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The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
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December 1, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
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December 1, 1921
 

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THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT )1 ORTONVILLE, MINN, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1921 NUMBER 30 " STATION HERE RECEIVE WORLD NEWS Prospects Good for Slide Kids May be Gladdened O. A. Ostlind and Dr. Chas. Bolsta have been out looking over possible sites available that would answer the purpose for the proposed snow slide, and still not require a large expendi- ture in money for the work necessary. WalsethListens to Speaking informally, Mr. Ostlind states that a site has been picked, Sent Out by Big Sta- but the consent of the party owning On East Coast. Pipe the ground over which the slide must Music Heard. music transmitted by the of Minnesota was heard Stebbins a short time ago I radio telegraph in Morris. He the name of each record an- by voice before the music was The records were transmitted purposes by a radio at the University. The of- nUmber of Stebbins' phone is He can communicate with sta- Milbank, Ortonvilte, Hancock, and other places where are amateur stations on any when the atmospheric is not interfering. He turns on the receiver instrument a way as to turn out undo- He can do this by of the fact that all stations wave lengths. ;SBcc Stebbins hears from five amateurs and can answer them are not over three hundred He has already aceom- this with 9T1 at Milbank, tt Ortonville and 9ABC at Han- pass, will have to be obtained. When this has been done, the matter will be again referred to the council for ac- tion. I is said that an elegant slide can be built at a very little cost over the ground chosen, and the kids, young and old are waiting in great anticipa- tion, the decision of the council, all hoping that the matter will soon be decided and a real fast hill be fixed up for this healthy sport. This matter was brought to the at- tention of the Council a short time ago and Dr. Bolsta and Mr. Ostlind were appointed as a committee to in- vestigate the feasibility of the plan. letters calls assigned to by the government. or five commercial stations are often over Stebbins' phone. receive time signals and presl the Great Lakes station larger coils in his receiving stations are known note stations according Stebbins. The human ear, due construction, can not respond to Waves, the the ca having a ear drum can respond to the Waves which are inaudible to The audion of the ra- one, a glass bulb, resemblin light, treats the waves in l that messages be heard l ears, and  radio tele- becomes practical. Mr. says foreign stations also on this inaudible note princi- a high beautiful flute- when made audible by the I Tribune. among the four Ortonvitle, who have radio out- that the Station refer- Is operated by Gerhardt Wal- number, assigned to him by government being 9BBD. having wireless outfits are Walker, Alton Hess and Beck. Young Walseth is li- the government as an area- operator, his license No. Call 9BBD. He haw the requirements to obtain including the oath of se- not to revea| mes- news given out by the gov- Mr. Walseth's apparatu en- to receive messages and l )oints on the east coast where the In the world is located, from Florida, and Great Lakes his sending radius is miles. Government time by him from Arlington at 9:00 o'clock, and af- is given out news from world is sent. One even- weeks ago, Gerhardt told that there had been a big Ireland, and a large Two days later this out in daily papers organ music sent out by Paul, was heard by him very distinctly. encourages boys in giving them the privilege air, but asked them not to as messages frr station to be disturbed by careless , Amateur operators send- interstate, are required licenses, we are informed, Freed Of Murder Charge was acquitted on a degree murder in dis- tonight, the jury re- Verdict of not guilty after seven hours and twenty Was tried on an indictment him with the killing of Her- a farmer on June 10, indictment, charging murder in connection with of Paul Reinhardt, another the same date was nolled of the verdict topight. eged by the state that Ro- a bottle of poison- which he and Schwenk in their deaths. Was given to the jury at and a verdict returned at Independent's Want Ads Bring Sure Results That it pays to read the want ad column of the Ortonville Independent is the conclusion reached by several persons the past week, who received rewards for articles found by them, for which ads appeared in the issue of November 17. Russel Stotesbery, cashier of the Kollitz Mercantile Co., lost a valuable l ring, and a young man who found it, answered his ad and returned the ring. Another party from Waubay, adver- tised that he had lost an expensive ladies coat near Correll. The coat was located thru the Inlependent and the lucky finder received a reward of fifteen dollars for his honesty. People read the want ads of the Independent. In fact they read every word in the paper. The Dream Concert and" Dance or- chestra of Redwood Falls will play for a spot dance at the I. 0. O. F. hall at Ortonville Saturday evening of this week, December 3. Prizes will be given and a good time assured. SUNDAY TRAINS Fire Damages Meyers' Grocery Tuesday, A. M. ON FARGO LINE Fire was discovered at about two o'cIock a. m. Tuesday in the Meyer's DISCONTINUED o00oor00 Sam Arnquist who was passing by the store on his way from the Park garage. Observing smoke coming thru the front of the building, Milwaukee Road to Take Off Mr. Arnquist made a closer investiga- Trains No. 1 and No. 4 From Milbank to Aber- deen. New Schedule Out. "Effective with Train No. 1 from Minneapolis, Monday, December 5, trains No. 1 and No. 4 will be discon- tinued between Milbank and Aber- deen. "Train No. 15 will make regular stops at Summit, Ortley, Waubay, Webster, Holmquist, Bristol, Andover and Groton. "Train No. 18 will make all stops between Aberdeen and Milbank. "Effective December  passenger trains No. 403 and 406 will not run Sundays between Ortonville and Far- go, which eans there will be no Far-; go sleeper out of SL Paul on train No. 3 Saturdays. "Effective December 5, trains 501 and 504 will be discontinued between Milbank and Sisseton. (Signed) R.F. WALKER, Agent. (Eastbound Trains) Train No. 6 ........................ 12.50 a. m. Train No. 18 ........................ 9.05 a. m. Train No. 4 ........................ 10.46 a. m. Train No. 16 4.53 p. m. (Westbound Trains) Traiv No. 3 ........................ 12.30 a. m. Train No. 17 ........................ 3.22 a. m. Train No. 1 ........................ 3.60 p. m. Train No. 15 ........................ 4.53 p. m. As Christmas Day comes on Sunday this year, special account of these changes must be taken by travelers who might happen to be out of the city, expecting to come home that day from points west, or persons desiring to spend the day at points on the Far- go line, as Trains No. 1 and No. 4, to or from points west and passenger trains on the Fargo line will not be running Christxnas day. HIGH SCHOOL PLAYS MADISON FRIDAY Entire New Squad to Repre- sent O. H. S. This Year. Smokers Barred F r o m Team. The High school basketball season opens here on Friday of this when the Madison team will meet thq Ortonville boys at the high school gymnasium and the outcome of the game is looked forward to with no lit- tle interest by students and fans of this sport, on account of the fact that the mettle of an entirely new squad will be put to test. Coach Stegner is pinning a great deal of confidence o nthe new group and says that if he is not mistaken the tem has a goodly quantity of that Ortonville fighting spirit that is neces- sary in contests of this kind; that al- the they lack experience, this will soon be made up thru hard work and prac- tice and in the early season games. The squad was hit unusually hard this year according to Mr. Stegner by having to do without four or'five play- ers from last year's team who decided they would rather smoke than play basketball. The Ortonville coach is resolved that the High School boys of this com- munity must fall into line and observe I the smoking rule or be barred from participation in Athletic contests. Support by students and those in- terested in High School athletics is vital to the moral of the players and with the proper encouragement the opposing teams will have to go the limit to win. Mr. Steguer requests those of our city who are interested in clean High School sports, to get be- tion and found that the basement was in flames. He immediately turned in an alarm and the chemical auto truck, manned by the fire department was quickly on the scene, and the fire promptly extinguished. Cause of the fire was attributed to defective wiring, insulation on which was burned for a long distance. Damage to the stock of groceries was largely confined to the basement, where fire, smoke and chemical caused a severe toss, in addition to which goods on the ground floor were dam- aged to quite an extent by the dense smoke coming up from the basement. The stock was fairly well covered with insurance. Petition State To Hire Graveling; Not FARMERS VIOLATING U. S. ANTI TRUST LAW Capper-Volstead Bill Held Up In Senate. Contention Raised Concerning Collec- tive Bargaining. Amendments offered by the Senate Judiciary Committee to the Capper- Volstead bill, legalizing collective bar- gaining by farmers, were severely criticized in a speech at Cincinnati, Ohio., before the National Milk Pro- ducing Federation on November 28 by Congressman Volstead, chairman of the House Judiciary Committee. Mr. Volstead said acceptance by congress of such amendments would place farm organizations in a more uncertain con- dition in relation to the Sherman anti. trust law than they now occupy. He calls upon the Senate to state its po- sition clearly and not camouflage its intention. Petitions are being circulated Such amendments, Mr. Volstead Beardsley addressed to the State said, totally nullify the original pur- Highway Commission asking that the pose of the bill, which was simply to graveling of the road between that so clarify the Clayton law as to let village and Graceville be not let by the farmers know exactly to what ex- contract, but that the work be done tent they can go in collectively mar- by the commission, hiring local men ketin their products. But the Senate witl teams direct, so that the money Judicmry, should its amendments be speit for such work be put in the adopted, has made collective action by hands of local people who are badly tillers of the soil more risky than ever. in need of the money. "No one could tell the status they School Children Get Milk. would occupy," said Mr. Volstead. In harmony with the suggestion of "The natural and inevitable effect of co-operative farm association is and always must be to lessen competition the Child Welfare Department of the Community Club, and in line with schools in many of the largest cities in the country, the children of our lo- cal school, in the lower grade, re- ceived their first daily ration of fresh milk Tuesday morning. Pupils were recently weighed and those found un- derweight were asked to drinl one pint of milk per day, and to keep ac- curate check on this, it was thot best that children be fed the milk at school. The milk is being purchased from Kaercherdale Farm. MR. AND MRS. W. H. MATTHEWS' GOLDEN WEDDING, 1871-1921 v Just a little golden circlet On your finger gleams you know, Placed there by a youth of promise Fifty years ago. Fifty years, just half a century, You have traversed hand ih hand Fifty years of joys and sorrows, Leaving foot prints on life's sands. Did your joys seem all too few And your sorrows hard to bear? You have kept your faith in Jesus, Laying all your burdens there. Many gifts of golden color, You're receiving, so they say, But these loving thots .we're sending For your Golden Wedding Day. May the fates deal gently with you Many anniversaries more, Eere you get the' Father's summons Over on the other shore. --Mrs. C. R. Welch, Bemidji. and Mrs. Matthews settled in West Prior township on the southeast quar- ter of section twenty-five, now occu- pied by Howard E. Holmes, and made the improvements required by the gov- ernment to establish their homestead rights. Returning to Wisconsin that year, they remained there until the year 1879 when they moved onto their land and made it their permanent home. Five children were born to bless the union of this happy couple, g. Arthur Matthews and Alvah I. Matthews of this city; Mrs. Paul Welch of Be- midji;Charles A. Matthews of Prior township and Glenn E. Matthews of Rochester, N. Y., all of whom are liv- ing. In celebration of their Golden Wed- ding day, invitations were ent to seventy relatives and friends, and the event was fittingly enjoyed yesterday hind the boys who have kept them- Fifty years ago, on November 30, selves eligible and show them that Miss Orlette F. Hagaman, becacne the their endeavors are appreciated, wife of William H. Matthews, at La- at the Matthews home in this city, all of the children attending with the ex- ception of their son, Glenn, who was unable to come on account of the dis- tanee and pressure of his work. Altho Glenn was not present in person, how- ever, Mrs. Matthews had the pleasure of hearing his voice over the tele- phone, as he surprised 'her by calling from Rochester, New York, to send her felicitations. Relatives entertained were Mrs. E. J. Stur- ges and Mrs. William Ferris, sis- ters of Mrs. Matthews; John Haga- man, her brothe of Clinton; Dr. Jus- tus Matthews and his sisters Harriet, Matthews, Mrs. Lybarger of Fayet- teville, Arkan.as, and Mrs. Frank Fin- berg of Clinton. Decorations were carried out in Gold and White. A sumptuous dinner was served at 12:30 p.m., and the afternoon spent in exchanging reminiscences and en- joying an "old fashioned visit." Cafe- teria lunch was served atT:00 p. m. valle, Wisconsin. Fifty years of happiness have pass- ed away, and finds them rejoicing in their continued companionship, blessed with health and fond memories of the that have rolled by. Mrs. Matthews, formerly Miss Or- ette F. Hagaman, was born at Reeds- burg, Wisconsin, and was 68 years of age April 16, 1921 Mr. Matthews was born at Prairie du Sac, Wisconsin, and was 73 years of age, August 23, 1921. Married at Lavalle, Wisconsin in 1871, they ventured with the pioneers of the northwest, to Big Stone county, in the year 1872, making the trip from that state in a covered wagon or prairie schooner, thru muddy and at times nearly impassable roads, being obliged to unload and pack their goods across bad places several times. in Big Stone Mr. Civic Club Plans Worthy Work. At a meeting of the Civic Club on November 7, plans were made for helping some of the people who are feeling the present "hard times." The next meeting on Monday, December 5, will be called at two o'clock in order that the members and anyone inter- ested may sew and make over gar- ments suitable for girls from 6 to 14 and for boys from 6 to 11. The fol- lowing are some of the articles need- ed: Mittens, overcoats, overshoes, caps, stockings, dresses, and sweaters. Anyone not able to attend that after- noon, and having these used articles may send them to the library club rooms before two o'clock on Monday afternoon. May many avail them- selves of the opportunity to help this work. Mrs. Michell hostess. among farmers in the sale of their pro- ducts: If they are not permitted to do this the Senate might as well say so in so many words and not camou- flage their intention by pretending to favor co-operation." It is contended by many members of the Senate that to legalize collective bargaining by farmers, in the shape of forming large co-operative agencies for the marketing of farm products, to procure better prices to the farmer producer, would be a violation of the Sherman Anti-trust law. Mr. Vol- stead, however, contends that such is not the ease; that the largest manu- facturing companies from whom the farmers must buy goods, are owned in many cases by thousands of stock- holders, whose interests are pooled in the. corporation, which acts for them to deal with the consumers, and that the farmer should have the same privilege. Minnesota, along with many other states has expressly authorized the formation of co-operative farm asso- ciations but there is no law under which these organizations can oper- ate in interstate and foreign com- merce, at least that is the contention raised against the Capper-Volstead bill, which passed the House and is still pending in the Senate, and the question is whether or not collective bargaining on the art of farmers is a violation of the Anti-trust taw. Orpheum Vaudeville Show Gets Big Crowd Last Week Last week's bill at the Orpheum theatre was shown to a large audience and from the applause given the vari- ous acts, the show was well received and enjoyed by all. Many people from Clinton, Grace- ville and other nearby towns are seen in the crowd who come to the Or- pheum's Friday night shows, as Orton- ville is the only town of its size it is said, in the state to be able to make bookings of such a class of vaudeville. Manager Gowan states that a fine bill has been procured for Friday night of this week. Four acts as us- ual with 2 reels of comedy pictures and the weekly news reel. Milan Basketball Quint Defeated by Ortonville Showing good team work, and play- ing a good grade of basketball, the local American Legion team took the Milan Independents into cap Thanks- giving evening, with a score of 21 to 12. The Milan team was outclassed by the Ortonville boys, the latter how- ever lacking the ability of throwing baskets as they should have, missing many good opportunities of piling up a larger score, on account of their shortcoming in this respect. The game was started with Rertel- son and Gowan playing forwards; Roy Geier and Joe Petrick, guards, and Paul Runnings, center. The line-up was changed several times during the game, all of the players on hand be- ing used before the finish. Those seeing the contest agree that while the local boys played a good game, endurance on the part of the most of them was lacking, and with proper training and persistent prac- tice to put all of the boys in better physical condition, a snappy team will be on the floor for the next game. Players making field baskets for the Legion team were; Stegner 5; Beck- man 2, Petrick 2, Gowan 1. Petrick made one free throw out of one Big Stone City Lyceum Books Noted Lecturer, The Big Stone City Luceum Course, which is on the Chicago Circuit Lyce- um Bureau, advertises their number for the evening of December 6 as be- mg one of special merit: Dr. William E. Bohn, one of the most noted lectur- ers on the platform today, to lecture on the subject, "The Resistless Tide." Those who have heard Dr. Bohn speak very highly of his ability in his field: Knowing his subject, and talking m a conversational voice in plain and smple language, it is said that he speaks to his audience as one of them- selves, and grips and holds their in- terest from his first sentence to the close; and with his unstudied eloquence gives to his lectures just the empha- sis needed to drive home the impres- sion of fine scholarship and splendid idealism. This entertainment will be given in the city hall at Big Stone City, S. D., on December 6th, at 8:15 !p. m. Admission 20c and 40c. Auditors for Income Tax Department Needed The United States Civil Service Commission stated today that the In- come Tax Unit of the Bureau of In- ternal Revenue will appoint several hundred additional auditors and reve-- nue agents or inspectors as soon as the Commission can supply the eligi- bles, for auditing work in the central office at Washington and inspection work thruout the country. It is sta- ted that the Bureau of Internal Reve- nue finds it necessary to greatly aug- ment its present force in order to bring its inspection and auditing work up to date and keep it current. The Bureau recognizes the importance to business interests of clearing away work in arrears. The Civil Service Commission has announced an examination to be held thruout the United States on Decem- ber 14 to fill these positions. The en- trance salaries offered range from $1,800 to $3,000 a year. Advancement will depend upon the record of the employee. Full information and application blanks may be obtained from the U. S. Civil Service Conm.ission, Wash- ington, D. C., or from the Civil Ser- vice Board at the post office or cus- tomhouse in any city. MAGPIE SHOT ON MINNESOTA RIVER BOTTOMS Rare Bird In This Locality Killed By Farmer. :Bird Was Attacking Cattle In Pasture When Shot. A large magpie was shot by Robert Dew, living on the old Cliff farm on the Minnesota bottoms this week. Mr. Dew heard a commotion among his cows and on investigation discovered the bird flying into the animal's face, evidently looking for a cow eye feed. It was promptlyshot and found to be a magpie, a bird very rarely seen in this section. The magpie is a handsome bird of saucy, vivacious habits, belonging to the jay family, according to the Amer- icana, and is chiefly noted for its thiev- ing habits and general rascality. It is always engaged in m.ischief, steal- ing bright or glittering objects and carrying them off to its nest. It is about the size of a crow and is dis- tinguishd by the extremely long, wedge-sltped tail, the middle feathers of which equal the entire length of the head and body. Color is a Ius- trous black with varied and changing iredescence and sharply contrasting white under parts, with patches of white on the shoulders and wings. A magpie ean be taught to talk like a parrot, saying many words and short sentences. Mr. Dew says that in sections of the southwest on cattle ranches, he has seen magpies in large numbers bothering cattle just branded, at- tracted no doubt by the wounds made" by the irons. $50.000.00 Libel Suit Filed Against Gee. M. Foslmrgh Gee. M. Fosburgh, editor of the Or- tonville Journal, has been sued for damages in the sum of $50,000.00 by Ernest Lundeen, according to reports received this week, the suit arising out of libelous statements alleged to have been published in the Journal by Fosburgh, subsequent to the deporta- tion of Mr. Lundeen in a box car from this city, after he had attempted to give a speech here two years ago. No- tice was served on Foshurgh, it is claimed, on November 15, 1919, de- manding the retraction by the defen- dant of the article referred to in the complaint, the same to be published on November 20th following. Such retraction was not published and suit was commenced in the Distri.t Court here on Friday, November 18 of this year against Mr. Fosburg, under Sec- tion 7901, 1913 General Laws of Min- THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT )1 ORTONVILLE, MINN, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1921 NUMBER 30 " STATION HERE RECEIVE WORLD NEWS Prospects Good for Slide Kids May be Gladdened O. A. Ostlind and Dr. Chas. Bolsta have been out looking over possible sites available that would answer the purpose for the proposed snow slide, and still not require a large expendi- ture in money for the work necessary. WalsethListens to Speaking informally, Mr. Ostlind states that a site has been picked, Sent Out by Big Sta- but the consent of the party owning On East Coast. Pipe the ground over which the slide must Music Heard. music transmitted by the of Minnesota was heard Stebbins a short time ago I radio telegraph in Morris. He the name of each record an- by voice before the music was The records were transmitted purposes by a radio at the University. The of- nUmber of Stebbins' phone is He can communicate with sta- Milbank, Ortonvilte, Hancock, and other places where are amateur stations on any when the atmospheric is not interfering. He turns on the receiver instrument a way as to turn out undo- He can do this by of the fact that all stations wave lengths. ;SBcc Stebbins hears from five amateurs and can answer them are not over three hundred He has already aceom- this with 9T1 at Milbank, tt Ortonville and 9ABC at Han- pass, will have to be obtained. When this has been done, the matter will be again referred to the council for ac- tion. I is said that an elegant slide can be built at a very little cost over the ground chosen, and the kids, young and old are waiting in great anticipa- tion, the decision of the council, all hoping that the matter will soon be decided and a real fast hill be fixed up for this healthy sport. This matter was brought to the at- tention of the Council a short time ago and Dr. Bolsta and Mr. Ostlind were appointed as a committee to in- vestigate the feasibility of the plan. letters calls assigned to by the government. or five commercial stations are often over Stebbins' phone. receive time signals and presl the Great Lakes station larger coils in his receiving stations are known note stations according Stebbins. The human ear, due construction, can not respond to Waves, the the ca having a ear drum can respond to the Waves which are inaudible to The audion of the ra- one, a glass bulb, resemblin light, treats the waves in l that messages be heard l ears, and  radio tele- becomes practical. Mr. says foreign stations also on this inaudible note princi- a high beautiful flute- when made audible by the I Tribune. among the four Ortonvitle, who have radio out- that the Station refer- Is operated by Gerhardt Wal- number, assigned to him by government being 9BBD. having wireless outfits are Walker, Alton Hess and Beck. Young Walseth is li- the government as an area- operator, his license No. Call 9BBD. He haw the requirements to obtain including the oath of se- not to revea| mes- news given out by the gov- Mr. Walseth's apparatu en- to receive messages and l )oints on the east coast where the In the world is located, from Florida, and Great Lakes his sending radius is miles. Government time by him from Arlington at 9:00 o'clock, and af- is given out news from world is sent. One even- weeks ago, Gerhardt told that there had been a big Ireland, and a large Two days later this out in daily papers organ music sent out by Paul, was heard by him very distinctly. encourages boys in giving them the privilege air, but asked them not to as messages frr station to be disturbed by careless , Amateur operators send- interstate, are required licenses, we are informed, Freed Of Murder Charge was acquitted on a degree murder in dis- tonight, the jury re- Verdict of not guilty after seven hours and twenty Was tried on an indictment him with the killing of Her- a farmer on June 10, indictment, charging murder in connection with of Paul Reinhardt, another the same date was nolled of the verdict topight. eged by the state that Ro- a bottle of poison- which he and Schwenk in their deaths. Was given to the jury at and a verdict returned at Independent's Want Ads Bring Sure Results That it pays to read the want ad column of the Ortonville Independent is the conclusion reached by several persons the past week, who received rewards for articles found by them, for which ads appeared in the issue of November 17. Russel Stotesbery, cashier of the Kollitz Mercantile Co., lost a valuable l ring, and a young man who found it, answered his ad and returned the ring. Another party from Waubay, adver- tised that he had lost an expensive ladies coat near Correll. The coat was located thru the Inlependent and the lucky finder received a reward of fifteen dollars for his honesty. People read the want ads of the Independent. In fact they read every word in the paper. The Dream Concert and" Dance or- chestra of Redwood Falls will play for a spot dance at the I. 0. O. F. hall at Ortonville Saturday evening of this week, December 3. Prizes will be given and a good time assured. SUNDAY TRAINS Fire Damages Meyers' Grocery Tuesday, A. M. ON FARGO LINE Fire was discovered at about two o'cIock a. m. Tuesday in the Meyer's DISCONTINUED o00oor00 Sam Arnquist who was passing by the store on his way from the Park garage. Observing smoke coming thru the front of the building, Milwaukee Road to Take Off Mr. Arnquist made a closer investiga- Trains No. 1 and No. 4 From Milbank to Aber- deen. New Schedule Out. "Effective with Train No. 1 from Minneapolis, Monday, December 5, trains No. 1 and No. 4 will be discon- tinued between Milbank and Aber- deen. "Train No. 15 will make regular stops at Summit, Ortley, Waubay, Webster, Holmquist, Bristol, Andover and Groton. "Train No. 18 will make all stops between Aberdeen and Milbank. "Effective December  passenger trains No. 403 and 406 will not run Sundays between Ortonville and Far- go, which eans there will be no Far-; go sleeper out of SL Paul on train No. 3 Saturdays. "Effective December 5, trains 501 and 504 will be discontinued between Milbank and Sisseton. (Signed) R.F. WALKER, Agent. (Eastbound Trains) Train No. 6 ........................ 12.50 a. m. Train No. 18 ........................ 9.05 a. m. Train No. 4 ........................ 10.46 a. m. Train No. 16 4.53 p. m. (Westbound Trains) Traiv No. 3 ........................ 12.30 a. m. Train No. 17 ........................ 3.22 a. m. Train No. 1 ........................ 3.60 p. m. Train No. 15 ........................ 4.53 p. m. As Christmas Day comes on Sunday this year, special account of these changes must be taken by travelers who might happen to be out of the city, expecting to come home that day from points west, or persons desiring to spend the day at points on the Far- go line, as Trains No. 1 and No. 4, to or from points west and passenger trains on the Fargo line will not be running Christxnas day. HIGH SCHOOL PLAYS MADISON FRIDAY Entire New Squad to Repre- sent O. H. S. This Year. Smokers Barred F r o m Team. The High school basketball season opens here on Friday of this when the Madison team will meet thq Ortonville boys at the high school gymnasium and the outcome of the game is looked forward to with no lit- tle interest by students and fans of this sport, on account of the fact that the mettle of an entirely new squad will be put to test. Coach Stegner is pinning a great deal of confidence o nthe new group and says that if he is not mistaken the tem has a goodly quantity of that Ortonville fighting spirit that is neces- sary in contests of this kind; that al- the they lack experience, this will soon be made up thru hard work and prac- tice and in the early season games. The squad was hit unusually hard this year according to Mr. Stegner by having to do without four or'five play- ers from last year's team who decided they would rather smoke than play basketball. The Ortonville coach is resolved that the High School boys of this com- munity must fall into line and observe I the smoking rule or be barred from participation in Athletic contests. Support by students and those in- terested in High School athletics is vital to the moral of the players and with the proper encouragement the opposing teams will have to go the limit to win. Mr. Steguer requests those of our city who are interested in clean High School sports, to get be- tion and found that the basement was in flames. He immediately turned in an alarm and the chemical auto truck, manned by the fire department was quickly on the scene, and the fire promptly extinguished. Cause of the fire was attributed to defective wiring, insulation on which was burned for a long distance. Damage to the stock of groceries was largely confined to the basement, where fire, smoke and chemical caused a severe toss, in addition to which goods on the ground floor were dam- aged to quite an extent by the dense smoke coming up from the basement. The stock was fairly well covered with insurance. Petition State To Hire Graveling; Not FARMERS VIOLATING U. S. ANTI TRUST LAW Capper-Volstead Bill Held Up In Senate. Contention Raised Concerning Collec- tive Bargaining. Amendments offered by the Senate Judiciary Committee to the Capper- Volstead bill, legalizing collective bar- gaining by farmers, were severely criticized in a speech at Cincinnati, Ohio., before the National Milk Pro- ducing Federation on November 28 by Congressman Volstead, chairman of the House Judiciary Committee. Mr. Volstead said acceptance by congress of such amendments would place farm organizations in a more uncertain con- dition in relation to the Sherman anti. trust law than they now occupy. He calls upon the Senate to state its po- sition clearly and not camouflage its intention. Petitions are being circulated Such amendments, Mr. Volstead Beardsley addressed to the State said, totally nullify the original pur- Highway Commission asking that the pose of the bill, which was simply to graveling of the road between that so clarify the Clayton law as to let village and Graceville be not let by the farmers know exactly to what ex- contract, but that the work be done tent they can go in collectively mar- by the commission, hiring local men ketin their products. But the Senate witl teams direct, so that the money Judicmry, should its amendments be speit for such work be put in the adopted, has made collective action by hands of local people who are badly tillers of the soil more risky than ever. in need of the money. "No one could tell the status they School Children Get Milk. would occupy," said Mr. Volstead. In harmony with the suggestion of "The natural and inevitable effect of co-operative farm association is and always must be to lessen competition the Child Welfare Department of the Community Club, and in line with schools in many of the largest cities in the country, the children of our lo- cal school, in the lower grade, re- ceived their first daily ration of fresh milk Tuesday morning. Pupils were recently weighed and those found un- derweight were asked to drinl one pint of milk per day, and to keep ac- curate check on this, it was thot best that children be fed the milk at school. The milk is being purchased from Kaercherdale Farm. MR. AND MRS. W. H. MATTHEWS' GOLDEN WEDDING, 1871-1921 v Just a little golden circlet On your finger gleams you know, Placed there by a youth of promise Fifty years ago. Fifty years, just half a century, You have traversed hand ih hand Fifty years of joys and sorrows, Leaving foot prints on life's sands. Did your joys seem all too few And your sorrows hard to bear? You have kept your faith in Jesus, Laying all your burdens there. Many gifts of golden color, You're receiving, so they say, But these loving thots .we're sending For your Golden Wedding Day. May the fates deal gently with you Many anniversaries more, Eere you get the' Father's summons Over on the other shore. --Mrs. C. R. Welch, Bemidji. and Mrs. Matthews settled in West Prior township on the southeast quar- ter of section twenty-five, now occu- pied by Howard E. Holmes, and made the improvements required by the gov- ernment to establish their homestead rights. Returning to Wisconsin that year, they remained there until the year 1879 when they moved onto their land and made it their permanent home. Five children were born to bless the union of this happy couple, g. Arthur Matthews and Alvah I. Matthews of this city; Mrs. Paul Welch of Be- midji;Charles A. Matthews of Prior township and Glenn E. Matthews of Rochester, N. Y., all of whom are liv- ing. In celebration of their Golden Wed- ding day, invitations were ent to seventy relatives and friends, and the event was fittingly enjoyed yesterday hind the boys who have kept them- Fifty years ago, on November 30, selves eligible and show them that Miss Orlette F. Hagaman, becacne the their endeavors are appreciated, wife of William H. Matthews, at La- at the Matthews home in this city, all of the children attending with the ex- ception of their son, Glenn, who was unable to come on account of the dis- tanee and pressure of his work. Altho Glenn was not present in person, how- ever, Mrs. Matthews had the pleasure of hearing his voice over the tele- phone, as he surprised 'her by calling from Rochester, New York, to send her felicitations. Relatives entertained were Mrs. E. J. Stur- ges and Mrs. William Ferris, sis- ters of Mrs. Matthews; John Haga- man, her brothe of Clinton; Dr. Jus- tus Matthews and his sisters Harriet, Matthews, Mrs. Lybarger of Fayet- teville, Arkan.as, and Mrs. Frank Fin- berg of Clinton. Decorations were carried out in Gold and White. A sumptuous dinner was served at 12:30 p.m., and the afternoon spent in exchanging reminiscences and en- joying an "old fashioned visit." Cafe- teria lunch was served atT:00 p. m. valle, Wisconsin. Fifty years of happiness have pass- ed away, and finds them rejoicing in their continued companionship, blessed with health and fond memories of the that have rolled by. Mrs. Matthews, formerly Miss Or- ette F. Hagaman, was born at Reeds- burg, Wisconsin, and was 68 years of age April 16, 1921 Mr. Matthews was born at Prairie du Sac, Wisconsin, and was 73 years of age, August 23, 1921. Married at Lavalle, Wisconsin in 1871, they ventured with the pioneers of the northwest, to Big Stone county, in the year 1872, making the trip from that state in a covered wagon or prairie schooner, thru muddy and at times nearly impassable roads, being obliged to unload and pack their goods across bad places several times. in Big Stone Mr. Civic Club Plans Worthy Work. At a meeting of the Civic Club on November 7, plans were made for helping some of the people who are feeling the present "hard times." The next meeting on Monday, December 5, will be called at two o'clock in order that the members and anyone inter- ested may sew and make over gar- ments suitable for girls from 6 to 14 and for boys from 6 to 11. The fol- lowing are some of the articles need- ed: Mittens, overcoats, overshoes, caps, stockings, dresses, and sweaters. Anyone not able to attend that after- noon, and having these used articles may send them to the library club rooms before two o'clock on Monday afternoon. May many avail them- selves of the opportunity to help this work. Mrs. Michell hostess. among farmers in the sale of their pro- ducts: If they are not permitted to do this the Senate might as well say so in so many words and not camou- flage their intention by pretending to favor co-operation." It is contended by many members of the Senate that to legalize collective bargaining by farmers, in the shape of forming large co-operative agencies for the marketing of farm products, to procure better prices to the farmer producer, would be a violation of the Sherman Anti-trust law. Mr. Vol- stead, however, contends that such is not the ease; that the largest manu- facturing companies from whom the farmers must buy goods, are owned in many cases by thousands of stock- holders, whose interests are pooled in the. corporation, which acts for them to deal with the consumers, and that the farmer should have the same privilege. Minnesota, along with many other states has expressly authorized the formation of co-operative farm asso- ciations but there is no law under which these organizations can oper- ate in interstate and foreign com- merce, at least that is the contention raised against the Capper-Volstead bill, which passed the House and is still pending in the Senate, and the question is whether or not collective bargaining on the art of farmers is a violation of the Anti-trust taw. Orpheum Vaudeville Show Gets Big Crowd Last Week Last week's bill at the Orpheum theatre was shown to a large audience and from the applause given the vari- ous acts, the show was well received and enjoyed by all. Many people from Clinton, Grace- ville and other nearby towns are seen in the crowd who come to the Or- pheum's Friday night shows, as Orton- ville is the only town of its size it is said, in the state to be able to make bookings of such a class of vaudeville. Manager Gowan states that a fine bill has been procured for Friday night of this week. Four acts as us- ual with 2 reels of comedy pictures and the weekly news reel. Milan Basketball Quint Defeated by Ortonville Showing good team work, and play- ing a good grade of basketball, the local American Legion team took the Milan Independents into cap Thanks- giving evening, with a score of 21 to 12. The Milan team was outclassed by the Ortonville boys, the latter how- ever lacking the ability of throwing baskets as they should have, missing many good opportunities of piling up a larger score, on account of their shortcoming in this respect. The game was started with Rertel- son and Gowan playing forwards; Roy Geier and Joe Petrick, guards, and Paul Runnings, center. The line-up was changed several times during the game, all of the players on hand be- ing used before the finish. Those seeing the contest agree that while the local boys played a good game, endurance on the part of the most of them was lacking, and with proper training and persistent prac- tice to put all of the boys in better physical condition, a snappy team will be on the floor for the next game. Players making field baskets for the Legion team were; Stegner 5; Beck- man 2, Petrick 2, Gowan 1. Petrick made one free throw out of one Big Stone City Lyceum Books Noted Lecturer, The Big Stone City Luceum Course, which is on the Chicago Circuit Lyce- um Bureau, advertises their number for the evening of December 6 as be- mg one of special merit: Dr. William E. Bohn, one of the most noted lectur- ers on the platform today, to lecture on the subject, "The Resistless Tide." Those who have heard Dr. Bohn speak very highly of his ability in his field: Knowing his subject, and talking m a conversational voice in plain and smple language, it is said that he speaks to his audience as one of them- selves, and grips and holds their in- terest from his first sentence to the close; and with his unstudied eloquence gives to his lectures just the empha- sis needed to drive home the impres- sion of fine scholarship and splendid idealism. This entertainment will be given in the city hall at Big Stone City, S. D., on December 6th, at 8:15 !p. m. Admission 20c and 40c. Auditors for Income Tax Department Needed The United States Civil Service Commission stated today that the In- come Tax Unit of the Bureau of In- ternal Revenue will appoint several hundred additional auditors and reve-- nue agents or inspectors as soon as the Commission can supply the eligi- bles, for auditing work in the central office at Washington and inspection work thruout the country. It is sta- ted that the Bureau of Internal Reve- nue finds it necessary to greatly aug- ment its present force in order to bring its inspection and auditing work up to date and keep it current. The Bureau recognizes the importance to business interests of clearing away work in arrears. The Civil Service Commission has announced an examination to be held thruout the United States on Decem- ber 14 to fill these positions. The en- trance salaries offered range from $1,800 to $3,000 a year. Advancement will depend upon the record of the employee. Full information and application blanks may be obtained from the U. S. Civil Service Conm.ission, Wash- ington, D. C., or from the Civil Ser- vice Board at the post office or cus- tomhouse in any city. MAGPIE SHOT ON MINNESOTA RIVER BOTTOMS Rare Bird In This Locality Killed By Farmer. :Bird Was Attacking Cattle In Pasture When Shot. A large magpie was shot by Robert Dew, living on the old Cliff farm on the Minnesota bottoms this week. Mr. Dew heard a commotion among his cows and on investigation discovered the bird flying into the animal's face, evidently looking for a cow eye feed. It was promptlyshot and found to be a magpie, a bird very rarely seen in this section. The magpie is a handsome bird of saucy, vivacious habits, belonging to the jay family, according to the Amer- icana, and is chiefly noted for its thiev- ing habits and general rascality. It is always engaged in m.ischief, steal- ing bright or glittering objects and carrying them off to its nest. It is about the size of a crow and is dis- tinguishd by the extremely long, wedge-sltped tail, the middle feathers of which equal the entire length of the head and body. Color is a Ius- trous black with varied and changing iredescence and sharply contrasting white under parts, with patches of white on the shoulders and wings. A magpie ean be taught to talk like a parrot, saying many words and short sentences. Mr. Dew says that in sections of the southwest on cattle ranches, he has seen magpies in large numbers bothering cattle just branded, at- tracted no doubt by the wounds made" by the irons. $50.000.00 Libel Suit Filed Against Gee. M. Foslmrgh Gee. M. Fosburgh, editor of the Or- tonville Journal, has been sued for damages in the sum of $50,000.00 by Ernest Lundeen, according to reports received this week, the suit arising out of libelous statements alleged to have been published in the Journal by Fosburgh, subsequent to the deporta- tion of Mr. Lundeen in a box car from this city, after he had attempted to give a speech here two years ago. No- tice was served on Foshurgh, it is claimed, on November 15, 1919, de- manding the retraction by the defen- dant of the article referred to in the complaint, the same to be published on November 20th following. Such retraction was not published and suit was commenced in the Distri.t Court here on Friday, November 18 of this year against Mr. Fosburg, under Sec- tion 7901, 1913 General Laws of Min- THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT ORTONVILLE, MINN THURSDAY. DECEMBER 1, 1921 NUMBER STATION Prospects Good for Slide Kids May BERE RECEIVE .... ost.od .n.--r Lmve bn out looking over posslble! WORLD NEWS purpose ................................. for the d stifl no% lqui a large expcndl :ure in money for the work neestory Listens to 5peaking infomallY, Mr. Ostlinc ,y Big Sta- tates that a site h been Picked but the consent of the Pipe the ground over which the pass, will have to be obtained. Wbell this h been done, the matter will be by the ' radio telegph in Morns. the name uf eh cord an- befo the mie was at the Urdveity. uraber of Stebbins' phone is Milhlk, Ortonville, Hck, and other giwea where sre teur statio on y atmcpheric as to turn out unde- stations. He c do rids by nf the ft that all stations lengths. Stebbi hears from five ' are ot over this vAth 9TI at MiIbank, Orton,tle and 9ABC at Han- lettem are calls assigned to guvement. commerclat stations phone. .eive tme ignals d pres, Great note stations according " tebhins. The human ear, due not spcnd to the oa having a ground chosen, and the kids, young and old an waiting in great antieipa- tlon, the decision of the council 11 hoping that the matter will soon be d a al fast hill be fixed up for this healthy spor This tter w brought to of the Coundl a short time ago and Dr. Bolsta d Mr. Ostlind a ommitt to in- vestigate the feasibility of the plan. Independent's Want Ads Bring Sure That it is the neiusien nached by evera] perns the past wk, 17. Rsel Stetesbery, chier of the lost a rulable ring, d a young man who found it, l his ad and ntued the y, adver- tised that he had lost an expensive near Coll. The coat lntlependent and the lucky finder reived a reward flftn dolla for his honesty People Independent. word ha the paper. giay for Saturday evening of thiB wk, December 3. prlzes wilI given and a good time assured. HIGH SCHOOL PLAYS MADISON Is bulb, resembling light, treats the wav in Way that messages he beard and ae mdie tele- Mr. also ays forelg prii- when raade audible by the four boys s operated b government belng having witless Alton Hess and Ynung Walseth is li- his llnse No. the requirements not to nveal mes- news given out hy the Mr. Waiseth's apparatus en- to ceive messag and L points on the cast cot, rllngton, where the largest , fm t, Flolida, and Great Lakes his sending radius is Government time Arlington , and af- weeks ago, Gerhardt told r that there had bn a big a large Twn days inter ts i given out in daily mlc sent out by was heard by him giving them the pvleg m sent O. H. S. This Year. Smokers Barred F r o m Team. The High school basketball opens he on Ftlday of this wk. when the Madison team will meet the boys at the high gymnasium d the outcome of the ge is looked fotalJ to with no lit- tle interest by students and fans of this sport, on account of the fact that the mettle of an entily new sqd will be put to test. Coach Stegner is pinning a gnat deal of nfidencc o ntbe new group and says that if be is gorily quantity of that Or tonville fightin I in contts of this kind; tho they lack experien, this will soon be made up The squad w hit unusually hard this year ording to Mr. Stegner hy having to do without four or'five play- ers from Im year's team whe dl id.d they would ther smoke th play The Ortonvitle oh is that the High School boys of this com- murdt the smoking participati ha Athletic contests. Support by students and those in. SUNDAY TRAINS ON FARGO LINE DISCONTINUED Trains No. 1 and No. 4 From Mllksnk to Aber- deeD. New Schedule Out. "Effective with inneapols, Monday, between Mhlbank "Train No. 15 will make ng'ular stops at Summit, Ortiey. Waubay, Webster, Holmquist, Bristol, Andover "Train No. 18 will rake all stops betwee Abvrdn and Milbank. "Effective December & pnger 4O3 and 4O6 will not n Sundays betwn Ortoaville d F- go, which ,ans the will k go sleeper out of Sk Paul on train NO. 8 Saturdays. "Effective December 5, trains 501 Milbank d Sisseton. (Signed) tL F. WALKIR, Agent. (Eastbound Train) No. 6 ............ 12.50  m. NO. 18 .............. 9.05  m. No. 4 ........................ i@.46 a. m. No. 16 ........... 4.53 p. m. (Westbound Trains) No. 3 ................ 12.30  m. NO. 17 ................ 3.22 & m. No. t .................... 350 p. m. No. 15 ................... 4.53 p. m. AS Christmas Day comes on Sunday special unt of these be taken by trave]em who might happen to be out of the city, expecting to come home that day from ints west, or persons designs to spend the day at points on the Fa go line,  Trains NO. i and No. a, to points west and psseager line will not be running Christmas day. Fire Damages Meyers' Grocery Tuesday, A. M, Fxre was dizove[ at about tw in the Meyer' eery by Sam Arnquiat psing by the sto on his way f garage. Obseing smoke coming thr the front of the building, Mr. Aquist made a closer invcstiga. He immediately tutored in mned by the fl quickly on the scene, and the fire pr.n*ptly extinguished, Cau of the wmng, I for long distance. Damage to the stock ef grories was largely confined to the bment. whe fi, smoke and chemlcM caused a severe loss, in addition to which goods on the grod floor we d. aged to quite an extent by the dese eke coming o drly Petition State To Hire Graveling; Not Contract Petitions are being eireuiatt at Beardsley adduced to the State Highway Gommission asking that the graveIing of the l hetn that village and Granville be not let by contact, but that the work be done the commission, hiring local men itl teams dit, so that the money mat for sh work he put in the rods of local people who a badly in need of the ney. Sehl Children Get Milk. In barony with the suggestion of the Child Welfa Department of the Community Club, and in line with sehls in many of the largest cities in the country, the ehildn of our Io. cM schl, in the lower grade, - eeved their flint dail milk Tuesday morning. PupRs wen recently weighed and thee de.eight we asked to drint one pint of milk per day, and to k curate chk on this, it ws thor best The milk is being puhased Kaereherda;e Farm. MR. AND MRS. W. H. MATTHEWS' GOLDEN WEDDING 1871-1921 Just a little golden oMelet ]ul blrs. Matthews settled in West On your finger gleams you know, [Prior townshi on the southeast qr- Placed there by a youth of promise tel of section twenty-five, now DeeD- Fifty ye ago. pied by Howard g. Iolmes, mid made Fifty years, just half a century, he improvements qu d by the SOy- You have traveled hand ih hand Fifty years of joy* and sorrows. ghts. Returning to Wiconsln year, they remained there until the Leaving foot plints on life's sands, year 1879 when they moved onto their Did your joys sm an too few land and made it their peanent And your sorrows hard to bear? You have kept your faith in Jus, Laying all your brdeas the. Many gifts of golden color, g,  they say, thot we' sending For your Golden Wedding Day, May the fates deal gently with yon My anniverries mo, Eer you get the Father's summo --Mrs. C. R. Welch, BemidL Fifty yea ago, wife of Wi11am H. Matthews, at La- vaUe, Winsi Fifty years of happlne have ed away. d finds them re,citing ir in High School athletics is he moral of the ptaye and pper encouragement the tm interstate, are quid oppoain$ teams Will have to o the limit to win. Mr. Stegner requts licenses, we those of our dt in ele High School sports, to get be- hind the boys who have kept them- eligible and show them that Of ,ppredated. w acquitted Cl*ie Club Phma Worth Work. At a meztlng of the Ci.Ac Club es tonight, the jury  7, pla were made fol Verdiet of not guilty aftel helping some of the people who a twent ys that have rolled by. next meeting on Monday, Dber 5 Mrs. Matthews. foerly I will be called at two o'clock lotto F. Hagan, that the membe and anyone inter burg, Wiensin, and was 68 yea o faer on June 10 sted may sew ge April 1. 1921 indictment, ehargln meats suitable for girls fnm 0 to 1 Sac, Wisconsin and for boys frnm 6 to 11. sf Paul Reinhatt. anothc Iowlug same date w DOlled! d: Mittens, overeats, ight. raps, stockings, dresses, and saters. Anyone net able to attend that after- polsnn ppy couple, J Arthur and Alvah 1. Malthus of this city; Mrs. Paul Welch of Be. mldjil 'Charles A. Matthews ( township and Glenn E. Matthews of Rochester. N. Y., all uf whnm are v- ins. In ]ebration , dins day, invitations we cent to eaty relatives and friends, and the g with the ex- son, Glenn, who w unable to come on aecount of the dis- preeent in pe, how- pleur of hearing his voice over the tele. phone, as he surprised her by calling from Rochester, New Ynrk to nd her felicitations, Relative cnterained wet6 Mrs. E. J. Slur ws and Mr wlniam Ferns, sis mrs of Mrs. Matthews; Jo man, her bthe of Cllnton;  73 years of age, August 23, 1921 and Married at Ivalle. Matthews, Mrs. Lybarer of Fayet. 187t, they ventured with the pinnee eville. Arkansas. ! the northwest, to Big Stone county, berg of Clitoa. in the yar 172, making the tp fm the ury at ARE FARMERS VIOLATING U. S. apper-Volstead Bill Held Up In Senate. Contention Raised Concerning Collec- tive Bargaining. Amendmentza offend by the JUdiciary Committee to the Cappe Volstead hill, legalizing ollective bar- ffainiag by fmers, we aevely criticized it a speech at Cineiati, Ohio., before the National Milk P- dueing Fedeltion on November 25 by Congssm Volstead, ehail of Mr, said acceptance h pl fa opy. He calls upon te Send, to to state its po- sition elely d not meflage its Such endment.% Mr. t sa[d, totally nullify the original pu po of the bill which was simply to tent they can go in oIleetively mar- ketlng their product But the Juddary, should adopted, has made eolIectlve action by :y than er. "No one could tell the status they oepy/' id Mr Volstead. and inevitable efft of fa soiation is mad always must be to lessen competition ]f they are not peitted to th, Senate might  11 say so in  many words and not ou- flute their intention hy pteding to favor co-operation." It is contended hy many membersef the Senate that to legalize collective bargaining by faers, in the shape of foiag large -opemtive agencies better prices te the prodr, would be a violation Antl-trast law. stead, hoover, tends that such is not the ease; that the Iget mu- faturlng mpanies from must buy goods, are in many cas by thounds of stock- holder, whose intests are pooled in the corporation which atte for them with the consumers, and that: the farmer should have the privilege. Miesota. alo with many other states has expssl foation of co-operatlve fa ash- but the is no law under which the organizations can ate in interstate and foreign against the Capper-Volstead hill, which pasd the House and is still pending in the Senate, and the question is bargaining Orpheum Vaudeville Show Gets Big Crowd Last Week Last wk's hill at the Orph applause given o ts, the show was wel} eelved and enjoyed by all. Many people from Clinton. Grace- in the crowd who me to the Or- pbeum's Friday night shows, &s Often+ eMile is the only town said, in the state to be able to make bookings of such a cls of vaudeville. Manager Gowan states that a fine biI has been procured for Friday night of this wk. Four acts as us- ual with 2 ets of comedy pletums and the wkly ns eL Milan Basketball Quint Defeated by Ortonvilh Showing good te work, d play- ins a good grade of bktball, the te took the Milan Inde!ndent into cap Thanks- giing ening, The Mtl team was outelasse by the latter how- lacking the ability of thwin they should have, missing my good opportuniti of piling up a larger sre, on account of their shortmint in this spee The game w started dth playing foards; Roy Joe Petr, guards, and Paul Running% center. The line-up was changed sevel times during th game, all of Those seeifig the contest agree thai local boys played a game, e most of them was Iking, ploper training and peistent pe ticc to pat all of the boys in physical condition, a snappy team wll oon, and having that state in a covered wagon or and White. the next game. may send them to the library olub prairie booner, thru muddy ad at A snmptuons dinner was rooms before two o'elk on Monday times nearly impsable muds. being 12:30 pm., and the afternoon spent Legion te we; Stegner 5; Beck- May many avail them- ohllged to pack io exchanging minisnce and on- man 2, Petriek 2, Gowan 1. P seves of the opportunity to help this joying an "old fashioned visit." made one fr throw oat of in Big unty, Mr. terms lunch was seed at 7:OO Big Stone City Lyceum Books Noted Lecture The Big Stone City Luum Course# on the Chleago Ciuit Lyce- um Buau, advertis their number for the evening o December 6 as be tag one of special merit: Dr. William E. Bohn, ons of the most noted lect giatfo today, to lecture on the sabjt, "The Resistless Tide." Those who have heard Dr. Bohn spk very highly of his ability in his field: Knowing his subjt, and ta ki shmple lguage, it is id that he speaks to his audience as one of them- seIves, and grips and holds their il his fit sentee to the gives to his lectu just the empha- sis needed o drive home the impres- sion of fine seholhlp and splendid idlism. This entertainment will be given in the city hall at Big Stone City, S. D. on December 6th, at 8:15 Admission 20c and 40. Auditors for Income Tax Department Needed The United States Civit Service that the t Bureau of In- Revue will appoint eral auditors and reu' nue agents or inspectors  sn the Coissinn u apply the eligi- bles, for auditing work in the central ofee at Washington and inspection work thout the untry. It is eta. meat its pt force in order o bring its insption and auditing work up to date and keep it current. The Burn gnizes the mportanee to interests of clearing, away The Civil Seice Commission has annound au emhaation to be heId on Deeem- The en- lares offend range fm $1,800 to $-5,OO0 a year Advancement will depend upon the ord of the employee. Full infoation d application bilks may be obtained fm the U. 8ei Commission, Wash- MasCon, D. C. or from the Civil Ser- vi Board at the pot office or s- tomlouse in any city. MAGPIE SHOT ON MINNESOTA RIVER BOTTOMS Rare Bird In This Locality Killed By Farmer. Bird Was Attacking Cattle In Pasture When Shot A large magpie was shot by Robert Dew, living on the old Cliff f on Dew hear a commotion ong his cows and on investigation discoved the bird flying into the imai's fa. evidently ]king for a cow eye feed It w promptlyshot and found to be a magpie, a bitfl very rarely en in this etion. The magpie is a hand.me bird of i i habit, belonging to the jay flily, cordlng to the Amev ica, and is chiefly noted for it thiev- ing habits and general rascality. It is always engaged in mihlef, steal* Jag bright or glittering objt and carrying them off to its nesL It is about the size of a cw and is dis- tingush by the extely long, wedge lps ed tail, the middle feathe of which equal the entire length of the heod and bly. Color is a ]us- sharply ntsting parts, with patth of white on the shoulders d wlng. A gpie c be taught to talk like a part, saying my word and shor Mr. Dew says that in Mttlons of the southwest on ttle raneh, he h en magpies in largo nmmbers bothering ettle Jtt b,tt ded, at- Libel Suit Filed Against GoD. M. Folmrgh Gee. M. Fosburh, editor of the O ville Journal. has  ned for damages in the sum of $0,.09 by gt Lden, according to report this wk, eke smt ea'lsing allegtl to have been published in the Journal by Fosburgh, subsent to the deporta- tion of Mr. Lundn in a box ear fm ;his city, after he had attempted to ive a speech here two yeurs ago, No- i was seed on Fosburgh. it ia elalmed, on ovemher 15, 1919, de- manding the retrtlon by the defen- ferred to fn the complaint, the ze to be published sn November 20th following. Such retraction was not published and suit was commenced in the District Court Fiday, November 18 uf this year against Mr. Foshurg, under SW- lion 7901, 1913 Geueral Lws of Min THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT )1 ORTONVILLE, MINN, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1921 NUMBER 30 " STATION HERE RECEIVE WORLD NEWS Prospects Good for Slide Kids May be Gladdened O. A. Ostlind and Dr. Chas. Bolsta have been out looking over possible sites available that would answer the purpose for the proposed snow slide, and still not require a large expendi- ture in money for the work necessary. WalsethListens to Speaking informally, Mr. Ostlind states that a site has been picked, Sent Out by Big Sta- but the consent of the party owning On East Coast. Pipe the ground over which the slide must Music Heard. music transmitted by the of Minnesota was heard Stebbins a short time ago I radio telegraph in Morris. He the name of each record an- by voice before the music was The records were transmitted purposes by a radio at the University. The of- nUmber of Stebbins' phone is He can communicate with sta- Milbank, Ortonvilte, Hancock, and other places where are amateur stations on any when the atmospheric is not interfering. He turns on the receiver instrument a way as to turn out undo- He can do this by of the fact that all stations wave lengths. ;SBcc Stebbins hears from five amateurs and can answer them are not over three hundred He has already aceom- this with 9T1 at Milbank, tt Ortonville and 9ABC at Han- pass, will have to be obtained. When this has been done, the matter will be again referred to the council for ac- tion. I is said that an elegant slide can be built at a very little cost over the ground chosen, and the kids, young and old are waiting in great anticipa- tion, the decision of the council, all hoping that the matter will soon be decided and a real fast hill be fixed up for this healthy sport. This matter was brought to the at- tention of the Council a short time ago and Dr. Bolsta and Mr. Ostlind were appointed as a committee to in- vestigate the feasibility of the plan. letters calls assigned to by the government. or five commercial stations are often over Stebbins' phone. receive time signals and presl the Great Lakes station larger coils in his receiving stations are known note stations according Stebbins. The human ear, due construction, can not respond to Waves, the the ca having a ear drum can respond to the Waves which are inaudible to The audion of the ra- one, a glass bulb, resemblin light, treats the waves in l that messages be heard l ears, and  radio tele- becomes practical. Mr. says foreign stations also on this inaudible note princi- a high beautiful flute- when made audible by the I Tribune. among the four Ortonvitle, who have radio out- that the Station refer- Is operated by Gerhardt Wal- number, assigned to him by government being 9BBD. having wireless outfits are Walker, Alton Hess and Beck. Young Walseth is li- the government as an area- operator, his license No. Call 9BBD. He haw the requirements to obtain including the oath of se- not to revea| mes- news given out by the gov- Mr. Walseth's apparatu en- to receive messages and l )oints on the east coast where the In the world is located, from Florida, and Great Lakes his sending radius is miles. Government time by him from Arlington at 9:00 o'clock, and af- is given out news from world is sent. One even- weeks ago, Gerhardt told that there had been a big Ireland, and a large Two days later this out in daily papers organ music sent out by Paul, was heard by him very distinctly. encourages boys in giving them the privilege air, but asked them not to as messages frr station to be disturbed by careless , Amateur operators send- interstate, are required licenses, we are informed, Freed Of Murder Charge was acquitted on a degree murder in dis- tonight, the jury re- Verdict of not guilty after seven hours and twenty Was tried on an indictment him with the killing of Her- a farmer on June 10, indictment, charging murder in connection with of Paul Reinhardt, another the same date was nolled of the verdict topight. eged by the state that Ro- a bottle of poison- which he and Schwenk in their deaths. Was given to the jury at and a verdict returned at Independent's Want Ads Bring Sure Results That it pays to read the want ad column of the Ortonville Independent is the conclusion reached by several persons the past week, who received rewards for articles found by them, for which ads appeared in the issue of November 17. Russel Stotesbery, cashier of the Kollitz Mercantile Co., lost a valuable l ring, and a young man who found it, answered his ad and returned the ring. Another party from Waubay, adver- tised that he had lost an expensive ladies coat near Correll. The coat was located thru the Inlependent and the lucky finder received a reward of fifteen dollars for his honesty. People read the want ads of the Independent. In fact they read every word in the paper. The Dream Concert and" Dance or- chestra of Redwood Falls will play for a spot dance at the I. 0. O. F. hall at Ortonville Saturday evening of this week, December 3. Prizes will be given and a good time assured. SUNDAY TRAINS Fire Damages Meyers' Grocery Tuesday, A. M. ON FARGO LINE Fire was discovered at about two o'cIock a. m. Tuesday in the Meyer's DISCONTINUED o00oor00 Sam Arnquist who was passing by the store on his way from the Park garage. Observing smoke coming thru the front of the building, Milwaukee Road to Take Off Mr. Arnquist made a closer investiga- Trains No. 1 and No. 4 From Milbank to Aber- deen. New Schedule Out. "Effective with Train No. 1 from Minneapolis, Monday, December 5, trains No. 1 and No. 4 will be discon- tinued between Milbank and Aber- deen. "Train No. 15 will make regular stops at Summit, Ortley, Waubay, Webster, Holmquist, Bristol, Andover and Groton. "Train No. 18 will make all stops between Aberdeen and Milbank. "Effective December  passenger trains No. 403 and 406 will not run Sundays between Ortonville and Far- go, which eans there will be no Far-; go sleeper out of SL Paul on train No. 3 Saturdays. "Effective December 5, trains 501 and 504 will be discontinued between Milbank and Sisseton. (Signed) R.F. WALKER, Agent. (Eastbound Trains) Train No. 6 ........................ 12.50 a. m. Train No. 18 ........................ 9.05 a. m. Train No. 4 ........................ 10.46 a. m. Train No. 16 4.53 p. m. (Westbound Trains) Traiv No. 3 ........................ 12.30 a. m. Train No. 17 ........................ 3.22 a. m. Train No. 1 ........................ 3.60 p. m. Train No. 15 ........................ 4.53 p. m. As Christmas Day comes on Sunday this year, special account of these changes must be taken by travelers who might happen to be out of the city, expecting to come home that day from points west, or persons desiring to spend the day at points on the Far- go line, as Trains No. 1 and No. 4, to or from points west and passenger trains on the Fargo line will not be running Christxnas day. HIGH SCHOOL PLAYS MADISON FRIDAY Entire New Squad to Repre- sent O. H. S. This Year. Smokers Barred F r o m Team. The High school basketball season opens here on Friday of this when the Madison team will meet thq Ortonville boys at the high school gymnasium and the outcome of the game is looked forward to with no lit- tle interest by students and fans of this sport, on account of the fact that the mettle of an entirely new squad will be put to test. Coach Stegner is pinning a great deal of confidence o nthe new group and says that if he is not mistaken the tem has a goodly quantity of that Ortonville fighting spirit that is neces- sary in contests of this kind; that al- the they lack experience, this will soon be made up thru hard work and prac- tice and in the early season games. The squad was hit unusually hard this year according to Mr. Stegner by having to do without four or'five play- ers from last year's team who decided they would rather smoke than play basketball. The Ortonville coach is resolved that the High School boys of this com- munity must fall into line and observe I the smoking rule or be barred from participation in Athletic contests. Support by students and those in- terested in High School athletics is vital to the moral of the players and with the proper encouragement the opposing teams will have to go the limit to win. Mr. Steguer requests those of our city who are interested in clean High School sports, to get be- tion and found that the basement was in flames. He immediately turned in an alarm and the chemical auto truck, manned by the fire department was quickly on the scene, and the fire promptly extinguished. Cause of the fire was attributed to defective wiring, insulation on which was burned for a long distance. Damage to the stock of groceries was largely confined to the basement, where fire, smoke and chemical caused a severe toss, in addition to which goods on the ground floor were dam- aged to quite an extent by the dense smoke coming up from the basement. The stock was fairly well covered with insurance. Petition State To Hire Graveling; Not FARMERS VIOLATING U. S. ANTI TRUST LAW Capper-Volstead Bill Held Up In Senate. Contention Raised Concerning Collec- tive Bargaining. Amendments offered by the Senate Judiciary Committee to the Capper- Volstead bill, legalizing collective bar- gaining by farmers, were severely criticized in a speech at Cincinnati, Ohio., before the National Milk Pro- ducing Federation on November 28 by Congressman Volstead, chairman of the House Judiciary Committee. Mr. Volstead said acceptance by congress of such amendments would place farm organizations in a more uncertain con- dition in relation to the Sherman anti. trust law than they now occupy. He calls upon the Senate to state its po- sition clearly and not camouflage its intention. Petitions are being circulated Such amendments, Mr. Volstead Beardsley addressed to the State said, totally nullify the original pur- Highway Commission asking that the pose of the bill, which was simply to graveling of the road between that so clarify the Clayton law as to let village and Graceville be not let by the farmers know exactly to what ex- contract, but that the work be done tent they can go in collectively mar- by the commission, hiring local men ketin their products. But the Senate witl teams direct, so that the money Judicmry, should its amendments be speit for such work be put in the adopted, has made collective action by hands of local people who are badly tillers of the soil more risky than ever. in need of the money. "No one could tell the status they School Children Get Milk. would occupy," said Mr. Volstead. In harmony with the suggestion of "The natural and inevitable effect of co-operative farm association is and always must be to lessen competition the Child Welfare Department of the Community Club, and in line with schools in many of the largest cities in the country, the children of our lo- cal school, in the lower grade, re- ceived their first daily ration of fresh milk Tuesday morning. Pupils were recently weighed and those found un- derweight were asked to drinl one pint of milk per day, and to keep ac- curate check on this, it was thot best that children be fed the milk at school. The milk is being purchased from Kaercherdale Farm. MR. AND MRS. W. H. MATTHEWS' GOLDEN WEDDING, 1871-1921 v Just a little golden circlet On your finger gleams you know, Placed there by a youth of promise Fifty years ago. Fifty years, just half a century, You have traversed hand ih hand Fifty years of joys and sorrows, Leaving foot prints on life's sands. Did your joys seem all too few And your sorrows hard to bear? You have kept your faith in Jesus, Laying all your burdens there. Many gifts of golden color, You're receiving, so they say, But these loving thots .we're sending For your Golden Wedding Day. May the fates deal gently with you Many anniversaries more, Eere you get the' Father's summons Over on the other shore. --Mrs. C. R. Welch, Bemidji. and Mrs. Matthews settled in West Prior township on the southeast quar- ter of section twenty-five, now occu- pied by Howard E. Holmes, and made the improvements required by the gov- ernment to establish their homestead rights. Returning to Wisconsin that year, they remained there until the year 1879 when they moved onto their land and made it their permanent home. Five children were born to bless the union of this happy couple, g. Arthur Matthews and Alvah I. Matthews of this city; Mrs. Paul Welch of Be- midji;Charles A. Matthews of Prior township and Glenn E. Matthews of Rochester, N. Y., all of whom are liv- ing. In celebration of their Golden Wed- ding day, invitations were ent to seventy relatives and friends, and the event was fittingly enjoyed yesterday hind the boys who have kept them- Fifty years ago, on November 30, selves eligible and show them that Miss Orlette F. Hagaman, becacne the their endeavors are appreciated, wife of William H. Matthews, at La- at the Matthews home in this city, all of the children attending with the ex- ception of their son, Glenn, who was unable to come on account of the dis- tanee and pressure of his work. Altho Glenn was not present in person, how- ever, Mrs. Matthews had the pleasure of hearing his voice over the tele- phone, as he surprised 'her by calling from Rochester, New York, to send her felicitations. Relatives entertained were Mrs. E. J. Stur- ges and Mrs. William Ferris, sis- ters of Mrs. Matthews; John Haga- man, her brothe of Clinton; Dr. Jus- tus Matthews and his sisters Harriet, Matthews, Mrs. Lybarger of Fayet- teville, Arkan.as, and Mrs. Frank Fin- berg of Clinton. Decorations were carried out in Gold and White. A sumptuous dinner was served at 12:30 p.m., and the afternoon spent in exchanging reminiscences and en- joying an "old fashioned visit." Cafe- teria lunch was served atT:00 p. m. valle, Wisconsin. Fifty years of happiness have pass- ed away, and finds them rejoicing in their continued companionship, blessed with health and fond memories of the that have rolled by. Mrs. Matthews, formerly Miss Or- ette F. Hagaman, was born at Reeds- burg, Wisconsin, and was 68 years of age April 16, 1921 Mr. Matthews was born at Prairie du Sac, Wisconsin, and was 73 years of age, August 23, 1921. Married at Lavalle, Wisconsin in 1871, they ventured with the pioneers of the northwest, to Big Stone county, in the year 1872, making the trip from that state in a covered wagon or prairie schooner, thru muddy and at times nearly impassable roads, being obliged to unload and pack their goods across bad places several times. in Big Stone Mr. Civic Club Plans Worthy Work. At a meeting of the Civic Club on November 7, plans were made for helping some of the people who are feeling the present "hard times." The next meeting on Monday, December 5, will be called at two o'clock in order that the members and anyone inter- ested may sew and make over gar- ments suitable for girls from 6 to 14 and for boys from 6 to 11. The fol- lowing are some of the articles need- ed: Mittens, overcoats, overshoes, caps, stockings, dresses, and sweaters. Anyone not able to attend that after- noon, and having these used articles may send them to the library club rooms before two o'clock on Monday afternoon. May many avail them- selves of the opportunity to help this work. Mrs. Michell hostess. among farmers in the sale of their pro- ducts: If they are not permitted to do this the Senate might as well say so in so many words and not camou- flage their intention by pretending to favor co-operation." It is contended by many members of the Senate that to legalize collective bargaining by farmers, in the shape of forming large co-operative agencies for the marketing of farm products, to procure better prices to the farmer producer, would be a violation of the Sherman Anti-trust law. Mr. Vol- stead, however, contends that such is not the ease; that the largest manu- facturing companies from whom the farmers must buy goods, are owned in many cases by thousands of stock- holders, whose interests are pooled in the. corporation, which acts for them to deal with the consumers, and that the farmer should have the same privilege. Minnesota, along with many other states has expressly authorized the formation of co-operative farm asso- ciations but there is no law under which these organizations can oper- ate in interstate and foreign com- merce, at least that is the contention raised against the Capper-Volstead bill, which passed the House and is still pending in the Senate, and the question is whether or not collective bargaining on the art of farmers is a violation of the Anti-trust taw. Orpheum Vaudeville Show Gets Big Crowd Last Week Last week's bill at the Orpheum theatre was shown to a large audience and from the applause given the vari- ous acts, the show was well received and enjoyed by all. Many people from Clinton, Grace- ville and other nearby towns are seen in the crowd who come to the Or- pheum's Friday night shows, as Orton- ville is the only town of its size it is said, in the state to be able to make bookings of such a class of vaudeville. Manager Gowan states that a fine bill has been procured for Friday night of this week. Four acts as us- ual with 2 reels of comedy pictures and the weekly news reel. Milan Basketball Quint Defeated by Ortonville Showing good team work, and play- ing a good grade of basketball, the local American Legion team took the Milan Independents into cap Thanks- giving evening, with a score of 21 to 12. The Milan team was outclassed by the Ortonville boys, the latter how- ever lacking the ability of throwing baskets as they should have, missing many good opportunities of piling up a larger score, on account of their shortcoming in this respect. The game was started with Rertel- son and Gowan playing forwards; Roy Geier and Joe Petrick, guards, and Paul Runnings, center. The line-up was changed several times during the game, all of the players on hand be- ing used before the finish. Those seeing the contest agree that while the local boys played a good game, endurance on the part of the most of them was lacking, and with proper training and persistent prac- tice to put all of the boys in better physical condition, a snappy team will be on the floor for the next game. Players making field baskets for the Legion team were; Stegner 5; Beck- man 2, Petrick 2, Gowan 1. Petrick made one free throw out of one Big Stone City Lyceum Books Noted Lecturer, The Big Stone City Luceum Course, which is on the Chicago Circuit Lyce- um Bureau, advertises their number for the evening of December 6 as be- mg one of special merit: Dr. William E. Bohn, one of the most noted lectur- ers on the platform today, to lecture on the subject, "The Resistless Tide." Those who have heard Dr. Bohn speak very highly of his ability in his field: Knowing his subject, and talking m a conversational voice in plain and smple language, it is said that he speaks to his audience as one of them- selves, and grips and holds their in- terest from his first sentence to the close; and with his unstudied eloquence gives to his lectures just the empha- sis needed to drive home the impres- sion of fine scholarship and splendid idealism. This entertainment will be given in the city hall at Big Stone City, S. D., on December 6th, at 8:15 !p. m. Admission 20c and 40c. Auditors for Income Tax Department Needed The United States Civil Service Commission stated today that the In- come Tax Unit of the Bureau of In- ternal Revenue will appoint several hundred additional auditors and reve-- nue agents or inspectors as soon as the Commission can supply the eligi- bles, for auditing work in the central office at Washington and inspection work thruout the country. It is sta- ted that the Bureau of Internal Reve- nue finds it necessary to greatly aug- ment its present force in order to bring its inspection and auditing work up to date and keep it current. The Bureau recognizes the importance to business interests of clearing away work in arrears. The Civil Service Commission has announced an examination to be held thruout the United States on Decem- ber 14 to fill these positions. The en- trance salaries offered range from $1,800 to $3,000 a year. Advancement will depend upon the record of the employee. Full information and application blanks may be obtained from the U. S. Civil Service Conm.ission, Wash- ington, D. C., or from the Civil Ser- vice Board at the post office or cus- tomhouse in any city. MAGPIE SHOT ON MINNESOTA RIVER BOTTOMS Rare Bird In This Locality Killed By Farmer. :Bird Was Attacking Cattle In Pasture When Shot. A large magpie was shot by Robert Dew, living on the old Cliff farm on the Minnesota bottoms this week. Mr. Dew heard a commotion among his cows and on investigation discovered the bird flying into the animal's face, evidently looking for a cow eye feed. It was promptlyshot and found to be a magpie, a bird very rarely seen in this section. The magpie is a handsome bird of saucy, vivacious habits, belonging to the jay family, according to the Amer- icana, and is chiefly noted for its thiev- ing habits and general rascality. It is always engaged in m.ischief, steal- ing bright or glittering objects and carrying them off to its nest. It is about the size of a crow and is dis- tinguishd by the extremely long, wedge-sltped tail, the middle feathers of which equal the entire length of the head and body. Color is a Ius- trous black with varied and changing iredescence and sharply contrasting white under parts, with patches of white on the shoulders and wings. A magpie ean be taught to talk like a parrot, saying many words and short sentences. Mr. Dew says that in sections of the southwest on cattle ranches, he has seen magpies in large numbers bothering cattle just branded, at- tracted no doubt by the wounds made" by the irons. $50.000.00 Libel Suit Filed Against Gee. M. Foslmrgh Gee. M. Fosburgh, editor of the Or- tonville Journal, has been sued for damages in the sum of $50,000.00 by Ernest Lundeen, according to reports received this week, the suit arising out of libelous statements alleged to have been published in the Journal by Fosburgh, subsequent to the deporta- tion of Mr. Lundeen in a box car from this city, after he had attempted to give a speech here two years ago. No- tice was served on Foshurgh, it is claimed, on November 15, 1919, de- manding the retraction by the defen- dant of the article referred to in the complaint, the same to be published on November 20th following. Such retraction was not published and suit was commenced in the Distri.t Court here on Friday, November 18 of this year against Mr. Fosburg, under Sec- tion 7901, 1913 General Laws of Min-