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November 25, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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There's been a lot of opinions voiced over the past few days, as the major media has focused on the 40th anniversary of the assassination of President John Kennedy, Nov. 22, 1963. Well do we remember the exact moment. We were driving in downtown Mpls. and going through a police-controlled intersection, when we heard the news on our car radio. We rolled our window down to so inform the policeman as to what had happened. His jaw dropped in disbe- lief! We also well remember watch- ing television at the exact moment Jack Ruby shot Lee Harvey Oswald. Ruby, dying of cancer, certainly did not act alone! We join the vast major- ity of Americans who believe there was a massive cover-up to the killing and that there was definitely a con- spiracy. Look at some of the most important facts. Why was the Warren commission report on the tragedy "closed" so quickly?! But a day or so before Kennedy's arrival in Dallas, the parade route was changed near the Depository Book Store, (where the gunman was located) creating a jog in the route so that the President's limp would be in a direct line of fire for the shooter. Indeed, that in itself spells something was fishy! Who or what dept. in our government autho- rized that route change?! There's also plenty of proof that more than one gun was used in the assassination. Finally, who had the most to gain by President Kennedy's death? Indeed, President Lyndon B. Johnson was among those gainers! That's our two- bits worth...thoughts that we've had ever since the tragic event! We know we're not alone in our belief! Another memo from a first-time eater of our Hobo Soup, ordering a hobo soup t-shirt, having purchased the cans through the catalog of The Vermont Country Store. F. W. Breaux of Opelousas, Louisiana, writes '*1 found " your soup tasted pretty gOod...added some parsley and a tablespoon of white wine. Not bad!" A couple rid-bits in a recent Sunday Mpls. Star-Tribune make a lot of sense..thought we'd pass them on here: Life isn't fair; "Our planet is not balanced. Too few control too much, and many have too little to hope for." World Bank President James Wolfensohn, at the bank's annual meeting on Sept. 23; Bosses' pay zooms "Bosses' pay has moved inexorably upwards, especially in America. In I980, the average pay for the CEOS of America's biggest companies was about 40 times that of the average production worker. In 1990, it was about 85 times. Now this ratio is thought to be about 400. Profits of big firms fell last year and shares are still well down on their record high, but the average remu- neration of the heads of America's companies rose by over 6 percent." Speaking of money, we note the nickel coin is get- ting its first makeover in 65 years. The back of the nickel will commemorate the 1803 Louisiana Purchase and the 1804-06 Lewis and Clark expedi- tion - there will be no more Monticello on the back - until 2006 when it will return to the back of the nickel, according to the United States Mint. The Mint expects to make around 500 million each of the new design nickels - but more will be minted depending on the coun- try's demand. Legislation was passed and signed into Law by President Bush in April clearing the way for the new nickel. A recent article in the West Central Tribune daily newspaper in Willmar informs us that sixth grader Aiissa Tinklenberg, formerly of Ortonville, "is causing some waves there. The new member of the Aquatic Racing Stingrays is turning in varsity-level times. At Marshall last week-end, the daughter of former Cardinal athletes Paul and Beth (Magnuson) Tinklenberg, swam times that would have placed first in Tuesday's Roccori meet in the 200- free and 100-backstroke and second in both the 50- and 500-freestyles. The family recently moved from Ortonville." Board will vote on amended feedlot ordinance December 2 Darren Wilke attended last Tuesday's regular meeting of the Big Stone County Board of Commissioners to speak with the Board about the proposed amended Feedlot Ordinance. This regular meeting was the first opportunity Commissioners had to hold discussion on the public hearing that was held during the last regular meeting on Tuesday, Nov. 4. According to Wilke, there are two primary hang-ups in the proposed ordinance, including the animal unit cap and the setback from Big Stone Lake. Wilke also recommended including setbacks from churches and cemeteries, a prohibition of open-air liquid manure storage structures, a requirement that any feedlot contain- ing 10 or more animal units must become registered, and a one-half mile reciprocal between county resi- dences and feedlots. The additions proposed by Wilke are not currently included in the amended draft of the ordinance. Commissioner Dick Lane men- tioned that he feels the minimum acreage requirements as proposed in the ordinance are set too high, and feels that obtaining the land may be too expensive for young feedlot oper- ators. Commissioner Dave Torgerson suggested that the Board place a cap of 2,000 animal units for hogs, but allow for a 3,000 animal unit total cap. Commissioners also discussed the possibilities ofdigestors. Board Chair Alvin Maas mentioned that he had contacted David Schmidt of the University of Minnesota, who has much knowledge about digestors and how they work. Maas suggested that the Commissioners place a confer- ence call to Schmidt during the next regular meeting on Dec. 2 to talk with him about it. Commissioners then discussed when they will be voting on the ordi- nance. "There is one thing wrong with a tough decision," said Commissioner Lane, "and that is putting it off. We need to let these people know what our decision is." Following further discussion, Commissioners agreed that they would vote on the Feedlot Ordinance on Tuesday, Dec. 2 at their next regu- lar meeting. Joan Hasslen, Marketing Coordinator for Ortonville's Senior Housing facility, also attended the meeting to update Commissioners on the project, and to inform them of how the center will benefit all of Big Stone County. According to Hasslen, the Senior Housing will be owned by the Ortonville EDA, and Prairie Grass will manage the property for a few years until Ortonville Area Health Services is prepared to take over. "'This project will have a great eco- nomic impact for Big Stone County,'" said Hasslen. She went on to mention that many local businesses have already been involved with construct- ing the senior housing building. According to Hasslen, 70 percent of the apartments available in the Senior Housing complex have been filled, and she does have many more names on waiting lists. Hasslen also mentioned she feels the project will have great economical and phsycho- logical impact on the Ortonville com- munity, as well as the entire county. In other action, Commissioner Bruce Swigerd presented a motion to accept the employment of Laura Berger as the new Deputy Treasurer. The motion was seconded and carried, and County Treasurer Cindy Nelson introduced Berger to the Board of Commissioners. Lucille Nelson rites Saturday Zahrbock Funeral Home of Madison, announces the death of 77- year-old Lucille Nelson of Bellingham, who passed away Monday, Nov. 24th, 2003 at the Madison Lutheran ttome. Services will be at 10:30 a.m. this Saturday, Nov. 29, 2003, at Louisburg Lutheran Church, witl service at 7 p.m., Friday, the Zahrbock F' Lucille is survived by of Bellingham and Van Hull of St. Louis Park. A complete obituary later. iii TUBBS SOFT WAT O (All Makes) Drinking Water Systems Iron Removal Systems Salt Delivery Appleton, MN Phone !!!!iT!! DA denies Chamber funding Waste request, sends money to RDC Management Ortonville's Economic would be better used on staff develop- EDA members discussed whether to will not be working on Development Authority voted to give budgeted tourism money to the Upper Minnesota Valley Rural Development committee during last Wednesday's regular meeting. During the EDA's previous regular meeting, representatives from Big Stone Lake Area Chamber of Commerce attended, and presented to EDA members a petition of all four local hotels, five local food establish- ments and many other local business- es who were requesting that the EDA's tourism money was given to BSLA Chamber, rather than UMVRDC. Chamber representatives had also shared with EDA members comments from Granite Falls and Montevideo the expressed dissatisfaction with UMVRDC because they felt the ser- vices they were promised were not received. Additionally, it was pointed out that much of the funding given to UM is used fqr administrative costs, because the RDC has full-time paid employees. EDA members invited the RDC to have representatives at last Wednesday's meeting to answer some questions regarding the comments from Granite Falls and Montevideo. According to representatives of the RDC, employees answer directly to a Board of Directors, and the Board had decided that funding to the RDC ment and training conferences, which is the reason that some of the services offered were not provided to the RDC's investors last year. She responded to the question about administrative costs saying that there is a paid staff on hand at the RDC, and some of the client's money does go to pay administrative costs. "As far as I am concerned, the money used to pay salaries gives us service," said Blair Johnson, EDA member. "A business needs a profes- sional staff, and that costs money. My concern lies in the comments that the RDC is not providing the services promised." RDC representatives added that the purpose of the RDC is not to com- pete with the local Chamber of Commerce, but to work with them to promote tourism. Additionally, she said the RDC has the advantage of higher funding levels to work with. Following the presentation, Mayor l)'avid Dinnel advised the RDC that the EDA have not yet finalized their 2004 budget, and once the budget is finalized, he would contact the RDC about their decision whether to fund BSLA Chamber or the RDC. EDA members then worked on the budget for 2004, and Johnson present- ed a motion to approve the budget. The motion was seconded and carried. Once the budget was finalized, give budgeted tourism money to BSLA Chamber or to UMVRDC. Many EDA members agreed they felt it is important to market Ortonville's tourism on a regional level, as well as locally. EDA mem- ber Greg Peterson mentioned that at the financial committment level they were considering to the RDC, Ortonville would be able to have a representative on the Board of Directors. "If we have someone that knows about local tourism, they can make sure that things are being done as promised," he said. Blair Johnson made a motion to committ $5,000 to the RDC, provided that an ad previously placed with the RDC would be included in the total. The motion was seconded and carried. Thursday, Nov. 27th due to Thanksgiving Holiday. ORTONVILLE RESIDE RECYCLING AND COM WILL BE PICKED UP ON FR NOV. 28th Have a and happy Letters to the editor I To the Editor: It is time to get out! Sometimes, one American is murdered during a 24 hour day. Sometimes, the average murder of Americans is only one for two days. Occasionally, one political party, then the other party blocks legislation by the strategy of filibuster. Then a not-elected group of eight old men and one woman enact the legislation. But like the plitburu of the defunct Soviet Empire, this not- elected group assumes supreme power to enact legislation above all elected legislatures. This is democracy? The not- elected group fills our prisons by trying to make America a godless nation and by converting criminal prosecution into a slot machine system. The gamble of escaping conviction by luck, skill and money lures many young people into a life of crime, resulting in more victims and prisons. Yes, the subject is Washington D.C. Even if you believe in the "neccesity" for abortion on demand, don't you think that killing a million pre-born every year to protect free sex is murder? 4,000 Americans were killed by the attack on Washington and New York, several times the Winter's second snowfall occurs over the weekend The second snowfall of this winter came over the weekend, but proved to be much less than predicted by weath- er forecasts. Approximately 4-6 inches fell in the Big Stone Lake area, and com- bined with blowing winds to result in low driving visibility and large snow drifts. Although the blizzard conditions were not as bad as expected, blowing snow and slippery roads managed to keep many travelers from reaching their destinations, and others opted to stay home. I number of America's brave servicemen killed in Iraq. Instead of a back-alley dogfight to determine who will be elected President in 2004, shouldn't we have a reasonable debate on how to prevent future terrorist attack? Otherwise, we may have to abandon Washington because of terrorist attacks. It is time to pray instead of silly anti-God attacks. I recently heard the the Declaration of Independence quoted on television: "We hold these truths to be self-evident that all men are created equal and ARE ENDOWED BY THEIR CREATOR with certain inalienable rights, and among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness." "ENDOWED BY THEIR CREATOR" was omitted. This silly anti-God censorship is sad! Clean up Washington D.C., reform the Supreme Court. have reasonable debate on our problems, PRAY or our enemies will make Washington into a place too dangerous for humans. We will have to "get out"! Wesley Olson Box 142 Clinton MN 56225 ph 320-325 5565 CLASSIFIED ADS BRING QUICK RESULTS ORIWC.4WCqgtY I INDEPENDENT WANT ADS BRING QUICK RESULTS! I O0 s F F "-okies/ Holida 00his 00riday c6 )Vov. 28 29 Russell Stover Christmas Colonial Christmas Candles Carlton Greeting & Gift Large Selection o Childr00 Books! Many Christmas Figurines Holiday Linens Porcelain Angels Check Out Our Large Selection of Gift Items for the Entire Family! Selection o[ ell CARLSON DRUG & Your Locally Owned and Operated Thrifty .N Phone 320-839-e102 -nIWhite oaonvi,e, ll00Drug Page 2  INDEPENDENT TuesdaY, NoV' There's been a lot of opinions voiced over the past few days, as the major media has focused on the 40th anniversary of the assassination of President John Kennedy, Nov. 22, 1963. Well do we remember the exact moment. We were driving in downtown Mpls. and going through a police-controlled intersection, when we heard the news on our car radio. We rolled our window down to so inform the policeman as to what had happened. His jaw dropped in disbe- lief! We also well remember watch- ing television at the exact moment Jack Ruby shot Lee Harvey Oswald. Ruby, dying of cancer, certainly did not act alone! We join the vast major- ity of Americans who believe there was a massive cover-up to the killing and that there was definitely a con- spiracy. Look at some of the most important facts. Why was the Warren commission report on the tragedy "closed" so quickly?! But a day or so before Kennedy's arrival in Dallas, the parade route was changed near the Depository Book Store, (where the gunman was located) creating a jog in the route so that the President's limp would be in a direct line of fire for the shooter. Indeed, that in itself spells something was fishy! Who or what dept. in our government autho- rized that route change?! There's also plenty of proof that more than one gun was used in the assassination. Finally, who had the most to gain by President Kennedy's death? Indeed, President Lyndon B. Johnson was among those gainers! That's our two- bits worth...thoughts that we've had ever since the tragic event! We know we're not alone in our belief! Another memo from a first-time eater of our Hobo Soup, ordering a hobo soup t-shirt, having purchased the cans through the catalog of The Vermont Country Store. F. W. Breaux of Opelousas, Louisiana, writes '*1 found " your soup tasted pretty gOod...added some parsley and a tablespoon of white wine. Not bad!" A couple rid-bits in a recent Sunday Mpls. Star-Tribune make a lot of sense..thought we'd pass them on here: Life isn't fair; "Our planet is not balanced. Too few control too much, and many have too little to hope for." World Bank President James Wolfensohn, at the bank's annual meeting on Sept. 23; Bosses' pay zooms "Bosses' pay has moved inexorably upwards, especially in America. In I980, the average pay for the CEOS of America's biggest companies was about 40 times that of the average production worker. In 1990, it was about 85 times. Now this ratio is thought to be about 400. Profits of big firms fell last year and shares are still well down on their record high, but the average remu- neration of the heads of America's companies rose by over 6 percent." Speaking of money, we note the nickel coin is get- ting its first makeover in 65 years. The back of the nickel will commemorate the 1803 Louisiana Purchase and the 1804-06 Lewis and Clark expedi- tion - there will be no more Monticello on the back - until 2006 when it will return to the back of the nickel, according to the United States Mint. The Mint expects to make around 500 million each of the new design nickels - but more will be minted depending on the coun- try's demand. Legislation was passed and signed into Law by President Bush in April clearing the way for the new nickel. A recent article in the West Central Tribune daily newspaper in Willmar informs us that sixth grader Aiissa Tinklenberg, formerly of Ortonville, "is causing some waves there. The new member of the Aquatic Racing Stingrays is turning in varsity-level times. At Marshall last week-end, the daughter of former Cardinal athletes Paul and Beth (Magnuson) Tinklenberg, swam times that would have placed first in Tuesday's Roccori meet in the 200- free and 100-backstroke and second in both the 50- and 500-freestyles. The family recently moved from Ortonville." Board will vote on amended feedlot ordinance December 2 Darren Wilke attended last Tuesday's regular meeting of the Big Stone County Board of Commissioners to speak with the Board about the proposed amended Feedlot Ordinance. This regular meeting was the first opportunity Commissioners had to hold discussion on the public hearing that was held during the last regular meeting on Tuesday, Nov. 4. According to Wilke, there are two primary hang-ups in the proposed ordinance, including the animal unit cap and the setback from Big Stone Lake. Wilke also recommended including setbacks from churches and cemeteries, a prohibition of open-air liquid manure storage structures, a requirement that any feedlot contain- ing 10 or more animal units must become registered, and a one-half mile reciprocal between county resi- dences and feedlots. The additions proposed by Wilke are not currently included in the amended draft of the ordinance. Commissioner Dick Lane men- tioned that he feels the minimum acreage requirements as proposed in the ordinance are set too high, and feels that obtaining the land may be too expensive for young feedlot oper- ators. Commissioner Dave Torgerson suggested that the Board place a cap of 2,000 animal units for hogs, but allow for a 3,000 animal unit total cap. Commissioners also discussed the possibilities ofdigestors. Board Chair Alvin Maas mentioned that he had contacted David Schmidt of the University of Minnesota, who has much knowledge about digestors and how they work. Maas suggested that the Commissioners place a confer- ence call to Schmidt during the next regular meeting on Dec. 2 to talk with him about it. Commissioners then discussed when they will be voting on the ordi- nance. "There is one thing wrong with a tough decision," said Commissioner Lane, "and that is putting it off. We need to let these people know what our decision is." Following further discussion, Commissioners agreed that they would vote on the Feedlot Ordinance on Tuesday, Dec. 2 at their next regu- lar meeting. Joan Hasslen, Marketing Coordinator for Ortonville's Senior Housing facility, also attended the meeting to update Commissioners on the project, and to inform them of how the center will benefit all of Big Stone County. According to Hasslen, the Senior Housing will be owned by the Ortonville EDA, and Prairie Grass will manage the property for a few years until Ortonville Area Health Services is prepared to take over. "'This project will have a great eco- nomic impact for Big Stone County,'" said Hasslen. She went on to mention that many local businesses have already been involved with construct- ing the senior housing building. According to Hasslen, 70 percent of the apartments available in the Senior Housing complex have been filled, and she does have many more names on waiting lists. Hasslen also mentioned she feels the project will have great economical and phsycho- logical impact on the Ortonville com- munity, as well as the entire county. In other action, Commissioner Bruce Swigerd presented a motion to accept the employment of Laura Berger as the new Deputy Treasurer. The motion was seconded and carried, and County Treasurer Cindy Nelson introduced Berger to the Board of Commissioners. Lucille Nelson rites Saturday Zahrbock Funeral Home of Madison, announces the death of 77- year-old Lucille Nelson of Bellingham, who passed away Monday, Nov. 24th, 2003 at the Madison Lutheran ttome. Services will be at 10:30 a.m. this Saturday, Nov. 29, 2003, at Louisburg Lutheran Church, witl service at 7 p.m., Friday, the Zahrbock F' Lucille is survived by of Bellingham and Van Hull of St. Louis Park. A complete obituary later. iii TUBBS SOFT WAT O (All Makes) Drinking Water Systems Iron Removal Systems Salt Delivery Appleton, MN Phone !!!!iT!! DA denies Chamber funding Waste request, sends money to RDC Management Ortonville's Economic would be better used on staff develop- EDA members discussed whether to will not be working on Development Authority voted to give budgeted tourism money to the Upper Minnesota Valley Rural Development committee during last Wednesday's regular meeting. During the EDA's previous regular meeting, representatives from Big Stone Lake Area Chamber of Commerce attended, and presented to EDA members a petition of all four local hotels, five local food establish- ments and many other local business- es who were requesting that the EDA's tourism money was given to BSLA Chamber, rather than UMVRDC. Chamber representatives had also shared with EDA members comments from Granite Falls and Montevideo the expressed dissatisfaction with UMVRDC because they felt the ser- vices they were promised were not received. Additionally, it was pointed out that much of the funding given to UM is used fqr administrative costs, because the RDC has full-time paid employees. EDA members invited the RDC to have representatives at last Wednesday's meeting to answer some questions regarding the comments from Granite Falls and Montevideo. According to representatives of the RDC, employees answer directly to a Board of Directors, and the Board had decided that funding to the RDC ment and training conferences, which is the reason that some of the services offered were not provided to the RDC's investors last year. She responded to the question about administrative costs saying that there is a paid staff on hand at the RDC, and some of the client's money does go to pay administrative costs. "As far as I am concerned, the money used to pay salaries gives us service," said Blair Johnson, EDA member. "A business needs a profes- sional staff, and that costs money. My concern lies in the comments that the RDC is not providing the services promised." RDC representatives added that the purpose of the RDC is not to com- pete with the local Chamber of Commerce, but to work with them to promote tourism. Additionally, she said the RDC has the advantage of higher funding levels to work with. Following the presentation, Mayor l)'avid Dinnel advised the RDC that the EDA have not yet finalized their 2004 budget, and once the budget is finalized, he would contact the RDC about their decision whether to fund BSLA Chamber or the RDC. EDA members then worked on the budget for 2004, and Johnson present- ed a motion to approve the budget. The motion was seconded and carried. Once the budget was finalized, give budgeted tourism money to BSLA Chamber or to UMVRDC. Many EDA members agreed they felt it is important to market Ortonville's tourism on a regional level, as well as locally. EDA mem- ber Greg Peterson mentioned that at the financial committment level they were considering to the RDC, Ortonville would be able to have a representative on the Board of Directors. "If we have someone that knows about local tourism, they can make sure that things are being done as promised," he said. Blair Johnson made a motion to committ $5,000 to the RDC, provided that an ad previously placed with the RDC would be included in the total. The motion was seconded and carried. Thursday, Nov. 27th due to Thanksgiving Holiday. ORTONVILLE RESIDE RECYCLING AND COM WILL BE PICKED UP ON FR NOV. 28th Have a and happy Letters to the editor I To the Editor: It is time to get out! Sometimes, one American is murdered during a 24 hour day. Sometimes, the average murder of Americans is only one for two days. Occasionally, one political party, then the other party blocks legislation by the strategy of filibuster. Then a not-elected group of eight old men and one woman enact the legislation. But like the plitburu of the defunct Soviet Empire, this not- elected group assumes supreme power to enact legislation above all elected legislatures. This is democracy? The not- elected group fills our prisons by trying to make America a godless nation and by converting criminal prosecution into a slot machine system. The gamble of escaping conviction by luck, skill and money lures many young people into a life of crime, resulting in more victims and prisons. Yes, the subject is Washington D.C. Even if you believe in the "neccesity" for abortion on demand, don't you think that killing a million pre-born every year to protect free sex is murder? 4,000 Americans were killed by the attack on Washington and New York, several times the Winter's second snowfall occurs over the weekend The second snowfall of this winter came over the weekend, but proved to be much less than predicted by weath- er forecasts. Approximately 4-6 inches fell in the Big Stone Lake area, and com- bined with blowing winds to result in low driving visibility and large snow drifts. Although the blizzard conditions were not as bad as expected, blowing snow and slippery roads managed to keep many travelers from reaching their destinations, and others opted to stay home. I number of America's brave servicemen killed in Iraq. Instead of a back-alley dogfight to determine who will be elected President in 2004, shouldn't we have a reasonable debate on how to prevent future terrorist attack? Otherwise, we may have to abandon Washington because of terrorist attacks. It is time to pray instead of silly anti-God attacks. I recently heard the the Declaration of Independence quoted on television: "We hold these truths to be self-evident that all men are created equal and ARE ENDOWED BY THEIR CREATOR with certain inalienable rights, and among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness." "ENDOWED BY THEIR CREATOR" was omitted. This silly anti-God censorship is sad! Clean up Washington D.C., reform the Supreme Court. have reasonable debate on our problems, PRAY or our enemies will make Washington into a place too dangerous for humans. We will have to "get out"! Wesley Olson Box 142 Clinton MN 56225 ph 320-325 5565 CLASSIFIED ADS BRING QUICK RESULTS ORIWC.4WCqgtY I INDEPENDENT WANT ADS BRING QUICK RESULTS! I O0 s F F "-okies/ Holida 00his 00riday c6 )Vov. 28 29 Russell Stover Christmas Colonial Christmas Candles Carlton Greeting & Gift Large Selection o Childr00 Books! Many Christmas Figurines Holiday Linens Porcelain Angels Check Out Our Large Selection of Gift Items for the Entire Family! Selection o[ ell CARLSON DRUG & Your Locally Owned and Operated Thrifty .N Phone 320-839-e102 -nIWhite oaonvi,e, ll00Drug Page 2  INDEPENDENT TuesdaY, NoV'