Newspaper Archive of
The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
Lyft
November 24, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
PAGE 6     (6 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 6     (6 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
November 24, 1921
 

Newspaper Archive of The Ortonville Independent produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




Where Do We Go From Here? By Maud Radford Warren This was the question you soldiers of the A. E. F. asked when you were called to the colors. You said it al- ways with humor, but always, toy, .with underlying seriousness. It be- i came, in a way, your slogan. An un-! known soldier torpedoed out of the scania reached a raft so overloaded that those on it warned him that if he joined them they_ would all drown; he swam away saying, "Where do we go from here?" You said it march- ing up from second to first lines, and in the trenches, and dying on the field and slowly getting well in the hospi- tals. You said it on the day of the :Armistice--md so,me of you are sav- ing it still. It i. not a new question. The cave- ]men asked it of one another when to protect their homes, they finished the first battle with the enemies beyond the next ridge. They wiped their stone mnmm., buried their dead and want- ed to know what next. Doubtless, the lmore active warriors began to invent stone weapons warranted to make mincemeat of all opposing heads, .While those with a glimmering of philosophy reminded the warriors that the enemies were likewise not idle in of self-sacrifice, small and great, from little personal denials to the greatest and final test---for many who sleep now in the American graveyard at Romagne, literally laid down their lives for their friends. Something like three years ago you came home to a country that no long- er needed you for war. Many of you were disappointed and perhaps dis- couraged with what you found. You have had your own personal problems, but they have not completely absorbed you; beyond them you have seen your country urged on this side and that with many propagandas, swayed with cross-currents of feeling. It is hard to tell what causes-are worthy; some- times what really is worth while seems shoddy because of the people associated with it. But in all the con- fusion this fact is sure: you are grow- ing to be more and more a power in the land. Precisely as much as it needed you in war does your country need you now. All the big social feelings you de- veloped overseas have been linked up with war. But has not the hour come to apply them to peace, and to peace only? In the years to come, could "Dreamers and Their Dreams." Spe- cial music at both preaching services. Thursday: Midweek Bible study meet- ing, 7:45 p. m. All are most cordially invited, to these services. $ $ Church of St. John. Rev. Fr. J. A. SuIlivam Mass at 9:00 next Sunday morning, November 27. $ @ Zion Lutheran Church. Rev. Arnold Nelson, Pastor. Services in English next Sunday morning, November 27 from 10 to 11 o'clock and in the Swedish language from 11 to 12 o'clock. Sunday school from 12 to 1 p. m. Evening service in English at 7:30 o'clock at which the Union Lutheran Choir will sing. Services will be held in English on Thanksgiving Day from 10 to 11 o'clock a. m. The Ladies' Aid will meet at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Kriesel aturday afterrLoon, Dee. 3 to which all are invited to attend. Zion Ladies' Aid will hold their an- nual Bazaar Saturday afternoon of this week, November 26, at the Gain- a-day Electrical shop. Lunch will be served in connection. $ United Evangelical Church. armament and counting the dead, the nalmed, the widows and orphans, they asked what had been the real profit, and what should be the next move. Down thru the long ages, scarred .ith wars which have seemed to car- lJ utter waste of life has counted the losses, asked what the gain was, and inquired, "Where do we go from ]lere?" From the first battle of the cavemen till the latest struggle on the [Argonne, the gain has been the same --not territory, or wealth, or power, but just this: The shining spectacle of great loyalties; courage, self-sac- fiee, devotion to homes, devotion to country. And in all the nations dur- ing all the ages, none have sho-n and stood by these great loyalties more valiantly than you soldiers of the A. E.F. Thoughts of your people and your homes Were with you frufn your first day in camp till your last hour in France or Flanders or Germany. From your first training in back areas and 6'quiet" sectors, thru Cantigny and Champagne, in the drive from the Marne to the Vesle, in the St. Mihiel and the Argonne drives, you showed supreme endurance, matchless courage and self-forgetful service for buddies and officers. These high qualities were doubtless in you before you went you really preserve your country by fighting ? Can safety come thru any future wars ? Stone hammers are not much more out of date than the wea pons of seven years ago; we have gone so far in od rinventions that one bomb Of the latest poison gas will destroy all life within a radius of two hun- dred miles. Modern means of destruc- tion are so deadly that the homes you would die to preserve could be obliter- ated in spite of you. Does it not seem as if gas and bombs have about run thefr course, and that the only safety for the world is to suppress these frightful agents of destruction? The answer is with you. Three years ago you turned your back on destruc- tion. Before you now, with increas- ing influence, lies the chance for con- struction. Here is the vast power of human p'oduction of this century, but it is still wasteful, still imperfectly organized. Here are the modern in- dustrial, social and moral problems. Here is a chance to interpret real de- mocracy. You can help make the terms of the new civilization; you can help put the ties into joint. During the war, by grace of your great loy- alties, you saved us. Will you help save the future for us? Where do we go from here, boy? F. W. Agte, Pastor. Odessa-ColTell Circuit. Odessa--Sunday services as follows: Preaching at 10:00 a.m. K. L. C. E. at 7:30 p. m. This is Young People's meeting open to all. Midweek prayer meeting Wednesday evening at 7:30 o'clock. Woman's Missionary Society, last Thursday of the month at 2:30 p.m. Class in Catechism, every Sat- urday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock. Correll--Sunday services as followg: Sunday school at 10:30 a.m. Preach- ing at 7:30 p.m. Ladies Aid meets every two weeks on Thursday after- noon at 2:30 o'clock. Next meeting November 17. Akron and Steinie Schoolhouse Services discontinued. @ $ $ The Church of Good Fellowship. United Evangelical Church. Rev. J. H. Mayne, Pastor Big Stone City.--Preaching services at 10:00 a.m. Sunday school at 11:00 a.m. K. L. C. E. meeting at 7:30 p. m. Preaching services at 8:00 p. m. Prayer meeting and Bible Class will be held every Wednesday evening at 8:00 p. m. Johnson--Preaching services every alternate Sunday at 3:00 p. m. @ @ overseas, but they were intensified by your experience in war. There is a long and glorious tally of your deeds ;ranbemes Always Have - Played Prominent Part at Thanksgiving Feast (Reprinted from. Official Program, Eids Lutheran Church _me.rican Legion Convention, Kansas i (Eleven miles northeast of Ortonville) ]Y}"  _ _ Rev. S. M. Moe of Crmton, Pastor.  [ Ladies' Aid will be held at the home ] CHURCH N()TICE' T[ of Andrew Steen November 26. Sv- ................ [eryone invited to attend. Norwegian Lutheran. [ @ @ @ Rev. J. Walseth, Pastor. Swedish M. E. Church. It is a tradition in Plymouth that the eating of turkey and cranberry muce on Thanksgiving day goes back to the first Pilgrim Thanksgivin. That little band of self-exiled, de- Toted Christians crossed the stormy ea in the Mayflower and landed at Plymouth Rock on December 21, 1620. Their first winter in the New World .was one of great suffering, marked With famine and hardships. Governor Bradford, in his account of the Pilgrims' first Thanksgiving', does not give a menu of the dinner, but he often refers to the wild tur- keys as one of the luxuries of the colony. ..A aohn Josslyn, an lflnglish traveler anl naturalist, who There will be no services at Or- tonville next Sunday morning, Novem- ber 27. Services will be held at Bel- lingham in the English language at 10:30 a.m. Catechism class will meet at the parsonage next Saturday. @ @ C2wistian Science. Sunday services at 10:45 a. m. Subject, "Ancient and Modern Ne- chomancy Alias Mesmerism and Hyp- notism Denounced." Wednesday service at 8:00 p. m. All are welcome to these servioe. Frew .,eading room in thvir hall (Shumaker bmlcimg). Open every Tuesday and Friday from 3 to 5 p. m, A. J. Anderson, Pastor Regular services on the second Sun- day of each month at 10:30 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. Pleasant Valley Methodist Episcopal Church. Rev. F. J. Johnston. Regular services every Sunday af- ternoon at three o'clock. Sunday school at twelve o'clock. @ Trinity Lutheran Church. August artling, Pastor. Service every Sunday at 10:00 a. m. or 2:00 p.m. German language. Sunday school after each service English language. ited New Eng2and in 1638 and wrote account of its "Rarities," says: anberry or bearberry (because used much to feed upon them) a small trayltng plant that grows salt marshes that are overgrown ,lth moss. The Indians and English e them much, boiling them with su- r for sauce to eat with their meat." at cranberries belong to the tra- tional Pilgrim dinner Is shown by e menu of the "decent repast" served t the first "Celebration of the Land- |ng of Our Forefathers," which was bserved on December 22, 1769. This ay was celebrated by the Old Colony club of Plymouth with a procession @ $ @ Methodit Episcopal. [ : LEGAL NOTICES Rev. G. L. Haggans, Pastor. 1 * . ...... Theme next Sunday at 10:30 in the Citation for Hearing on Petition To Methodist church, "Suppose Nobody Cared." Sunday school at 12:00 m. Ep- worth League at 7:00. Preaching at 7:45, the topic being "Is Conversation a Spent Force ?" First Congregational Church. Paul J. Bockoven, Pastor Sunday: Morning preaching ser- vice, 10:45. Sermon subject: "Liv- ing In A Large Place." Sunday school, 11:45 a. m. Evening service, 7:45. Sell, Mortgage or Lease Land. (Estate. of Albert Zahrbock) STATE OF MINNESOTA, County of Big Stone, In Probate Court. In the matter of the Estate of Albert Zahrbock, deceased. The state of Minnesota to Emilie Zahrbock, Gertrude Zahrbock; Arthur Zahrbock, Bertha Zahrbock, Albert Zahrbock, Leonard Zahrbock, Law- renee Zahrbock, Elmer Zahrbock, Har- vey Zahrbock, Harold Zahrbock, Eve- $.nd a dinner consisting of a large baked Indian whortleberry pudding, a lish of sauquetach (succotash), a dish bf clams, a dish of oysters and a dlsh f codfish, a haunch of venison, roasted y the first Jack brought into the col- Ony; a dish of fowl, cranberry tarts, dlsh of fresh fish and eels, an apple ie, n course of cheese made in the Old colony. These articles were ressed in the plainest manner (all Sppearance of luxury, whose memory We hall ever respect). Turkey, succotash and cranberries tlll play their part in the Thanks- tving dinners in Plymouth, and five lgrains of parched corn are laid beside! ch place in remembrance of the ear-! years of famine. "Say, Jim," said the friend of the taxicab-driver, standing in front of the vehicle, "there's a purse lying on the floor of your car." The driver looked carefully around and then whispered: "Sametimes when business is bad I put it there and leave the door open. "It's empty, but you've no idea how many people'll jump in for a short drive when they see it." "You should save up for a rainy day, dear." "I will as soon as I get thru saving p for a dry one." 'I call that dress a crime," said Hupp. Rep]ied his storm and strife, 'Stop jawing now and hook me up?" ! $o he fastened the crime oa hi 'fe Short H sermon from the subject, lyn Zahrbock, and all persons inter- ested in the mortgaging of certain lands belonging to said estate. The petition of Emilie Zahrbock represen- tative of the above named decedent, being duly filed in this court, repre- senting that it is necessary and for the best interest of said estate and ot all interested therein that certain lands of said estate described thereto be mortgaged and praying that a li- cense be to her granted to mortgage the same. Now, therefore, you and each of you, are hereby cited and re- quired to show cause, if any you, have, before this court, at the Probate Court rooms, in the court- house in the city of Ortonville, county of Big Stone, state of Minnesota, on the 28th day of November, 1921, at 10:00 o'clock a. m., why the prayer of said petition should not be granted. Witness, the Judge of said court, and the seal of said court, this 28th day of October, 1921. (Seal) R.B. HUDSON, Judge of Probate Court. A. B. KAERCHER, Attorney for Petitioner. Notice of Mortgage Forclosure Sale Default having been made in th conditions of a certain mortgage con- taining a Power of Sale dated Octo- ber 31, 1919, and recorded in the office of the Register of Deeds of Big Stone County, Minnesota, November 6, 1919, at nine o'clock a. m. in Book 55 Of Mortgages on page 406,whereby H. H. DeWall and Grace G. DeWall mort- gagors, mortgaged to Fred Hansen, mortgagee, the northwest quarter (NW) and north half (N1/) of the seuthwest quarter (SW) of section i 31, township one hundred twenty-one, (121), range fourty-four, (44), Big Stone county, Minnesota, which said mortgage was on February 14th, 1921, duly assigned by an instrument in writing recorded in said Register of Deeds office on February 23 1921, at 9:00 o'clock a. m., in Book forty-six (46) of Mortgages on page 452, to H. P. Carlson, by which de- fault the power of sale has become operative and no action or proceeding at law having been instituted to re- cover the debt secured thereby or any part thereof, and there is claimed to be due on this mortgage to the dat hereof, the sum of Five Thousand Three Hundred Seventeen and 50-100 ($5,317.50) Dollars. Now, Notice is hereby given that by virtue of said power, said mortage will be foreclosed and said premises scld at public auction by the Sheriff of said county, or his deputy on Satur- day, January 7, 1922, at 10:00 o'clock a. m. at the front door of the house in Ortonville, in said pay said debt, interest, and disbursements allowed by Dated November 21, 1921. H. P. CA] Assignee of Mort A. B. KAERCHER, Attorney, Ortonville, Minn. First pub. Nov. 24 Potatoes Large supply of choice pota- toes on hand which we are offering from Friday, Nov. 25th to Saturday, Dec. 3rd, at $1.25 per bushel This is a splendid opportun- ity to secure your winter's supply. Remember this offer lasts one week only. A. C. Saeger Phone 37 Ortonville, Minn. It Makes One Thirsty By Richard Trewin in The Business Printer WHEN some one talks about "stimulants," mem- ories of days gone by loom up, but talking about stimulating business is good business. IF YOU were to ask me what was the matter with business I would say lack of a stimulant, and that stimulant is: advertising. IF BUSINESS is "rotten," it certainly cannot be made better by not advertising--and even a good business can00 be kept good by constantly adver Furnaces tising. STIMULANTS go to the head--and advertising used with a little headwork makes for better businegs-- When placed every week in A Furnace not only means greater comfort far the cold weather, but it insures better health for you and your family. Selected in the size fit- ted for the amount of space to be heated and properly installed it will keep your entire home at an even temperate warmth. The prices for the Em- porer Furnace alone---in- stalling cost will be given, without obligation on your part. AUGUST LINDERT, Ortonville The Ortonville Independent Most News Largest Circulation Where Do We Go From Here? By Maud Radford Warren This was the question you soldiers of the A. E. F. asked when you were called to the colors. You said it al- ways with humor, but always, toy, .with underlying seriousness. It be- i came, in a way, your slogan. An un-! known soldier torpedoed out of the scania reached a raft so overloaded that those on it warned him that if he joined them they_ would all drown; he swam away saying, "Where do we go from here?" You said it march- ing up from second to first lines, and in the trenches, and dying on the field and slowly getting well in the hospi- tals. You said it on the day of the :Armistice--md so,me of you are sav- ing it still. It i. not a new question. The cave- ]men asked it of one another when to protect their homes, they finished the first battle with the enemies beyond the next ridge. They wiped their stone mnmm., buried their dead and want- ed to know what next. Doubtless, the lmore active warriors began to invent stone weapons warranted to make mincemeat of all opposing heads, .While those with a glimmering of philosophy reminded the warriors that the enemies were likewise not idle in of self-sacrifice, small and great, from little personal denials to the greatest and final test---for many who sleep now in the American graveyard at Romagne, literally laid down their lives for their friends. Something like three years ago you came home to a country that no long- er needed you for war. Many of you were disappointed and perhaps dis- couraged with what you found. You have had your own personal problems, but they have not completely absorbed you; beyond them you have seen your country urged on this side and that with many propagandas, swayed with cross-currents of feeling. It is hard to tell what causes-are worthy; some- times what really is worth while seems shoddy because of the people associated with it. But in all the con- fusion this fact is sure: you are grow- ing to be more and more a power in the land. Precisely as much as it needed you in war does your country need you now. All the big social feelings you de- veloped overseas have been linked up with war. But has not the hour come to apply them to peace, and to peace only? In the years to come, could "Dreamers and Their Dreams." Spe- cial music at both preaching services. Thursday: Midweek Bible study meet- ing, 7:45 p. m. All are most cordially invited, to these services. $ $ Church of St. John. Rev. Fr. J. A. SuIlivam Mass at 9:00 next Sunday morning, November 27. $ @ Zion Lutheran Church. Rev. Arnold Nelson, Pastor. Services in English next Sunday morning, November 27 from 10 to 11 o'clock and in the Swedish language from 11 to 12 o'clock. Sunday school from 12 to 1 p. m. Evening service in English at 7:30 o'clock at which the Union Lutheran Choir will sing. Services will be held in English on Thanksgiving Day from 10 to 11 o'clock a. m. The Ladies' Aid will meet at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Kriesel aturday afterrLoon, Dee. 3 to which all are invited to attend. Zion Ladies' Aid will hold their an- nual Bazaar Saturday afternoon of this week, November 26, at the Gain- a-day Electrical shop. Lunch will be served in connection. $ United Evangelical Church. armament and counting the dead, the nalmed, the widows and orphans, they asked what had been the real profit, and what should be the next move. Down thru the long ages, scarred .ith wars which have seemed to car- lJ utter waste of life has counted the losses, asked what the gain was, and inquired, "Where do we go from ]lere?" From the first battle of the cavemen till the latest struggle on the [Argonne, the gain has been the same --not territory, or wealth, or power, but just this: The shining spectacle of great loyalties; courage, self-sac- fiee, devotion to homes, devotion to country. And in all the nations dur- ing all the ages, none have sho-n and stood by these great loyalties more valiantly than you soldiers of the A. E.F. Thoughts of your people and your homes Were with you frufn your first day in camp till your last hour in France or Flanders or Germany. From your first training in back areas and 6'quiet" sectors, thru Cantigny and Champagne, in the drive from the Marne to the Vesle, in the St. Mihiel and the Argonne drives, you showed supreme endurance, matchless courage and self-forgetful service for buddies and officers. These high qualities were doubtless in you before you went you really preserve your country by fighting ? Can safety come thru any future wars ? Stone hammers are not much more out of date than the wea pons of seven years ago; we have gone so far in od rinventions that one bomb Of the latest poison gas will destroy all life within a radius of two hun- dred miles. Modern means of destruc- tion are so deadly that the homes you would die to preserve could be obliter- ated in spite of you. Does it not seem as if gas and bombs have about run thefr course, and that the only safety for the world is to suppress these frightful agents of destruction? The answer is with you. Three years ago you turned your back on destruc- tion. Before you now, with increas- ing influence, lies the chance for con- struction. Here is the vast power of human p'oduction of this century, but it is still wasteful, still imperfectly organized. Here are the modern in- dustrial, social and moral problems. Here is a chance to interpret real de- mocracy. You can help make the terms of the new civilization; you can help put the ties into joint. During the war, by grace of your great loy- alties, you saved us. Will you help save the future for us? Where do we go from here, boy? F. W. Agte, Pastor. Odessa-ColTell Circuit. Odessa--Sunday services as follows: Preaching at 10:00 a.m. K. L. C. E. at 7:30 p. m. This is Young People's meeting open to all. Midweek prayer meeting Wednesday evening at 7:30 o'clock. Woman's Missionary Society, last Thursday of the month at 2:30 p.m. Class in Catechism, every Sat- urday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock. Correll--Sunday services as followg: Sunday school at 10:30 a.m. Preach- ing at 7:30 p.m. Ladies Aid meets every two weeks on Thursday after- noon at 2:30 o'clock. Next meeting November 17. Akron and Steinie Schoolhouse Services discontinued. @ $ $ The Church of Good Fellowship. United Evangelical Church. Rev. J. H. Mayne, Pastor Big Stone City.--Preaching services at 10:00 a.m. Sunday school at 11:00 a.m. K. L. C. E. meeting at 7:30 p. m. Preaching services at 8:00 p. m. Prayer meeting and Bible Class will be held every Wednesday evening at 8:00 p. m. Johnson--Preaching services every alternate Sunday at 3:00 p. m. @ @ overseas, but they were intensified by your experience in war. There is a long and glorious tally of your deeds ;ranbemes Always Have - Played Prominent Part at Thanksgiving Feast (Reprinted from. Official Program, Eids Lutheran Church _me.rican Legion Convention, Kansas i (Eleven miles northeast of Ortonville) ]Y}"  _ _ Rev. S. M. Moe of Crmton, Pastor.  [ Ladies' Aid will be held at the home ] CHURCH N()TICE' T[ of Andrew Steen November 26. Sv- ................ [eryone invited to attend. Norwegian Lutheran. [ @ @ @ Rev. J. Walseth, Pastor. Swedish M. E. Church. It is a tradition in Plymouth that the eating of turkey and cranberry muce on Thanksgiving day goes back to the first Pilgrim Thanksgivin. That little band of self-exiled, de- Toted Christians crossed the stormy ea in the Mayflower and landed at Plymouth Rock on December 21, 1620. Their first winter in the New World .was one of great suffering, marked With famine and hardships. Governor Bradford, in his account of the Pilgrims' first Thanksgiving', does not give a menu of the dinner, but he often refers to the wild tur- keys as one of the luxuries of the colony. ..A aohn Josslyn, an lflnglish traveler anl naturalist, who There will be no services at Or- tonville next Sunday morning, Novem- ber 27. Services will be held at Bel- lingham in the English language at 10:30 a.m. Catechism class will meet at the parsonage next Saturday. @ @ C2wistian Science. Sunday services at 10:45 a. m. Subject, "Ancient and Modern Ne- chomancy Alias Mesmerism and Hyp- notism Denounced." Wednesday service at 8:00 p. m. All are welcome to these servioe. Frew .,eading room in thvir hall (Shumaker bmlcimg). Open every Tuesday and Friday from 3 to 5 p. m, A. J. Anderson, Pastor Regular services on the second Sun- day of each month at 10:30 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. Pleasant Valley Methodist Episcopal Church. Rev. F. J. Johnston. Regular services every Sunday af- ternoon at three o'clock. Sunday school at twelve o'clock. @ Trinity Lutheran Church. August artling, Pastor. Service every Sunday at 10:00 a. m. or 2:00 p.m. German language. Sunday school after each service English language. ited New Eng2and in 1638 and wrote account of its "Rarities," says: anberry or bearberry (because used much to feed upon them) a small trayltng plant that grows salt marshes that are overgrown ,lth moss. The Indians and English e them much, boiling them with su- r for sauce to eat with their meat." at cranberries belong to the tra- tional Pilgrim dinner Is shown by e menu of the "decent repast" served t the first "Celebration of the Land- |ng of Our Forefathers," which was bserved on December 22, 1769. This ay was celebrated by the Old Colony club of Plymouth with a procession @ $ @ Methodit Episcopal. [ : LEGAL NOTICES Rev. G. L. Haggans, Pastor. 1 * . ...... Theme next Sunday at 10:30 in the Citation for Hearing on Petition To Methodist church, "Suppose Nobody Cared." Sunday school at 12:00 m. Ep- worth League at 7:00. Preaching at 7:45, the topic being "Is Conversation a Spent Force ?" First Congregational Church. Paul J. Bockoven, Pastor Sunday: Morning preaching ser- vice, 10:45. Sermon subject: "Liv- ing In A Large Place." Sunday school, 11:45 a. m. Evening service, 7:45. Sell, Mortgage or Lease Land. (Estate. of Albert Zahrbock) STATE OF MINNESOTA, County of Big Stone, In Probate Court. In the matter of the Estate of Albert Zahrbock, deceased. The state of Minnesota to Emilie Zahrbock, Gertrude Zahrbock; Arthur Zahrbock, Bertha Zahrbock, Albert Zahrbock, Leonard Zahrbock, Law- renee Zahrbock, Elmer Zahrbock, Har- vey Zahrbock, Harold Zahrbock, Eve- $.nd a dinner consisting of a large baked Indian whortleberry pudding, a lish of sauquetach (succotash), a dish bf clams, a dish of oysters and a dlsh f codfish, a haunch of venison, roasted y the first Jack brought into the col- Ony; a dish of fowl, cranberry tarts, dlsh of fresh fish and eels, an apple ie, n course of cheese made in the Old colony. These articles were ressed in the plainest manner (all Sppearance of luxury, whose memory We hall ever respect). Turkey, succotash and cranberries tlll play their part in the Thanks- tving dinners in Plymouth, and five lgrains of parched corn are laid beside! ch place in remembrance of the ear-! years of famine. "Say, Jim," said the friend of the taxicab-driver, standing in front of the vehicle, "there's a purse lying on the floor of your car." The driver looked carefully around and then whispered: "Sametimes when business is bad I put it there and leave the door open. "It's empty, but you've no idea how many people'll jump in for a short drive when they see it." "You should save up for a rainy day, dear." "I will as soon as I get thru saving p for a dry one." 'I call that dress a crime," said Hupp. Rep]ied his storm and strife, 'Stop jawing now and hook me up?" ! $o he fastened the crime oa hi 'fe Short H sermon from the subject, lyn Zahrbock, and all persons inter- ested in the mortgaging of certain lands belonging to said estate. The petition of Emilie Zahrbock represen- tative of the above named decedent, being duly filed in this court, repre- senting that it is necessary and for the best interest of said estate and ot all interested therein that certain lands of said estate described thereto be mortgaged and praying that a li- cense be to her granted to mortgage the same. Now, therefore, you and each of you, are hereby cited and re- quired to show cause, if any you, have, before this court, at the Probate Court rooms, in the court- house in the city of Ortonville, county of Big Stone, state of Minnesota, on the 28th day of November, 1921, at 10:00 o'clock a. m., why the prayer of said petition should not be granted. Witness, the Judge of said court, and the seal of said court, this 28th day of October, 1921. (Seal) R.B. HUDSON, Judge of Probate Court. A. B. KAERCHER, Attorney for Petitioner. Notice of Mortgage Forclosure Sale Default having been made in th conditions of a certain mortgage con- taining a Power of Sale dated Octo- ber 31, 1919, and recorded in the office of the Register of Deeds of Big Stone County, Minnesota, November 6, 1919, at nine o'clock a. m. in Book 55 Of Mortgages on page 406,whereby H. H. DeWall and Grace G. DeWall mort- gagors, mortgaged to Fred Hansen, mortgagee, the northwest quarter (NW) and north half (N1/) of the seuthwest quarter (SW) of section i 31, township one hundred twenty-one, (121), range fourty-four, (44), Big Stone county, Minnesota, which said mortgage was on February 14th, 1921, duly assigned by an instrument in writing recorded in said Register of Deeds office on February 23 1921, at 9:00 o'clock a. m., in Book forty-six (46) of Mortgages on page 452, to H. P. Carlson, by which de- fault the power of sale has become operative and no action or proceeding at law having been instituted to re- cover the debt secured thereby or any part thereof, and there is claimed to be due on this mortgage to the dat hereof, the sum of Five Thousand Three Hundred Seventeen and 50-100 ($5,317.50) Dollars. Now, Notice is hereby given that by virtue of said power, said mortage will be foreclosed and said premises scld at public auction by the Sheriff of said county, or his deputy on Satur- day, January 7, 1922, at 10:00 o'clock a. m. at the front door of the house in Ortonville, in said pay said debt, interest, and disbursements allowed by Dated November 21, 1921. H. P. CA] Assignee of Mort A. B. KAERCHER, Attorney, Ortonville, Minn. First pub. Nov. 24 Potatoes Large supply of choice pota- toes on hand which we are offering from Friday, Nov. 25th to Saturday, Dec. 3rd, at $1.25 per bushel This is a splendid opportun- ity to secure your winter's supply. Remember this offer lasts one week only. A. C. Saeger Phone 37 Ortonville, Minn. It Makes One Thirsty By Richard Trewin in The Business Printer WHEN some one talks about "stimulants," mem- ories of days gone by loom up, but talking about stimulating business is good business. IF YOU were to ask me what was the matter with business I would say lack of a stimulant, and that stimulant is: advertising. IF BUSINESS is "rotten," it certainly cannot be made better by not advertising--and even a good business can00 be kept good by constantly adver Furnaces tising. STIMULANTS go to the head--and advertising used with a little headwork makes for better businegs-- When placed every week in A Furnace not only means greater comfort far the cold weather, but it insures better health for you and your family. Selected in the size fit- ted for the amount of space to be heated and properly installed it will keep your entire home at an even temperate warmth. The prices for the Em- porer Furnace alone---in- stalling cost will be given, without obligation on your part. AUGUST LINDERT, Ortonville The Ortonville Independent Most News Largest Circulation i BY Maud Radford Wen This was the question you soldie of lf-r]fi, small d great, from of the A E. F. asked when you  llttie personal denials to the greatest esed to the color. YO. sd it el- and fl.al test.--for many who leep with aderlging serioe. It be- Romagne, literally laid down their was with humor, but always, to, now in the Acverin graveyard at e. ia a way, your slga=,. An un- lives for their friend, Imo soldier torpedoed out of thai Semettng like thee years ago you Teseia ached a raft so nveroaded eame home t a untry that no long- that those on it waed him that if er needed you for war. Many of you he jolne(I them the would nil drown; .ere d;*appointed and perhaps dis- go from hale?" Yon aid it march have had your own personal problems, he sw away saying, "Whe do we eeuraged th what you found. YOU ing up from econd to first line, and, but they have ot completely absorbed in the trenches, and dying on the field, you; beyond them you have see. your and slm, ly getting well n the hepi- cou,,try urgl on ths side d that ta]s. You said it on the day of the with many propaganda% swayed with A,istJce ,ud s,ne of you a say Thuday: Midweek Bible study meet ing, 7:45 p. m. All am mt cordially Chuh ot SL IohL Ray. Ft. J. A. Sumv Ma at 9:00 next Sunday momng, 27. Zion Lutheran Chub. Rev. Aold Nell, Ptor, Services in English next unday mornhg, N ve and in Sunday school 1 p m, Evening i Lutheran Choir will sing g it still Services will be held in English on t i not a new question The cave I tmes what really is worth while Thanksgiving Day from 10 eL k'i: h,mee th lfinishh d t ....... ,t a ................ '*Aid at the home of Mr. rst bart[e with the enemies beyond fusion this fact is sure: ed Kiesel atuay aStermon, Dec the next rdge. They x, iped their stone ing ir anm% bmied their dead and want- the laod, Pisely il Aid ledtok ] t ext D btls the neeied ouinw d -no wwa p au ca, t y ar oes  Sat y afternoon Imox act*w wattmrs began to int need you now. veu 26, Ittone epons warranted to make[ All the big social feelings you de. a day Electrical shop i mneemeat of all oplmsmg heads, veloped overa have t ,an linked u I in connection. While those with a glimmering of [ with war BU has not le hour eom ]philophy reminded the wriom that]to apply them to pe, and to pet the enemies ere likewise not idle in I only7 In the $rnent and counting the dead, th you ally petwe your country by malmed, the widows nd orphans, the fighting? Can sety come thru nay itake d what had been the al profit and what shouM be the next ve mol out of date Dwn thru the long ages, pens of seven years ago; we have ]of the latest poison gas will desty 10$, asko] what the gain w, d all life wlthin a radi of two hun- inqd, "Where do we go from] dred miles. Medina means of deste- lucre?" From the first battle of the emen tin the latest struggle on the[ [Argonne, the ate in spite of you. --not territory, or wealth, or but $t this: The shining spectacle of grat loyalties; courage, elf-s- fl* devotion to homes, devotion to co.try. And ing al the age, =tcl by the great loyalties morn valitly than you soldiers of the A. E.F. Thoughts of your peopt and your homes we with yon fmfa your , Frce or Flander or Gerny. From your first training in bk n and "qtet" etors, th Cantigy and Clmmpnga, in the drive from the e to the Vle, in the St. MiMeI and the Argonne drives, you showed =up.me en,lur, matchless courage and self forgetfu seiee for bnddie ad emcee. These hgh quaIRies we doubtless in you befo yea n overseas, but they were intensified b your experience in war. There is tong and glorious tally of your deed reemes Nway Have Played Prominent Part at Thankegiving Feast It 1 n tradltl in pl.vmoetb that be tmg ot tke ua eaberrx aaee on aankvm da goa bck at Imle bd of lt.Orll, d oted cttane  the torm athe aaower d Ided at Cth k on Dmb 2L 120. aer art winter m the N Wo nne ot rt ,g. marked lth fammo and hardtlpa Gowmor dotd. n b accost the ptJgm,' rt Thakevlag, ]o ant ve a mu of the droner, ut he often fe to the wild tn es as one of the ]a of the tliz traveler and nature]let, who ]lt od ew aor] in l(JB and te neeount of It "Raritie" eays: as if gas and bombs have about run thefr course, d that the only safety for the world is to suppress the frightful agents of desteten? The answer is with you. Thee years tion. Before you now, wlth inereas- lag inflnee, lies the ehce He is the st por of poduction of this rentury, but wasteful, still imperfectly Hem a the dustral, social and moral pblem. :hen(, to ,terp t ai de- You ran help make the ,; you can help put the ti h,to job,t. During the war, by grace of your great Ioy- alUm, you saved us. Will you help save the future for m? Where do we go from here, boy? (Repented fm Ometl Program, Amed Legion Conventn, Kansas Cty). CHURCH NOTICES ; Negia. Luthera There will be no selMs at Of- t onville xt Sday moi, Novem- ber 27. Sei will be held at l- Imgham in the Egiish ang' at 10:30 a, m. CateeEsm class win meet at the paona next Satlay. Stt.y ree at 10:4 u u SJt, "Ancient and Medem N ehomaney AIias Mmesm d H- notm lneed." Wnehy le t S: p. m. All Ire wel t these   mlng om b. their hal (ar a,mng). O n every Taeay ant Frtdy from  5 p, r Methedt Epeol. "0nberry or earberry (bause Rev. G. L, Haggans, pastor. bears uSed ue to fd .pen them) Thee next Sunday a 0 3O n th hi a .man tylmg pln.t that grows lethodist church, "Suppo Nobody ta tt mashes mat am overgrown Cared'Sunday schoo a 200m Ep- with m The Indians an0 ngU.h worth League at 7:00. Preaching a rhem muc, bollng th with *u- 7:4 the "la Conversa tople being ee saue to et wth hetr  I a Spent Fo?  'at eraarrl beon  th ta  Ua Pgrl mer Is hen by I Fi t Con  t   Chn eh e menu of the "e. rep.t" .erve  rs gr Z lena . Paul J B eke en Ptor =t the nrst "Celebratl o the Land- . o v , lag of Our Fofathars" weh was Sunday: Morning phng ser- seed on December 22, 1760. This vi, 10:45. Son sbject: "Liv lay was celebrated by the el Cotony  lug In A Large Place." Sunday school, #rib of Plymouth with ptocessl [ 11:46 n. m. Evening iee, 7:45. trod a droner nslstlg of a hi Short on from the subject, aked Indian whortlebe padInS, h of uquetaeh (*ueeotwh), a dtsb bf lam, a dish of oysters and a dls codfish, a &aeh of vt*on, routed tythe 5t aek bm.eht rote the 1. 6y; e dleh of fo, eaberr tarts, dish ot t asu .a m. an apple le, a COU of eheee marie tn the ld looy. :rbes artlel we h'ud m the plalaut  (air kppen of lux.r, whOe memory e elell ever respect). Turkey, ootash and enbele, tttll play their part In the Tba.l vln dnn t. '21ymth, d five grams of parched   laid beIda e place Ia mbn of the ear rs e famine "Say, Jim," id the flqend of the tmb-dnver, sndtg in front of the hlcle, "e's a purse l#ng nn the floor ef your r." The driver lk c*f.lly around and then whlsld: "8tm whe alne is bad l put it  and leave the d,or epen. "It's empty, hut yo'vt ,,0 hl how mat, y people'n Jump ib for a short Jrve whea they see it." "You should save np for a rainy day, dear" "I will as soon as I get thin savng p for a dry one." "I call that dress a clime," sdd ltapp. Repel his storm and stfe, "Stop jab,g no nd hok me up?"  So he fatencd the cdme on hi wie Uited Evangelical Cheh. F. W. Ae, ptor. Odessa-Cmll Ciuit. Paehng at 10:00  m. at 7:3O p. m. This is Yog People's meeting Wednelay evening nt 7:8O o'clock, Wemav's Missionary Siety. last Thursday of p.m. Class in Catechism, every Sat- urday artesian at 2:OO o'clock, Snnday school at 10:30 a. m. lug at 7:30 p. every two ,,reaLs on Thursday after- noon at 2:3O o'elock. Next meeting ovemb 17, Akron and Steinle Sehoolho United Evangelical Church. Ray. J. H. Maybe, Pter Big Stone OtyphL.g servis Sda a*  K. L, C, E. meeting at 7:30 p. m. PreaeEng rvie at S:00 p. m. Prayer mting nnd Bible be hem every Wedday evenlag at s:oo p. m. Joh.son--Phing serv;e every Sdny nt 8:00 p. EM. Lutheran Ouh (Eleven rles norther of Or tonville) Rev. S. _ Moe of CUnton. ptor. of Andw Steen November 26. eryeue invitea to attend. Swedh 14. R. Chm'eK A. g. Anderson, Ptor Regul see dny of each month 7:0 p. Im PI ...... V.lle e, ethiat E4.a, Chuh. Rgolar rvie ever] Stmday t* ttrnccn at th o'clock. Sa" eol at twelve e'dJ Aegat artlln, Pastor. eerv ery Sday at .nda eehool after LEGAL NOTICES itatiea far Hearing on petiti t Sell, Mortgage or Lease Land. Estate of Alber Zahrheck) TATE OF MINNESOTA, County of Big Stone, In Probate Court In the tter of the Este of Albert Zahrbock, deased. The Zahrhock, Gertde Zahrbk, Arthur Zahrbk, Bertha Zahrbk, Zahrbock, Leonard Zahrboek, Law. nee Zahrboek, Elmer Zahrbk, Ha vey Zahrbock. Harold Zahrboek Eve- yn Zahrbk, and all perso Furnaces A Famaee ant only meas greater comfort fe the ld weather, bat it ns tter health tot you ad your family. Selected in the size fit- ted for the ot of apse to be hted and pperly italled it will keep y tlre home at an eaeu tempete wtl The pri.s for the Em- per Fum gionin- taltlng cost wll be given, wltheut obligatlon on year part. AUGUST LINDERT, Ortonville eared in the mortgaging of a. m, at the front lands belonging to said estate. The beef, the su m of Fi house in OrLville petition ef Emilie gahrbk pn- pay said debt, interns tative of the above uamed decedent. ($5#17.50) Dollars. being duly filed in this eourt repro NOW, NoU s hereby given that I Dated November 21, 1921. sentmg that it is nessary E, premises Assignee ef intested thein that sold at publle auction by the Sheriff of ss]d county, or his deputy on Satu Ortonville, Minn. be mortgaged and praying that a H- ,lay, January 7, 1922, grated to mortgage Now, thefore, you and each of you, e hereby cited and . qulred to show cause, if any you. have, befo this court, at the Ceurt rooms, in the eourt- ho.se in the city of Ortonvihe, cou.ty of Big Stone, state of Minnesota, o. the 28th day of November, 1921. at m,, of said petitien hould .ot he Witness, the Judg, and the al of seSd court, this zat day ef Otober, 1921. * (enl) R.B. HUDSON, Judg Attoey for Petitioner. Notice of Mertgaze Forelosure Sala Default having been made in the raining a Power of bar 31, 1919, of the Register of Deeds of Big Stone County. Minnesota. November 6, 919, o'clock a. m. in Book 55 of Mortgages on page 406,whereby H. H. and Grace G. DeWall mort- mortgaged to Fred Hansen, the nurthwest qua,er (NW4) and north half (N) of the southwest qarter (SW4) of 31, toshig (121), rge fourty-four, (44), Big Stone oty, Mnnesota. mortgage was on Feby 14th, 1921, drily assigned by an writing orded in said Register 9:00 o'clk a. m., in ferty-sx (46) of Mortgages on 452. to B. P. Carlsen, by which de fault the power ef sale has become no action or proceeding law having been part thereof, and them ia alaimed Potatoes Large supply of choice pota- toes on hand which we are offering from Friday, Nov. 25th to Saturday, Dec. 3rd, at $1.25 per bushel This is a splendid opportun- ity to secure your winter's supply. Remember this offer lasts one week only. A. C. Saeger Phone 37 Ortonville, Minn. It Makes One Thirsty By Richard Trewin in The Business Printer WHEN some one talks about "stimulants," mem- ories of days gone by loom up, but talking about stimulating business is good business. IF YOU were to ask me what was the matter with business I would say lack of a stimulant, and that stimulant is advertising. IF BUSINESS is "rotten," it certainly cannot be made better by not advertising--and even a good business can-be kept good by constantly adver- tising. STIMULANTS go to the head--and advertising used with a little headwork makes for better business-- When placed every week in The Ortonville Independent Most News Largest Circulation Where Do We Go From Here? By Maud Radford Warren This was the question you soldiers of the A. E. F. asked when you were called to the colors. You said it al- ways with humor, but always, toy, .with underlying seriousness. It be- i came, in a way, your slogan. An un-! known soldier torpedoed out of the scania reached a raft so overloaded that those on it warned him that if he joined them they_ would all drown; he swam away saying, "Where do we go from here?" You said it march- ing up from second to first lines, and in the trenches, and dying on the field and slowly getting well in the hospi- tals. You said it on the day of the :Armistice--md so,me of you are sav- ing it still. It i. not a new question. The cave- ]men asked it of one another when to protect their homes, they finished the first battle with the enemies beyond the next ridge. They wiped their stone mnmm., buried their dead and want- ed to know what next. Doubtless, the lmore active warriors began to invent stone weapons warranted to make mincemeat of all opposing heads, .While those with a glimmering of philosophy reminded the warriors that the enemies were likewise not idle in of self-sacrifice, small and great, from little personal denials to the greatest and final test---for many who sleep now in the American graveyard at Romagne, literally laid down their lives for their friends. Something like three years ago you came home to a country that no long- er needed you for war. Many of you were disappointed and perhaps dis- couraged with what you found. You have had your own personal problems, but they have not completely absorbed you; beyond them you have seen your country urged on this side and that with many propagandas, swayed with cross-currents of feeling. It is hard to tell what causes-are worthy; some- times what really is worth while seems shoddy because of the people associated with it. But in all the con- fusion this fact is sure: you are grow- ing to be more and more a power in the land. Precisely as much as it needed you in war does your country need you now. All the big social feelings you de- veloped overseas have been linked up with war. But has not the hour come to apply them to peace, and to peace only? In the years to come, could "Dreamers and Their Dreams." Spe- cial music at both preaching services. Thursday: Midweek Bible study meet- ing, 7:45 p. m. All are most cordially invited, to these services. $ $ Church of St. John. Rev. Fr. J. A. SuIlivam Mass at 9:00 next Sunday morning, November 27. $ @ Zion Lutheran Church. Rev. Arnold Nelson, Pastor. Services in English next Sunday morning, November 27 from 10 to 11 o'clock and in the Swedish language from 11 to 12 o'clock. Sunday school from 12 to 1 p. m. Evening service in English at 7:30 o'clock at which the Union Lutheran Choir will sing. Services will be held in English on Thanksgiving Day from 10 to 11 o'clock a. m. The Ladies' Aid will meet at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Kriesel aturday afterrLoon, Dee. 3 to which all are invited to attend. Zion Ladies' Aid will hold their an- nual Bazaar Saturday afternoon of this week, November 26, at the Gain- a-day Electrical shop. Lunch will be served in connection. $ United Evangelical Church. armament and counting the dead, the nalmed, the widows and orphans, they asked what had been the real profit, and what should be the next move. Down thru the long ages, scarred .ith wars which have seemed to car- lJ utter waste of life has counted the losses, asked what the gain was, and inquired, "Where do we go from ]lere?" From the first battle of the cavemen till the latest struggle on the [Argonne, the gain has been the same --not territory, or wealth, or power, but just this: The shining spectacle of great loyalties; courage, self-sac- fiee, devotion to homes, devotion to country. And in all the nations dur- ing all the ages, none have sho-n and stood by these great loyalties more valiantly than you soldiers of the A. E.F. Thoughts of your people and your homes Were with you frufn your first day in camp till your last hour in France or Flanders or Germany. From your first training in back areas and 6'quiet" sectors, thru Cantigny and Champagne, in the drive from the Marne to the Vesle, in the St. Mihiel and the Argonne drives, you showed supreme endurance, matchless courage and self-forgetful service for buddies and officers. These high qualities were doubtless in you before you went you really preserve your country by fighting ? Can safety come thru any future wars ? Stone hammers are not much more out of date than the wea pons of seven years ago; we have gone so far in od rinventions that one bomb Of the latest poison gas will destroy all life within a radius of two hun- dred miles. Modern means of destruc- tion are so deadly that the homes you would die to preserve could be obliter- ated in spite of you. Does it not seem as if gas and bombs have about run thefr course, and that the only safety for the world is to suppress these frightful agents of destruction? The answer is with you. Three years ago you turned your back on destruc- tion. Before you now, with increas- ing influence, lies the chance for con- struction. Here is the vast power of human p'oduction of this century, but it is still wasteful, still imperfectly organized. Here are the modern in- dustrial, social and moral problems. Here is a chance to interpret real de- mocracy. You can help make the terms of the new civilization; you can help put the ties into joint. During the war, by grace of your great loy- alties, you saved us. Will you help save the future for us? Where do we go from here, boy? F. W. Agte, Pastor. Odessa-ColTell Circuit. Odessa--Sunday services as follows: Preaching at 10:00 a.m. K. L. C. E. at 7:30 p. m. This is Young People's meeting open to all. Midweek prayer meeting Wednesday evening at 7:30 o'clock. Woman's Missionary Society, last Thursday of the month at 2:30 p.m. Class in Catechism, every Sat- urday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock. Correll--Sunday services as followg: Sunday school at 10:30 a.m. Preach- ing at 7:30 p.m. Ladies Aid meets every two weeks on Thursday after- noon at 2:30 o'clock. Next meeting November 17. Akron and Steinie Schoolhouse Services discontinued. @ $ $ The Church of Good Fellowship. United Evangelical Church. Rev. J. H. Mayne, Pastor Big Stone City.--Preaching services at 10:00 a.m. Sunday school at 11:00 a.m. K. L. C. E. meeting at 7:30 p. m. Preaching services at 8:00 p. m. Prayer meeting and Bible Class will be held every Wednesday evening at 8:00 p. m. Johnson--Preaching services every alternate Sunday at 3:00 p. m. @ @ overseas, but they were intensified by your experience in war. There is a long and glorious tally of your deeds ;ranbemes Always Have - Played Prominent Part at Thanksgiving Feast (Reprinted from. Official Program, Eids Lutheran Church _me.rican Legion Convention, Kansas i (Eleven miles northeast of Ortonville) ]Y}"  _ _ Rev. S. M. Moe of Crmton, Pastor.  [ Ladies' Aid will be held at the home ] CHURCH N()TICE' T[ of Andrew Steen November 26. Sv- ................ [eryone invited to attend. Norwegian Lutheran. [ @ @ @ Rev. J. Walseth, Pastor. Swedish M. E. Church. It is a tradition in Plymouth that the eating of turkey and cranberry muce on Thanksgiving day goes back to the first Pilgrim Thanksgivin. That little band of self-exiled, de- Toted Christians crossed the stormy ea in the Mayflower and landed at Plymouth Rock on December 21, 1620. Their first winter in the New World .was one of great suffering, marked With famine and hardships. Governor Bradford, in his account of the Pilgrims' first Thanksgiving', does not give a menu of the dinner, but he often refers to the wild tur- keys as one of the luxuries of the colony. ..A aohn Josslyn, an lflnglish traveler anl naturalist, who There will be no services at Or- tonville next Sunday morning, Novem- ber 27. Services will be held at Bel- lingham in the English language at 10:30 a.m. Catechism class will meet at the parsonage next Saturday. @ @ C2wistian Science. Sunday services at 10:45 a. m. Subject, "Ancient and Modern Ne- chomancy Alias Mesmerism and Hyp- notism Denounced." Wednesday service at 8:00 p. m. All are welcome to these servioe. Frew .,eading room in thvir hall (Shumaker bmlcimg). Open every Tuesday and Friday from 3 to 5 p. m, A. J. Anderson, Pastor Regular services on the second Sun- day of each month at 10:30 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. Pleasant Valley Methodist Episcopal Church. Rev. F. J. Johnston. Regular services every Sunday af- ternoon at three o'clock. Sunday school at twelve o'clock. @ Trinity Lutheran Church. August artling, Pastor. Service every Sunday at 10:00 a. m. or 2:00 p.m. German language. Sunday school after each service English language. ited New Eng2and in 1638 and wrote account of its "Rarities," says: anberry or bearberry (because used much to feed upon them) a small trayltng plant that grows salt marshes that are overgrown ,lth moss. The Indians and English e them much, boiling them with su- r for sauce to eat with their meat." at cranberries belong to the tra- tional Pilgrim dinner Is shown by e menu of the "decent repast" served t the first "Celebration of the Land- |ng of Our Forefathers," which was bserved on December 22, 1769. This ay was celebrated by the Old Colony club of Plymouth with a procession @ $ @ Methodit Episcopal. [ : LEGAL NOTICES Rev. G. L. Haggans, Pastor. 1 * . ...... Theme next Sunday at 10:30 in the Citation for Hearing on Petition To Methodist church, "Suppose Nobody Cared." Sunday school at 12:00 m. Ep- worth League at 7:00. Preaching at 7:45, the topic being "Is Conversation a Spent Force ?" First Congregational Church. Paul J. Bockoven, Pastor Sunday: Morning preaching ser- vice, 10:45. Sermon subject: "Liv- ing In A Large Place." Sunday school, 11:45 a. m. Evening service, 7:45. Sell, Mortgage or Lease Land. (Estate. of Albert Zahrbock) STATE OF MINNESOTA, County of Big Stone, In Probate Court. In the matter of the Estate of Albert Zahrbock, deceased. The state of Minnesota to Emilie Zahrbock, Gertrude Zahrbock; Arthur Zahrbock, Bertha Zahrbock, Albert Zahrbock, Leonard Zahrbock, Law- renee Zahrbock, Elmer Zahrbock, Har- vey Zahrbock, Harold Zahrbock, Eve- $.nd a dinner consisting of a large baked Indian whortleberry pudding, a lish of sauquetach (succotash), a dish bf clams, a dish of oysters and a dlsh f codfish, a haunch of venison, roasted y the first Jack brought into the col- Ony; a dish of fowl, cranberry tarts, dlsh of fresh fish and eels, an apple ie, n course of cheese made in the Old colony. These articles were ressed in the plainest manner (all Sppearance of luxury, whose memory We hall ever respect). Turkey, succotash and cranberries tlll play their part in the Thanks- tving dinners in Plymouth, and five lgrains of parched corn are laid beside! ch place in remembrance of the ear-! years of famine. "Say, Jim," said the friend of the taxicab-driver, standing in front of the vehicle, "there's a purse lying on the floor of your car." The driver looked carefully around and then whispered: "Sametimes when business is bad I put it there and leave the door open. "It's empty, but you've no idea how many people'll jump in for a short drive when they see it." "You should save up for a rainy day, dear." "I will as soon as I get thru saving p for a dry one." 'I call that dress a crime," said Hupp. Rep]ied his storm and strife, 'Stop jawing now and hook me up?" ! $o he fastened the crime oa hi 'fe Short H sermon from the subject, lyn Zahrbock, and all persons inter- ested in the mortgaging of certain lands belonging to said estate. The petition of Emilie Zahrbock represen- tative of the above named decedent, being duly filed in this court, repre- senting that it is necessary and for the best interest of said estate and ot all interested therein that certain lands of said estate described thereto be mortgaged and praying that a li- cense be to her granted to mortgage the same. Now, therefore, you and each of you, are hereby cited and re- quired to show cause, if any you, have, before this court, at the Probate Court rooms, in the court- house in the city of Ortonville, county of Big Stone, state of Minnesota, on the 28th day of November, 1921, at 10:00 o'clock a. m., why the prayer of said petition should not be granted. Witness, the Judge of said court, and the seal of said court, this 28th day of October, 1921. (Seal) R.B. HUDSON, Judge of Probate Court. A. B. KAERCHER, Attorney for Petitioner. Notice of Mortgage Forclosure Sale Default having been made in th conditions of a certain mortgage con- taining a Power of Sale dated Octo- ber 31, 1919, and recorded in the office of the Register of Deeds of Big Stone County, Minnesota, November 6, 1919, at nine o'clock a. m. in Book 55 Of Mortgages on page 406,whereby H. H. DeWall and Grace G. DeWall mort- gagors, mortgaged to Fred Hansen, mortgagee, the northwest quarter (NW) and north half (N1/) of the seuthwest quarter (SW) of section i 31, township one hundred twenty-one, (121), range fourty-four, (44), Big Stone county, Minnesota, which said mortgage was on February 14th, 1921, duly assigned by an instrument in writing recorded in said Register of Deeds office on February 23 1921, at 9:00 o'clock a. m., in Book forty-six (46) of Mortgages on page 452, to H. P. Carlson, by which de- fault the power of sale has become operative and no action or proceeding at law having been instituted to re- cover the debt secured thereby or any part thereof, and there is claimed to be due on this mortgage to the dat hereof, the sum of Five Thousand Three Hundred Seventeen and 50-100 ($5,317.50) Dollars. Now, Notice is hereby given that by virtue of said power, said mortage will be foreclosed and said premises scld at public auction by the Sheriff of said county, or his deputy on Satur- day, January 7, 1922, at 10:00 o'clock a. m. at the front door of the house in Ortonville, in said pay said debt, interest, and disbursements allowed by Dated November 21, 1921. H. P. CA] Assignee of Mort A. B. KAERCHER, Attorney, Ortonville, Minn. First pub. Nov. 24 Potatoes Large supply of choice pota- toes on hand which we are offering from Friday, Nov. 25th to Saturday, Dec. 3rd, at $1.25 per bushel This is a splendid opportun- ity to secure your winter's supply. Remember this offer lasts one week only. A. C. Saeger Phone 37 Ortonville, Minn. It Makes One Thirsty By Richard Trewin in The Business Printer WHEN some one talks about "stimulants," mem- ories of days gone by loom up, but talking about stimulating business is good business. IF YOU were to ask me what was the matter with business I would say lack of a stimulant, and that stimulant is: advertising. IF BUSINESS is "rotten," it certainly cannot be made better by not advertising00and even a good business can00 be kept good by constantly adver Furnaces tising. STIMULANTS go to the head--and advertising used with a little headwork makes for better businegs-- When placed every week in A Furnace not only means greater comfort far the cold weather, but it insures better health for you and your family. Selected in the size fit- ted for the amount of space to be heated and properly installed it will keep your entire home at an even temperate warmth. The prices for the Em- porer Furnace alone---in- stalling cost will be given, without obligation on your part. AUGUST LINDERT, Ortonville The Ortonville Independent Most News Largest Circulation