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December 1, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
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December 1, 1921
 

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PAGE 2 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT THURSDAY, DECEMBEB 1 [ Amer|cetn 1 Leqion Corner Buddy, Are You A Minnesota .:; Legionaire7 One of the 30,000 Minnesotans who ot only served their country in war, but are going to serve it in peace. One of the million former service men who in three short years have built up the American Igion, of which the ,whole Nation is proud--which means so much in the life of America today. Down thru the years, The American Legion will go carrying its message of Loyalty to God, country and com- rades. Will you who have helped build this great organization, continue to support it? Do you stili believe in The Aumrican Legion, and will you do your lart now by paying your dues "for 1922, which your pos officer must col- lect and forward by December 31st, 1921 ? Place yourself in the position of your local post officers. Before the bells of the New Year ring out, they face the task of collectin and for- warding the national and state dues for 1922 to state and national head- quarters. This is necessary, in order that the Legion&apos;s work may go on-- that the task which it has pledged it- self to accomplish during the coming Fear, may be carried out. No great organization can achieve results without funds to finance its work. There is the American Legion Weekly to be published and sent to a million members; there is the work of the state and national service de- partments, the routine work of state and national headquarters, the func- tioning of the National Executive com- mittee, the National Americanism ommission the National Legislative committee, and ,many other state and national committees, the expense of maintaining state and national Legion : news bureaus, and the cost of all the routine work and innumerable special expenses which go with the function- ing of any great national society. One of the biggest tasks for the coming year will be that of securing e enactment of the Legion Federal Adjusted Compensation Bill in Con- grass. With the united moral and fi- nancial support of the entire member- ship this can be accomplished. With- out the support of the entire member- ship, the result is not so sure. As state commander, I am sending you this personal message because I ffeel that if you thoroly understand the situation you will have no hesitation in doing your part. You have placed on my shoulders the responsibility of upholding the reputation of the Amer- lean Legion of Minnesota during my term of office. I want tO do that, and I want to increase the Legion member- ship in the Gopher State if possible. But I must have the help of each of  our 35,000 Minnesota Legionaires, and I am asking your help here and now. This is how you can help me most. Instead of putting off paying your dues for 1922 from day to day, until they are past due, Pay Them Today. Drop in on one of your post officers or mail a check, and get squared away for another year. Your state and na- tional leaders will then know where the organization stands and they can make their plans for 1922 without fear of financially embarrassing our great organization. And by paying promptly you will be sure to receive every on of the 52 issues of the Amer- ican Legion Weekly, commencing with the first issue of 1922. Let's Beat Iowa's Record! Iowa has more Legion members I proportion to her former service men than any oth- er state in the country. Minnesota san do better! Every buddy get a buddy. And be sure to pay his own dues too. Over the top for the Gopher State! Your Department Commander, --Arthur A. Van Dyke. Minnesota Legionaires Greet Foch. The following message signed by Arthur A. Van Dyke, state command- er, greeted Marshall Foch on his ar- rival at Harrisburg, Pa., November 28: "Legionaires of Minnesota send their greetings to the Marshall of France on Thanksgiving Day, 1921. All Minnesota and the Great North- west opens its arms to you in wel- come. Our citizens await your com- ing that they may demonstrate to you country to be a member of the great American Legion." The he is seventy years of age, Marshal Foch is a great traveler. Af- ter he had traveled five thousand miles in connection with his visit to the Le- gion's National Convention in Kansas City, and was asked whether he  felt l able to make an extended trip thru the West and South as the Legion's guest, he exclaimed, "0ui, Oui, tres hen! I am enjoying it all immensely. After the difficulties of the gret war, these visits to see your country and your people are full of pleasure. I would not be without the memory of the trip you plan for me. It shall be the' most enjoyable memory of my life." With 1921 and its problems and achievements fading into the back- ground, national and Minnesota de- partment Legion officers and members are turning toward 1922--its problems and hoped-for achievements. And so that the organization may be ready to launch its program for 1922 with the Start o the New Year, the eleven thousand Legion posts thruout the na- tion are busy reminding their mem- bers that each New Year brings its readjustment, and that to be in good standing on January 1 next, every Mqnnesota Legionaire must in the meantime get squared away for anoth- er year by seeing his post adjutant and paying his yearly assessment. The adjutant, in turn, is expected to remit the state and national dues of the members of his post on or before De- cember 31, 1921. A bulletin just mailed to the 485 American Legion posts in Minnesota urges all posts to remit the 1922 of every member before the first of the New Year. A national publicity note cites the fact that practically all Legion departments are racing to see which can have the largest percentage of renewals for 1922 remitted to na- tional headquarters by December 31, 1921. The Minnesota officers have an- nounced that every Minnesota Legion Post which by 5:00 p. m., December 31,1921, has remitted the 1922 dues of at least 75 per cent of its mem- bership, will receive a high quality lithographed citation sign by the De- partment Commander and the Depart- ment Adjutant. A Wisconsin Legion post has an- nounced that the last of its members to pay 1922 dues will suffer the de- rision of spending an evening in an improvised guard house. Down in Kansas the finance committee of a Legion Post chose 4:00 u m. as the best time to collect 1922 dues. Mem- bers of the committee, rout the Le- gionaires out of bed at that unearthly hour and refuse to let them slumber again until they pay up. A South Dakota Legion Post is of- faring each service man who pays dues for 1922 before December 15 a bis- cuit baked by a recent bride and Le- gion Auiliary member. Three of the biscuits will contain cash prizes$ 20, $I0 and $5 in gold, but no biscuits will be broken until the night of the banquet, December 15th, when they will serve as adm.ission tickets. There is a big rush for the biscuits and the Legionaires' nerves are on edge await- ing the grand night. Bust Shews Two Natures. The United Service club is one of London's famous clubs In Pall Mall for officers of the twin British serv- ices, the navy and the army. Busts of naval and military heroes adorn the hall. The duke of Wellington with his stately and aristocratic look gazes ]own on members as they pass through the main entrance. Honesty, pride and dignity are written there. But a head of Lord Nelson at the side is more interesting. Each side of the face is modeled differently, so that the impression of a man of the world Is given as you look at the por- trait from the left. and of a dreamer as you look at it from the right. In the one case the modeling is firm, in the other soft. Even the eyes, for both are shown, are different. The bust Is a replica by the famous English artist. Flaxman, the original ef which is In possession of the family.--Christian Science Monitor. MICKIE SAYS HEALTH HINTS FROM BIBLE Proof That More Than Spiritual Con. solation Is Contained In the Pages of Scripture. If you want to keep well and avoid doctors' bills, study your Bible. That would seem to be the moral drawn from the remarks of Slr James Cant- lie, famous English surgeon, who pointed out that medicine rests on the law of Moses. "There is not one page of the Bible which does not teach us some hygienic fact," he said. For Instance, the wrong use of mllk is the cause of indigestion and bad teeth. Moses lald down the salutary law that milk should not be drunk un- til at least two hours after eating fish, three after chicken, and four after meat, but this is disregarded and milk is drunk at meals. No careful Jewish mother gives mllk to her child when meat is served. Sir James points out how the dan- gers of plagues carried by rats was learned from the Bible. When he was a dOctor at Hongkong there was a bu- bonic plague and he and others searched the encyclopedia for infor- mation. Then a clergyman came to him and asked him to read the fourth, fifth and sixth chapters of the Book of SamMel, where five models of swell- ings and three golden images of rats were described as being offered to the God of Israel. "That's the cause of your plague, these rats," said the clergyman, and on that basis the medical authorities went to work.--Pittsburgh Gazette- Times. HAS HIS MEMORY TRAINED Filbert Flam Hereby Makes Public a System Which He Claims to Be Infallible. There is a cure for absent-minded- ness, or almost so, and Filbert Flare has fom, d it, according to the New York Sun. He doesn't talk much about It, but if you mention the mat- ter to him he will confide it to you. Filbert and Flllpo were leaving the office together when Filbert suddenly stopped in the hallway. Fllipo was hungry and in a hurry, and Fllbert's lack of haste annoyed him. "Hasten," replied Fllipo. "Waft," cautioned Filbert, and stood a moment in silence. Then a smile broke over his face; he returned to the office for a moment and came back with the box of candy which be had purchased for Mrs. Flare. "It is infallible," said Filbert. "What?" asked Filipo. "It," Filbert repeated, "the syster. I used to be very. absent-minded, leave things behind, forget appoint- ments, that sort of thing. Never any more. I never leave a place without stopping and saying to myself: Til- bert, have you left anything? Is there anything you should do? Or haven't you and isn't there?' Sometimes there isn't, but generally there is. It hasn't failed in months." The Old Homestead. Its weather bepten exterior, gray against the blue of a summer sky, stands out in plain relief on top of a hill overlooking the irregular line of church spires that mark the city below. Gay and earl-colored little portulacca blossoms welcome one near the open door, and from the shade of old apple trees comes the scent of violets and  mountain lilies. Down at the well house a tall, blond youth is slowly turning the wheel and watching the chain that winds and winds until the iron-bound bucket ap- pears with its cool, dripping nectar, while he waves a cheery hand to the glrl across the orchard, her hands filled with old-fashioned roses that bloom in abundance beside the gray stone wall. lending their radiant color and rlch fragrance to the Joy of all beholders. The Old Homestead l To its past, to its present, and Its future---and to its memories -- forever I  Gertrude Louise Small in the New York Sun. "Made Money." The first person to make a counter- feit was Richard Vaughan. a linen draper of Stacord. England, which ec- curred in 1758. The Bank of England had been In operation for 64 years without ever experiencing the slight- @ LEGAL: NOTICES Citation for Hearing on . Petition To Rendering a Sell, Mortgage or Lease Land. (Estate of Albert Zahrbock) STATE OF MINNESOTA, County of Positive " Big Stone, In Probate Court. In the matter of the Estate of Albert Zahrbock, deceased. The state of Minnesota to Emilie The Daily News, Minneapolis, Minnesota, prints Zahrbock, Gertrude Zahrbock, Arthur the following editorial in its issue of November 14: Zahrbock, Bertha Zahrbock, Albert Zahrbock, Leonard Zahrbock, Lave- When Magnitude Discards Mystery Frankness is being better recognized a big rence Zahrbock, Elmer Zahrbock, Hat- asset in all human relations, including busirss. vey Zahrbock, Harold Zahrbock, Eve- The bigger the business, the greater the need lyn Zahrbock, and all persons inter- for frankness. It wasn always so: in fact, until only a few ested in the mortgaging of certain years ago, the reverse was true so far as actual practice was concerned and magnitude paid a lauds belonging to said estate. The penalty for the mystery in which it chose to cloak petition of Emilie Zahrbock represen- itself. As one of the biggest of the big industrial and tative of the above named decedent, commercial organizations, the Standard Oil Co. being duly filed in this court, repre- used to exercise its hill proportionate share of mystery. That this polio, has been changed-- senting that it is necessary and for deliborand conspicuoty--isa development the best interest of said estate and ot that is as radical  it i in to sttent8 of blicRT. all interested therein that certam For three years. Standard Oil has been out of its shell telling the public exactly how it was doing lands of said estate described tnerem thinS why it was doing things and what it was be mortgaged and praying that ali- driving at. It has made .large use of advertising space m newspapers witlxmt regard to their atu. cense be to her granted to mortgage tudetoward it,ll. It has conspicuously evidenced its desire to talk to the people and to put out its the same. products for a price that included  will. Now, therefore, you and each of Today. instem of merely makmgitsprvducts ou, are hereby cited and re- available to tlume who MUST buy, Standard Oil is qrD_ploFiag exte.mive publicity to mak..e people quired to show cause, if any WANT to buy. x nere zs a very great difference. lust about the differenae between the exaction of you, have, before this court, at the tribute in one case and the rendering of positive Probate Court rooms, in the court- xvlceintheottr. E'rdy aside froni commercial consider- house in the city of Ortonville, county ons, a policy of frankness and service will tend of Big Stone, state of Minnesota, on to iron out some disagreeable wrinkles in the things that are. And the benefits will go to both the 28th day of November, 1921, at sides of the equation. ]0:00 o'clock a. m., why the prayer of said petition should not be granted. Pr) render a positive service is not alone the desire Witness, the Judge of said court, JI. t,4of those responsible for the management of th# and the seal of said court, this 28th Standard Oil Company (Indiana). It is a well- day of October, 1921. formed, clearly-understood determination. (Seal) R.B. HUDSON, This determination to render a positive service Judge of Probate Court. is expressed in the multitude of products mann- A. B. KAERCHER, facturod by this Company from crude petroleum. Attorney for Petitioner. The housewife, the motorist, the farmer, the Notice of Mortgage Forclosure Sale. sician, the fabricator of raw materials, almost everY special branch of human endeavor, has been con- Default having been made in the sidered and that part of the petroleum which will conditions of a certain mortgage con- render to each the greatest service, has been segre- taining a Power of Sale dated Octo- ber 31, 1919, and recorded in the office gated and made instantly available. of the Register of Deeds of Big Stone This is the method chosen by the Standard Oil County, Minnesota, November 6, 1919, Company (Indiana) to make tangible the positive at nine o'clock a. m. in Book 55 of service it is endeavoring to render. Mortgages on page 406,whereby H.H. The campaign of advertising which is DeWall and Grace G. DeWall mort- carried on has as its object a frank discussion gagors, mortgaged to Fred Hanson, the ways and means used by the Company mortgagee, the northwest quarter delivering this service, a discussion which (NW) and north half (N) of the what it is doing and how it is doing it, and whY. southwest quarter (SW%) of section That there is a better understandin of the 31, township one hundred twenty-one, motives of the Standard Oil Company (Indiana) and (121), range fourty-four, (44), Big a feeling of increasing confidence in its integrity Stone county, Minnesota, which said and straightforward frankness is indicated by th mortgage was on February 14th, 1921, number of favorable comments which the campaign. duly assigned by an instrument in has elicited from the editorial departments o! writing recorded in said Register of newspapers, big and little, throughout the eleve Deeds office on February 23 1921, at 9:00 o'clock a. m., in B o o k states served. forty-six (46) of Mortgages on page Justice, equity, frankness, a basic desire to render 452, to H. P. Carlson, by which de- a positive service, and a determination to take all fault the power of sale has become of the people into its confidence are the underlying operative and o action or proceeding princip]ea governing this organization. at'lw having been instituted to re- cover the debt secured thereby or any Standa d Oil Company part thereof, and there is claimed to r be due on this mortgage to the date (ldma) hereof, the sum of Five Thousand, hig Three Hundred Seventeen and 50-100 910 So. Mic an Ave., Chica ($5,317.50) Dollars. Now, Notice is hereby given that by virtue of said power, said 'mortgage will be foreclosed and said premises scld at public auction by the Sheriff of said county, or his deputy on Satur- Proper Care of a. m. at the front door of the court house in Ortonville, in said county, to pay said debt, interest, attorney's fees and disburseme'ts allowed by law. Battery in Dated November 21, 1921. H. P. CARLSON, Assignee of Mortgagee, A. B. KAERCHER, Attorney, Ortonville, Minn. First p?b. Nov. 24 Local Vesta Dealer Gives Have you trte0000"00 vice Regarding Methods of .-L coat [ Storage Battery in SILVEI00SIII Winter Most for theo Winter storage for your Battery is a different problem from merely storing your car for the winter. Your battery is an electr AsKyour Dealer chemical combination, and must have special , , , tention, according to Mr. Ostlind, manager the local Vesta Station. There are two methods of battery storage, wet and dry, states Mr. Ostlind. In wet their affection, their esteem and their gratitude." All Minnesota now knows with what warmth and welcome Ferdinand Fech, Marshal of France, was received and how pleased he was with his reception in the North Star State. Wells Drilled .... _ trf  A400f-O-TOgl- est trouble or apprehension in the Isuiezea wov oe matter, and would probably have gone the battery is left just the way it is taken out [ FOR. O0 WOt . VJ  DO on for many years more, but for the I am prepared to put down ambition of this man to impress his the car. It must be kept at safe )NtOt.)lR M4ORt( A VJPA.L  : fiancee with a show of his wealth. He your well in the least time ) Pit4Y -I4{)NOt.NtOMEN handed over" to this lady a consider- and smallest cost to you. See watered and charged at least once a month ]V,It4K'R NK tAKY. tT DO}4"f i able sum in bank notes, all of which me firs otherwise kept under competent su \\; A IMM < turned out to be of hlS own manuae- Chemical action takes place during the ttmo separators are taken out of the battery and plates are stored dry. All chemical action suspended, so that the battery does not -- ture. The fraud was revealed by one J A. SMITH Compliment for Legion Magazine. of the er.ve, whose servia, had months, and the life of the battery is F. W. Atha is in receipt of a letter been engaged upon one part of the Phone 10-F-11 R. 3. Ortonville from Teddy Budtong Post Marinette, not. He communicated with the au- " somewhat shortened. Wis., complimenting the "Legion Bul- thorities, and Mr. Vaughan's enterprise / I letin" issued by the Ralph Spink Post. came to tra e end ..... Mr. Higley, commander of theMarinet- gl . , , Dry Storage is a far better method. separators are taken  ut ( f the b ttery m et post, says, "Dear Atha:--Your  ---.-=- =m === magazine is a corker and I enjoy it plates are stored dr  l! chevdcal act very much W00th good as JU ST TH IN K ! suspended, so that the batl .ry doe s not det you fellows put out, it surely bespeaks ate during winter. When it is  eassemb a very "live post. Please accept my the spring, new separators are used which l best wishes for you and your fellow A LIBERTY BELL FREE OF CHARGE. This bank wants this method slightly more expensive, but the workers." o every bey and girl of this city to have one of these unique dad life given to the battery makes-st chea] When chatting together, Haniford home safes. They will help you save your dimes and MacNider and Marshal Foch discover- nickles. Open a Savings Account today and get a Liberty the long run. ed they both celebrate on the same Bell Bank. birthday---October2. During his Min- The Park Garage nesota visit, Marshal Foch remarked 5 PER CENT PAID ON ALL SAVINGS to Arthur A. Van Dyke, Legion State ORTONVILLE STATE BANK Commander, "Yours is a great or- , Ostlind & Karn, Props. ganization. But you can make it greater and stronger by getting every John Carlson, President. man who served under the American /tAl C.J. Stark, d. IL A. Stueke, Ain't. Omhler. eo4ors to enll| himself under its bad- mar. He owes R to himseff and to his Want Ad publicity is valuable pnb iieity--amt casts but a PAGE 2 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT THURSDAY, DECEMBEB 1 [ Amer|cetn 1 Leqion Corner Buddy, Are You A Minnesota .:; Legionaire7 One of the 30,000 Minnesotans who ot only served their country in war, but are going to serve it in peace. One of the million former service men who in three short years have built up the American Igion, of which the ,whole Nation is proud--which means so much in the life of America today. Down thru the years, The American Legion will go carrying its message of Loyalty to God, country and com- rades. Will you who have helped build this great organization, continue to support it? Do you stili believe in The Aumrican Legion, and will you do your lart now by paying your dues "for 1922, which your pos officer must col- lect and forward by December 31st, 1921 ? Place yourself in the position of your local post officers. Before the bells of the New Year ring out, they face the task of collectin and for- warding the national and state dues for 1922 to state and national head- quarters. This is necessary, in order that the Legion's work may go on-- that the task which it has pledged it- self to accomplish during the coming Fear, may be carried out. No great organization can achieve results without funds to finance its work. There is the American Legion Weekly to be published and sent to a million members; there is the work of the state and national service de- partments, the routine work of state and national headquarters, the func- tioning of the National Executive com- mittee, the National Americanism ommission the National Legislative committee, and ,many other state and national committees, the expense of maintaining state and national Legion : news bureaus, and the cost of all the routine work and innumerable special expenses which go with the function- ing of any great national society. One of the biggest tasks for the coming year will be that of securing e enactment of the Legion Federal Adjusted Compensation Bill in Con- grass. With the united moral and fi- nancial support of the entire member- ship this can be accomplished. With- out the support of the entire member- ship, the result is not so sure. As state commander, I am sending you this personal message because I ffeel that if you thoroly understand the situation you will have no hesitation in doing your part. You have placed on my shoulders the responsibility of upholding the reputation of the Amer- lean Legion of Minnesota during my term of office. I want tO do that, and I want to increase the Legion member- ship in the Gopher State if possible. But I must have the help of each of  our 35,000 Minnesota Legionaires, and I am asking your help here and now. This is how you can help me most. Instead of putting off paying your dues for 1922 from day to day, until they are past due, Pay Them Today. Drop in on one of your post officers or mail a check, and get squared away for another year. Your state and na- tional leaders will then know where the organization stands and they can make their plans for 1922 without fear of financially embarrassing our great organization. And by paying promptly you will be sure to receive every on of the 52 issues of the Amer- ican Legion Weekly, commencing with the first issue of 1922. Let's Beat Iowa's Record! Iowa has more Legion members I proportion to her former service men than any oth- er state in the country. Minnesota san do better! Every buddy get a buddy. And be sure to pay his own dues too. Over the top for the Gopher State! Your Department Commander, --Arthur A. Van Dyke. Minnesota Legionaires Greet Foch. The following message signed by Arthur A. Van Dyke, state command- er, greeted Marshall Foch on his ar- rival at Harrisburg, Pa., November 28: "Legionaires of Minnesota send their greetings to the Marshall of France on Thanksgiving Day, 1921. All Minnesota and the Great North- west opens its arms to you in wel- come. Our citizens await your com- ing that they may demonstrate to you country to be a member of the great American Legion." The he is seventy years of age, Marshal Foch is a great traveler. Af- ter he had traveled five thousand miles in connection with his visit to the Le- gion's National Convention in Kansas City, and was asked whether he  felt l able to make an extended trip thru the West and South as the Legion's guest, he exclaimed, "0ui, Oui, tres hen! I am enjoying it all immensely. After the difficulties of the gret war, these visits to see your country and your people are full of pleasure. I would not be without the memory of the trip you plan for me. It shall be the' most enjoyable memory of my life." With 1921 and its problems and achievements fading into the back- ground, national and Minnesota de- partment Legion officers and members are turning toward 1922--its problems and hoped-for achievements. And so that the organization may be ready to launch its program for 1922 with the Start o the New Year, the eleven thousand Legion posts thruout the na- tion are busy reminding their mem- bers that each New Year brings its readjustment, and that to be in good standing on January 1 next, every Mqnnesota Legionaire must in the meantime get squared away for anoth- er year by seeing his post adjutant and paying his yearly assessment. The adjutant, in turn, is expected to remit the state and national dues of the members of his post on or before De- cember 31, 1921. A bulletin just mailed to the 485 American Legion posts in Minnesota urges all posts to remit the 1922 of every member before the first of the New Year. A national publicity note cites the fact that practically all Legion departments are racing to see which can have the largest percentage of renewals for 1922 remitted to na- tional headquarters by December 31, 1921. The Minnesota officers have an- nounced that every Minnesota Legion Post which by 5:00 p. m., December 31,1921, has remitted the 1922 dues of at least 75 per cent of its mem- bership, will receive a high quality lithographed citation sign by the De- partment Commander and the Depart- ment Adjutant. A Wisconsin Legion post has an- nounced that the last of its members to pay 1922 dues will suffer the de- rision of spending an evening in an improvised guard house. Down in Kansas the finance committee of a Legion Post chose 4:00 u m. as the best time to collect 1922 dues. Mem- bers of the committee, rout the Le- gionaires out of bed at that unearthly hour and refuse to let them slumber again until they pay up. A South Dakota Legion Post is of- faring each service man who pays dues for 1922 before December 15 a bis- cuit baked by a recent bride and Le- gion Auiliary member. Three of the biscuits will contain cash prizes$ 20, $I0 and $5 in gold, but no biscuits will be broken until the night of the banquet, December 15th, when they will serve as adm.ission tickets. There is a big rush for the biscuits and the Legionaires' nerves are on edge await- ing the grand night. Bust Shews Two Natures. The United Service club is one of London's famous clubs In Pall Mall for officers of the twin British serv- ices, the navy and the army. Busts of naval and military heroes adorn the hall. The duke of Wellington with his stately and aristocratic look gazes ]own on members as they pass through the main entrance. Honesty, pride and dignity are written there. But a head of Lord Nelson at the side is more interesting. Each side of the face is modeled differently, so that the impression of a man of the world Is given as you look at the por- trait from the left. and of a dreamer as you look at it from the right. In the one case the modeling is firm, in the other soft. Even the eyes, for both are shown, are different. The bust Is a replica by the famous English artist. Flaxman, the original ef which is In possession of the family.--Christian Science Monitor. MICKIE SAYS HEALTH HINTS FROM BIBLE Proof That More Than Spiritual Con. solation Is Contained In the Pages of Scripture. If you want to keep well and avoid doctors' bills, study your Bible. That would seem to be the moral drawn from the remarks of Slr James Cant- lie, famous English surgeon, who pointed out that medicine rests on the law of Moses. "There is not one page of the Bible which does not teach us some hygienic fact," he said. For Instance, the wrong use of mllk is the cause of indigestion and bad teeth. Moses lald down the salutary law that milk should not be drunk un- til at least two hours after eating fish, three after chicken, and four after meat, but this is disregarded and milk is drunk at meals. No careful Jewish mother gives mllk to her child when meat is served. Sir James points out how the dan- gers of plagues carried by rats was learned from the Bible. When he was a dOctor at Hongkong there was a bu- bonic plague and he and others searched the encyclopedia for infor- mation. Then a clergyman came to him and asked him to read the fourth, fifth and sixth chapters of the Book of SamMel, where five models of swell- ings and three golden images of rats were described as being offered to the God of Israel. "That's the cause of your plague, these rats," said the clergyman, and on that basis the medical authorities went to work.--Pittsburgh Gazette- Times. HAS HIS MEMORY TRAINED Filbert Flam Hereby Makes Public a System Which He Claims to Be Infallible. There is a cure for absent-minded- ness, or almost so, and Filbert Flare has fom, d it, according to the New York Sun. He doesn't talk much about It, but if you mention the mat- ter to him he will confide it to you. Filbert and Flllpo were leaving the office together when Filbert suddenly stopped in the hallway. Fllipo was hungry and in a hurry, and Fllbert's lack of haste annoyed him. "Hasten," replied Fllipo. "Waft," cautioned Filbert, and stood a moment in silence. Then a smile broke over his face; he returned to the office for a moment and came back with the box of candy which be had purchased for Mrs. Flare. "It is infallible," said Filbert. "What?" asked Filipo. "It," Filbert repeated, "the syster. I used to be very. absent-minded, leave things behind, forget appoint- ments, that sort of thing. Never any more. I never leave a place without stopping and saying to myself: Til- bert, have you left anything? Is there anything you should do? Or haven't you and isn't there?' Sometimes there isn't, but generally there is. It hasn't failed in months." The Old Homestead. Its weather bepten exterior, gray against the blue of a summer sky, stands out in plain relief on top of a hill overlooking the irregular line of church spires that mark the city below. Gay and earl-colored little portulacca blossoms welcome one near the open door, and from the shade of old apple trees comes the scent of violets and  mountain lilies. Down at the well house a tall, blond youth is slowly turning the wheel and watching the chain that winds and winds until the iron-bound bucket ap- pears with its cool, dripping nectar, while he waves a cheery hand to the glrl across the orchard, her hands filled with old-fashioned roses that bloom in abundance beside the gray stone wall. lending their radiant color and rlch fragrance to the Joy of all beholders. The Old Homestead l To its past, to its present, and Its future---and to its memories -- forever I  Gertrude Louise Small in the New York Sun. "Made Money." The first person to make a counter- feit was Richard Vaughan. a linen draper of Stacord. England, which ec- curred in 1758. The Bank of England had been In operation for 64 years without ever experiencing the slight- @ LEGAL: NOTICES Citation for Hearing on . Petition To Rendering a Sell, Mortgage or Lease Land. (Estate of Albert Zahrbock) STATE OF MINNESOTA, County of Positive " Big Stone, In Probate Court. In the matter of the Estate of Albert Zahrbock, deceased. The state of Minnesota to Emilie The Daily News, Minneapolis, Minnesota, prints Zahrbock, Gertrude Zahrbock, Arthur the following editorial in its issue of November 14: Zahrbock, Bertha Zahrbock, Albert Zahrbock, Leonard Zahrbock, Lave- When Magnitude Discards Mystery Frankness is being better recognized a big rence Zahrbock, Elmer Zahrbock, Hat- asset in all human relations, including busirss. vey Zahrbock, Harold Zahrbock, Eve- The bigger the business, the greater the need lyn Zahrbock, and all persons inter- for frankness. It wasn always so: in fact, until only a few ested in the mortgaging of certain years ago, the reverse was true so far as actual practice was concerned and magnitude paid a lauds belonging to said estate. The penalty for the mystery in which it chose to cloak petition of Emilie Zahrbock represen- itself. As one of the biggest of the big industrial and tative of the above named decedent, commercial organizations, the Standard Oil Co. being duly filed in this court, repre- used to exercise its hill proportionate share of mystery. That this polio, has been changed-- senting that it is necessary and for deliborand conspicuoty--isa development the best interest of said estate and ot that is as radical  it i in to sttent8 of blicRT. all interested therein that certam For three years. Standard Oil has been out of its shell telling the public exactly how it was doing lands of said estate described tnerem thinS why it was doing things and what it was be mortgaged and praying that ali- driving at. It has made .large use of advertising space m newspapers witlxmt regard to their atu. cense be to her granted to mortgage tudetoward it,ll. It has conspicuously evidenced its desire to talk to the people and to put out its the same. products for a price that included  will. Now, therefore, you and each of Today. instem of merely makmgitsprvducts ou, are hereby cited and re- available to tlume who MUST buy, Standard Oil is qrD_ploFiag exte.mive publicity to mak..e people quired to show cause, if any WANT to buy. x nere zs a very great difference. lust about the differenae between the exaction of you, have, before this court, at the tribute in one case and the rendering of positive Probate Court rooms, in the court- xvlceintheottr. E'rdy aside froni commercial consider- house in the city of Ortonville, county ons, a policy of frankness and service will tend of Big Stone, state of Minnesota, on to iron out some disagreeable wrinkles in the things that are. And the benefits will go to both the 28th day of November, 1921, at sides of the equation. ]0:00 o'clock a. m., why the prayer of said petition should not be granted. Pr) render a positive service is not alone the desire Witness, the Judge of said court, JI. t,4of those responsible for the management of th# and the seal of said court, this 28th Standard Oil Company (Indiana). It is a well- day of October, 1921. formed, clearly-understood determination. (Seal) R.B. HUDSON, This determination to render a positive service Judge of Probate Court. is expressed in the multitude of products mann- A. B. KAERCHER, facturod by this Company from crude petroleum. Attorney for Petitioner. The housewife, the motorist, the farmer, the Notice of Mortgage Forclosure Sale. sician, the fabricator of raw materials, almost everY special branch of human endeavor, has been con- Default having been made in the sidered and that part of the petroleum which will conditions of a certain mortgage con- render to each the greatest service, has been segre- taining a Power of Sale dated Octo- ber 31, 1919, and recorded in the office gated and made instantly available. of the Register of Deeds of Big Stone This is the method chosen by the Standard Oil County, Minnesota, November 6, 1919, Company (Indiana) to make tangible the positive at nine o'clock a. m. in Book 55 of service it is endeavoring to render. Mortgages on page 406,whereby H.H. The campaign of advertising which is DeWall and Grace G. DeWall mort- carried on has as its object a frank discussion gagors, mortgaged to Fred Hanson, the ways and means used by the Company mortgagee, the northwest quarter delivering this service, a discussion which (NW) and north half (N) of the what it is doing and how it is doing it, and whY. southwest quarter (SW%) of section That there is a better understandin of the 31, township one hundred twenty-one, motives of the Standard Oil Company (Indiana) and (121), range fourty-four, (44), Big a feeling of increasing confidence in its integrity Stone county, Minnesota, which said and straightforward frankness is indicated by th mortgage was on February 14th, 1921, number of favorable comments which the campaign. duly assigned by an instrument in has elicited from the editorial departments o! writing recorded in said Register of newspapers, big and little, throughout the eleve Deeds office on February 23 1921, at 9:00 o'clock a. m., in B o o k states served. forty-six (46) of Mortgages on page Justice, equity, frankness, a basic desire to render 452, to H. P. Carlson, by which de- a positive service, and a determination to take all fault the power of sale has become of the people into its confidence are the underlying operative and o action or proceeding princip]ea governing this organization. at'lw having been instituted to re- cover the debt secured thereby or any Standa d Oil Company part thereof, and there is claimed to r be due on this mortgage to the date (ldma) hereof, the sum of Five Thousand, hig Three Hundred Seventeen and 50-100 910 So. Mic an Ave., Chica ($5,317.50) Dollars. Now, Notice is hereby given that by virtue of said power, said 'mortgage will be foreclosed and said premises scld at public auction by the Sheriff of said county, or his deputy on Satur- Proper Care of a. m. at the front door of the court house in Ortonville, in said county, to pay said debt, interest, attorney's fees and disburseme'ts allowed by law. Battery in Dated November 21, 1921. H. P. CARLSON, Assignee of Mortgagee, A. B. KAERCHER, Attorney, Ortonville, Minn. First p?b. Nov. 24 Local Vesta Dealer Gives Have you trte0000"00 vice Regarding Methods of .-L coat [ Storage Battery in SILVEI00SIII Winter Most for theo Winter storage for your Battery is a different problem from merely storing your car for the winter. Your battery is an electr AsKyour Dealer chemical combination, and must have special , , , tention, according to Mr. Ostlind, manager the local Vesta Station. There are two methods of battery storage, wet and dry, states Mr. Ostlind. In wet their affection, their esteem and their gratitude." All Minnesota now knows with what warmth and welcome Ferdinand Fech, Marshal of France, was received and how pleased he was with his reception in the North Star State. Wells Drilled .... _ trf  A400f-O-TOgl- est trouble or apprehension in the Isuiezea wov oe matter, and would probably have gone the battery is left just the way it is taken out [ FOR. O0 WOt . VJ  DO on for many years more, but for the I am prepared to put down ambition of this man to impress his the car. It must be kept at safe )NtOt.)lR M4ORt( A VJPA.L  : fiancee with a show of his wealth. He your well in the least time ) Pit4Y -I4{)NOt.NtOMEN handed over" to this lady a consider- and smallest cost to you. See watered and charged at least once a month ]V,It4K'R NK tAKY. tT DO}4"f i able sum in bank notes, all of which me firs otherwise kept under competent su \\; A IMM < turned out to be of hlS own manuae- Chemical action takes place during the ttmo separators are taken out of the battery and plates are stored dry. All chemical action suspended, so that the battery does not -- ture. The fraud was revealed by one J A. SMITH Compliment for Legion Magazine. of the er.ve, whose servia, had months, and the life of the battery is F. W. Atha is in receipt of a letter been engaged upon one part of the Phone 10-F-11 R. 3. Ortonville from Teddy Budtong Post Marinette, not. He communicated with the au- " somewhat shortened. Wis., complimenting the "Legion Bul- thorities, and Mr. Vaughan's enterprise / I letin" issued by the Ralph Spink Post. came to tra e end ..... Mr. Higley, commander of theMarinet- gl . , , Dry Storage is a far better method. separators are taken  ut ( f the b ttery m et post, says, "Dear Atha:--Your  ---.-=- =m === magazine is a corker and I enjoy it plates are stored dr  l! chevdcal act very much W00th good as JU ST TH IN K ! suspended, so that the batl .ry doe s not det you fellows put out, it surely bespeaks ate during winter. When it is  eassemb a very "live post. Please accept my the spring, new separators are used which l best wishes for you and your fellow A LIBERTY BELL FREE OF CHARGE. This bank wants this method slightly more expensive, but the workers." o every bey and girl of this city to have one of these unique dad life given to the battery makes-st chea] When chatting together, Haniford home safes. They will help you save your dimes and MacNider and Marshal Foch discover- nickles. Open a Savings Account today and get a Liberty the long run. ed they both celebrate on the same Bell Bank. birthday---October2. During his Min- The Park Garage nesota visit, Marshal Foch remarked 5 PER CENT PAID ON ALL SAVINGS to Arthur A. Van Dyke, Legion State ORTONVILLE STATE BANK Commander, "Yours is a great or- , Ostlind & Karn, Props. ganization. But you can make it greater and stronger by getting every John Carlson, President. man who served under the American /tAl C.J. Stark, d. IL A. Stueke, Ain't. Omhler. eo4ors to enll| himself under its bad- mar. He owes R to himseff and to his Want Ad publicity is valuable pnb iieity--amt casts but a PAGE 2 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT THURSDAY, DECEMBER h [Amer|cn ] ....... Igien."be ......... th ..... HF.LTH HINTS FROM BIBLE i LEGALqOTICES I O1 The iOlatien II Oontalnd In the CRati for Hearing on Petiti To  L.Orle Pa0es of Scripture. Sell, Mortg ..... Lease Laud. Buddy. Are You A Minnesota ; Legioige ? One of the 0,000 Minnetana who ot only ed their country in w, but are going to sere it in. peace. who in thne short yes have baltt up the Ameli Legion. of which the whole Nation is pud--which means an much Ln the life of America today. Down thru the eare, The Ameri Legion will go carrying its message el Loyatty to God, comatry and com- rades. WIll you who have helped build Up this great organitien, ntinue t appor t it? Do y stlb belie in The 'Amel Legion, and will you de youz part n by paying yo dues'fez 1922, whleh leer ad forwd by December 31st 19217 place you--ll in the position 70 local post eaters+ Before belts of the N year ring out, the 1ace the task of eollvctln and for- wazng the nntional d state d for 1922 to. state and quarters. Tfls is necessary. that the Legion' work may that the tk which it has pledged i self to acmplish during the comln year, may be earred out, No great organization n ach;ev ]ts without funds to finance t work, Then is the America Leglor Wkly to mltlion members; the of the state d national iee de. partments, the routtne work of and tiol headquarters, the func tinning e mittee, the National mmission, the National Legislati mmlttee, and many other aflonal committe, the expen of maintairdng state d tlonat Legion news bures routine work and iumemble special expenses which go with the function- ing of any great national iety. One of the biggest tasks for the eomlng yr will be that of ring the actment of the Legion Fedel Adjusted Compensation gns With the uited moral and fi- ldp this c he eomplished. out the uppor of the enti memb- hip, the result is ot so sure. AS state commander, I am sending you this perusal message beea I eel that Jf you tholy understand the ituation you will ha no hesitation in doing your part. You have placed cn my shoulders the nspensibility of upholding the reputation of the Am iema Legion of Miesota during ray terra of ofee. I want t do that, and I wt to increase the Legi member- ship In the Goph State if pemsible, Bat 1 must ha the help of each ot ur 3G,000 Miesota Leglonar, d 1 am as]ng yo hep here d now. This is how you can help  st. Intead of putting off paying your dues for 1922 from day to day. until they are past due, Pay Them Today. Dp in on one of your post omeers, o mail a hk, and get squred away for ather ye. tal leaders the orgion steads and they can mal their plans for 1922 ,ithout fear of flnaneislly embassing our grea organization. And by paying prptly you 11 he su lean Legion Weekly, commencing with the first is of 1922. Let's Beat Iowa's Reerdt more Legion membe fil propertlon t h former se men than any oth- er state in the country. n do betterl Every buddy get a buddy. And be sure to pay his o dues too. Over the top for the Gopher Staler Your Department Commander, --Arur A. Van Dyke, Ninneta Legiouir Greet Fh. Yae following message signed h5 Arthur A. V Dyke, state co--and. er, greeted Mhl Foeh rival at Harrisburg, P. 28: "Legionalres of their greetings to the France on Thanksging Day, 1921. All Minnesota and the Gat North- west opens its a to you in wel- come. lag that they ma g'catit ud" with what warmth and welcome Ferdinand Fcch, Mshal of Fran, wa reelved and h pleased he s dth State. Comldimt for Legion Magazine. F. W. Atha is in reeelpt of a letter fm Teddy Budlong post Mafinette, Wis., compmenr the "Legion Bul- letin" issued by the Ralph Splnk Peat, Mr. Kigtey,, et post, says, "De magazine is a rker and I enjoy it ver much. With such good stuff a y fellows put out. 1 surely bespeaks a wry "live posu Ple accept my bet wishes for you d your tellnw w0rke" When abating together, 1ifotd MNider and Marshal ed they both celebte birthday--0ctober 2. During his Min- neta vsit, Marshal to Arthur A. Van Dyke, Legion State Commander, "Yn Is a gre-t or- ganition. But you can make it greater d tronger hy getttng ery man eroll hlmelf under i bn- He o it to himself d to h __ (Estate of AIberL Zahrbock) If you want to kp well OF MINNESOTA, County of your Bible, at Big Stone, In Probate Court. In the and was ked whether he felt seem to be the moral d matter of the Estate of able to make an extended trip thra the Zahrbock, decead, egion's guest, lie, tams EnglLsh surgeon, who The state of Mnneta to he exclaimed, "Oui, Oul, Ins bent I pointed out that medicine rests  Zahrboek, Gertrude Zahrbk, Arthur enjoying it all iensely. After the law ef lose*. Zahrboek, Bertha Zahrbeck, of the great war, then Zahrboek, Leonard Zahrhock, La vimits to see your co.try and us some hyglenle : fence Zahrbock, Elmer Zahrbock, Her I vey Zhrbook, Humid Zahrbock, Eve- fact," he Bflld. the wrong U of milk I lyn Zahrbock, and all perso, inte For mstance, you plan for m ested iu a mortgaging of certain enjoyable memory of my life." Muses laid do the salutary Im, is belonging to srdd estate. The -- d not be dnk us- petition of Emille Zahrbock uprisen- With 1921 and its prnblems and tative of the above ned dedent, into the back-  after chicken, and being duly flied in this court, pre+ and Is dlsregard and auk seating that it s necessary s turnng toward 1922 its problem gtves mL]k to bar all interbred therein that and hoped-for echievement, la serve1. Ils that the organization may be ready t Sir :Iames points t h the dan- be mortgaged and praying that a li. Iunch its pJ gers nf plaguee espied by rats was granted to mortgage start o the New Yr, rom the Bible. Now', thefore, you and each of ties an buy remcng plague and be end you, m he.by eid and re- bars that eh New Year brings it d the aeycl per  for quoted to shaw reuse, if any readjustment, and that to be in guod matins, Then a elergymnn came to VSU, hays, before ths enurt, at the standing on Juary 1 next, him and a,ked him to read the fourth, Pbate Court Iinnofa Legionai must obapters of the Book mountie get squared away fur anoth- ' of Sumach nf Big .qtone, el. yr by seeing his post adjutant lugs and three golden image, of rats the 28th day and paying his yrly assessment. The we described as being ordered te the why the ljutant, in turn, is expected to mit Od of Israel. of said petition should not be :rantd. the state aml uatienal dues of the "Ttmt's the cause of your plague, Witness, the Judge of said court, members of his post on or fon De these rats," said the clergyman, and of said ur, this ZRth comber 31, 1921. on that basis the medical I day of Oateber, 1921. -- went to work--p shurgh (Seal) R.B. HUDSON, A bulletin just malted to the 48 3udge American Legion posts in Mnnesot urges all posts HAS HIB MEMORY TRAINED AttameTforPetltloner* Df every member A national publicit Fam Hers MakN Publla Legion departments are ring to se Syst*m W1h [q Claims to Default having been mde iu Ba I nfalllbl perntag -- tining a Power There ts a cure for cOOl" 31, 1919, innal headqrters by December Register of Deeds of Big Stone 1921. The Minnesota has fonnd It, scarring to the Ne County, Minnesota, November 6, Minnota Legion york gun. He doesn't talk much Post which by 5:00 p. m., Dember Mortgages on page 406,whereby H. H 1,1921, has remitted the him he will eonnde It to you. DeWa]l d Grace G. DW of at least 75 per nt of it mere- Filbert and Flllpo were leaving the augers, mortgaged to Fred bership, will elve a high qlity omce together when Filbert suddenly mortgagee, the northwest lithographed etation sign by the ne- partnent Commander d the Depot- la the hallway. Fllipo was (NWI) and north half (N) of th scuthweat quarter (SW%) of tior ment Adjutant. 1, to--ship one -- ,,Hasten,,, replied Fltlpo. (121), range fourty-four, (44), Bi A Wionsln Legion post has au -walt,, county, Minneta, which said  a moment In silence, mortgage ws on Fehary 14th, 1921, to pay 1922 dues will suffer the broke over hI duly aigned by an rision of spending an evenir  i writing neorded in said Register of mprovtsed guard house. Do in box of candy which he Febary 28 1921, at the finance committee of a for Mrs Flam. 9:0O o'clock  m,, in Legion Post chose 4:00  m* as the .,it i s Infallible," said Filbert* ferty-sSx (46) of Mortgages on page Mere- ..What?,. asked Ftllpo. 452, to H. F. Curlsn. by which de- bets of the mmittee. nut the Le- "It." Filbert repeated, "the fault the power of sale has gionaires out of bed at that nnearthly used to be very a'0ent mladl, operative and lie tion or peding hour and fuse to et thm lher cave thing behind, forget appIof- at'lw haing been instituted to again mtil they pay up. that sort of thing, cover the debt secud tbeby or y -- I never leave a place without I part thereof, and the is claimed to A South Dg*kofa Legion Post in of- g and saying to mylf: 'FII- [be due n this mortgage to the date faring eh service man who pays dues t  you left nnythlng? Is there he.of, the sum of Five Thousand, for 1922 before December 15 a bi anything you should do? Or haven't Thee Hundred Seventeen and 50-100 cult baked by a rent bride and I ($5,317.0) Dollars. glen Auillary member. Thne of the Now. Notice is he,by given that by bisits will contain cash plze 20, rower, said mortgage $0 and $5 in gold. but no said pmiscs wilt be broken until the night of the The Old Homestead. sehl at public auction by the Sheriff of banquet, December lth, when they It| weather bepten said coty, or his deputy on The the blue of a summer sky. day, January 7, 1922, at 10:00 is S big sh for the biscuits and the stands out In plain relief on top Legionaires' nees a on [ge await h in said county, to lug the gnd night. nay and varl-colored IRtl portutac by law. Jvet 8he T Nat nr Dated Nober 21, 121. The United Sel club H' P. CARLSON, Assignee of Mortgagee, twin British se [IIl KAERCHER, Attoey, t. the navy and the ay. BIlt Down at the welt he a tall, blond Ortonvlle, Minn. youth is slowly tuing the whl aad First pub. Nov. 24 hall. The duke of Welllnion with watching the chain that his stately bers ss Lhey pa R ], dripping .e O]d 'ed- though the main entrance, Honesty, while he waves cheery hand to the pride and dignity a ltten the. glrl acss the orchard. TH E @[At (OAL Bat a head of Lord Nels filled with old-fashioned sea more lofestlng, in abundance blde the gy te wail ]ending their radiant color that the lmp[ of a man and rich fragce to the Joy of all world IS bfl beholders. The md netead To t* past. MO for theo/ it fm the right. In to its prelen sad its future--and to A modeling Is fl, in Rs  morie -- for ,erI yea, 1'or bOl Iuln Small In the New dlffert a tepees by the femnus Fngt teh artist. "Made Money." , yoiir ea- the Iginal et weh la Te flt eu pnul of the famlly,"YsUan Selenes Monltor+ -- 178. The Bank of England MICKIE SAYS ad h Ln oVeratl f e y ................ Wells Drilled est trOuble or apphslon In Sktg k'qogt Op2.g mtt, and would p PO. ., .MDO man to impr h 1 am prepand to put do your wet in the PRO4*L F.ox/Ot  a eOnld and smallest st to you. S g  DO  bank note ll of which me flrsL A ebttl#A.l 11 u  ..... J.A. SMITH of the ers whe rv| bad t 10-F-11 R. 3, Oronville untO. He communicated lth the au- thtle, and r. Vnghan'. t 'pd came to tragic end. A LIBERTY BELL FRgE OF CHARGE. 'Ida bank mta every boy and girl of this city to have one of  maiq he fe They will help you ave our dlm d idckles Open a S#vings Aunt today ud set a Lberty Bell Ban $ PER CENT PAID ON ALl* SAVINGS ORTONVILLE STATE BANK Rendering a Positive The Daily News. Minneapolis. Mtane.ota. prtnt the followlng editorial in its issue of November 14:" W.; M#nid Did Mystery or fr e. .go.      f .t  nlt mvatn T rder a poitlve tae is not alone the des/ off tlmee plible for the agemet of th Nrd Oil py (ldhlna). It is a welb [ormed. cllF-derst detenlitin, "his d.tcrmtlon to rend s positive servic ill exprmed in the multitdeof products faured by this Company from crude petroleum. TIw luwife, the motst, the {i, the phi- special branch of human endeavor, has been con- sidered d tt  of the lrolev', which will render to  the grvatet r vice. has bean aegr gted and mls istanOy mvilabl 'lis is tl method e.N bY the 5dsrd 0 NPanF (India) to  tangible the Isitivs service it is endvring to render. The e.amgn of sdveMising VACh it being cd on bl as it object a frank discuni  the way and means used by the Company ill delivering this r, a diseuszion which telis what it is doing lnd how it is doing it, ad why. That thcr is a better under.tending of th# motives of the Standard Oil Company (Indiana I and i feeling of irrsmg 'flde in its intethr lind traigthirocwmd frankness is indicated by thi number of favorable comments which the cam pigl has eliNted frem the editorial departn M nlpe, big and ]itde, tl'tqgiut the eW t tates served. Justice, lult y, frankness, a e desire to 1 a plitivc see, and s det'mifion to take all of the people into its corffidence &re the drl gIg principles governing this organization. Standard Oil Company 910 So. Michigan Ave., Proper Care of Battery in Winter Local Vesta Dealer Gives Ad- vice Regarding Methods of Storage Battery in Winter Winter storage for your Battery is a vastly different problem from mere y storing your e" " for the winter. Your battery is an electr" i chemical combination, and must have special at" : tention, according to Mr. Ostlind, manager of the local Vesta Station. There are two methods of batter wet and dry, states Mr. Ostlind. the battery is left just the way it is taken out a the car. It must be kept at safe temperature;, watered and charged at least once a montht ai'gt : otherwise kept under competent Chemical action takes place during months, and the life of the battery somewhat shortened. Dry Storage is a far separators are taken out of the batter plates are stored dry. All suspended, so that the battery ate during winter. When it is the spring,2es " this meth0 "ghtly more expensive but the s dad llfe gven to the battery makes it cheaper the long run. The Park Garage Ostlind & Karn, Props. PAGE 2 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT THURSDAY, DECEMBEB 1 [ Amer|cetn 1 Leqion Corner Buddy, Are You A Minnesota .:; Legionaire7 One of the 30,000 Minnesotans who ot only served their country in war, but are going to serve it in peace. One of the million former service men who in three short years have built up the American Igion, of which the ,whole Nation is proud--which means so much in the life of America today. Down thru the years, The American Legion will go carrying its message of Loyalty to God, country and com- rades. Will you who have helped build this great organization, continue to support it? Do you stili believe in The Aumrican Legion, and will you do your lart now by paying your dues "for 1922, which your pos officer must col- lect and forward by December 31st, 1921 ? Place yourself in the position of your local post officers. Before the bells of the New Year ring out, they face the task of collectin and for- warding the national and state dues for 1922 to state and national head- quarters. This is necessary, in order that the Legion's work may go on-- that the task which it has pledged it- self to accomplish during the coming Fear, may be carried out. No great organization can achieve results without funds to finance its work. There is the American Legion Weekly to be published and sent to a million members; there is the work of the state and national service de- partments, the routine work of state and national headquarters, the func- tioning of the National Executive com- mittee, the National Americanism ommission the National Legislative committee, and ,many other state and national committees, the expense of maintaining state and national Legion : news bureaus, and the cost of all the routine work and innumerable special expenses which go with the function- ing of any great national society. One of the biggest tasks for the coming year will be that of securing e enactment of the Legion Federal Adjusted Compensation Bill in Con- grass. With the united moral and fi- nancial support of the entire member- ship this can be accomplished. With- out the support of the entire member- ship, the result is not so sure. As state commander, I am sending you this personal message because I ffeel that if you thoroly understand the situation you will have no hesitation in doing your part. You have placed on my shoulders the responsibility of upholding the reputation of the Amer- lean Legion of Minnesota during my term of office. I want tO do that, and I want to increase the Legion member- ship in the Gopher State if possible. But I must have the help of each of  our 35,000 Minnesota Legionaires, and I am asking your help here and now. This is how you can help me most. Instead of putting off paying your dues for 1922 from day to day, until they are past due, Pay Them Today. Drop in on one of your post officers or mail a check, and get squared away for another year. Your state and na- tional leaders will then know where the organization stands and they can make their plans for 1922 without fear of financially embarrassing our great organization. And by paying promptly you will be sure to receive every on of the 52 issues of the Amer- ican Legion Weekly, commencing with the first issue of 1922. Let's Beat Iowa's Record! Iowa has more Legion members I proportion to her former service men than any oth- er state in the country. Minnesota san do better! Every buddy get a buddy. And be sure to pay his own dues too. Over the top for the Gopher State! Your Department Commander, --Arthur A. Van Dyke. Minnesota Legionaires Greet Foch. The following message signed by Arthur A. Van Dyke, state command- er, greeted Marshall Foch on his ar- rival at Harrisburg, Pa., November 28: "Legionaires of Minnesota send their greetings to the Marshall of France on Thanksgiving Day, 1921. All Minnesota and the Great North- west opens its arms to you in wel- come. Our citizens await your com- ing that they may demonstrate to you country to be a member of the great American Legion." The he is seventy years of age, Marshal Foch is a great traveler. Af- ter he had traveled five thousand miles in connection with his visit to the Le- gion's National Convention in Kansas City, and was asked whether he  felt l able to make an extended trip thru the West and South as the Legion's guest, he exclaimed, "0ui, Oui, tres hen! I am enjoying it all immensely. After the difficulties of the gret war, these visits to see your country and your people are full of pleasure. I would not be without the memory of the trip you plan for me. It shall be the' most enjoyable memory of my life." With 1921 and its problems and achievements fading into the back- ground, national and Minnesota de- partment Legion officers and members are turning toward 1922--its problems and hoped-for achievements. And so that the organization may be ready to launch its program for 1922 with the Start o the New Year, the eleven thousand Legion posts thruout the na- tion are busy reminding their mem- bers that each New Year brings its readjustment, and that to be in good standing on January 1 next, every Mqnnesota Legionaire must in the meantime get squared away for anoth- er year by seeing his post adjutant and paying his yearly assessment. The adjutant, in turn, is expected to remit the state and national dues of the members of his post on or before De- cember 31, 1921. A bulletin just mailed to the 485 American Legion posts in Minnesota urges all posts to remit the 1922 of every member before the first of the New Year. A national publicity note cites the fact that practically all Legion departments are racing to see which can have the largest percentage of renewals for 1922 remitted to na- tional headquarters by December 31, 1921. The Minnesota officers have an- nounced that every Minnesota Legion Post which by 5:00 p. m., December 31,1921, has remitted the 1922 dues of at least 75 per cent of its mem- bership, will receive a high quality lithographed citation sign by the De- partment Commander and the Depart- ment Adjutant. A Wisconsin Legion post has an- nounced that the last of its members to pay 1922 dues will suffer the de- rision of spending an evening in an improvised guard house. Down in Kansas the finance committee of a Legion Post chose 4:00 u m. as the best time to collect 1922 dues. Mem- bers of the committee, rout the Le- gionaires out of bed at that unearthly hour and refuse to let them slumber again until they pay up. A South Dakota Legion Post is of- faring each service man who pays dues for 1922 before December 15 a bis- cuit baked by a recent bride and Le- gion Auiliary member. Three of the biscuits will contain cash prizes$ 20, $I0 and $5 in gold, but no biscuits will be broken until the night of the banquet, December 15th, when they will serve as adm.ission tickets. There is a big rush for the biscuits and the Legionaires' nerves are on edge await- ing the grand night. Bust Shews Two Natures. The United Service club is one of London's famous clubs In Pall Mall for officers of the twin British serv- ices, the navy and the army. Busts of naval and military heroes adorn the hall. The duke of Wellington with his stately and aristocratic look gazes ]own on members as they pass through the main entrance. Honesty, pride and dignity are written there. But a head of Lord Nelson at the side is more interesting. Each side of the face is modeled differently, so that the impression of a man of the world Is given as you look at the por- trait from the left. and of a dreamer as you look at it from the right. In the one case the modeling is firm, in the other soft. Even the eyes, for both are shown, are different. The bust Is a replica by the famous English artist. Flaxman, the original ef which is In possession of the family.--Christian Science Monitor. MICKIE SAYS HEALTH HINTS FROM BIBLE Proof That More Than Spiritual Con. solation Is Contained In the Pages of Scripture. If you want to keep well and avoid doctors' bills, study your Bible. That would seem to be the moral drawn from the remarks of Slr James Cant- lie, famous English surgeon, who pointed out that medicine rests on the law of Moses. "There is not one page of the Bible which does not teach us some hygienic fact," he said. For Instance, the wrong use of mllk is the cause of indigestion and bad teeth. Moses lald down the salutary law that milk should not be drunk un- til at least two hours after eating fish, three after chicken, and four after meat, but this is disregarded and milk is drunk at meals. No careful Jewish mother gives mllk to her child when meat is served. Sir James points out how the dan- gers of plagues carried by rats was learned from the Bible. When he was a dOctor at Hongkong there was a bu- bonic plague and he and others searched the encyclopedia for infor- mation. Then a clergyman came to him and asked him to read the fourth, fifth and sixth chapters of the Book of SamMel, where five models of swell- ings and three golden images of rats were described as being offered to the God of Israel. "That's the cause of your plague, these rats," said the clergyman, and on that basis the medical authorities went to work.--Pittsburgh Gazette- Times. HAS HIS MEMORY TRAINED Filbert Flam Hereby Makes Public a System Which He Claims to Be Infallible. There is a cure for absent-minded- ness, or almost so, and Filbert Flare has fom, d it, according to the New York Sun. He doesn't talk much about It, but if you mention the mat- ter to him he will confide it to you. Filbert and Flllpo were leaving the office together when Filbert suddenly stopped in the hallway. Fllipo was hungry and in a hurry, and Fllbert's lack of haste annoyed him. "Hasten," replied Fllipo. "Waft," cautioned Filbert, and stood a moment in silence. Then a smile broke over his face; he returned to the office for a moment and came back with the box of candy which be had purchased for Mrs. Flare. "It is infallible," said Filbert. "What?" asked Filipo. "It," Filbert repeated, "the syster. I used to be very. absent-minded, leave things behind, forget appoint- ments, that sort of thing. Never any more. I never leave a place without stopping and saying to myself: Til- bert, have you left anything? Is there anything you should do? Or haven't you and isn't there?' Sometimes there isn't, but generally there is. It hasn't failed in months." The Old Homestead. Its weather bepten exterior, gray against the blue of a summer sky, stands out in plain relief on top of a hill overlooking the irregular line of church spires that mark the city below. Gay and earl-colored little portulacca blossoms welcome one near the open door, and from the shade of old apple trees comes the scent of violets and  mountain lilies. Down at the well house a tall, blond youth is slowly turning the wheel and watching the chain that winds and winds until the iron-bound bucket ap- pears with its cool, dripping nectar, while he waves a cheery hand to the glrl across the orchard, her hands filled with old-fashioned roses that bloom in abundance beside the gray stone wall. lending their radiant color and rlch fragrance to the Joy of all beholders. The Old Homestead l To its past, to its present, and Its future---and to its memories -- forever I  Gertrude Louise Small in the New York Sun. "Made Money." The first person to make a counter- feit was Richard Vaughan. a linen draper of Stacord. England, which ec- curred in 1758. The Bank of England had been In operation for 64 years without ever experiencing the slight- @ LEGAL: NOTICES Citation for Hearing on . Petition To Rendering a Sell, Mortgage or Lease Land. (Estate of Albert Zahrbock) STATE OF MINNESOTA, County of Positive " Big Stone, In Probate Court. In the matter of the Estate of Albert Zahrbock, deceased. The state of Minnesota to Emilie The Daily News, Minneapolis, Minnesota, prints Zahrbock, Gertrude Zahrbock, Arthur the following editorial in its issue of November 14: Zahrbock, Bertha Zahrbock, Albert Zahrbock, Leonard Zahrbock, Lave- When Magnitude Discards Mystery Frankness is being better recognized a big rence Zahrbock, Elmer Zahrbock, Hat- asset in all human relations, including busirss. vey Zahrbock, Harold Zahrbock, Eve- The bigger the business, the greater the need lyn Zahrbock, and all persons inter- for frankness. It wasn always so: in fact, until only a few ested in the mortgaging of certain years ago, the reverse was true so far as actual practice was concerned and magnitude paid a lauds belonging to said estate. The penalty for the mystery in which it chose to cloak petition of Emilie Zahrbock represen- itself. As one of the biggest of the big industrial and tative of the above named decedent, commercial organizations, the Standard Oil Co. being duly filed in this court, repre- used to exercise its hill proportionate share of mystery. That this polio, has been changed-- senting that it is necessary and for deliborand conspicuoty--isa development the best interest of said estate and ot that is as radical  it i in to sttent8 of blicRT. all interested therein that certam For three years. Standard Oil has been out of its shell telling the public exactly how it was doing lands of said estate described tnerem thinS why it was doing things and what it was be mortgaged and praying that ali- driving at. It has made .large use of advertising space m newspapers witlxmt regard to their atu. cense be to her granted to mortgage tudetoward it,ll. It has conspicuously evidenced its desire to talk to the people and to put out its the same. products for a price that included  will. Now, therefore, you and each of Today. instem of merely makmgitsprvducts ou, are hereby cited and re- available to tlume who MUST buy, Standard Oil is qrD_ploFiag exte.mive publicity to mak..e people quired to show cause, if any WANT to buy. x nere zs a very great difference. lust about the differenae between the exaction of you, have, before this court, at the tribute in one case and the rendering of positive Probate Court rooms, in the court- xvlceintheottr. E'rdy aside froni commercial consider- house in the city of Ortonville, county ons, a policy of frankness and service will tend of Big Stone, state of Minnesota, on to iron out some disagreeable wrinkles in the things that are. And the benefits will go to both the 28th day of November, 1921, at sides of the equation. ]0:00 o'clock a. m., why the prayer of said petition should not be granted. Pr) render a positive service is not alone the desire Witness, the Judge of said court, JI. t,4of those responsible for the management of th# and the seal of said court, this 28th Standard Oil Company (Indiana). It is a well- day of October, 1921. formed, clearly-understood determination. (Seal) R.B. HUDSON, This determination to render a positive service Judge of Probate Court. is expressed in the multitude of products mann- A. B. KAERCHER, facturod by this Company from crude petroleum. Attorney for Petitioner. The housewife, the motorist, the farmer, the Notice of Mortgage Forclosure Sale. sician, the fabricator of raw materials, almost everY special branch of human endeavor, has been con- Default having been made in the sidered and that part of the petroleum which will conditions of a certain mortgage con- render to each the greatest service, has been segre- taining a Power of Sale dated Octo- ber 31, 1919, and recorded in the office gated and made instantly available. of the Register of Deeds of Big Stone This is the method chosen by the Standard Oil County, Minnesota, November 6, 1919, Company (Indiana) to make tangible the positive at nine o'clock a. m. in Book 55 of service it is endeavoring to render. Mortgages on page 406,whereby H.H. The campaign of advertising which is DeWall and Grace G. DeWall mort- carried on has as its object a frank discussion gagors, mortgaged to Fred Hanson, the ways and means used by the Company mortgagee, the northwest quarter delivering this service, a discussion which (NW) and north half (N) of the what it is doing and how it is doing it, and whY. southwest quarter (SW%) of section That there is a better understandin of the 31, township one hundred twenty-one, motives of the Standard Oil Company (Indiana) and (121), range fourty-four, (44), Big a feeling of increasing confidence in its integrity Stone county, Minnesota, which said and straightforward frankness is indicated by th mortgage was on February 14th, 1921, number of favorable comments which the campaign. duly assigned by an instrument in has elicited from the editorial departments o! writing recorded in said Register of newspapers, big and little, throughout the eleve Deeds office on February 23 1921, at 9:00 o'clock a. m., in B o o k states served. forty-six (46) of Mortgages on page Justice, equity, frankness, a basic desire to render 452, to H. P. Carlson, by which de- a positive service, and a determination to take all fault the power of sale has become of the people into its confidence are the underlying operative and o action or proceeding princip]ea governing this organization. at'lw having been instituted to re- cover the debt secured thereby or any Standa d Oil Company part thereof, and there is claimed to r be due on this mortgage to the date (ldma) hereof, the sum of Five Thousand, hig Three Hundred Seventeen and 50-100 910 So. Mic an Ave., Chica ($5,317.50) Dollars. Now, Notice is hereby given that by virtue of said power, said 'mortgage will be foreclosed and said premises scld at public auction by the Sheriff of said county, or his deputy on Satur- Proper Care of a. m. at the front door of the court house in Ortonville, in said county, to pay said debt, interest, attorney's fees and disburseme'ts allowed by law. Battery in Dated November 21, 1921. H. P. CARLSON, Assignee of Mortgagee, A. B. KAERCHER, Attorney, Ortonville, Minn. First p?b. Nov. 24 Local Vesta Dealer Gives Have you trte0000"00 vice Regarding Methods of .-L coat [ Storage Battery in SILVEI00SIII Winter Most for theo Winter storage for your Battery is a different problem from merely storing your car for the winter. Your battery is an electr AsKyour Dealer chemical combination, and must have special , , , tention, according to Mr. Ostlind, manager the local Vesta Station. There are two methods of battery storage, wet and dry, states Mr. Ostlind. In wet their affection, their esteem and their gratitude." All Minnesota now knows with what warmth and welcome Ferdinand Fech, Marshal of France, was received and how pleased he was with his reception in the North Star State. Wells Drilled .... _ trf  A400f-O-TOgl- est trouble or apprehension in the Isuiezea wov oe matter, and would probably have gone the battery is left just the way it is taken out [ FOR. O0 WOt . VJ  DO on for many years more, but for the I am prepared to put down ambition of this man to impress his the car. It must be kept at safe )NtOt.)lR M4ORt( A VJPA.L  : fiancee with a show of his wealth. He your well in the least time ) Pit4Y -I4{)NOt.NtOMEN handed over" to this lady a consider- and smallest cost to you. See watered and charged at least once a month ]V,It4K'R NK tAKY. tT DO}4"f i able sum in bank notes, all of which me firs otherwise kept under competent su \\; A IMM < turned out to be of hlS own manuae- Chemical action takes place during the ttmo separators are taken out of the battery and plates are stored dry. All chemical action suspended, so that the battery does not -- ture. The fraud was revealed by one J A. SMITH Compliment for Legion Magazine. of the er.ve, whose servia, had months, and the life of the battery is F. W. Atha is in receipt of a letter been engaged upon one part of the Phone 10-F-11 R. 3. Ortonville from Teddy Budtong Post Marinette, not. He communicated with the au- " somewhat shortened. Wis., complimenting the "Legion Bul- thorities, and Mr. Vaughan's enterprise / I letin" issued by the Ralph Spink Post. came to tra e end ..... Mr. Higley, commander of theMarinet- gl . , , Dry Storage is a far better method. separators are taken  ut ( f the b ttery m et post, says, "Dear Atha:--Your  ---.-=- =m === magazine is a corker and I enjoy it plates are stored dr  l! chevdcal act very much W00th good as JU ST TH IN K ! suspended, so that the batl .ry doe s not det you fellows put out, it surely bespeaks ate during winter. When it is  eassemb a very "live post. Please accept my the spring, new separators are used which l best wishes for you and your fellow A LIBERTY BELL FREE OF CHARGE. This bank wants this method slightly more expensive, but the workers." o every bey and girl of this city to have one of these unique dad life given to the battery makes-st chea] When chatting together, Haniford home safes. They will help you save your dimes and MacNider and Marshal Foch discover- nickles. Open a Savings Account today and get a Liberty the long run. ed they both celebrate on the same Bell Bank. birthday---October2. During his Min- The Park Garage nesota visit, Marshal Foch remarked 5 PER CENT PAID ON ALL SAVINGS to Arthur A. Van Dyke, Legion State ORTONVILLE STATE BANK Commander, "Yours is a great or- , Ostlind & Karn, Props. ganization. But you can make it greater and stronger by getting every John Carlson, President. man who served under the American /tAl C.J. Stark, d. IL A. Stueke, Ain't. Omhler. eo4ors to enll| himself under its bad- mar. He owes R to himseff and to his Want Ad publicity is valuable pnb iieity--amt casts but a