy in. ., and in all tlG world of thine hands, tharefor thou .Mlt surely rejoice. --D.1J, TRONOMY, CH. ,6, , ,o Frank Person cane in response to: cries for help, and held out poles and ::; rope, but his hands had become tool!: numb to grasp and hold them. The :' fire department was called and the ':; body brought to the surface after haw '' ing been under water about 45 min- utes or an hogr. eral services re held. in Our " Savior's Lutherati church Monday af-' ternoon, Rev. J. M. Mason officiatingi  : the large church being filled with friends of the young lad and his rel-  atives. Members t of the junior high school were present in a body, and  their girls' glee club sang, "Nearer ' My God to Thee." Thor Graves and Ester Soderstrom sang, "Beautiful   Isle of Somewhere." Lloyd Melvin Bentson was born September 25, 1906, in Mgntevideo, the" son of Mr. and Mrs. P. F. Bentson. He was a pupil in the junior high school, a member of Our Saviour's Sunday school and a very likable young lad :' of fifteen years. He leaves to mourn" his loss his parents; five sisters, Mrs. Kenneth Conright, Mrs. Lester Peter, son, Palma, Margaret and Elaine; four brothers, Harold, Bert, Clifford and Palmer. The family home is in Thompson's addition and Mr. Bentson is employed at the roundh0use.' Montevideo News. FLOOD CONTROL PLANS O. K. Minnesota, North Dakota Scheme On-  iy Wayar Department Says. Reservoir and channel improvement control, now being worked out by l North Dakota and Minnesota are the  natural and only means of preventing floods, according to the formal report of the War Department engineers tel-: ative to flood control measures in the  Red River valley and their relations to Canada, received at the state flood :" control office in Fargo. The war Department acted on the i request of Secretary Hughes who in : turn acted on the joint request of the : North Dakota and Tri-State Flood Control associations, and the North : Dakota legislature.Minneapolis Jour-  nal. Senator F. B. Kellogg . Loses His Left Eye/e Senator F. B. Kellog of Minnesota, is recovering in a Minneapolis hos-' pital from an operation in which his left eye, which has been sightless for several years, was removed. The " operation was advised, it is said, be- ' cause of the fear that the sight of the other eye, which now is unimpaired, might become affected. The Senator - is reported to be in good condition ': and is improving rapidly. The Kolah Club will hold its next meeting at the home of Mrs. Jackson Zummach on Wednesday, Noven)ber 30. Mrs. E. L. Zehringer and Mrs. Zummach will be hostesses, and pro- gram will be in charge of the club officers. All members are urged to attend, and each one to bring a baby picture of themselves, or at least a picture - taken in early childhood. Members are warned not to attempt to pass off i a picture of one of their children in lieu of their own. A kitchen shower in honor of Miss Marga.ct Gowan was given by Mss Florence Michell at the latter's hoe Saurda ftearnoon. The ymmg ladies spent the afternoon hemming towels, after which a luncheon was served. The marriage of Miss Gowan and M. Robert Moe will take place at the Catholic church in this city Saturday morning at 10:30, Fr. J. A. Sullivan performing the ceremony Swedish Lutheran Ladies' Aid will hold their annual bazaar at the Sam Barr Electrical Shop Saturday after- noon, commencing at 3.0 o'clock p. m. and continuing thruout the after- noon and evening.. I.unch will be .rved during this time and candy wilt also be on sale Rev. L. G! Edgren will hold service in the Swedish M. E. church Sunday. 3 and 7:30 November 27 at 10:0 a. m., p.m. Lll are welcome. THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT i ORTONVI'LLF MINN., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1921 NUMBER 29 of Donators To Dew. Z Memorial Fund; Men. Jaily. the ady sk wt almost everyon, donations to the county.  igges( ! te of Minne , p Crippled and handicapped iv but with hopeftfl an lton d for himself, but Fund in the state crippleai chil- be not only a fitting tribute list. Mail your sub- With chk ha A. B. Knew r eha[mn, or to The Or- National Bk.. 2O.OO & Chrlsman 1.0o  and Stephney .00 5.00 e Garage .................. 5.OO .0o 5.OO 3,OO Lumber Co ..... 3.00 2.OO 2.0O 2.OO ' Helmann ............. 2.0O 2.0O 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0'Beu ............. 1.00 1.00 1.00 1,00 1,00 1.00 1,00 1.00 1.00 1.00  ................... $169.05 Robs Bank At Wheaten of $4,213 ',. Oaon, i, studying banking at e di- F#aters ' and Homemakers' HIGH SCHOOL Week Speaker Praised STARTED -- DEBATES WITH ger, of the Eizabeth McCormick PLEDGED .....   .........  ..... ...... d ...... , ......  ........ MORRIS DEC. 16 eighth annual Faers' and given by Dr. Walter i C. Coffey, dean of the department of Debaters Chosen To Repre rieultu of the University of Min. sent the Ortonville Hig nesota a]I ot partment who School--Much Interest croup Shown In Discussions. rsity Farm cent]y. "Here w one of the most signifi- Work i n anectl  with the State ltigI" School' Debating Conteal ys Dr. Coffey. ha s just commenced i speaks with rkable fo and  the local high school, the what she h to say Will be su tc chosen to repnt Orlon- grip the integer of her L to tha vault. n the evening. tmtil to Fergas lived, giving He stayed moIng he took a train for n there on all At Odessa f th e Faers & Mer- Odsa, Minn. kno si. appniated Beginning Monday noon, January 2 and ending Saturday noon, January 7 will include th pgrams of els for home six for men. Class m work will be go aroused that s atteption Pan be given to home pb- $oint r e spon sibiIiti. A fa buau s ting will be addssed by J. IL Howard, presi- dent of the American Fa federation d other speakers ef na- tional putation on Fa Buau day, Tuesday, January 3, Dr. A. V. Storm, ditor, has arranged speaal days fur an evening banquet for makers and farme. Mass mfings will P* held at noon and in the even- ing. Horse, swine d sheep beders me*t separately J- uary 4. The Mianesnta Livestock Breeders association, paint organize , will pent a strong pgr at its con- vention Friday, Jry 6. Meetinga a also being planned by vadoua fa Unveity Farm the American Legion Oyster Supper Well Attended About fifty ex-eice men were en- tertailed by the Ralph Spink post of the American Legion Tuey evening at the Legion club morns the emt be ng an Oyster feed to which all ex- Alter the oystem w made away with, interesting short talks we made by Rev. Bkoven, E. M. Pike, and Elmer St n, and the enlng w spent i playing cards, talking o war experices, and listening to mtmic furnished by David Lundin, con- certina player who had given a n- eer at the Orpheum, with pictures and nes in Sweden, 1ar]ier in the evening. Mr. Lundin was sisted by Mr. }/ordin, a violin player who ac. The boys pox that a gauine good time w had by ev- ig especial[ y ap- pointed. "Devil Dogs" Now Guard Mail Thru Ortonville All trains carrying the Milwauk road thru Ortonvlle, now carry U. S. Marine soldier, to gud against train bdits who have tlve of late, the Postal De. paiment havi pen was warranted on account of enormous losses ineurd th suc]l These guards a all sharp- have orders to sht to kill. The aluable mail will be only a few of he trains instead of every train as helatofore. Only trains NO. 3 and kNo. 4 thru Ortonvine, will carry such mail, ann me rat guards t thr he on thos It wk on Wednesday. Terminals and marl stations thru- out the co.try a also guarded. quent the past year, and Is so gat that the govement is going the this, notices have been posted in post- country, offering a standing reward of $5,OO0 for appre- dlts, to be paid to y pvrn who p- to yone Ittlng such a crime, t be paid when the sensed is 'ound guilty in court, or the sum of $5,O00 i, offered to any cn ptmin g or kill- ing any person caught in the act of robbing the U. $, Malls, The National Edueati0nal tlou and The American Le#on have jolncd together to hold an American 1921. Week Dember 4 to 10, Ceremonial clubs, chambers of corn- mee, fraternal oly signified willingness to help, but have The American eion to ta and show the way. Our Amerinin committee out the generat plan. More than oleo. en thousand Legion posts will pt it The Orton Hotel was closed Frida Davis. pmprintres, left fol ville being Bnny Hess, Haxld Shult, attd Mar[ Randall, and while pmp. ha been much delayed this s,H.N Trage*hon, who is hiag the team, make a ditable showing. The topic for debate this year will be, "Resolved that the Unlte Statez Goveent should regulate the piee nf eva in pea time. eonstutionity gted." If this qtlon we left to the judges to dide, fm the standpoint of the average bondholder, no doubt but that it would , in favor el th However, the matter nf oratory, delivery, and quick.as of mind in bringing out salient points in favor nf or againat the subjt tat- ed must eme into the decsiona made, and it mains to ba en what our lal boys cn do with the question. The fit debate of the an will High School, at that pLa on December 16. Ortonville them last e. Declann and diuion wnrk gh school stu- dents tlds year, more than debating, their attention having be dwn to ma phase of public speaking nn doubt by the special pzes offend by local men, and the Amerie Leginn. A unifotan medal is to be given to the winner of te thr ighet hon- ors in eh of the th ntest to be held, nlely Senior High School De- af-alien Contest, Senior High Sehoo Discussi Contest, avd the Senior High Schol Delartion Cntest, the medals to be made of gold, for fit pride, silwr for ond prize and bren for third prize. The Ameri Legion of Ortnville furnishes the medals for the Jmdnl High School DeclamaOon Contest; Pay G. Fqngton. the medals for the Senior High Sehnol D1scualon Cnn- test. d A. B. Kereher, tho for the Senior High Schl Declamation Cn- teal These contests a to be held eael, year here, thie to b the first annua' contest der the arrangement. Miss Huggins, Deaf, Blind, !THIATDU P_II) Outrivais Helen Keller 'ALtrxllt 1,o M .........  ............... ) TO SEE gPl;CIAI ability to pick out ec4ors, althe she is tJx/taxxt blind, to ogxli friends fm atran-' gers, altho they do lint speak, and, the ........................ I SHOW FRIDAY telephone message by pling herl fingers on the membrane of the tnv r m m r 3v eta n " 1 O pheu Theatre Books Ex- x ugglns, a -year- . old girl rom the state school for the[ ceptlonally Good Program blind at Jtesvilie' Wis" astounded[ For Frida LNovemb 9 physician s and psychologists in Madi_  er .. son this wee] She "sees" with her, O Advance In Price. no and "hears" wit h her fingers,,F outrialing Helen Keller.   The Orpheum Theat In the ofl of Dr. (3. A. Harper, di-  i fortunate to be ab e o cter of the Wisconsin state boardl . offer one of the finest of health, ha 'ad" a telephone me i shows on the rd this sage with pet ury at*d with week, Friday, November no mhan ca contrivance of any rt 25, aording in information reivol to aid her tfrom he McCarthy intests th "We consider Miss Huggins' pc-[whom these shows a booked. This eullar talents o of the most won- I show is rommended by them as one derful itans nf hyperdeveloped, nf special merit and onv showing in neo nsiveness in lceiving ira. the larger titles, but on account nf the pssions that I have ever heard of,", bak in the eircait and the fact that Dr. Harper said today. ' the date was open. a enabled to stop "When Mss Huggins is brought in- I at Ortonville. to a rm whe the a a number of I Four good ts compri the pr pecans she picks out those she knows I gram with the esl ppy thin.el and thnse who are strgers without]comedy. Bassett & Bailey, Europe yune either moving or saklng," NoIty Artists, appear in "2he Un- Dr. Harper said. "I do not happen to expected." Menke Sisters gi ngs have been psent when this was done and dances that a "diffent." The but I am nvnced of it in my mind Nifty Trio. put over a mirth pvok- on the authoty of perns who ng llie nf song, dance, mie and word I have no ason to dubt, p patter, and the ppeii Fve, "A "Apparently she us her hypbrde-[ Night n Venice." vsloped sen of smell for this put- The management announces that this how vail be given for the same pose." Abillt to tell the oolor of a pie ,iee of admission as usual. ' . of clnth, by sllng it is annther hi- This bill was shown at Fargo fnr zar eomphshraent attributed to Ln entire wk to packed hoes each Wflletta Huggins. afternoon d evening. "The girl w not always blind and deaf, i believe," said Dr. Harper. Legion Basketball Game "Whether her fmr ability to - Here Thanksgiving Day eeive ocular and und impsalens ha* anything to do with her psent abili. Basketball ason will be opl ties I cannot say." In addition to her ability to read a he Tbuday, November 24th, hen the Milan Independents met the Or- telephone message by plJng her fin- gem on the membrane of the reeelver M ss Hugg na can carry on a onver- satnn thru the vlbmtions nf a wooden pnle sting nn the he nf the perso with whom she is speaking. Cream Separators To Be Repaired Without Charge The DeLaval Cam Separator Com- pany ha instituted a very novel d llberat followu9 plan with the sal made by them in the past of cream separator, in offering to overhaul and palr f of charge, any cream sep- arat out of order that may be bt into the IaI dealer, we a advised by Alvah 1. Matthews, their salesmn here. The seiee man of the DeLaval Cnmpan vdlI be at the A;vah L Mat- 'hews implement sto, on December 15 to do this work fur thnse who bng heir e separato in on that date. tonville Legion team, The gvlne was played at the High school gymnasium at eight o'clock p. m. Ellen aspirants to the Legion quint have been out ptisng. They are Glenn Rertelson, Ray Gowan, Pat Loy. Hy Geier, Roy Geier, W. E. Stegner, Ralph Gunderson Clnce eekm, Paul Rnings, Joe Patrick, and Walter Sndth. Cld Gow is managing the team, and expect to develop a snapp bunch f hket getters fro the materia, in ight. Big Dance Here Deeemb 3. Pple who enjoy gnod dan music will have a tat on Saturday, Dem- bar 3, wh the famous Dream Or- eht wilt give a dance at the Odd Fellows HdL Prizes will be given and a real time is asved to every- one attending. TI-IOL1 skull k,p the fst d e.is unto Ix,,d th# God i a tribute d * frill ofe of thine hand. whkh thou shah gie unto h brd th9 Go ttrdixag a th bd th Cw:d hath blel t. AD thou sha[t toi om the Lord t GO, tnl d h:7 son. eM th9 &hter, d & t,er,,t, and th makrant. d the Levi that b within th gate, an the reger, and the thark, e the wi, that m  yo, h th ph hh  L th9 GOd h Ab  ,Mr ,=1 that thou  * h,d=m i., t; .ad d..u.tih ,aad & thin mmm. AVES BROTHER, BUT ' LOSES OWN LIFE  Fifteen-Year.Old Bentson Is Dwn- In Olippewa River .t Mt e- vide, Friday Afte. Trylag to save the life nf bin yomg ' r brother, and succeediug L[ob. Rentson lost his own life day af- ternaon in the Chippewa river. ftr helping ten-y-old Bert Bentson oat of the Id water Lloyd found the i tee thin to support his own weight and as he straggled he beca ntnb with cold. After making a brave fight he went down in about ten ft of - tar. His ,comrades, unable to av him healxl him praying the Lord's Plyer in his final s:xruggies. With Ernst KolMad and his bth- or, Hld Bent6, Lloyd had gone up river, about a mile d haft fm ' town, to t ttpsf Bert was on the other side of the river d they w ed hm not to  but he started and the ice gave waY. Lloyd ]tmpt in arm helped Ida brother get on the . ice d crawl aho, but it would not bold his heavier ighL Mr. mad Frk Peoa cae ia spon t ces for help, d hem out poles and rope, but his hde had become to nb to grip and hold them. "he fire detmrtment w lled d the' bcy bught to the sat/ace after hay. '' ins been under water about 45 rain. , utes r an hair: " , ternr. Pv. J. M, Maa ometating. the large chin.oh being filled wa k flSends of the yog Lad and Ms 1- r olives. Members ,of the. J tuior h'g hI hoo] we psent m a body, and' their gJriw glee etub sg, "Near My God to Thee." Thor Graves and Eater Sedrstrnm sang, "Buiful Isle of Sotaewhem" Lloyd Melvin Bton w bo' September 25.1905, in Mnteideo. the sen of Mr. d Mrs. F. F. Bentson. He ' was a pupil in the junior high hmq, a member of Our Kaviour's Sunday school d a very likable yog tad of fifteen ye. H* leaves to mourn his loss his paints; five sister, Mrs. Kenneth Conright, M. lmDter peter. son, Palma, Mm.gt tmd Elaine; four bthen, Hald, Bert, Clifford , d PMmer. The family home is in Thompson's addition d MTr. Rentson is employed at the roundhou.--' Montevld News. FLOOD CONTROL PLANS o. K. Mit North Dakota Scheme On. [y Way,War Iartment Say& Reoir and channel impent ntll. now being worked out by North Dakota and Mies0ta  the natuI and only means of penting flol, ordlng to the foai pert f the War Department engi l- alive to flood control meur in the Red Rir valley and their latioa to Canada, tcived at the state flood The war Departmt acted on the : Hughes who in the joint request of the . Tri-State Fld associations, md the North Dakota legislat u.--Minneapolis Jour- :' Senator F, B, Kellogg , Loses His Left Eye  Senator F. B, Kellog of Minnesota, is recovering in a Minnpolis hoe-' pital from an operation in wMeh his left eye, which has bn sightle for years, w moved. The operation was vied, it is said, be. , cau of the fear that the fight of the other eye, which now is unimpadved, might bme affected. The Senator is ported to he in good eodltion d is improving rapidly. The Kolah Club dll hold its next meeting at the home of Mr 5kson on Wednesday, Novevber 30. M. E. L. Zenger and Mrs. Zummh will be houtess, and p ffr will be in e2tal'g of the club omeer All membem  urged to attend, tg a baby picture of thwlv, or at least a pictu tken in rly childhood. Members children in A kitchen shower in honor of Miss Margaret GOW wu glen by MTs latter'a oe Salurday fteaoon. The young ]adi spant the afternoon hen'mdng towels, after which a ]ehn w rve. The arriage of Miss Gowan and ML pl at the ty Saturday moing at 10:30, Fx. L A. SUllivan performing the moy Swedish Lutheran Ladies' Aid will hold their annual baga at the Sam p Saturday afte d nuntiulng thout the after* nn and evealng., lunch will he served durn is time and candy will _lso ha on sa;em Ray. L. G[ Ndgn will hold ,ices in the Pwedish hi. E. chUrCh nnday, Novemb*r 27 at 10: q a, m.. and 7:30 p.m. All a welcome. THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDE00,IT FUND STARTED 69 PLEDGED Chairman Gives Out of Donators To Dow- al Fund; Mon- In Daily. Notwithstanding the fact t haJc ready cash seems to be scarce with almost everyone, liberal donations to the Dowling are being received by of the county. name stands out in as one of the biggest State of Minnesota has pro- Crippled and handicapped in Way, but with hopeful heart, an education and finan- for hmself, but never career did he forget others, rkir g for the betterment and children suffering a to say, were Mr. Dowling he would be still devot- time in the interests of the Memorial Fund of raised in the state by to be used in the a school for crippled chil- be not only a fitting tribute of Mr. Dowling, but a boon to the little children crippled and deformed as to attend regular public is a list of donations week. See that your on this list. Mail your sub- 'with check to A. B. Kaer- chairman, or to The Or- )endent. National Bank ....... 20.00 Bank ............ 20.00 .................. 10.00 t," & Bolsta ............ 10.00 " & Karn .............. 10.00 v Independent ........ 5.00 v ........................ 5.00*" & Chrisman ........ 5.00 '1 8ehoen ...................... 5.00  ........................ 1.00" .............................. 1.00  LO0"--' .................... 1.00 "I and Stephney ................................ 17.05 w" ........................ 5.00 ............................ 5.00 Garage .................. 5.00 ............................ 5.00 ...................... 5.00 ...................... 3.00 Lumber Co ........... 8.00 2.00 ...................... 2.00 .......................... 2.00 tteimann. ............... 2.00 ........................ 2.00 .............. i ....... 2.00 .......................... 1.00 ........................ 1.00 via ............................ 1.00 O'Brien ................. 1.00 .............................. 1.00 1.00 .............. 1.00 .......................... 1.00 ............................ 1.00 Strong ................ 1.00 ........................ 1.00 1.00 . ........................ 1.00 .............................. 1.OO .................... 1.00  .................................. $169.05 Robs Bank At Wheaton of I,213 Olson, an ex-service man studying banking at Bank under the di- Federal Vocatiohal Bu- past two months walked before Armistice Day of the bank's currency'. assisted in closing the evening and car- to the vault. Instead of he placed it on a con- outside where he could the evening. The theft until Saturday was a holiday. a car late Thursday went to Fergus Falls lived, giving the liveryman that his sis- He stayed in Fergus 2:30 Saturday morning but did not go near his he took a train for MiD- there on all trace is Gazette, New Cashier Bank At Odessa of Phil H. Thomas of the Farmers & Mer- lank of Odessa, Minn., November 18, the board of directors, well known real- who was interested in appointed to take his ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1921 NUMBER 29 ! t'Z HIG Fa"rkuers' and Homemakers' H SCHOOL Miss Huggins, Deaf, Blind, Outrivals Helen Ke|ler THEATRE GOERS ._4_ --- DEBATES WITH ,soo wis.----Demonstrating her TO SEE SPECIAL ability to pick out colors, altho she is l Week Speaker Praised High praise for Dr. Caroline A. Hed- ger, of the Elizabeth McCormick Memorial Fund, who has been an- nounced as one of the speakers at the eighth annual Farmers' and Home- Makers' week is given by Dr. Walter C. Coffey, dean of the department of agriculture of the University of'Min- nesota and other members of the de- partment who heard her address a group of nutrition specialists at Uni- versity Farm recently. "Here was one of the most signifi- cant lectures I have ever heard on the nutrition and hygiene of adolescence," says Dr. Coffey. "She is a woman who speaks with remarkable force and what she has to say will be sure to grip the interest of her entire audi- ence." Beginning Monday noon, January 2, and ending Saturday noon, January 7, the short course will include two or three programs of class for home- makers and six for men. Class room work will be so arranged that special atteption can be given to home prob- lems in which men and women have joint responsibilities. A farm bureau mass meeting will be addressed by J. R. Howard, presi- dent of the American Farm Bureau federation and other speakers of na- tional reputation on Farm Bureau day, Tuesday, January 3. Dr. A. V. Storm, director, has arranged special days for the livestock breeders of the state and an evening banquet for the home- makers and farmers. Mass meetings will Fe held at noon and in,the even- ing. Horse, swine and sheep breeders of the state will meet separately Jan- uary 4. The Minnesota Livestock Breeders association, parent organiza- tion to various breed associations, will present a strong program at its con- vention Friday, January 6. Meetings are also being planned by various farm organizations at University Farm the same week. American Legion Oyster Supper Well Attended About fifty ex-service men were en- tertained by the Ralph Spink post of the American Legion Tuesday evening at the Legion club rooms, the event being an Oyster feed to which all ex- service men ere invited. After the oysters were made away with, interesting short talks were made by Rev. Bockoven, E. M. Pike, and Elmer Schoen, and the evening was spent in playing cards, talking over war experiences, and listening to music furnished by David Lundin, con- certina player who had given a con- ce at the Orphettm, with pictures and scenes in Sweden, arlier in the evening. Mr. Lundin was assisted by Mr. ordin, a violin player who ac- companies him. The boys report that a genuine good time was had by ev- eryone, the music being especially ap- preciated. "Devil Dogs" Now Guard Mail Thru Ortonville All trains carrying valuable mail on the Milwaukee road thru Ortonville, now carry U. S. Marine soldiers, to guard against train bandits who have been so active of late, the Postal De- partment having decided that this ex- pense was warranted on account of enormous losses incurred thru such robbetdes. These guards are all sharp- .shooters and have orders to shoot to kilt. The valuable mail will be sent on only a few of the trains instead of every train as heretofore. Only trains No. 3 and No. 4 thru Ortonville, will carry such mail, and the first Marine guards went thru here on those trains last week on Wednesday. Terminals and mail stations thru- out the country are also guarded. Mail car robberies have been so fre- quent the past year, and losses so great that the government is' going the limit in resolving to make it a more hazardous occupation. As evidence of this, notices have been posted in post- offices thruout the country, offering a standing reward of $5,000 for appre- ! hension of postoffice and mail car ban- dits, to be paid to any person who cap- lures anyone committing such a crime, to be paid when the accused is found guilty in court, or the sum of $5,000 is offered to any one capturing or kill- mg any person caught in the act of robbing the U. S. Mails. The National Educational Associa- tion and The American Legion have joined together to hold an American Education Week December 4 to 10, 1921. Commerclal clubs, chambers of com- merce, fraternal, patriotic and civic bodies have not 0nly signified their willingness to help, but have asked The American Legion to take the lead and show the way. Our National Americanism committee has mapped out the general plan. More than elev- en thousand Legion pots will put it across. The Orton Hotel was closed Friday for the winter sea.on and Mrs. Bertha Davis, proprietress, left for Minne-! apulia for two or three weeks stay. MORRIS DEC. 16 Debaters Chosen To Repre- sent the Ortonville High School--Much Interest Is Shown In Discussions. Work i n connection with the State High School" Debating Contest has just commenced in the local high school, the blind, to recognize friends from stran- SHOW FRIDAY gers, altho they do not speak, and, tho stone deaf, to receive accurately a telephone message by placing her i fingers on the membrane of the trans- Orpheum Theatre Books Ex- mitter, .zWilletta Huggins, a 16-year- old girl from' the state school for the ceptionally Good Program blind at Jesville, Wis., astounded physicians and psychologists in Madi- son this week. She "sees" with her nose and "hears" with her fingers, outrivaling Helen Keller. In the office of Dr. C. A. Harper, di- rector of the Wisconsin state board of health, she 'read" a telephone me- sage with perfect accuracy and with For Friday, gNovember 25. No Advance In Price. The Orpheum Theatre is fortunate to be able to offer one of the finest shows on the road this week, Friday, November SAVES BROTHER, BUT LOSES OWN LIFE !I Fifteen-Year-Old Bentson Is Drown-  In Chippewa River At Monte- video, Friday Afternoon. Trying to save the life of his" young, .... er brother, and succeeding, Lloyd Benison lost his own life Friday af-  ; ternoon in the Chippewa river. After helping ten-year-old Bert Bentson out of the cold water Lloyd found the ice * too thin to suppor his own weight and as he struggled he became nttmb with cold. After making a brave fight he went down in about ten feet of wa- ter. His .comrades, unable to save i' him heard him praying the Lord's Prayer in his final strug'gles. debaters chosen to represent Orton- ville being Benny Hess, Harold Shult, and Marice Randall, and while prep- aration has been much delayed this season for unavoidable reasons, H. N. Tragehon, who is coaching the team, expects this trio to make a creditable showing. The topic for debate this year will be, "Resolved that the United States no mechanical contrivance of any sort to aid her. "We consider Miss Huggins' pe- culiar talents one of the most won- derful instances of hyperdeveloped nervous sensitiveness in receiving im- pressions that I have ever heard of," Dr. Harper said today. "When Miss Huggins is brought in- to a room where there are a number of .... With Ernest Kolstad and his broth- 25, accoraing to imormaion receiveo er Harold Bents0n Llo d had ...... from the McCarthy interests thro ' . . , y gone .......... l up river, aooa a mile and half from whom mese snows are DOOKe'(I. "l'nlS ....  . . ...... . i[own) o se rapg er was on me snow is recommenDeD vV mem as one l .. ., . .. . merit," and only- showing" I other Sltle oi me river and hey warn,  ' of special m'ed him not to cr sbu ....... e OS I; ne sr, al- the larg r cities, but on account of the l ....... . i break in the circuit and the fact that l. an(/ ne lee gave way. ,.loyd jumpea m ann neJpeu nis Dromer get on" the the date was open, are enabled to stop, ......... ice ann crawl asnore, one i woum not : at Ortonville.  ........... Four good acts comprise the pro- nora ms neavier welghL Mr. and Mrs. Government should regulate the price of coal. in peace time, constitutionality granted." If this question were left to the judges to decide, from the standpoint of the average householder, there is no doubt but that it would be decided unanimously in favor of th affirmative. However, the matter of oratory, delivery, and quickness of mind in bringing out salient points in favor of or against the subject treat- ed must came into the decisions made, and it remains to be seen what our local boys can do with the question. The first debate of the season will be with the Morris High School, at that place on December 16. Ortonville was defeated there last year. Declamation and discussion work seems to interest the high school stu- dents this year, more than debating, their attention having been drawn to that phase of public speaking no doubt by the special prizes offered by local men, and the American Legion. A uniform medal is to be given to the winner of the three highest hon- ors in each of the three contests to be held, namely Senior High School De- clamation Contest, Senior High School: Discussion Contest, and the Senior High School Declamation Contest, the medals to be made of gold, for first pride, silver for second prize and bronze for third prize. The American Legion of Ortonville furnishes the medals for the Junior High School Declamation Contest; Ray G. Farrington, the ,medals for the Senior High School Discussion Con- test, and A. B. Kaercher, those for the Senior High School Declamation Con. test. These contests are to be held each year here, this to lye the first annua  contest under the arrangement. persons she picks out those she knows and those who are strangers without i anyone either moving or speaking," Dr. Harper said. "I do not happen to have been present when this was done but I am convinced of it in my mind on the authority of persons whos word I have no reason to doubt. "Apparently she uses her hyprde- veloped sense of smell for this pur- pose." ! Ability to tell the color of a piece of cloth, by smelling it is another bi- zarre accomplishment attributed to Willetta Huggins. "The girl was not always blind and deaf, I believe," said Dr. Harper. "Whether her former ability to re- ceive ocular and sound impressions ha anything to do with her present abili- ties I cannot say." In addition to her ability to read a telephone message by placing her fin- gers on the membrane of the receiver, Miss Huggins can carry on a conver- sation thru the vibrations of a wooden pole resting on the head of the persons with whom she is speaking. Cream Separators To Be Repaired Without Charge The DeLaval Cream Separator Com- pany have instituted a very novel and liberal follow-up plan witk the sal made by them in the past of cream separator, in offering to overhaul and repair free of charge, any cream sep- arators out of order that may be brot into the local dealer, we are advised by Alvah I. Matthews, their salesman here. The service man of the DeLaval Company will be at the Alvah I. Mat- hews implement store, on December 15 to do this work for those who bring :heir cream separators in on that date. gram with the tsual snappy three-reel comedy. Bassett & Bailey, European Novelty Artists, appear in "The Un- expected." Menke Sisters give songs and dances that are "different." The Nifty Trio, put over a mirth provok- ing frolic of song, dance, music and patter, and the Pam,peii Five, "A Night in Venice." The management announces that this show will be given for the same price of admission as usual. ' . This bill was shown at Fargo for an entire week to packed houses each afternoon and evening. Legion Basketball Game Here Thanksgiving Day Basketball season will be opened here Thursday, November 24th, when the Milan Independents met the Or- tonville Legion team. The game was played at the High school gymnasium at eight o'clock p. m. Eleven aspirants to the Legion quint have been out practising. They are Glenn Bertelson, Ray Gowan, Pat Loy, Harry Geier, Roy Geier, W. E. Slegner, Ralph Gunderson Clarence Beckman, Paul Runnings, Joe Petriek, and Walter Smith. Claud Gowan is managing the team, and expect to develop a snappy bunch ,f basket getters from the materia, in sight. Big Dance Here December 3. People who enjoy good dance music will have a treat on Saturday, Decem- ber 3, when the famous Dream Or- chestra will give a dance at the Odd Fellows Hall. Prizes will be given and a real time is assured to every- one attending. 00hanks00ivin00 ND TFIOU skalt keep the feast of meelo unto the Lord th:9 God with a tribute of a freewill offering of thine hand, which thou shah give unto the Lord th:9 God, according as the Lord th:9 God hath blessed thee. lx/D thou shah rejoice Ix, fore the Lord th) God, thou, and th: son, and th:9 daughter, and th: manservant, and th: maidsernt, and the Lvite that is within th: gates, and the stranger, and the fatherless, and the widow, that are among you, in the place which the Lord th: God has chosen to place his name AND thou slmlt remember that thou west a bondma in Egypt; and thou. shalt observe and do these statutes. THOU shall ol the feast of trnw.l seven days, aft that t ha.. hast gathar.d in # corn and th ina; ant, and the I.ite, the , and tint  fatharls, and the ktt, that m ithia th# t,. Lord th:  in.the place which the Lord shall cloo; because tha' Lord ,: God shall hies_ th in all thy in. ., and in all tlG world of thine hands, tharefor thou .Mlt surely rejoice. --D.1J, TRONOMY, CH. ,6, , ,o Frank Person cane in response to: cries for help, and held out poles and ::; rope, but his hands had become tool!: numb to grasp and hold them. The :' fire department was called and the ':; body brought to the surface after haw '' ing been under water about 45 min- utes or an hogr. eral services re held. in Our " Savior's Lutherati church Monday af-' ternoon, Rev. J. M. Mason officiatingi  : the large church being filled with friends of the young lad and his rel-  atives. Members t of the junior high school were present in a body, and  their girls' glee club sang, "Nearer ' My God to Thee." Thor Graves and Ester Soderstrom sang, "Beautiful   Isle of Somewhere." Lloyd Melvin Bentson was born September 25, 1906, in Mgntevideo, the" son of Mr. and Mrs. P. F. Bentson. He was a pupil in the junior high school, a member of Our Saviour's Sunday school and a very likable young lad :' of fifteen years. He leaves to mourn" his loss his parents; five sisters, Mrs. Kenneth Conright, Mrs. Lester Peter, son, Palma, Margaret and Elaine; four brothers, Harold, Bert, Clifford and Palmer. The family home is in Thompson's addition and Mr. Bentson is employed at the roundh0use.' Montevideo News. FLOOD CONTROL PLANS O. K. Minnesota, North Dakota Scheme On-  iy Wayar Department Says. Reservoir and channel improvement control, now being worked out by l North Dakota and Minnesota are the  natural and only means of preventing floods, according to the formal report of the War Department engineers tel-: ative to flood control measures in the  Red River valley and their relations to Canada, received at the state flood :" control office in Fargo. The war Department acted on the i request of Secretary Hughes who in : turn acted on the joint request of the : North Dakota and Tri-State Flood Control associations, and the North : Dakota legislature.Minneapolis Jour-  nal. Senator F. B. Kellogg . Loses His Left Eye/e Senator F. B. Kellog of Minnesota, is recovering in a Minneapolis hos-' pital from an operation in which his left eye, which has been sightless for several years, was removed. The " operation was advised, it is said, be- ' cause of the fear that the sight of the other eye, which now is unimpaired, might become affected. The Senator - is reported to be in good condition ': and is improving rapidly. The Kolah Club will hold its next meeting at the home of Mrs. Jackson Zummach on Wednesday, Noven)ber 30. Mrs. E. L. Zehringer and Mrs. Zummach will be hostesses, and pro- gram will be in charge of the club officers. All members are urged to attend, and each one to bring a baby picture of themselves, or at least a picture - taken in early childhood. Members are warned not to attempt to pass off i a picture of one of their children in lieu of their own. A kitchen shower in honor of Miss Marga.ct Gowan was given by Mss Florence Michell at the latter's hoe Saurda ftearnoon. The ymmg ladies spent the afternoon hemming towels, after which a luncheon was served. The marriage of Miss Gowan and M. Robert Moe will take place at the Catholic church in this city Saturday morning at 10:30, Fr. J. A. Sullivan performing the ceremony Swedish Lutheran Ladies' Aid will hold their annual bazaar at the Sam Barr Electrical Shop Saturday after- noon, commencing at 3.0 o'clock p. m. and continuing thruout the after- noon and evening.. I.unch will be .rved during this time and candy wilt also be on sale Rev. L. G! Edgren will hold service in the Swedish M. E. church Sunday. 3 and 7:30 November 27 at 10:0 a. m., p.m. Lll are welcome.