Newspaper Archive of
The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
Lyft
November 24, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
PAGE 2     (2 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 2     (2 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
November 24, 1921
 

Newspaper Archive of The Ortonville Independent produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




IPAGE2 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT THURSDAY, I American ] Leqlon "The foundation of every state is the education of its youth." That is why The American Legion and The lational Education Association have joined together to hold an American Education week, December 4, 10, 1921. Eleven thousand Legion posts thru- out America will urge ministers of all denominations to preach upon Educa- tion on Sunday, December 4. Mer- chants will be asked to contribute ad- vertising space and window displays appropriately featuring EdUcation week. Newspapers and movi/ig pic- ture theatres will be urged to help drive home to the people the value nd the necessity of Education to the individual, the community, the state, and the nation. Thousands of Legion speakers will do their part. One of the greatest pillars of the Legion's creed is its solemn declara- tion in the preamble to its constitu- tion: "To foster and perpetrate a one hundred per cent Americanism and to tmeulcate a sense of individual obli- gation to the community, state, and nation." American Education Week is the big opportunity for every Le- gion Post, for a million buddies of the Legion, to help drive home to the country the great part which Educa- tion has played in making this Nation great "The School and the Nation," "Im- migration and the Nation," "The Value of Education," will form some of the Subjects which Legion speakers will discuss durin American Education i Week. Kindr-d subjects will be dealt with too, such as "Our Flag," "Ameri- can Ideals," "American Patriotism." American Patriotism, for which so many of our comrades died; the wear- ing of the Flag  our hearts as well as in our buttonholes; being gee0 citi- zens from day to day; always striving as citizens to reflect honor and respect pen the Nation. Part of the program for schoolchil- dren during American Week will in- clude the recitation of the "Pledge to America:" "I pledge allegiance to my Flag, and to the Republic for Which it stands; one nation indivisible, with liberty and justice for all," Anthem, telling how the flag was made, talks on Flag Etiquitte, discussion of inter- esting points regarding the Declara- tion of Independence, and short sdies on how the government of the drfd's greatest republic, functions. The main purpose of American Edu- cation Week is to inform the public on the needs and accomplishments of our public schools and to secure the co-operation and support of the peo- ple in the meeting these needs and in teaching and fostering good Ameri- canism. The average citizen, busy with business affairs, has no connec- tion of school except as he knew it in his own school days. American Edu- cation Week will give the taxpayers first hand knowledge of the service for which they pay. It is'the duty of all friends of Education to help keep the idea of public education before all the people. The mayor of every communi- ty thruout the nation will be urged to issue a proclamation calling for the observance of American Education Week and asking every citizen to co- operate. "The National Convention of the American Legion at Kansas City marks a new era in Americanism," declares the editor of the Fairmont Independent, "Never before has such enthusiasm been displayed as has been at these sessions. America for Ameri- cans and the true American idea is paramount. This great organization of ex-service men, while withholding from politics, will shape the destiny of the nation in the coming decade. Such spirit as is shown is of the kind that will be forever for the betterment of the Nation." A score or more of Minnesota news- papers have shown their interest in and good will toward the American Legion in their editorial columns upon the occasion of the Legion's annual national re-union. The concensus of opinion seems to be that the Legion is making good. Perhaps the greatest compliment the newspapers have paid Legionaires, from the point of view of the latter, is the statement that "The American Legion is a worthy successor of the Grand Army of the Republic." No higher praise could be given. So united are the 36 Legion posts of the 8th Minnesota congressional dis- trict that instead of handling their un- employment problems individually, all vacancies are reported to the District Employment officer who also receives, thru the posts, the names of comrades out of work. By poolin jobs in this manner, unemployment among ex-ser- vice men is kept down to the mini- mum. The 8th District takes in Du- luth, Two Harbors, International Falls, and the Iron mining district of the Mesaba range. "The American Legion declares that mericans fought for the rights of America and the freedom of the world; and as Legionaires, and not the p01i- ticians, did the fighting, they ought to know. At least so far as we are con- cerned, we are going to take their word for it," writes the St. Cloud Times. DAY EXPRESSIVE OF A NATION'S GRATITUDE Turkey and cranberry sauce, crisp weather, n general sense of well-being and football are in the air at the very menUon of Thanksgiving, writes Mar- guerite Samuels in the New Orleans Times-Picayune. But football and too much dinner are not, in the final analysis, all of Thanksgiving. There is a deeper, in- spirational side to the day set aside through three hundred years of Amer- Ican history as  the great national celebration of gratitude. Do you remember the simple story of that first Thanksgiving day as you read it in your primary reader? And the thrill of thankfulness for national greatness and goodness that came to you as your chubby fingers drew de- formed turkeys and round-eyed' Pil- grim fathers on the school blackboard? It was in 1621, the fall following the landing at Plymouth, that the Pil- grims celebrated the first Thanksgiv- ing day. The little colony, one hun- dred and two souls who had fared westward from England for their con- science's sake, bad weathered the storms of the Atlantic and the worse hardships of a New England winter, and they had won'through at last to a sort of tranqullltyweomparatlvely speaking. Back from the rocky coastline of Massachusetts, with its thunder of limitless waves, a little group of log houses crowded together behind the tall stockade, feeling safe in their nearness to each other. Garnered corn filled the barns and the storerooms of the houses were pungent with ripe apples. The colony felt firmly established in the New World of its seeking. Even the silent- footed Indians had begun to under- stand that there was room for them and for the pale faces too. The de- Oh. Boys--Stuffing! rout Puritan spirit of the travelers in the Mayflower felt that there was sufficient cause for thanking God. The First Thanksgiving. And so it was that the first day of organized thanksgiving was set. The whole little colony, in its best buckled ! shoes and high hats, with blunder-l busses across square shoulders, sallied I i forth from the stockaded homes I through snow to the log church, there to give community thanks for the free- dom of their stern lives. Outside, the Indians crouched be- hind the firs and beeches, watching and wondering. From the Pilgrim colony, the custom spread to others in the New England states. In 1630 the Massachusetts Bay colony set aside a day forthanksgiv. lug, and frequently thereafter, until 1680, when it became a annual festi- val in the colony. Connecticut appointed a day in 1689, and annually after 1647, except in 1675. The Dutch in New Nether- lands set aside a day in 1644 and oc- casionally thereafter. During the War of Independence the Continental con- grass appointed one or more thanks- giving days each year, except in 1777. President Washington set aside Thurs- day, Nov. 26, 1789, as a day of na- tlonal thanks, and again in 1795 he called the country together for such a celebration. President Madison, at the close of the War of 1812, appointed a day. In New York state, from 1817 on, the festival was annual. In some of the southern states a na- tional Thanksgiving day met with op- position as a relic of Puritanic bigotry, so utterly at variance with the Cav- alier ideals of the southern colonists ; but by 1858 proclamations were issued by the governors >f 25 states and two territories. Is New England Festlval. Perhaps It is natural that the South, so far in thought and experience from the colonizers of New England, should even yet, be less whole-hearted in its celebration of Thanksgiving than is the eastern section of the United States. With its commemoration of hardships of 1620, with its ceremonies of the harvest, Thanksgiving is essen- tially a New England festival. And to see it truly carried out, you must see it there. In Massachusetts, it is the signal for great family reunions. From Cali- fornia, from the high seas, from the neighboring town, the sons and daugh- ters and cousins and aunts and uncles foregather at the old homestead on Thanksgiving day. With the first snowfall of the season, generally scheduled for the Jast week in Novem ber. the roomy sleighs and the vast bearskin rugs are hauled out of their summer mothballs; and from early morning until noon, there is a gay Jingle of sleigh bells going and coming between the railroad station and the farmhouse. After the dinner--s tremendous af- fair-the old people sit half dozing about the open fires, telling stories of the New England that is gone. "Do you remember?" says one; and they are off in a glorious revel of recallectlon sf their own youth, when automobiles were unknown, and Bos- ton might have been 1,500 Instead of 15 miles away. The young people of the family. i deeply wrapped tn fur coats and rugs, i already had dashed off along the slippery roads to Cambridge and "The I Game." The Harvard stadium on Thanks- giving day was a view of serried rows of excitement never to be forgotten. qfhe grey rhythmic curves of the coli- seum all flamlngly gay with banners and flowers and girls' holiday hats. Along the Harvard section, red roses and crimson sweaters bloomed in the menagerie of fur coats and rugs. Where the Yale contingent cheered for the bulldog, the blue of Parma violets was like a twilight mist along the rows of spectators. A whistle-and the game is on. Tensely leaning forward, the 80,000 watch as if life and death were being decided in the arena below. At the first touchdown the winning side goes mad with Joy. Flags wave, arms and hats are promiscuously pitched about, perfect strangers pat other perfect strangers on the back; and thrilled girls shake hands with boys they never saw before. Meanwhile the snow comes down softly, In a powdery rain, and the final goal sees frozen hands and feet res- tively glad to race off to warm dormi- tory teas, where the victo[y is cele- brated in English breakfast, or the defeat drowned in orange pekoe, cakes and laughing chatter. In Boston Thanksgiving morning great crowds fill Trinity, or whatever church has been designated for the union service. The pigeons in Copley square flutter over themtame friend- ly doves of "peace on earth, good will to men." Thanksgiving In New Orleans. Here in New Orleans several of the churches hold special union services, and the day is commemorated in typi- cal New Orleans fashlonthanking God by giving others something for which to be thankful. Mag!cal basket dinners, containing everything from turkey to dessert, are given to the hungry poor of the city by the Elks, the Shrtners, the Salvation Army, Kingsley house and other benevolent organizations. School children remem- ber, with fruit and nuts, the sufferers at the Home for Incurables. For the Great Day Coming. The pumpkin pie as It may bl Im in Its natural state, When Houston, Minnesota, Legion- aires netted $50 from their movie show they turned it over to the Sal- vation Army. They have not forgot- en what the army did for them over there. At Mankato, Minnesota, the Salvation Army, in honor of old times in France invited the mmbers of Lor- rentz Legion Post to a dinner in the Saulpaugh Hotel. To attempt chronicle all the ac- tivities of the Minnesota Legion posts on Armistice Day would require whole newspapers instead of newspaper col- umes. The occasion was observed en- thusiastically by Legion posts every- where. The Virginia Minnesota City Council voted $2,000 to the Burr Pratt Legion past to provide entertainment and eats for all former buddies. At Faribault, Minnesota, local Legion- aires took over the editing of the Warren, Minnesota, Legionaires arc erecting an ice-skating rink and are forming a hockey club and a basketball eam. Legionaires of Stewart, Minne- to burn corn? Should we who have stoves, ranges or furnaces which will I handle it use corn for fuel if we find it cheaper than coal and a satisfac- tory substitute? It is no joke, or if so, it is at the expense o fthe coal barons and the railroads for if a large percentage of the people in the corn states use "home grown" fuel it is practically certain to cause a drop in the price of coal and possibly in freight rates also which are things that most of us devoutly hope for. It would cause a rise in the price of corn and other feeds which would help the farmer pay he merchant his bills and the banker his interest. Let's look at it in this way; if we want to help our- selves, our neighbors and the Rus- sians, let us burn corn and send the difference in the price of the fuel to the lussians; if we want to help our- selves and neighbors, let's burn corn and keep the change; if we want to help the coal barons and railroad com- panies, let's burn coal. WAFFLES Served at the Pie House sots, are the proud possessors of a at all hours. pennant which says they are the champion baseball team of the Mc- Leod County Legion Baseball League for 1921. Ramsey County's twelve American Legion posts are establish- ing a Legion war museum, which wil] contain interesting war trophies bro back from France "by St. Paul Legion- aires. To Burn or Not to Burn. There has been a good deal of dis- cussion lately about using corn for fuel as a cheap substitute for coal It was tried out in a good many locali- ties last winter and the consensus of opinion seems to be that it compares very favorably with soft coal as a fue! avd at present prices of corn and coal wond be considerably cheaper. It does not sec/n that it could be used uccessfully in the :aazine heater but in the ordinary heater range or furn-: it i said to be very :::'ae.. tory. In spite of these admitted fa, : there are many v, ho hesitate to burn corn. A large share of these are "con- scientious objectors" who profes to be- lieve that it is a sin to use corn for fuel because it can be used for human food. They aint to the fact that peo- ple in Russia are starving for want of corn. Others seem to regard the idea as a huge joke and say "we ought to burn corn" but have no intention of doing so. The question is, ought we They're delicious. Yes Ma'am The (kt0nville Dry Cleanin00 Co. "Quality First-- Then Service A ray of sunshine has the right to penetrate anywhere. JUST THINK ! A LIBERTY BELL FREE OF CHARGE. This every boy and girl of this city to have one of these unique home safes. They will help you save your dimes and nickles. Open a Savings Account t.eday and get a Bell Bank. 5 PER CENT PAID ON ALL SAVINGS ORTONVILLE STATE John Carlson, President. C, J. Stark, Cashier. H.A. Stucke, Aas't. Proper .Care of Battery in Local Vesta Dealer Gives vice Regarding Methods of Storage Battery in Winter Winter storage for your Battery is a different problem from merely storing your for the winter. Your battery is an Chemical combination, and must have special tention, according to Mr. 0stlind, manager the local Vesta Station. There are two methods of battery wet and dry, states Mr. Ostlind. In wet the battery is left just the way it is taken the car. It must be kept at safe temI watered and charged at least once a month otherwise kept under competent Chemical action takes place during the months, and the life of the battery is somewhat shortened. Dry Storage is a far better method. separators are taken out of the battery and plates are stored dry. All chemical action suspended, so that the battery does not ate during winter. When it is reassembled the spring, new separators are used this method slightly more expensive, but the ded life given to the battery makes it cheaper the long run. The Park Garage00 Ostlind & Karn, Props. 'iT !ll With the Happiness the very comfort of your family at stake you can well afford to cultivate your Bank account, your Bank credit. Our most complete banking facil- ities are at your service. IIIIIIlllHIIIIIIIIIg] IIIIIIlllllllilllillllllllllililllllllllllllllllllllflllllllllllllllllll IIIilllllllllllllllll$11111flmllillllllllllilllllllllllllll[ IPAGE2 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT THURSDAY, I American ] Leqlon "The foundation of every state is the education of its youth." That is why The American Legion and The lational Education Association have joined together to hold an American Education week, December 4, 10, 1921. Eleven thousand Legion posts thru- out America will urge ministers of all denominations to preach upon Educa- tion on Sunday, December 4. Mer- chants will be asked to contribute ad- vertising space and window displays appropriately featuring EdUcation week. Newspapers and movi/ig pic- ture theatres will be urged to help drive home to the people the value nd the necessity of Education to the individual, the community, the state, and the nation. Thousands of Legion speakers will do their part. One of the greatest pillars of the Legion's creed is its solemn declara- tion in the preamble to its constitu- tion: "To foster and perpetrate a one hundred per cent Americanism and to tmeulcate a sense of individual obli- gation to the community, state, and nation." American Education Week is the big opportunity for every Le- gion Post, for a million buddies of the Legion, to help drive home to the country the great part which Educa- tion has played in making this Nation great "The School and the Nation," "Im- migration and the Nation," "The Value of Education," will form some of the Subjects which Legion speakers will discuss durin American Education i Week. Kindr-d subjects will be dealt with too, such as "Our Flag," "Ameri- can Ideals," "American Patriotism." American Patriotism, for which so many of our comrades died; the wear- ing of the Flag  our hearts as well as in our buttonholes; being gee0 citi- zens from day to day; always striving as citizens to reflect honor and respect pen the Nation. Part of the program for schoolchil- dren during American Week will in- clude the recitation of the "Pledge to America:" "I pledge allegiance to my Flag, and to the Republic for Which it stands; one nation indivisible, with liberty and justice for all," Anthem, telling how the flag was made, talks on Flag Etiquitte, discussion of inter- esting points regarding the Declara- tion of Independence, and short sdies on how the government of the drfd's greatest republic, functions. The main purpose of American Edu- cation Week is to inform the public on the needs and accomplishments of our public schools and to secure the co-operation and support of the peo- ple in the meeting these needs and in teaching and fostering good Ameri- canism. The average citizen, busy with business affairs, has no connec- tion of school except as he knew it in his own school days. American Edu- cation Week will give the taxpayers first hand knowledge of the service for which they pay. It is'the duty of all friends of Education to help keep the idea of public education before all the people. The mayor of every communi- ty thruout the nation will be urged to issue a proclamation calling for the observance of American Education Week and asking every citizen to co- operate. "The National Convention of the American Legion at Kansas City marks a new era in Americanism," declares the editor of the Fairmont Independent, "Never before has such enthusiasm been displayed as has been at these sessions. America for Ameri- cans and the true American idea is paramount. This great organization of ex-service men, while withholding from politics, will shape the destiny of the nation in the coming decade. Such spirit as is shown is of the kind that will be forever for the betterment of the Nation." A score or more of Minnesota news- papers have shown their interest in and good will toward the American Legion in their editorial columns upon the occasion of the Legion's annual national re-union. The concensus of opinion seems to be that the Legion is making good. Perhaps the greatest compliment the newspapers have paid Legionaires, from the point of view of the latter, is the statement that "The American Legion is a worthy successor of the Grand Army of the Republic." No higher praise could be given. So united are the 36 Legion posts of the 8th Minnesota congressional dis- trict that instead of handling their un- employment problems individually, all vacancies are reported to the District Employment officer who also receives, thru the posts, the names of comrades out of work. By poolin jobs in this manner, unemployment among ex-ser- vice men is kept down to the mini- mum. The 8th District takes in Du- luth, Two Harbors, International Falls, and the Iron mining district of the Mesaba range. "The American Legion declares that mericans fought for the rights of America and the freedom of the world; and as Legionaires, and not the p01i- ticians, did the fighting, they ought to know. At least so far as we are con- cerned, we are going to take their word for it," writes the St. Cloud Times. DAY EXPRESSIVE OF A NATION'S GRATITUDE Turkey and cranberry sauce, crisp weather, n general sense of well-being and football are in the air at the very menUon of Thanksgiving, writes Mar- guerite Samuels in the New Orleans Times-Picayune. But football and too much dinner are not, in the final analysis, all of Thanksgiving. There is a deeper, in- spirational side to the day set aside through three hundred years of Amer- Ican history as  the great national celebration of gratitude. Do you remember the simple story of that first Thanksgiving day as you read it in your primary reader? And the thrill of thankfulness for national greatness and goodness that came to you as your chubby fingers drew de- formed turkeys and round-eyed' Pil- grim fathers on the school blackboard? It was in 1621, the fall following the landing at Plymouth, that the Pil- grims celebrated the first Thanksgiv- ing day. The little colony, one hun- dred and two souls who had fared westward from England for their con- science's sake, bad weathered the storms of the Atlantic and the worse hardships of a New England winter, and they had won'through at last to a sort of tranqullltyweomparatlvely speaking. Back from the rocky coastline of Massachusetts, with its thunder of limitless waves, a little group of log houses crowded together behind the tall stockade, feeling safe in their nearness to each other. Garnered corn filled the barns and the storerooms of the houses were pungent with ripe apples. The colony felt firmly established in the New World of its seeking. Even the silent- footed Indians had begun to under- stand that there was room for them and for the pale faces too. The de- Oh. Boys--Stuffing! rout Puritan spirit of the travelers in the Mayflower felt that there was sufficient cause for thanking God. The First Thanksgiving. And so it was that the first day of organized thanksgiving was set. The whole little colony, in its best buckled ! shoes and high hats, with blunder-l busses across square shoulders, sallied I i forth from the stockaded homes I through snow to the log church, there to give community thanks for the free- dom of their stern lives. Outside, the Indians crouched be- hind the firs and beeches, watching and wondering. From the Pilgrim colony, the custom spread to others in the New England states. In 1630 the Massachusetts Bay colony set aside a day forthanksgiv. lug, and frequently thereafter, until 1680, when it became a annual festi- val in the colony. Connecticut appointed a day in 1689, and annually after 1647, except in 1675. The Dutch in New Nether- lands set aside a day in 1644 and oc- casionally thereafter. During the War of Independence the Continental con- grass appointed one or more thanks- giving days each year, except in 1777. President Washington set aside Thurs- day, Nov. 26, 1789, as a day of na- tlonal thanks, and again in 1795 he called the country together for such a celebration. President Madison, at the close of the War of 1812, appointed a day. In New York state, from 1817 on, the festival was annual. In some of the southern states a na- tional Thanksgiving day met with op- position as a relic of Puritanic bigotry, so utterly at variance with the Cav- alier ideals of the southern colonists ; but by 1858 proclamations were issued by the governors >f 25 states and two territories. Is New England Festlval. Perhaps It is natural that the South, so far in thought and experience from the colonizers of New England, should even yet, be less whole-hearted in its celebration of Thanksgiving than is the eastern section of the United States. With its commemoration of hardships of 1620, with its ceremonies of the harvest, Thanksgiving is essen- tially a New England festival. And to see it truly carried out, you must see it there. In Massachusetts, it is the signal for great family reunions. From Cali- fornia, from the high seas, from the neighboring town, the sons and daugh- ters and cousins and aunts and uncles foregather at the old homestead on Thanksgiving day. With the first snowfall of the season, generally scheduled for the Jast week in Novem ber. the roomy sleighs and the vast bearskin rugs are hauled out of their summer mothballs; and from early morning until noon, there is a gay Jingle of sleigh bells going and coming between the railroad station and the farmhouse. After the dinner--s tremendous af- fair-the old people sit half dozing about the open fires, telling stories of the New England that is gone. "Do you remember?" says one; and they are off in a glorious revel of recallectlon sf their own youth, when automobiles were unknown, and Bos- ton might have been 1,500 Instead of 15 miles away. The young people of the family. i deeply wrapped tn fur coats and rugs, i already had dashed off along the slippery roads to Cambridge and "The I Game." The Harvard stadium on Thanks- giving day was a view of serried rows of excitement never to be forgotten. qfhe grey rhythmic curves of the coli- seum all flamlngly gay with banners and flowers and girls' holiday hats. Along the Harvard section, red roses and crimson sweaters bloomed in the menagerie of fur coats and rugs. Where the Yale contingent cheered for the bulldog, the blue of Parma violets was like a twilight mist along the rows of spectators. A whistle-and the game is on. Tensely leaning forward, the 80,000 watch as if life and death were being decided in the arena below. At the first touchdown the winning side goes mad with Joy. Flags wave, arms and hats are promiscuously pitched about, perfect strangers pat other perfect strangers on the back; and thrilled girls shake hands with boys they never saw before. Meanwhile the snow comes down softly, In a powdery rain, and the final goal sees frozen hands and feet res- tively glad to race off to warm dormi- tory teas, where the victo[y is cele- brated in English breakfast, or the defeat drowned in orange pekoe, cakes and laughing chatter. In Boston Thanksgiving morning great crowds fill Trinity, or whatever church has been designated for the union service. The pigeons in Copley square flutter over themtame friend- ly doves of "peace on earth, good will to men." Thanksgiving In New Orleans. Here in New Orleans several of the churches hold special union services, and the day is commemorated in typi- cal New Orleans fashlonthanking God by giving others something for which to be thankful. Mag!cal basket dinners, containing everything from turkey to dessert, are given to the hungry poor of the city by the Elks, the Shrtners, the Salvation Army, Kingsley house and other benevolent organizations. School children remem- ber, with fruit and nuts, the sufferers at the Home for Incurables. For the Great Day Coming. The pumpkin pie as It may bl Im in Its natural state, When Houston, Minnesota, Legion- aires netted $50 from their movie show they turned it over to the Sal- vation Army. They have not forgot- en what the army did for them over there. At Mankato, Minnesota, the Salvation Army, in honor of old times in France invited the mmbers of Lor- rentz Legion Post to a dinner in the Saulpaugh Hotel. To attempt chronicle all the ac- tivities of the Minnesota Legion posts on Armistice Day would require whole newspapers instead of newspaper col- umes. The occasion was observed en- thusiastically by Legion posts every- where. The Virginia Minnesota City Council voted $2,000 to the Burr Pratt Legion past to provide entertainment and eats for all former buddies. At Faribault, Minnesota, local Legion- aires took over the editing of the Warren, Minnesota, Legionaires arc erecting an ice-skating rink and are forming a hockey club and a basketball eam. Legionaires of Stewart, Minne- to burn corn? Should we who have stoves, ranges or furnaces which will I handle it use corn for fuel if we find it cheaper than coal and a satisfac- tory substitute? It is no joke, or if so, it is at the expense o fthe coal barons and the railroads for if a large percentage of the people in the corn states use "home grown" fuel it is practically certain to cause a drop in the price of coal and possibly in freight rates also which are things that most of us devoutly hope for. It would cause a rise in the price of corn and other feeds which would help the farmer pay he merchant his bills and the banker his interest. Let's look at it in this way; if we want to help our- selves, our neighbors and the Rus- sians, let us burn corn and send the difference in the price of the fuel to the lussians; if we want to help our- selves and neighbors, let's burn corn and keep the change; if we want to help the coal barons and railroad com- panies, let's burn coal. WAFFLES Served at the Pie House sots, are the proud possessors of a at all hours. pennant which says they are the champion baseball team of the Mc- Leod County Legion Baseball League for 1921. Ramsey County's twelve American Legion posts are establish- ing a Legion war museum, which wil] contain interesting war trophies bro back from France "by St. Paul Legion- aires. To Burn or Not to Burn. There has been a good deal of dis- cussion lately about using corn for fuel as a cheap substitute for coal It was tried out in a good many locali- ties last winter and the consensus of opinion seems to be that it compares very favorably with soft coal as a fue! avd at present prices of corn and coal wond be considerably cheaper. It does not sec/n that it could be used uccessfully in the :aazine heater but in the ordinary heater range or furn-: it i said to be very :::'ae.. tory. In spite of these admitted fa, : there are many v, ho hesitate to burn corn. A large share of these are "con- scientious objectors" who profes to be- lieve that it is a sin to use corn for fuel because it can be used for human food. They aint to the fact that peo- ple in Russia are starving for want of corn. Others seem to regard the idea as a huge joke and say "we ought to burn corn" but have no intention of doing so. The question is, ought we They're delicious. Yes Ma'am The (kt0nville Dry Cleanin00 Co. "Quality First-- Then Service A ray of sunshine has the right to penetrate anywhere. JUST THINK ! A LIBERTY BELL FREE OF CHARGE. This every boy and girl of this city to have one of these unique home safes. They will help you save your dimes and nickles. Open a Savings Account t.eday and get a Bell Bank. 5 PER CENT PAID ON ALL SAVINGS ORTONVILLE STATE John Carlson, President. C, J. Stark, Cashier. H.A. Stucke, Aas't. Proper .Care of Battery in Local Vesta Dealer Gives vice Regarding Methods of Storage Battery in Winter Winter storage for your Battery is a different problem from merely storing your for the winter. Your battery is an Chemical combination, and must have special tention, according to Mr. 0stlind, manager the local Vesta Station. There are two methods of battery wet and dry, states Mr. Ostlind. In wet the battery is left just the way it is taken the car. It must be kept at safe temI watered and charged at least once a month otherwise kept under competent Chemical action takes place during the months, and the life of the battery is somewhat shortened. Dry Storage is a far better method. separators are taken out of the battery and plates are stored dry. All chemical action suspended, so that the battery does not ate during winter. When it is reassembled the spring, new separators are used this method slightly more expensive, but the ded life given to the battery makes it cheaper the long run. The Park Garage00 Ostlind & Karn, Props. 'iT !ll With the Happiness the very comfort of your family at stake you can well afford to cultivate your Bank account, your Bank credit. Our most complete banking facil- ities are at your service. IIIIIIlllHIIIIIIIIIg] IIIIIIlllllllilllillllllllllililllllllllllllllllllllflllllllllllllllllll IIIilllllllllllllllll$11111flmllillllllllllilllllllllllllll[ USE SUBJECTTO LICENSE AGREEMENT REPROOUCTO 0'SSEM'NAT'ON STORAGE 0'STR'BUr'ON PROHB'TE0 FAGEZ THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT rAdrner,ca. 1 DAY EXPRESSIVE I Leq ion I ' L W ornerj OF A NATION'S  "The foundation of every state is the education of its youth." That is why The Amerlc Legion /ational joined together to hold an Arieen Education week, December 4, 10, 1921. Eleven thod Legion posts th- net America will urge ministers of al dmination to preach upon Edn tlan on Sday, Deber 4. Mer- dsants will be asked to contribute ad- erttslng spe and window displays apppxately featuring Edteatlon week. Newspap and movl6g pic- ture theatres will be urged to help drb home to the people the value aud the slty of Edti to the Jludivldual, the emmdty, the state, lad the nation. ThouSands of Legion akers will do their part. One of the greatest pil[a of the Legion' creed is its solemn ta in the preamble to flea: "To fester d perpette a one hundred per eat Amricanim d te b.mleste  sen of Indlvldl obll- Katon to the community, state, d rmtlo." nelSn Edatlon Week is the big opportunity for every Le. aden post, for a mitlion buddie af the legion, to help drive home to th eoentry the great part which Eda don h played iU king thin Natlo tqea GRATITUDE 'Trke arl anberry maul, guerlte Samuals tn the New TlmPieayu.e. But fthalt and t ranch In the nnal aaa[ysls, alt of Thanksgtvlng. Tbe Is a deeper, In. Side to the day set thngh thee hundred yearn of Ame lu hlst a the gret De you remember the mple itery dret rhenksgtvlns day u y ad It In your prtmar ader greatne and gooanes that came to yo as year ehnbb flngere dw d tUrkeyS d nnd-eyed pile tn It was in II, the fall fonwln the landlng at ptymth, that th* Pn- The llttle olon,  bun. dred and two seals who hd fared wtwd from agEd ke, bad weathered the and the woe hardshlp* of a ew gland winter, and they had won'thrgh to a sort o tranqulUt--omparavely the Mayfloer felt that there was already hod dashed off along the sumclent eau for thanking God. i slippery s to C,,mbrdge and "The The Fr.t "rhanklivl. I (ame." And so It was that the erst day of The ]aard cranium on eresnlzed thanksgiving was set The, giving da l of hgh hat. with blunder-  The gey rthmlc sa led  scum all n from the stockaded homes and owers and grls' holiday the Io chuh, the ' Along the Hazard section, red to give eommunZt thanks for the fre I Ind crimson aweate boomed aom of thetr stem lives. Imenagerle of fur coati and s. Outside. the ladaaSbeh,euehedwatch[ngb [ Whe the Yala continent cheed for and wderlng. [ was nke i tlLzht mist along the rows Fm the pILgNm lony, the enstom al to others In the New England A whtsttd the game Is on. tat In 1 the MIssachset Bay Tenely leaning ford, the 8O.OOO t slde a dey f.hakslv* InS. and fluently In the ana betow. lelt0, wh It be I1 annual fel- the winning side ge Ilap wRve, arms alld onneetlt appointed a day In are promlonl gitl about, nnuany after 1?, expt strangers pat ther The Dutch In New e back; and da grll shake hsn with bass they never ca.lnnatly thereafter. Dung the War w hefo. of Independence the Cotlnentel Meanwhile e  es fUy, In a pc'der ln, and the anal 'lvlfig days eaeb ear. except ta 1777. |t s tEvely  day. Nov. 2O. 179, aa a day of ha- tory team, whe the vletn USl thinks, snd gln In 15 h bratl In Igllsb ba or the entry tether d In oge ko. Pldent la '.taa ThonkszLlng momlal n daY. gat cwds U lntty, or whatever In N Yk stat, l'm 1817 ehnh h bn devilled was annual. e plzes In Cepley UOnBI Thankslng day met th OP- ly dovu  "aeo  rth, good wnl to men." etterly Thanvln0 In N Otea. IIe In New JUST THINK! A LIBERTY BELL FREE OF CHARGE. every boy d glrl of this city to have o of the iqs home sfe They w] help you ve yo dimes trickles. Open a Sangs Aount tday d get a Ibert  Bell Bank, ON ALL SAVINGS ORTONVILLE John Caa, pklt. Proper Care of Battery in Local Vesta Dealer Gives vice Regarding Methods of Storage Battery in Winter speaking. "The School and the Nation," "Ira- Back from the rocky eoanOIne of mlgratinnandtheNatlon,""TheVa]ue Maasaehsett with Its thunder of af Eduction," ll llmltls wave a little group of log terrtert SubJts which Legion speake he e deal e eth behtsd eal l%w Orlemns fashlon--thanktng dius dnriq Amer[, n Ed, tall stockadeW felLgg sate tn the II New engitnd Feftlvat. end by gay n o hers meth g er my of ourmrades died. the a celebration of ThanksSdvng ban s' e Shne the SalvetLon Ay Wk. Kindr-d subjects v11 be dell e other Perhaps t Is natural that the Sth. which to be thaekfu. Mug eal basket ne to sch th t. sh as "Our Flag," "Ameri- Garnered co ned te bas and me far In thought and eperLen from dinne, eomslnlng evythtng tm Ideals " '*AraeHn patrtotim.' m b n we the ]onlers of New England, should, trkey to deert, are given to the American Parr o sm or which  te ster s of the o ev yet be ls whotbeared n I s hungry por of te city by the Elks pgent with pe appleS, The eoly ' , fel firm y estabshed n the New I h st U I ' ' ]ng of the FIag  our hearts as wel Wordo askng Even helnte - tet t ea emWh on of the United ngsey hnn and nhe benday ent n our b ttonho]es bein c ci i S a es. t t mm,t on o org za s Seh ch dn remem- u ,   fted Indians hod boston to under- s 1 lth tlt n n ts th ff zen from day to day', always tr'ving, stand that the wu m for th hardship of eO wtth Its ceremonl her, w a d n , e sn e U n tizens to flt honor d res ect of te haest, ThankagLvlng ts esn- at te Home er Ineub upon the Natiem P and for the pale ta t. oe d tinny a New England fesflwi. And to -- e It tly ealed out you must  FOr the Great [}a Co.in eAPmro  ekhOhi]: 01tl BOy$'-'SUlgl It Izea ....................... Y g 2.Y,2 ,_._..o n ............................. dude the rltatlon o the "Pledge to I .. . fern a, frnm the Mgh as, from the America: 1 pledge allegiance to my ne gbb ring town, the ns and daugh- Flag, and to the end uncles i it stands; one nation inner, sable, with Winter storage for i different problem from merely storing your c for the winter. Your battery is chemical comhination, and must have special a( tention, according to Mr. Ostlind, manager the local Vesta Station. There are wet and dry, states Mr. Ostlind. In wet the battery is left just the way it is the car. It must be kept at safe watered and charged at least once a otherwise kept under competent Chemlcal action takes place during the liberty and justice for all," Anthem, telling how the flag was made, talks n Flag Etiquitte, esting points gardJng the Uou of Independent, and short madles on how the government of the gtfd's gtest epnb]i, functi0n. etlon Week is to info the public the needs d aeeempllshments of oar public schools aud to ee the co open, inn d snpport of the peo- ple in the mtlng thee eeds and in tehing d ostering good Ame- with business affrs, ls nwn seheol dnys. tion Week will give the taxpayers fit hand knowledg which they pay. It isthe duty of all riende of Education to help keep the idea n pnbic edatian before all the people. The mayer ef every communi- ty thout the nation will be nrged to is a ree[amation calling for tbs obce of Americ Edneton Week and asg every citizen to . perate. 'he National Cenventlon of th Arin Legion t Kansas Cit eks a new era in Amerleanism d s the editor nf the Falcon Independent, "Never before h ch enthusiasm ben displayed  has been at these ssions. Aeriea for Ameri s and the tree Ameti idea is pon This great organzae of ex*seJee men, while withheldi f polities, will shape the desfin of the nation in the coming deead Sh epirit as is shown Is nf the Jd that will be foreve for the bettement nf the Nio" m t sce or moze of Minnets  papers have sho their interest in and good will towed the American Legion in their editorial eolnmns upon the ion of the begion's annual tional e-miou. The cennsus ot oplnlnn seems to bethat the Legion i, king good. Perhaps the greatee mpIlment the newspapers have pd Iginnals, fm the point of ve ef the later, is the etatement thai "The Americ Legion is a worth uessor of the Grand Army of th RepubliC." Ne bgher praise uld b given. So nnited a the 6 Lgion posts ol the 8t Minnet ngessonal di triet that instead of hdliug their un- employment problems individually, all eees are ported to the Isudct Employment ncer who alsn recves, thr the posts, the nes nf cemrade nnt nf work. By rolln jobs In this When Houston, Minnesota, Legion- aires netted $o from their moe show they tued it over to the Sal- vation Ay. They have nnt orgot- en what the army did for them over the. At Mankato, Mineta, the Salvation Army, in honor of eld times in Fnce invited the mbes of Lor- ntz Legion Post to a dinner in the Sau]paugh IIotel, To attempt 4hrnniele all the - fivitins of the Mnnesnta Legion posts en Armistice Day would qnire whele aepapers instead ef newpaper ol- ume The nccion w nbserved ca- thus asicalv by Igion posts every- where The Virginia Minneta City CounCil voted $2,00 to the Burt Pratl Legion past to precede entertainment and eat for al former bnddies. At Pallbault, Mhmeota. local Legin- as took ever the editing of the m Warren, Minneeta, Legianaires are crating aa ice-skating rink and a fnn n hockey club d a bketbal] lea Legionais ef Stewart, Min sots, are the pad peesors ef a pennant which says they a the hpinn bahall team ef the Mn Lend Cnunty Legion Baebl Leale for 1921. Eamy County's twei Amebean Legion post a establih. ing a Legion war mnsenm, which will contain interesting wa trophlee brel bk frnm Fm by St. Paul Legion- ir. To Bu or Not to Barn. The has bn a good deal of di ensslon lately about uing eo for fuel as a cheap substitute for coal. It was tred nnt in a good many loii- tied last winter and the nsenas nf opineu ems to be that it eompa ery favorably with sott coal as a fun! and at pent pces of corn and een weald be considerably cheaper manner, unemployment emong -ser. It does not sen that it could b used , men is kept do Lo the mr- 1,sfnlly iv th :aazlne heard, mum. The 8th District take in Du- bnt in the ordlnary heaer range or luth, Two Harbr, Intonational ur,tnc Jt i said to he ver  " a Fall, and the I mining district of tory. In site nf these admitted In, the Me.ha range, there are many ,,he hesitate to b,n -- co. A large share nf thee are "con- 'rhe Amebean Igin deelas that ientio objectors" who prefers to ho- T'men. doing sn. The qnestion is, enght we Aricans fought for the rights of Sieve that it s a sin to use cnrn for America and the freedom nf the world; fnel because it can be used for hnn and as Legienals, and not the poll- fd They.aint to the fact that pen- finishs, did the fighting, they ought to ple in RUSSla are g for want know. At leant se far u w ave n- of eo. Others m to regard the domed, we are going to take their idea n* a huge Joke aud say "we ought ord for it" writes the t Cloud abumeorn"bnthaveno ntentonnf to bu eo? Should we who have stove, rang  faees which will handle it a it cheaper than coal d a tory sabstltute? It s no joke, or iI n it is at the expense o fthe coal baro and the railads fn f a argo peentage of the people in the co stat u "home gro" fuel it is prteally certain to cse a drop in the prlee ef coal ad poIbly n freight rates also which a things that most nf us devoutly hope for. It wnnld eane a rise in the pri of corn and nther feeds which would help the faer pa the banker his interest. it in this way; if we want to help our- sel, our neighbors and the Rn- slane, let ns burn rn and nd the difference in the price of the Rnssias; Jf we want to help ear- ,diVeS and neighbors, let's bu d keep thn change; fielp the coal barons and railad eem- punier, let's bu el. WAFFLES Served at the Pie Hon at all hours. They're delicious, Yes Ma'am The Ort0nville Dry Cleaning o. Quality First-- Then Service A ray of sunshine h the right to penetrate anywhere. months, and the life of the battery somewhat shortened. Dry " a far better method. separators plates All suspended, .o ate duing winter. but the ded life given to the batter3 the long run. The Park Garage Ostlind & Karn, Props. With the Happiness the very comfort of your family at stake you can well afford to cultivate your Bank account, your Bank credit. Our most complete banking facil- ities are at your service. IPAGE2 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT THURSDAY, I American ] Leqlon "The foundation of every state is the education of its youth." That is why The American Legion and The lational Education Association have joined together to hold an American Education week, December 4, 10, 1921. Eleven thousand Legion posts thru- out America will urge ministers of all denominations to preach upon Educa- tion on Sunday, December 4. Mer- chants will be asked to contribute ad- vertising space and window displays appropriately featuring EdUcation week. Newspapers and movi/ig pic- ture theatres will be urged to help drive home to the people the value nd the necessity of Education to the individual, the community, the state, and the nation. Thousands of Legion speakers will do their part. One of the greatest pillars of the Legion's creed is its solemn declara- tion in the preamble to its constitu- tion: "To foster and perpetrate a one hundred per cent Americanism and to tmeulcate a sense of individual obli- gation to the community, state, and nation." American Education Week is the big opportunity for every Le- gion Post, for a million buddies of the Legion, to help drive home to the country the great part which Educa- tion has played in making this Nation great "The School and the Nation," "Im- migration and the Nation," "The Value of Education," will form some of the Subjects which Legion speakers will discuss durin American Education i Week. Kindr-d subjects will be dealt with too, such as "Our Flag," "Ameri- can Ideals," "American Patriotism." American Patriotism, for which so many of our comrades died; the wear- ing of the Flag  our hearts as well as in our buttonholes; being gee0 citi- zens from day to day; always striving as citizens to reflect honor and respect pen the Nation. Part of the program for schoolchil- dren during American Week will in- clude the recitation of the "Pledge to America:" "I pledge allegiance to my Flag, and to the Republic for Which it stands; one nation indivisible, with liberty and justice for all," Anthem, telling how the flag was made, talks on Flag Etiquitte, discussion of inter- esting points regarding the Declara- tion of Independence, and short sdies on how the government of the drfd's greatest republic, functions. The main purpose of American Edu- cation Week is to inform the public on the needs and accomplishments of our public schools and to secure the co-operation and support of the peo- ple in the meeting these needs and in teaching and fostering good Ameri- canism. The average citizen, busy with business affairs, has no connec- tion of school except as he knew it in his own school days. American Edu- cation Week will give the taxpayers first hand knowledge of the service for which they pay. It is'the duty of all friends of Education to help keep the idea of public education before all the people. The mayor of every communi- ty thruout the nation will be urged to issue a proclamation calling for the observance of American Education Week and asking every citizen to co- operate. "The National Convention of the American Legion at Kansas City marks a new era in Americanism," declares the editor of the Fairmont Independent, "Never before has such enthusiasm been displayed as has been at these sessions. America for Ameri- cans and the true American idea is paramount. This great organization of ex-service men, while withholding from politics, will shape the destiny of the nation in the coming decade. Such spirit as is shown is of the kind that will be forever for the betterment of the Nation." A score or more of Minnesota news- papers have shown their interest in and good will toward the American Legion in their editorial columns upon the occasion of the Legion's annual national re-union. The concensus of opinion seems to be that the Legion is making good. Perhaps the greatest compliment the newspapers have paid Legionaires, from the point of view of the latter, is the statement that "The American Legion is a worthy successor of the Grand Army of the Republic." No higher praise could be given. So united are the 36 Legion posts of the 8th Minnesota congressional dis- trict that instead of handling their un- employment problems individually, all vacancies are reported to the District Employment officer who also receives, thru the posts, the names of comrades out of work. By poolin jobs in this manner, unemployment among ex-ser- vice men is kept down to the mini- mum. The 8th District takes in Du- luth, Two Harbors, International Falls, and the Iron mining district of the Mesaba range. "The American Legion declares that mericans fought for the rights of America and the freedom of the world; and as Legionaires, and not the p01i- ticians, did the fighting, they ought to know. At least so far as we are con- cerned, we are going to take their word for it," writes the St. Cloud Times. DAY EXPRESSIVE OF A NATION'S GRATITUDE Turkey and cranberry sauce, crisp weather, n general sense of well-being and football are in the air at the very menUon of Thanksgiving, writes Mar- guerite Samuels in the New Orleans Times-Picayune. But football and too much dinner are not, in the final analysis, all of Thanksgiving. There is a deeper, in- spirational side to the day set aside through three hundred years of Amer- Ican history as  the great national celebration of gratitude. Do you remember the simple story of that first Thanksgiving day as you read it in your primary reader? And the thrill of thankfulness for national greatness and goodness that came to you as your chubby fingers drew de- formed turkeys and round-eyed' Pil- grim fathers on the school blackboard? It was in 1621, the fall following the landing at Plymouth, that the Pil- grims celebrated the first Thanksgiv- ing day. The little colony, one hun- dred and two souls who had fared westward from England for their con- science's sake, bad weathered the storms of the Atlantic and the worse hardships of a New England winter, and they had won'through at last to a sort of tranqullltyweomparatlvely speaking. Back from the rocky coastline of Massachusetts, with its thunder of limitless waves, a little group of log houses crowded together behind the tall stockade, feeling safe in their nearness to each other. Garnered corn filled the barns and the storerooms of the houses were pungent with ripe apples. The colony felt firmly established in the New World of its seeking. Even the silent- footed Indians had begun to under- stand that there was room for them and for the pale faces too. The de- Oh. Boys--Stuffing! rout Puritan spirit of the travelers in the Mayflower felt that there was sufficient cause for thanking God. The First Thanksgiving. And so it was that the first day of organized thanksgiving was set. The whole little colony, in its best buckled ! shoes and high hats, with blunder-l busses across square shoulders, sallied I i forth from the stockaded homes I through snow to the log church, there to give community thanks for the free- dom of their stern lives. Outside, the Indians crouched be- hind the firs and beeches, watching and wondering. From the Pilgrim colony, the custom spread to others in the New England states. In 1630 the Massachusetts Bay colony set aside a day forthanksgiv. lug, and frequently thereafter, until 1680, when it became a annual festi- val in the colony. Connecticut appointed a day in 1689, and annually after 1647, except in 1675. The Dutch in New Nether- lands set aside a day in 1644 and oc- casionally thereafter. During the War of Independence the Continental con- grass appointed one or more thanks- giving days each year, except in 1777. President Washington set aside Thurs- day, Nov. 26, 1789, as a day of na- tlonal thanks, and again in 1795 he called the country together for such a celebration. President Madison, at the close of the War of 1812, appointed a day. In New York state, from 1817 on, the festival was annual. In some of the southern states a na- tional Thanksgiving day met with op- position as a relic of Puritanic bigotry, so utterly at variance with the Cav- alier ideals of the southern colonists ; but by 1858 proclamations were issued by the governors >f 25 states and two territories. Is New England Festlval. Perhaps It is natural that the South, so far in thought and experience from the colonizers of New England, should even yet, be less whole-hearted in its celebration of Thanksgiving than is the eastern section of the United States. With its commemoration of hardships of 1620, with its ceremonies of the harvest, Thanksgiving is essen- tially a New England festival. And to see it truly carried out, you must see it there. In Massachusetts, it is the signal for great family reunions. From Cali- fornia, from the high seas, from the neighboring town, the sons and daugh- ters and cousins and aunts and uncles foregather at the old homestead on Thanksgiving day. With the first snowfall of the season, generally scheduled for the Jast week in Novem ber. the roomy sleighs and the vast bearskin rugs are hauled out of their summer mothballs; and from early morning until noon, there is a gay Jingle of sleigh bells going and coming between the railroad station and the farmhouse. After the dinner--s tremendous af- fair-the old people sit half dozing about the open fires, telling stories of the New England that is gone. "Do you remember?" says one; and they are off in a glorious revel of recallectlon sf their own youth, when automobiles were unknown, and Bos- ton might have been 1,500 Instead of 15 miles away. The young people of the family. i deeply wrapped tn fur coats and rugs, i already had dashed off along the slippery roads to Cambridge and "The I Game." The Harvard stadium on Thanks- giving day was a view of serried rows of excitement never to be forgotten. qfhe grey rhythmic curves of the coli- seum all flamlngly gay with banners and flowers and girls' holiday hats. Along the Harvard section, red roses and crimson sweaters bloomed in the menagerie of fur coats and rugs. Where the Yale contingent cheered for the bulldog, the blue of Parma violets was like a twilight mist along the rows of spectators. A whistle-and the game is on. Tensely leaning forward, the 80,000 watch as if life and death were being decided in the arena below. At the first touchdown the winning side goes mad with Joy. Flags wave, arms and hats are promiscuously pitched about, perfect strangers pat other perfect strangers on the back; and thrilled girls shake hands with boys they never saw before. Meanwhile the snow comes down softly, In a powdery rain, and the final goal sees frozen hands and feet res- tively glad to race off to warm dormi- tory teas, where the victo[y is cele- brated in English breakfast, or the defeat drowned in orange pekoe, cakes and laughing chatter. In Boston Thanksgiving morning great crowds fill Trinity, or whatever church has been designated for the union service. The pigeons in Copley square flutter over themtame friend- ly doves of "peace on earth, good will to men." Thanksgiving In New Orleans. Here in New Orleans several of the churches hold special union services, and the day is commemorated in typi- cal New Orleans fashlonthanking God by giving others something for which to be thankful. Mag!cal basket dinners, containing everything from turkey to dessert, are given to the hungry poor of the city by the Elks, the Shrtners, the Salvation Army, Kingsley house and other benevolent organizations. School children remem- ber, with fruit and nuts, the sufferers at the Home for Incurables. For the Great Day Coming. The pumpkin pie as It may bl Im in Its natural state, When Houston, Minnesota, Legion- aires netted $50 from their movie show they turned it over to the Sal- vation Army. They have not forgot- en what the army did for them over there. At Mankato, Minnesota, the Salvation Army, in honor of old times in France invited the mmbers of Lor- rentz Legion Post to a dinner in the Saulpaugh Hotel. To attempt chronicle all the ac- tivities of the Minnesota Legion posts on Armistice Day would require whole newspapers instead of newspaper col- umes. The occasion was observed en- thusiastically by Legion posts every- where. The Virginia Minnesota City Council voted $2,000 to the Burr Pratt Legion past to provide entertainment and eats for all former buddies. At Faribault, Minnesota, local Legion- aires took over the editing of the Warren, Minnesota, Legionaires arc erecting an ice-skating rink and are forming a hockey club and a basketball eam. Legionaires of Stewart, Minne- to burn corn? Should we who have stoves, ranges or furnaces which will I handle it use corn for fuel if we find it cheaper than coal and a satisfac- tory substitute? It is no joke, or if so, it is at the expense o fthe coal barons and the railroads for if a large percentage of the people in the corn states use "home grown" fuel it is practically certain to cause a drop in the price of coal and possibly in freight rates also which are things that most of us devoutly hope for. It would cause a rise in the price of corn and other feeds which would help the farmer pay he merchant his bills and the banker his interest. Let's look at it in this way; if we want to help our- selves, our neighbors and the Rus- sians, let us burn corn and send the difference in the price of the fuel to the lussians; if we want to help our- selves and neighbors, let's burn corn and keep the change; if we want to help the coal barons and railroad com- panies, let's burn coal. WAFFLES Served at the Pie House sots, are the proud possessors of a at all hours. pennant which says they are the champion baseball team of the Mc- Leod County Legion Baseball League for 1921. Ramsey County's twelve American Legion posts are establish- ing a Legion war museum, which wil] contain interesting war trophies bro back from France "by St. Paul Legion- aires. To Burn or Not to Burn. There has been a good deal of dis- cussion lately about using corn for fuel as a cheap substitute for coal It was tried out in a good many locali- ties last winter and the consensus of opinion seems to be that it compares very favorably with soft coal as a fue! avd at present prices of corn and coal wond be considerably cheaper. It does not sec/n that it could be used uccessfully in the :aazine heater but in the ordinary heater range or furn-: it i said to be very :::'ae.. tory. In spite of these admitted fa, : there are many v, ho hesitate to burn corn. A large share of these are "con- scientious objectors" who profes to be- lieve that it is a sin to use corn for fuel because it can be used for human food. They aint to the fact that peo- ple in Russia are starving for want of corn. Others seem to regard the idea as a huge joke and say "we ought to burn corn" but have no intention of doing so. The question is, ought we They're delicious. Yes Ma'am The (kt0nville Dry Cleanin00 Co. "Quality First-- Then Service A ray of sunshine has the right to penetrate anywhere. JUST THINK ! A LIBERTY BELL FREE OF CHARGE. This every boy and girl of this city to have one of these unique home safes. They will help you save your dimes and nickles. Open a Savings Account t.eday and get a Bell Bank. 5 PER CENT PAID ON ALL SAVINGS ORTONVILLE STATE John Carlson, President. C, J. Stark, Cashier. H.A. Stucke, Aas't. Proper .Care of Battery in Local Vesta Dealer Gives vice Regarding Methods of Storage Battery in Winter Winter storage for your Battery is a different problem from merely storing your for the winter. Your battery is an Chemical combination, and must have special tention, according to Mr. 0stlind, manager the local Vesta Station. There are two methods of battery wet and dry, states Mr. Ostlind. In wet the battery is left just the way it is taken the car. It must be kept at safe temI watered and charged at least once a month otherwise kept under competent Chemical action takes place during the months, and the life of the battery is somewhat shortened. Dry Storage is a far better method. separators are taken out of the battery and plates are stored dry. All chemical action suspended, so that the battery does not ate during winter. When it is reassembled the spring, new separators are used this method slightly more expensive, but the ded life given to the battery makes it cheaper the long run. The Park Garage00 Ostlind & Karn, Props. 'iT !ll With the Happiness the very comfort of your family at stake you can well afford to cultivate your Bank account, your Bank credit. Our most complete banking facil- ities are at your service. IIIIIIlllHIIIIIIIIIg] IIIIIIlllllllilllillllllllllililllllllllllllllllllllflllllllllllllllllll IIIilllllllllllllllll$11111flmllillllllllllilllllllllllllll[