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December 1, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
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December 1, 1921
 

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.i PAGE6 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT Ig6I &apos;I U)(I OOK REINDEER TO ENGLAND Jkttempt to Colonize the Animal Was Not a Success---Marked Intelli- gence Shown by Them. A hundred years ago it was thought :hat the mountain forests of Great ritain might be colonized by reindeer rom Lapland, and an account was ;diLven in 1821 in an issue of the Ob- qlerver, London, of the extraordinary :aagacity displayed by them when a mumber were brought to England at the instigation of an eminent natural- .lst, Mr. Bullock. The herd was ac- companled by a Laplander, to whom the animals were attached and to whose wishes they were usually obedi- .ant. All went well till they arrived at the place of embarkation, when the herdsman invited the deer to follow him to the boat. When the leader of the herd put his foot upon the float leading to the vessel he started back ,in alarm. It was the first unsteady ground he had ever trod. Fresh invi- tations to follow the herdsman and fresh investigations followed, the whole herd looking on and watching the proceedings, plae:ng entire confi- dence in the captain, not attempting to move till he gave them a signal that &ll was well. After a time he seemed o be reassured and in a majestic manner entered the vessel, where he trod upon every plank and carefully examined everything. When he had satisfied himself that it was perfectly safe, he uttered a kind of snort, when the hitherto passive herd bounded into the boat and In three minutes all had embarked. The account continues that the vessel was ;overloaded and the intelligent beast indicated this to followers. "Were we not assured of the fact, we could hardly credit it," the reporter continues. "As he had intimated other things, He also inti- mated this tO his followers. No soon- er was this done than the individual deer he appealed to leaped into an- other boat." The experiment did not prove a suc- tess, but the marked 'ntelligence of the reindeer made a deep impression upon the public. HOW THE MOLLUSKS TRAVEL ttach Themselves to Water Fowl and Are Thus Transported for Con- ' slderable Distances. L eerie 6f the problems that continually vonfronts the naturalist Is to account for the distribution of identical forms of life among widely separated locali- tie Investigation frequently shows ghat this has been accomplished In nany ways that appear quite simple hen once discovered, although one would hardly have thought of them in advance of their actual detection. Some interesting facts have been brought out concerning the dispersion of fresh-water mollusks, accounting for their appearance in remote and isolated ponds, It appears that water fowl play an important part in this work. Ducks have been known to carry mussels attached to their feet a hundred miles or more. Bivalve mol- lusks not infrequently cling to the toes of wading birds, and are thus transported for considerable distances. Even aquatic insects have been known to carry small fresh-water mollusks attached to their legs. In such manner does Nature compel the various inhabitants of the earth to UlSt one another whether they will or ot. eks Oriflln of Dancing. Can it be, in any sense, possible to conjecture that th origin" of dancing came from the desire to escape from one's self, into an imaginary world? In that .case, it might also have been a form of madness, as one finds it in the Dionysian Intoxication at the Attic festivals, when wine and the deities, the satyrs and the maenads, were closely linked togther, writes Arthur Symons in the Forum. Certainly, even now, one of the best ;means In escaping from one's self is dancing: Under fixed conditions, the ly one. The question Is: Can one ever escape from one's self? There are so many means. There is, for instance, a rapture in the dance which intoxicates every sense to a :oint of human infinity ; that is, while one is dancing. After, comes the ra- Coil. No rapture can ever be meas. ured ; while one endures It, it has no -limits. But, alas l for one's finite ha- -lure, nothing lasts. Amerln Drnracy, Whoever in America demlres to bet- ,tel" his fellowman must act by in- auqmcing their intellect. It he wishes :to Joe no idle man and no poor man in the land, he must take care that there shall be no Ignorant man..Ior- ance is the mother of superstition and misery. Men are better in pro- jportlon as they are wiser. In what- ever direction we lOOk we see the im- ,provement. The physical man iS more powerful, the intellectual man is more perfect, the moral man more-pure. The morality of a nation is the ag- ;gregate of the morality of the lndl- vAdusls. A lazy man is necessarily a bad man; an idle is necessarily a demor- alized - popuhttlon.John William Drtper. Mice Had Used 8.1eeves. About a year ago I was having a fancy dress made. When the sleeves were finlshed they mysteriously dis- appeared. I looked for them for days, but could not find them. Last week I tool the back off the organ to clean it, and imngine my surprise to find my sleeves made late a mouse nest in the bottom o. th# ori[aCea[o mmal. .................. 31SAPPEARS IN THE EARTH I-., [ Mystery of "Vanishing River" ]n Mexico Has Long Been a Puzzle to Scientists. One of the most remarkable rivers in the worJd flows through the nnrth- ern part of Mexico. It bord-r. he great Mexican desert and to rach It one need travel only one day's J ney on horseback from the 11, Grande, which marks the southern boundary of the United States in that region. The extraordi,mry river in question has its sea:roe in the hills bordering fhe de.e:'. It flows south- ward for some t,' vnty miles as smooth- ly as any we'.-iehaved river, but, sud- denly, as P. ,Aows between high bluffs, it beeowcd whirling rapids--rapids so strong and so dangerous that no man has ever been brave enough to at- tempt to cross the rushing waters. One follows the rapids, as he walks along the bluff on either side, for about two miles, and then that river vanishes utterly. Hence the name Vanishing river. It disappears sud- denly, mysteriously, completely, into the earth Itself, and not into a cave, as one would suppose. Scientists have tried in vain to ascertain where that river goes; all that they have yet an- nounced as the result of their explora- tions is that the river seems to drop sheer into the earth, as over the brink of a bottomless abyss, and that this Vanishing river is the most amazing body of water known to geographers. PROPER METHOD OF READING Bacon's Advice to "Weigh and Con. sider" Is as Valuable Today as Whqm First Given. Bacon is right, as he generally is, when he bids us read not to con- tradict and refute, not to believe and take for granted, nor to find talk and discourse, but to weigh and to con- sider. Yes, let us read to weigh and to consider. In the times before us that promise or threaten deep politi- cal, economical, and social contro- versy, what we need to do is to in- duce our people to weigh and con- sider, We want them to cultivate energy without impatience, activity without restlessness, inflexibility with- out ill-humor. I am not going to preach to you any indifference to money, or to the pleasures of social intercourse, or to the esteem and good- will of our neighbors, or to any other of the consolations and necessities of life. But, after all, the thing that matters most, both for happiness and for duty, is that we should strive habitually to live with wise thoughts and right feellngs.--"Studies in Litera- ture," Lord Morley. First Firemen. Fire-fighting organizations of men are known to have existed in the Second century before Christ, Heron of Alexandria, 200 years before the Christian era, in an old manuscript which has escaped destruction, de- scribed an hydraulic machine used in Egypt during the time of the Ptole- miss. It was composed of two brass cylinders resting on a wooden base with pistons fitted into themln its principles practtcally like our present engine. The Romans had squads of men to carry water in "hamae," or light vases, to the scene of an outbreak, where it was projected on to the fire by those in charge of the "siphones" or hand pumps. The precise nature of this in- strument has not been determined, but from specimens found in excavations it must have been much llke the old-fash- ioned syringe used by gardeners. These large organizations of men gave the Roman authorities trouble by their turbulence. Mention is made of the medieval use of forcing pumps as fire engines at Augsburg In 1518. The London Plane Tree. Citizens of London have reason to be grateful to the plane tree, which beautifies their city more than any other English tree. It is called the London plane. With lofty dignity, clothed in pleasant green, "it stands quietly in the parks and squares, a cheering sight to many hurrying work- ers. Sometimes It is stunted, but when it is free to expand it becomes one of the finest trees in the country'. Some of them in Kew Gardens, "oh ! so near to London." are magnificent. Many Leaden children, who know little of the beauties of nature in the coun- try, are familiar with the London plane. It is such a hardy tree that It flourishss in many strange corners of the city. It is strange to think that its origin is tmkaown. It is pleasant to know that it came to Lon- don as an otcast from the great family of trees, and, in return for the sanctuary afforded, has given the great city of its best. Ireland's "Mayflower.', Students of Anglo-American history have directed attention to the fact that Ireland also had her Mayflower. This was the Eaglewing, which, no later than 1636, set sail with a full passenger list of Ulster men for the American colonies. There were forty passengers, among whom were four ministers. Ill luck began at once. for unconquerable winds drove the vessel to the Scottish coast. A leak then held the ship in tle "Kyles of Buts." Starting again, she achieved mid-At- lantic, but there a hurricane did much damage and caused such general dis- couragement that finally the IriSh pil- grims made up their minds that Prov- Idence was frowning on thelt emigra- tion. and tneI the XUI back .I CHURCH NOTICES i Evangelical Association (Big Stone City) G. E. Zech, patter Preaching service at 10:00 a. m. Sunday school at 11:00 a. m. Young People's Alliance at 6:45 p. m. Prayer meeting and Teachers Training Class Wednesday evening, 7:30 p. m. Wom- an's Missionary Society will meet with Mrs. Walker Friday at 2:30 p. m. You are cordially invited to attend these services. Norwegian Lutheran. Rev. 3. Walseth, Pastor. There will be regular services at Ortonvi]le at 11:00 o'clock Sunday morning, December 4, in English. The choir will sing. Evening services at Milbank at 7:30 o'clock in the Norwe- gian language. Confirmation class will meet next Saturday morning at 10:30 o'clock at the parsonage. @ @ Christian Science. Sunday services at 10:45 a. m. Subject, "God, the Only Cause and Creator." Wednesday service at 8:00 p. m. All are welcome to these services. Fre, reading room in their hall (Shumaker building). Open every Tuesday and Friday from 3 to 5 p. rm Methodist Episcopal. Rev. G. L. Haggans, Pastor. Public worship Sunday morning at 10:30 in the Methodist church. Theme, "The Religion of the Burning Heart." Sunday school at 12:00 m. Epworth League at 7:00. The evening subject at 7:45 will be "Testing Life by the Divine Standard." A most hearty welcome to all services. @ Church of St. John. Rev. Fr. 3. A. Su[livan. Mass at 10:30 next Sunday morn- ing, December 4. Zion Lutheran Church. Rev. Arnold Nelson, Pastor. There will be no services at Orton- ville next Sunday, December 4. Rev. Nelson will preach at Milbank, S. D. Eids Lutheran Church (Eleven miles northeast of Ortonville) Rev. S. M. Moe of Clinton, Pastor. There will be no services next Sun- day, Dec. 4. Services wilt be heldthe following Sunday. @ @ @ Swedish M. E. Church. A. J. Anderson, Pastor Regular services on the second Sun- day of each month at 10:30 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. Pleasant Valley Methodist Church. Rev. F. J. Johnston. Regular services every Sunday af- ternoon at three o'clock. Sunday school at twelve o'clock. Trinity Lutheran Church. August Bartling, Pastor. Service every Sunday at 10:00 a. m. or 2:00 p. m. German language. unday school after each service English language. The Church of'Good Fellowship. United Evangelical Church. Rev. $. H. Mayne, Pastor Big Stone City.--Preaching services at 10:00 a.m. Sunday school at 11:00 a.m.K.L.C.E, meeting at 7:30 p. m. Preaching services at 8:00 p. m. Prayer meeting and Bible Class will be held every Wednesday evening at 8:00 p. m. JohnsonPreaching services every alternate Sunday at 3:00 p. m. COMING First Congregational Church. bridles and locks. Finally from one Paul J. Bockoven, Pastor Richard Markall there is a hogshead Sunday services as follows: "Morn- of tobacco, which encourages the hope ing preaching service, 10:45 a. m. that some good mlsslonary of the Sermon subject: "Open Windows." church in hls lonely statlon afar off Sunday school, 11:45 a. m. Evening enjoyed a comfortable smoke, says the preaching service, 7:45 p. ,m.. Sermon publicity department of the Protestant subject: "Margins." Special music. Episcopal church. All are most cordially invited. @ Uvited Evangelical Church. F: W. Agte, Pastor. Odessa-Correll Circuit. Odessa--Sunday services as follows: Preaching at 10:00 a.m. K. L. C. E. at 7:30 p. m. This is Young People's meeting open to all. Midweek prayer meeting Wednesday evening at 7:30 o'clock. Woman's Missionary Society, last Thursday of the month at 2:30 p.m. Class in Catechism, every Sat- urday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock. Correll--Sunday services as follows: Sunday school at 10:30 a.m. Preach- ing at 7:30 p.m. Ladies Aid meets every two weeks on Thursday after- noon at 2:30 o'clock. Akron and Steinle Schoolhouse-- Services discontinued. HORSE A PRACTICAL JOKER South American Physician Tells of Quadruped With Well.Developed Sense of Humor. Have horses a sense of humor? A South American doctor has one which is said to be fond of a practical Joke. Visiting a farmhouse, the doctor tied the animal to a post near which hung a rope attached to a large bell, used as a dinner signal for the work- men. Then he went in to see his pa- tient. A few minutes later the bell rang violently. The doctor looked out, but could see nothing. Again the bell CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PLATE How the Spirit of Giving Was Mani- fested in the Churches a Hun- dred Years Ago. Fresh.laid eggs are frequently de- posited on the contribution plate in some of the backwoods Episcopal churches of the South. Which goes to show that the spirit of giving hasn't changed so very much in the hundred years or so of the (Ynurch Missionary society. The first report of the so- ciety dated May 30, 1823, was dug up the other day, and while it shows no contribution of eggs, a score of other articles of/merchandise seem to have found their way to the plate from the people who gave "according to their means." This report, for instance, shows that back in 1821 David Sneth- an gave a basket of groceries for the support of the missionaries; Stephen North contributed a medicine chest; William Rawland, a cross-cut saw; Joe and 3ohn Needles, two sieves; S. Massey, a coffee mill. John and T. Clully contributed, alas, a singularly empty gift--s safe. 3ohn Burson came along with a tub, whether bath or wash is hot stated. O. Buckley is credited on the books with "deduction on hat," $1.50; John McAllister do- nates a thermometer. Among. other miscellanies are hymn books, slates, spad__es , sh?es, trouse_rs, chairs, soap, rang At the tHrd rt-ng concealed himself behind s the yard, and kept watch on! rope. Then, to his his horse lift up his rope between its teeth, and violent pull. After that sprang out and faced the which put on a look of canoe. Poking his nose into a which a cat lay curled up, horse got a nasty scratch for h!s pains. The careful aim, kicked the cat sky-high and then trotted low chuckle of Let Us Bid On Your Plumbing Work You will find our pri- ces are most reasona- ble, the materials of the best grade, and we guarantee you satisfac- tion with the complet- ed job. IF YOU ARE IN NEED OF A FURNACE SEE Aug. ChrisCtmas Greetings! DR. A. J. SIMPSON EYE SPECIALIST 803 Medloal Bldg,, Minneapolis, Dr. Simpson is a Graduate of one of the best Op- tical Colleges, this with his twenty years practical ex- perience enables him to give his patients the most Skilful and Scien- tific service in the treatment of their ees. In addition to the ormrmry sewing and reading glames required by everyone SOon after the age of forty, Dr. Simp- son is prepared to take care of the most complicated cases of Headache, Pain in the ]lyes, Burning and Smarting of the IAdm, Cross yes in Children, Falli Vision, Nervousness and other troubles caused by ye-strain. He makes all examinations with the new "Ratine- scope," a new lnetrument and a new method that does away with the slow. old fashioned and dangerous drug meth- od. This instrument reveals the inner earl of the eyes so strikingly and per- ctly that diagnosis is extremely easy. It is an instrument of precision and can be operated in a light room makin an actual pleasure of what by the old method was a trying ordeal for both the hatient and operator, It makes use of e direct method o Retinoscopy, the latest and most valuable method of testing for glasses, because: (1) it re- quires no answers from the pg'tient, and (2) because of its wonderful exactness. If your eyes trouble you, you can. not see well, you need glasses or your old lenses changed be sure and see Dr. Simpson on this visit. He will tell you the condition of your eyes, what you need and the cost of hav- ing your work done FRIE OF CHARGE. He will be at PALM'S JEWELRY STORE ORTONVILLE DECEMBER 6 CLINTON, DECEMBER 7 ODESSA, DECEMBER II II II II Belva TEACHER OF PIANO HARMONY Ortonville, Minn, / ! The custom of sending greeting cards during the holiday season is growing, both for personal and business use. To avoid being disappointed, orders for these cards can be placed at once. We have some very attractive samples and'can give prices now. Many suggestions and new designs that are shown in our line of samples might be of help to you, and its best to select the good designs early. Our line of samples of 1921 cards is the largest and best line we have ever had, and the prices are very reasona- ble. Call at our office and see them or telephone 297 and a representative will call on you. The 0rtonville Independent Ortonville, Minnesota , i! m .i PAGE6 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT Ig6I 'I U)(I OOK REINDEER TO ENGLAND Jkttempt to Colonize the Animal Was Not a Success---Marked Intelli- gence Shown by Them. A hundred years ago it was thought :hat the mountain forests of Great ritain might be colonized by reindeer rom Lapland, and an account was ;diLven in 1821 in an issue of the Ob- qlerver, London, of the extraordinary :aagacity displayed by them when a mumber were brought to England at the instigation of an eminent natural- .lst, Mr. Bullock. The herd was ac- companled by a Laplander, to whom the animals were attached and to whose wishes they were usually obedi- .ant. All went well till they arrived at the place of embarkation, when the herdsman invited the deer to follow him to the boat. When the leader of the herd put his foot upon the float leading to the vessel he started back ,in alarm. It was the first unsteady ground he had ever trod. Fresh invi- tations to follow the herdsman and fresh investigations followed, the whole herd looking on and watching the proceedings, plae:ng entire confi- dence in the captain, not attempting to move till he gave them a signal that &ll was well. After a time he seemed o be reassured and in a majestic manner entered the vessel, where he trod upon every plank and carefully examined everything. When he had satisfied himself that it was perfectly safe, he uttered a kind of snort, when the hitherto passive herd bounded into the boat and In three minutes all had embarked. The account continues that the vessel was ;overloaded and the intelligent beast indicated this to followers. "Were we not assured of the fact, we could hardly credit it," the reporter continues. "As he had intimated other things, He also inti- mated this tO his followers. No soon- er was this done than the individual deer he appealed to leaped into an- other boat." The experiment did not prove a suc- tess, but the marked 'ntelligence of the reindeer made a deep impression upon the public. HOW THE MOLLUSKS TRAVEL ttach Themselves to Water Fowl and Are Thus Transported for Con- ' slderable Distances. L eerie 6f the problems that continually vonfronts the naturalist Is to account for the distribution of identical forms of life among widely separated locali- tie Investigation frequently shows ghat this has been accomplished In nany ways that appear quite simple hen once discovered, although one would hardly have thought of them in advance of their actual detection. Some interesting facts have been brought out concerning the dispersion of fresh-water mollusks, accounting for their appearance in remote and isolated ponds, It appears that water fowl play an important part in this work. Ducks have been known to carry mussels attached to their feet a hundred miles or more. Bivalve mol- lusks not infrequently cling to the toes of wading birds, and are thus transported for considerable distances. Even aquatic insects have been known to carry small fresh-water mollusks attached to their legs. In such manner does Nature compel the various inhabitants of the earth to UlSt one another whether they will or ot. eks Oriflln of Dancing. Can it be, in any sense, possible to conjecture that th origin" of dancing came from the desire to escape from one's self, into an imaginary world? In that .case, it might also have been a form of madness, as one finds it in the Dionysian Intoxication at the Attic festivals, when wine and the deities, the satyrs and the maenads, were closely linked togther, writes Arthur Symons in the Forum. Certainly, even now, one of the best ;means In escaping from one's self is dancing: Under fixed conditions, the ly one. The question Is: Can one ever escape from one's self? There are so many means. There is, for instance, a rapture in the dance which intoxicates every sense to a :oint of human infinity ; that is, while one is dancing. After, comes the ra- Coil. No rapture can ever be meas. ured ; while one endures It, it has no -limits. But, alas l for one's finite ha- -lure, nothing lasts. Amerln Drnracy, Whoever in America demlres to bet- ,tel" his fellowman must act by in- auqmcing their intellect. It he wishes :to Joe no idle man and no poor man in the land, he must take care that there shall be no Ignorant man..Ior- ance is the mother of superstition and misery. Men are better in pro- jportlon as they are wiser. In what- ever direction we lOOk we see the im- ,provement. The physical man iS more powerful, the intellectual man is more perfect, the moral man more-pure. The morality of a nation is the ag- ;gregate of the morality of the lndl- vAdusls. A lazy man is necessarily a bad man; an idle is necessarily a demor- alized - popuhttlon.John William Drtper. Mice Had Used 8.1eeves. About a year ago I was having a fancy dress made. When the sleeves were finlshed they mysteriously dis- appeared. I looked for them for days, but could not find them. Last week I tool the back off the organ to clean it, and imngine my surprise to find my sleeves made late a mouse nest in the bottom o. th# ori[aCea[o mmal. .................. 31SAPPEARS IN THE EARTH I-., [ Mystery of "Vanishing River" ]n Mexico Has Long Been a Puzzle to Scientists. One of the most remarkable rivers in the worJd flows through the nnrth- ern part of Mexico. It bord-r. he great Mexican desert and to rach It one need travel only one day's J ney on horseback from the 11, Grande, which marks the southern boundary of the United States in that region. The extraordi,mry river in question has its sea:roe in the hills bordering fhe de.e:'. It flows south- ward for some t,' vnty miles as smooth- ly as any we'.-iehaved river, but, sud- denly, as P. ,Aows between high bluffs, it beeowcd whirling rapids--rapids so strong and so dangerous that no man has ever been brave enough to at- tempt to cross the rushing waters. One follows the rapids, as he walks along the bluff on either side, for about two miles, and then that river vanishes utterly. Hence the name Vanishing river. It disappears sud- denly, mysteriously, completely, into the earth Itself, and not into a cave, as one would suppose. Scientists have tried in vain to ascertain where that river goes; all that they have yet an- nounced as the result of their explora- tions is that the river seems to drop sheer into the earth, as over the brink of a bottomless abyss, and that this Vanishing river is the most amazing body of water known to geographers. PROPER METHOD OF READING Bacon's Advice to "Weigh and Con. sider" Is as Valuable Today as Whqm First Given. Bacon is right, as he generally is, when he bids us read not to con- tradict and refute, not to believe and take for granted, nor to find talk and discourse, but to weigh and to con- sider. Yes, let us read to weigh and to consider. In the times before us that promise or threaten deep politi- cal, economical, and social contro- versy, what we need to do is to in- duce our people to weigh and con- sider, We want them to cultivate energy without impatience, activity without restlessness, inflexibility with- out ill-humor. I am not going to preach to you any indifference to money, or to the pleasures of social intercourse, or to the esteem and good- will of our neighbors, or to any other of the consolations and necessities of life. But, after all, the thing that matters most, both for happiness and for duty, is that we should strive habitually to live with wise thoughts and right feellngs.--"Studies in Litera- ture," Lord Morley. First Firemen. Fire-fighting organizations of men are known to have existed in the Second century before Christ, Heron of Alexandria, 200 years before the Christian era, in an old manuscript which has escaped destruction, de- scribed an hydraulic machine used in Egypt during the time of the Ptole- miss. It was composed of two brass cylinders resting on a wooden base with pistons fitted into themln its principles practtcally like our present engine. The Romans had squads of men to carry water in "hamae," or light vases, to the scene of an outbreak, where it was projected on to the fire by those in charge of the "siphones" or hand pumps. The precise nature of this in- strument has not been determined, but from specimens found in excavations it must have been much llke the old-fash- ioned syringe used by gardeners. These large organizations of men gave the Roman authorities trouble by their turbulence. Mention is made of the medieval use of forcing pumps as fire engines at Augsburg In 1518. The London Plane Tree. Citizens of London have reason to be grateful to the plane tree, which beautifies their city more than any other English tree. It is called the London plane. With lofty dignity, clothed in pleasant green, "it stands quietly in the parks and squares, a cheering sight to many hurrying work- ers. Sometimes It is stunted, but when it is free to expand it becomes one of the finest trees in the country'. Some of them in Kew Gardens, "oh ! so near to London." are magnificent. Many Leaden children, who know little of the beauties of nature in the coun- try, are familiar with the London plane. It is such a hardy tree that It flourishss in many strange corners of the city. It is strange to think that its origin is tmkaown. It is pleasant to know that it came to Lon- don as an otcast from the great family of trees, and, in return for the sanctuary afforded, has given the great city of its best. Ireland's "Mayflower.', Students of Anglo-American history have directed attention to the fact that Ireland also had her Mayflower. This was the Eaglewing, which, no later than 1636, set sail with a full passenger list of Ulster men for the American colonies. There were forty passengers, among whom were four ministers. Ill luck began at once. for unconquerable winds drove the vessel to the Scottish coast. A leak then held the ship in tle "Kyles of Buts." Starting again, she achieved mid-At- lantic, but there a hurricane did much damage and caused such general dis- couragement that finally the IriSh pil- grims made up their minds that Prov- Idence was frowning on thelt emigra- tion. and tneI the XUI back .I CHURCH NOTICES i Evangelical Association (Big Stone City) G. E. Zech, patter Preaching service at 10:00 a. m. Sunday school at 11:00 a. m. Young People's Alliance at 6:45 p. m. Prayer meeting and Teachers Training Class Wednesday evening, 7:30 p. m. Wom- an's Missionary Society will meet with Mrs. Walker Friday at 2:30 p. m. You are cordially invited to attend these services. Norwegian Lutheran. Rev. 3. Walseth, Pastor. There will be regular services at Ortonvi]le at 11:00 o'clock Sunday morning, December 4, in English. The choir will sing. Evening services at Milbank at 7:30 o'clock in the Norwe- gian language. Confirmation class will meet next Saturday morning at 10:30 o'clock at the parsonage. @ @ Christian Science. Sunday services at 10:45 a. m. Subject, "God, the Only Cause and Creator." Wednesday service at 8:00 p. m. All are welcome to these services. Fre, reading room in their hall (Shumaker building). Open every Tuesday and Friday from 3 to 5 p. rm Methodist Episcopal. Rev. G. L. Haggans, Pastor. Public worship Sunday morning at 10:30 in the Methodist church. Theme, "The Religion of the Burning Heart." Sunday school at 12:00 m. Epworth League at 7:00. The evening subject at 7:45 will be "Testing Life by the Divine Standard." A most hearty welcome to all services. @ Church of St. John. Rev. Fr. 3. A. Su[livan. Mass at 10:30 next Sunday morn- ing, December 4. Zion Lutheran Church. Rev. Arnold Nelson, Pastor. There will be no services at Orton- ville next Sunday, December 4. Rev. Nelson will preach at Milbank, S. D. Eids Lutheran Church (Eleven miles northeast of Ortonville) Rev. S. M. Moe of Clinton, Pastor. There will be no services next Sun- day, Dec. 4. Services wilt be heldthe following Sunday. @ @ @ Swedish M. E. Church. A. J. Anderson, Pastor Regular services on the second Sun- day of each month at 10:30 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. Pleasant Valley Methodist Church. Rev. F. J. Johnston. Regular services every Sunday af- ternoon at three o'clock. Sunday school at twelve o'clock. Trinity Lutheran Church. August Bartling, Pastor. Service every Sunday at 10:00 a. m. or 2:00 p. m. German language. unday school after each service English language. The Church of'Good Fellowship. United Evangelical Church. Rev. $. H. Mayne, Pastor Big Stone City.--Preaching services at 10:00 a.m. Sunday school at 11:00 a.m.K.L.C.E, meeting at 7:30 p. m. Preaching services at 8:00 p. m. Prayer meeting and Bible Class will be held every Wednesday evening at 8:00 p. m. JohnsonPreaching services every alternate Sunday at 3:00 p. m. COMING First Congregational Church. bridles and locks. Finally from one Paul J. Bockoven, Pastor Richard Markall there is a hogshead Sunday services as follows: "Morn- of tobacco, which encourages the hope ing preaching service, 10:45 a. m. that some good mlsslonary of the Sermon subject: "Open Windows." church in hls lonely statlon afar off Sunday school, 11:45 a. m. Evening enjoyed a comfortable smoke, says the preaching service, 7:45 p. ,m.. Sermon publicity department of the Protestant subject: "Margins." Special music. Episcopal church. All are most cordially invited. @ Uvited Evangelical Church. F: W. Agte, Pastor. Odessa-Correll Circuit. Odessa--Sunday services as follows: Preaching at 10:00 a.m. K. L. C. E. at 7:30 p. m. This is Young People's meeting open to all. Midweek prayer meeting Wednesday evening at 7:30 o'clock. Woman's Missionary Society, last Thursday of the month at 2:30 p.m. Class in Catechism, every Sat- urday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock. Correll--Sunday services as follows: Sunday school at 10:30 a.m. Preach- ing at 7:30 p.m. Ladies Aid meets every two weeks on Thursday after- noon at 2:30 o'clock. Akron and Steinle Schoolhouse-- Services discontinued. HORSE A PRACTICAL JOKER South American Physician Tells of Quadruped With Well.Developed Sense of Humor. Have horses a sense of humor? A South American doctor has one which is said to be fond of a practical Joke. Visiting a farmhouse, the doctor tied the animal to a post near which hung a rope attached to a large bell, used as a dinner signal for the work- men. Then he went in to see his pa- tient. A few minutes later the bell rang violently. The doctor looked out, but could see nothing. Again the bell CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PLATE How the Spirit of Giving Was Mani- fested in the Churches a Hun- dred Years Ago. Fresh.laid eggs are frequently de- posited on the contribution plate in some of the backwoods Episcopal churches of the South. Which goes to show that the spirit of giving hasn't changed so very much in the hundred years or so of the (Ynurch Missionary society. The first report of the so- ciety dated May 30, 1823, was dug up the other day, and while it shows no contribution of eggs, a score of other articles of/merchandise seem to have found their way to the plate from the people who gave "according to their means." This report, for instance, shows that back in 1821 David Sneth- an gave a basket of groceries for the support of the missionaries; Stephen North contributed a medicine chest; William Rawland, a cross-cut saw; Joe and 3ohn Needles, two sieves; S. Massey, a coffee mill. John and T. Clully contributed, alas, a singularly empty gift--s safe. 3ohn Burson came along with a tub, whether bath or wash is hot stated. O. Buckley is credited on the books with "deduction on hat," $1.50; John McAllister do- nates a thermometer. Among. other miscellanies are hymn books, slates, spad__es , sh?es, trouse_rs, chairs, soap, rang At the tHrd rt-ng concealed himself behind s the yard, and kept watch on! rope. Then, to his his horse lift up his rope between its teeth, and violent pull. After that sprang out and faced the which put on a look of canoe. Poking his nose into a which a cat lay curled up, horse got a nasty scratch for h!s pains. The careful aim, kicked the cat sky-high and then trotted low chuckle of Let Us Bid On Your Plumbing Work You will find our pri- ces are most reasona- ble, the materials of the best grade, and we guarantee you satisfac- tion with the complet- ed job. IF YOU ARE IN NEED OF A FURNACE SEE Aug. ChrisCtmas Greetings! DR. A. J. SIMPSON EYE SPECIALIST 803 Medloal Bldg,, Minneapolis, Dr. Simpson is a Graduate of one of the best Op- tical Colleges, this with his twenty years practical ex- perience enables him to give his patients the most Skilful and Scien- tific service in the treatment of their ees. In addition to the ormrmry sewing and reading glames required by everyone SOon after the age of forty, Dr. Simp- son is prepared to take care of the most complicated cases of Headache, Pain in the ]lyes, Burning and Smarting of the IAdm, Cross yes in Children, Falli Vision, Nervousness and other troubles caused by ye-strain. He makes all examinations with the new "Ratine- scope," a new lnetrument and a new method that does away with the slow. old fashioned and dangerous drug meth- od. This instrument reveals the inner earl of the eyes so strikingly and per- ctly that diagnosis is extremely easy. It is an instrument of precision and can be operated in a light room makin an actual pleasure of what by the old method was a trying ordeal for both the hatient and operator, It makes use of e direct method o Retinoscopy, the latest and most valuable method of testing for glasses, because: (1) it re- quires no answers from the pg'tient, and (2) because of its wonderful exactness. If your eyes trouble you, you can. not see well, you need glasses or your old lenses changed be sure and see Dr. Simpson on this visit. He will tell you the condition of your eyes, what you need and the cost of hav- ing your work done FRIE OF CHARGE. He will be at PALM'S JEWELRY STORE ORTONVILLE DECEMBER 6 CLINTON, DECEMBER 7 ODESSA, DECEMBER II II II II Belva TEACHER OF PIANO HARMONY Ortonville, Minn, / ! The custom of sending greeting cards during the holiday season is growing, both for personal and business use. To avoid being disappointed, orders for these cards can be placed at once. We have some very attractive samples and'can give prices now. Many suggestions and new designs that are shown in our line of samples might be of help to you, and its best to select the good designs early. Our line of samples of 1921 cards is the largest and best line we have ever had, and the prices are very reasona- ble. Call at our office and see them or telephone 297 and a representative will call on you. The 0rtonville Independent Ortonville, Minnesota , i! m PAGE 6 THE ORTONVLLE INDEPENDENT ,! Hlfll[a ;rK REINDEER TO ENGLAND Attempt to C*onf.a the Anlma Wa* NOt a 8uMarRed InteBi. elate Shown by Them. A hundred years ago It was tbeaht that the momuam forests of reat .]BzJtain might be <]onid hy relnd'e *rom Lplund, and aa accoant ,a ltven In 11 In na Iue Of the Ob- er, London, of the exraurdmary agaelty lsplayed by them wheu a umber were brought to .gland at he InstiLlation of an emineut natural- let, Mr, Bullock. The herd was ae- eompaMed by a Laplander, to where the aals we attached and to he wishes flley we osaMly obedi- t. ll went weTI Oat they arrbed at the plane of embarkatlea, whei te herdsman invited the deer to foUow him to the boat When the leader of the herd pot his foot upna tba float |ending to the vessel he started bnek In alarm. ]t was the first unsceady uad he had ever trod. Fsh inv[- tatians to J'olIow the herdsma and fsh lavasOgaLlons followed, the ho]e herd leaking on and wateMng he proeeemngs, placq,g eaUre eonfi  la the eptMn, not ttempHag moe till he gave them a signal that H was welh After a time he eme(] 0 be reasnr] and in 8 aJestle nner eated the vessel, we he trod open eery plnk lad eautly amlned everything. Whefi he hod mtthlfled Mmself that it w perftly ale, he uttered a kind Of ort. when t.he ]Mtheo passive herd tounded Ito the boat and in th mlaatea all hod mbarked. he accot comln tt the vessel wu overloaded and te ite]]lgent bet IdtCated this to oUowe. "Were we ant assured of the fact, we eould hardly credit It" t poxCer enntlnu, "AS he had . Itlmated other thto, e also Inl- Iated this to his foHower NO ou- was th done tan the individual dr he appealed to leaped into an. other beet." abe exper[mt did net pve a sue. ez, but te markea 'ntemgea ef the relnaer made a 0p ImpresSes upon the public. MOW THE MOLLUSKS TRAVEL ttah Themlmlvl to water FI and Ar Thuz Tnlported for CO I aldaeabia Detnc. 010 f the pbtems thaL tlnUally cf the tu]iet is to 8ut or the distribution of Identical toga life eng dely evated :ocnu. ee. lvesttgatio nequeno shews at lhl h bn cmpllahed in  way that appear qite stelple hen once dlzcOved, atthough one Old baldly bve thought of there zn sdvan c their actual deistic. Io lnttlDg fets have bn brOlht out eetdng the diapel of fresh-wat molluskS, aontng  their appearxaee In remote aud related p. It appears that water owl play no ImpOrtant part [a thla wk. Zeks have bn knn to zr mls attached to thetr eet a hndred roues or mo. Bivalve mob |ueks not lntreqtty eUng to the toe of wading blrd and a thus Eve aqentle In,eats have bn kno to carry mar fre-water ltks aaehed to their tee. In eh manner d ature mpel a*det one avother whether they wm or lek Origin of anoinl, (]an It he, Jn auy a, pslh[s to oleetre that th origl of dancing came from the dtre to eape fm o*'s elt Into u lmaghtary world? In that a, Jt might ao have bn a tom of madne, a one flnde It t the Dionysian Intoxication at the Attic festlvate, wh wine and the detie, the satyr end the maenads, were e]e]y Hoked to'ther, wr[t Arthur Symon In the Poem. Cr talnl x men In eCaplng aanea; Tvder xed dmone, the t one. he qua.on lS: Can eer pe from one's lf? which lnto=lnate every ae to polnt o hum lomdt; that 1, while e I ng. After, eom the coil o -tur ncthmg z WhVer In meca dt tr his tellewm mlmt tot by mmelml 4r lntetlee It he wt  me no Idle man and o poor man in  land, he mt tke  that AJ,e eez be no mot man. hmn Inca mth* mother o suuen nd mteer. Mm a bett ta p polon am tbe re wr. Ill what- Ieect, the mal be morality of *x nnU is the a. ;ggate of the morality of the indb dual.  levy man 1 nssarBy e bad ellz . pulatton,ohn Draper. MI Had Used e ht a year ago 1 fane dro mde, When the sves we flnshed, hey myserteusb' as- appeared I looked for them for days, but oud nat Jqd them, LeL week ] took* the bnek off the organ to clean SAPPEARS N THE EARTH * CHURCH NOTICE * . coue.eg.to., ch. -- [ l S I Paul J. Bkoven, Pastor I Myetery of "Vanlehng Rive#' I $ -- unday seis n follows; "MO- Mexico Hat Long Been a Puia Evangelical Assiation ing paehing eiee, 10:45 a. m. to ScentiltL (Big 8toe City) elon subieet: "Open Wh.dows." -- G.E. Zech, partor Sunday sd, uol, 1x:45 a. m. Eening great Mexican desert all to aeh It meetior and Teoehers Tzaining Class @ * One of the most markable rives Paching sewiee aL 10:00  n. paehing sewice, 7:45 p. m, Sermon m the world flows though  n.rtZa. Sunday seheel at 11:00 a. or. You.g bjoet: "Matns." Sp.ia] music. ern part of Mexico. It bordr h People, Alliance nt 6:45 p, m Prayer re mt cordially invited. me need ravel only one duy'a jmm-- [ Ve(]ne]a3 eezng, 7:0 p, m. United Evangelial Chl oey on horsabae from the It. art's bIssie,,ary Seeiety F; w. Agte, Pastor. Grande, which marks be southern Mrs. "tlker Ezidy  (I p. m. You Odes  Cecil Circuit. boundary of the United tutes In that ere COldial[y invited to attend these Od__Sunday iees as follows regina. The extraorrlh, try river in services, e plaehlng at lO:O0  m. K. L. C. E question has its s;;ree in the hills @ ,It bordering the de.,. , It flow south- a 7:30 p. m. This is Yog peop]e' ward for some t, nty miles a smth- Norwegian Lutheran, meeting open to all. Midweek payel ly as any wen , bayed river, but, sud- Fev, J, Walseth. pastor, meeting Weduesday evening at 7:3( alertly, as P :],)ws between high bluffs. Thele will he gulor Woman's Missionary Siaty,j at 11:00 o'clock Sunday last Thursday of the moath at 2:30 It beenc,  wblrUnK mplds--raplds so stro. and so danRermls that no man ha var been brave hmpt to Cross the rusmg waters. One follows the rapids, as he walka along tha hlu# o. either side. about two UeS, and thea tbat river vanlshe utterly. Hence the aame VanlSldng river, it disappears sud denly, the rth Itself, and out Into a ve, ns One would suppfe. tried lo river goes; all that they have as ever the bllnk of a bottomless aby, and that Vantstng river [s the most amazing body of water known to ggrapherl. PROPER METHOD OF READING Advlce to "W*lh aed can. alder" la ai V|luable Today wh FIr Given. au [s right, as he generally I* he bide Us a not end z'ute, not to hal|eve for g, but to weJgh Ye, tee us ad to weigh and to nlder. I3 the tlm b'eT Us that promise  threaten deep poilU- L enmnieaL and sla] versy, wht we nee o do ts dn our ]ple to weigh We went ergy without hnpatlee, activity without zflen as, IneaxlbEIty with. at IHhllmor. [ am not ge[n e to paeh to yuu nDy Indlenee to mohay, or to the pinnaces of Lal good- writ of or neighbor, or to auy other for duty. ] that  huuld strive habRualy to eve 1e-httng orzmlttons known to have extsed Zu the Seod eentur heo Christ. He of Alexandria, )O O,rLetlan ez In has escaped detmction, d ao hydraulic machine ud In gpt duties mle It llndez etg on with plcoz fitted Iota pznelple pactlny uke enfflne. he Romen has squads ef men to tght m, win pJeetea  to the fi by th m ehaze o the 'lphene" or pumps. toned yge ud by rdeos, e larva organlzats of me. gave the by MeoUon Is mode n the u ot foremg pumps as fl engine, at Augsburg In 15|8. The Lond pla.a Tt el|Isis ot Odon have Mon to ateut te the p.e t. which beautle their eltl  , th EnglLah tree, It t Ued Londou pla.e. With lofty dignity. clothed u paunt . It ; quietly [n the parks ehrmg aght to maa hyg work. era. Somet[mH tt  stuntea, but when It IS free to suspend tt bme one ot the fin t* u th couot. Soma of them tn Kew Oaren "ah! near to La," am malnt. Many LOndon oldn, who Zm lit|l* the buU ot natu In th - try, m tmlX with the Lo.d plan*. IC Is such a hary tree that It ourlsh bz oy *trem oome of the alto. It la atne to think that I orlzLu L tmkewn. It lz pleasa.t to kow that tt e to Lon- don ae U tc'zst  th* |t lmly o tze and. L tum f the unctur7 alZoled, bu vz great ct of lie bee Ireland's "Mayflovt." StUdent of A.lAmeelean bstory have directed attention te the fact w the agtewin, which, no than le. t ll let of Ulster men for the eelOnles. he we foau amoug whom  four nl tusk began at te the 8sottish eclat, A leak thee held the sbp m te "Kyles o Bu e." tartlng again, she achieved lantle, demean an caused aueb geueral US- gms mao up hrldl end locks. Finally from o ng. At the zfrd rV'ng Rlohard Markau there is hogshd nnted mmself elud tobaeco, whleh eneomge the hope the ynrd, that .ome goo mis.tonary at the rope. ehh In hls iely ate|ton nfar o Then, nJoye a eomfortabte smoke, says the hla hoe llft up hls pobllelty dev.rtment of the Ptestant l rope between t* gpIopal ch,h, l violent pull. -- spng HORSE A PRACTCAL JOKER een.l 8curb &merlcan Phyeila Tulle of I poking his nose into 8 I Quadped WRh WelbDalopel I wMeh a lay eted Sen  Humor. I hoe got a -- pala. The Have horses a se of burner? A outh American dtor has e wMeh sky'Mgh Is ald to be fond of a practical o'Ke. Vsltlng u teahouse, the tied the animal tn a poet my eev made tnfo e mou neat ,g C their en. the bottom  tb gr--La  tlou, end Wsned tYek e bae molrdng, Dember 4, in English. The p.m. Cla in Catechism, every Sat choir wLII sin. Evenin seis at u, day afternoon at 2:OO o'clock. Correll Sunday oi've as follows gian language Sunday sehno a 0 3O a n Prah-I ttent. meet next Saturday moling at lug at 7:3O p. m. Ladles Aid meIs! A few mnntes uter the bell ng ' i u'elock at the parsonage, every two weeks en Thursday after violently. The doctor Iked one, but ; I @ o'clock, not hlng Agatn Chrtlan Selene ! Akron and Steinle Sunday iees at 10:45 Subject, "God, tile Only Cau CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PLATE Wednesday ser5 at 8:On p, m, All the rHees, F Spirit of Giving Was Maul. d[ng om in their hal] (Sbalmaker fat4ad In the Chuh a Hun- buiIdlng). Open every Tuesday d d Yea A. Fiday f 3 to  p,  hqald emma are freqnentl Methodist EpbgopaL peslted on the trlbutlol plate In Ray. G. L* Haggis, Por.  of the bankwoOds ]GplOpal Public warship Sunday morning at plr[t of stying ha't so very mch Sunday school at 12:00 m. Epworth e or  o the Cuh Jlonary Iague at 7:00. The evenLvg subjeeL eoeJety* The flt pozc of the - "Testing Life by the tety dated May , 1, was dug Standard)' A ost heaLy the ether day, and while tt shows arttel omehandt m to Ch2h of* St.eh p .......... people ho ga',e "aceerdIag to tbnlr I llev, Fr. J. A, 8.tliv mean*." ls nr. for nste, I Mass at 10:30 next Sunday shows that back in 1821 David Sneth- ] log, Deeember4  gve a baeket of grerles for the I suppo% of the m]lanari; Zi Lutheran Church. cntributed a medicine R, Aold Nelson, Pter. Rawland, a css-cut w; l There will be no eic s at Or Jo hn N lee, two slew i1 S. I ille net Sunday, De  4. I Massey* a eolT mllh John end "I?. Ne]son wilt pach at Milbank, S.D. (3lully contributed, alas, a empty tlft te. John a tub, whether hnth Eids Lutheran Cheh or wal Is et stated. O. Buekley Is (Ele miles nor theast of Ortenville) ercdlted Te ill be no selTieas next Sun- hates theeter, Aag other day, D. 4. Se,Lees wil be heldthe tel|owing Sunday. qad, hoe tuse, eha!t, ap, Swedish M. E. Churda. " A. J, Anderson. pastor 7:80 . m. @ Church. Ray. F. J. Jnhoston. Regular services every Sunday ef. Smaday 1 at twelve o'eleek. 4. Trkdty Lutheran Church. August Bartllng, pastor. erd every Sunday at 10:On or 2:OO p. m. Gemenl Sends hI after each The Chur o f "zelloweh Jl United Evangelical Church. Ray. J, H. Mayne, Pt Btg Stone Clty.--Preaching service a.m, K. L. C E meeting at 7:80 p m. Preaching settees pyer mtln be held every Weduesday evenlr 8:00 p. m. ; Jolmson--Preeng serffces ever alterte Sday at $:00 p. m. COMING DR. A. J. SIMPSON EYE PlAklT /10| Medloal 81dg. MlnnpOll of the beat C,p- With his twty perlen enables patlen the moat tllc sslne In the ttmnt n te" R I a Iatent of reelioa gud taa w a tm ara or t te y yes treuble you, you ean- not see weLl, you need glsses or your be nre and ea Dr, Simpson en this visit. He will the condltlon of your eyes, whet you naed sod tile eoet o hay. lOg your work done FRliI O He writ be &t PALM'S JEWELRy STORE ORTONV[LLE DECEMBER G CLINTON, DECEMBER 7 ODESSA DECEMBER ung a rope attached to a i : Belva Kaercher used s a dnner signet for the work. I " men Then he went lu to sea his pa- i TEACHER OF PIANO HARMONY Or tonville. Mi Let Us Bid On Your Plumbing Work You will find our pri- ces are most reasona- ble, the materials of the best grade, and we guarantee you satisfac- tion with the complet- ed job. IF YOU ARE IN NEED - OF A FURNACE SEE Aug, C].ir:igtmas G:re,00tings! The custom of sending greeting cards during the holiday season is growing, both for personal and business use. To avoid being disappointed, orders for these cards can be placed at once. We have some very attractive samples and'can give prices now. Many suggestions and new designs that are shown in our line of samples might be of help to you, and its best to select the good designs early. Our line of samples of 1921 cards is the largest and best line we have ever had, and the prices are very reasona- ble. Call at our office and see them or telephone 297 and a representative will call on you. The Ortonville Independent Ortonville, Minnesota .i PAGE6 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT Ig6I 'I U)(I OOK REINDEER TO ENGLAND Jkttempt to Colonize the Animal Was Not a Success---Marked Intelli- gence Shown by Them. A hundred years ago it was thought :hat the mountain forests of Great ritain might be colonized by reindeer rom Lapland, and an account was ;diLven in 1821 in an issue of the Ob- qlerver, London, of the extraordinary :aagacity displayed by them when a mumber were brought to England at the instigation of an eminent natural- .lst, Mr. Bullock. The herd was ac- companled by a Laplander, to whom the animals were attached and to whose wishes they were usually obedi- .ant. All went well till they arrived at the place of embarkation, when the herdsman invited the deer to follow him to the boat. When the leader of the herd put his foot upon the float leading to the vessel he started back ,in alarm. It was the first unsteady ground he had ever trod. Fresh invi- tations to follow the herdsman and fresh investigations followed, the whole herd looking on and watching the proceedings, plae:ng entire confi- dence in the captain, not attempting to move till he gave them a signal that &ll was well. After a time he seemed o be reassured and in a majestic manner entered the vessel, where he trod upon every plank and carefully examined everything. When he had satisfied himself that it was perfectly safe, he uttered a kind of snort, when the hitherto passive herd bounded into the boat and In three minutes all had embarked. The account continues that the vessel was ;overloaded and the intelligent beast indicated this to followers. "Were we not assured of the fact, we could hardly credit it," the reporter continues. "As he had intimated other things, He also inti- mated this tO his followers. No soon- er was this done than the individual deer he appealed to leaped into an- other boat." The experiment did not prove a suc- tess, but the marked 'ntelligence of the reindeer made a deep impression upon the public. HOW THE MOLLUSKS TRAVEL ttach Themselves to Water Fowl and Are Thus Transported for Con- ' slderable Distances. L eerie 6f the problems that continually vonfronts the naturalist Is to account for the distribution of identical forms of life among widely separated locali- tie Investigation frequently shows ghat this has been accomplished In nany ways that appear quite simple hen once discovered, although one would hardly have thought of them in advance of their actual detection. Some interesting facts have been brought out concerning the dispersion of fresh-water mollusks, accounting for their appearance in remote and isolated ponds, It appears that water fowl play an important part in this work. Ducks have been known to carry mussels attached to their feet a hundred miles or more. Bivalve mol- lusks not infrequently cling to the toes of wading birds, and are thus transported for considerable distances. Even aquatic insects have been known to carry small fresh-water mollusks attached to their legs. In such manner does Nature compel the various inhabitants of the earth to UlSt one another whether they will or ot. eks Oriflln of Dancing. Can it be, in any sense, possible to conjecture that th origin" of dancing came from the desire to escape from one's self, into an imaginary world? In that .case, it might also have been a form of madness, as one finds it in the Dionysian Intoxication at the Attic festivals, when wine and the deities, the satyrs and the maenads, were closely linked togther, writes Arthur Symons in the Forum. Certainly, even now, one of the best ;means In escaping from one's self is dancing: Under fixed conditions, the ly one. The question Is: Can one ever escape from one's self? There are so many means. There is, for instance, a rapture in the dance which intoxicates every sense to a :oint of human infinity ; that is, while one is dancing. After, comes the ra- Coil. No rapture can ever be meas. ured ; while one endures It, it has no -limits. But, alas l for one's finite ha- -lure, nothing lasts. Amerln Drnracy, Whoever in America demlres to bet- ,tel" his fellowman must act by in- auqmcing their intellect. It he wishes :to Joe no idle man and no poor man in the land, he must take care that there shall be no Ignorant man..Ior- ance is the mother of superstition and misery. Men are better in pro- jportlon as they are wiser. In what- ever direction we lOOk we see the im- ,provement. The physical man iS more powerful, the intellectual man is more perfect, the moral man more-pure. The morality of a nation is the ag- ;gregate of the morality of the lndl- vAdusls. A lazy man is necessarily a bad man; an idle is necessarily a demor- alized - popuhttlon.John William Drtper. Mice Had Used 8.1eeves. About a year ago I was having a fancy dress made. When the sleeves were finlshed they mysteriously dis- appeared. I looked for them for days, but could not find them. Last week I tool the back off the organ to clean it, and imngine my surprise to find my sleeves made late a mouse nest in the bottom o. th# ori[aCea[o mmal. .................. 31SAPPEARS IN THE EARTH I-., [ Mystery of "Vanishing River" ]n Mexico Has Long Been a Puzzle to Scientists. One of the most remarkable rivers in the worJd flows through the nnrth- ern part of Mexico. It bord-r. he great Mexican desert and to rach It one need travel only one day's J ney on horseback from the 11, Grande, which marks the southern boundary of the United States in that region. The extraordi,mry river in question has its sea:roe in the hills bordering fhe de.e:'. It flows south- ward for some t,' vnty miles as smooth- ly as any we'.-iehaved river, but, sud- denly, as P. ,Aows between high bluffs, it beeowcd whirling rapids--rapids so strong and so dangerous that no man has ever been brave enough to at- tempt to cross the rushing waters. One follows the rapids, as he walks along the bluff on either side, for about two miles, and then that river vanishes utterly. Hence the name Vanishing river. It disappears sud- denly, mysteriously, completely, into the earth Itself, and not into a cave, as one would suppose. Scientists have tried in vain to ascertain where that river goes; all that they have yet an- nounced as the result of their explora- tions is that the river seems to drop sheer into the earth, as over the brink of a bottomless abyss, and that this Vanishing river is the most amazing body of water known to geographers. PROPER METHOD OF READING Bacon's Advice to "Weigh and Con. sider" Is as Valuable Today as Whqm First Given. Bacon is right, as he generally is, when he bids us read not to con- tradict and refute, not to believe and take for granted, nor to find talk and discourse, but to weigh and to con- sider. Yes, let us read to weigh and to consider. In the times before us that promise or threaten deep politi- cal, economical, and social contro- versy, what we need to do is to in- duce our people to weigh and con- sider, We want them to cultivate energy without impatience, activity without restlessness, inflexibility with- out ill-humor. I am not going to preach to you any indifference to money, or to the pleasures of social intercourse, or to the esteem and good- will of our neighbors, or to any other of the consolations and necessities of life. But, after all, the thing that matters most, both for happiness and for duty, is that we should strive habitually to live with wise thoughts and right feellngs.--"Studies in Litera- ture," Lord Morley. First Firemen. Fire-fighting organizations of men are known to have existed in the Second century before Christ, Heron of Alexandria, 200 years before the Christian era, in an old manuscript which has escaped destruction, de- scribed an hydraulic machine used in Egypt during the time of the Ptole- miss. It was composed of two brass cylinders resting on a wooden base with pistons fitted into themln its principles practtcally like our present engine. The Romans had squads of men to carry water in "hamae," or light vases, to the scene of an outbreak, where it was projected on to the fire by those in charge of the "siphones" or hand pumps. The precise nature of this in- strument has not been determined, but from specimens found in excavations it must have been much llke the old-fash- ioned syringe used by gardeners. These large organizations of men gave the Roman authorities trouble by their turbulence. Mention is made of the medieval use of forcing pumps as fire engines at Augsburg In 1518. The London Plane Tree. Citizens of London have reason to be grateful to the plane tree, which beautifies their city more than any other English tree. It is called the London plane. With lofty dignity, clothed in pleasant green, "it stands quietly in the parks and squares, a cheering sight to many hurrying work- ers. Sometimes It is stunted, but when it is free to expand it becomes one of the finest trees in the country'. Some of them in Kew Gardens, "oh ! so near to London." are magnificent. Many Leaden children, who know little of the beauties of nature in the coun- try, are familiar with the London plane. It is such a hardy tree that It flourishss in many strange corners of the city. It is strange to think that its origin is tmkaown. It is pleasant to know that it came to Lon- don as an otcast from the great family of trees, and, in return for the sanctuary afforded, has given the great city of its best. Ireland's "Mayflower.', Students of Anglo-American history have directed attention to the fact that Ireland also had her Mayflower. This was the Eaglewing, which, no later than 1636, set sail with a full passenger list of Ulster men for the American colonies. There were forty passengers, among whom were four ministers. Ill luck began at once. for unconquerable winds drove the vessel to the Scottish coast. A leak then held the ship in tle "Kyles of Buts." Starting again, she achieved mid-At- lantic, but there a hurricane did much damage and caused such general dis- couragement that finally the IriSh pil- grims made up their minds that Prov- Idence was frowning on thelt emigra- tion. and tneI the XUI back .I CHURCH NOTICES i Evangelical Association (Big Stone City) G. E. Zech, patter Preaching service at 10:00 a. m. Sunday school at 11:00 a. m. Young People's Alliance at 6:45 p. m. Prayer meeting and Teachers Training Class Wednesday evening, 7:30 p. m. Wom- an's Missionary Society will meet with Mrs. Walker Friday at 2:30 p. m. You are cordially invited to attend these services. Norwegian Lutheran. Rev. 3. Walseth, Pastor. There will be regular services at Ortonvi]le at 11:00 o'clock Sunday morning, December 4, in English. The choir will sing. Evening services at Milbank at 7:30 o'clock in the Norwe- gian language. Confirmation class will meet next Saturday morning at 10:30 o'clock at the parsonage. @ @ Christian Science. Sunday services at 10:45 a. m. Subject, "God, the Only Cause and Creator." Wednesday service at 8:00 p. m. All are welcome to these services. Fre, reading room in their hall (Shumaker building). Open every Tuesday and Friday from 3 to 5 p. rm Methodist Episcopal. Rev. G. L. Haggans, Pastor. Public worship Sunday morning at 10:30 in the Methodist church. Theme, "The Religion of the Burning Heart." Sunday school at 12:00 m. Epworth League at 7:00. The evening subject at 7:45 will be "Testing Life by the Divine Standard." A most hearty welcome to all services. @ Church of St. John. Rev. Fr. 3. A. Su[livan. Mass at 10:30 next Sunday morn- ing, December 4. Zion Lutheran Church. Rev. Arnold Nelson, Pastor. There will be no services at Orton- ville next Sunday, December 4. Rev. Nelson will preach at Milbank, S. D. Eids Lutheran Church (Eleven miles northeast of Ortonville) Rev. S. M. Moe of Clinton, Pastor. There will be no services next Sun- day, Dec. 4. Services wilt be heldthe following Sunday. @ @ @ Swedish M. E. Church. A. J. Anderson, Pastor Regular services on the second Sun- day of each month at 10:30 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. Pleasant Valley Methodist Church. Rev. F. J. Johnston. Regular services every Sunday af- ternoon at three o'clock. Sunday school at twelve o'clock. Trinity Lutheran Church. August Bartling, Pastor. Service every Sunday at 10:00 a. m. or 2:00 p. m. German language. unday school after each service English language. The Church of'Good Fellowship. United Evangelical Church. Rev. $. H. Mayne, Pastor Big Stone City.--Preaching services at 10:00 a.m. Sunday school at 11:00 a.m.K.L.C.E, meeting at 7:30 p. m. Preaching services at 8:00 p. m. Prayer meeting and Bible Class will be held every Wednesday evening at 8:00 p. m. JohnsonPreaching services every alternate Sunday at 3:00 p. m. COMING First Congregational Church. bridles and locks. Finally from one Paul J. Bockoven, Pastor Richard Markall there is a hogshead Sunday services as follows: "Morn- of tobacco, which encourages the hope ing preaching service, 10:45 a. m. that some good mlsslonary of the Sermon subject: "Open Windows." church in hls lonely statlon afar off Sunday school, 11:45 a. m. Evening enjoyed a comfortable smoke, says the preaching service, 7:45 p. ,m.. Sermon publicity department of the Protestant subject: "Margins." Special music. Episcopal church. All are most cordially invited. @ Uvited Evangelical Church. F: W. Agte, Pastor. Odessa-Correll Circuit. Odessa--Sunday services as follows: Preaching at 10:00 a.m. K. L. C. E. at 7:30 p. m. This is Young People's meeting open to all. Midweek prayer meeting Wednesday evening at 7:30 o'clock. Woman's Missionary Society, last Thursday of the month at 2:30 p.m. Class in Catechism, every Sat- urday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock. Correll--Sunday services as follows: Sunday school at 10:30 a.m. Preach- ing at 7:30 p.m. Ladies Aid meets every two weeks on Thursday after- noon at 2:30 o'clock. Akron and Steinle Schoolhouse-- Services discontinued. HORSE A PRACTICAL JOKER South American Physician Tells of Quadruped With Well.Developed Sense of Humor. Have horses a sense of humor? A South American doctor has one which is said to be fond of a practical Joke. Visiting a farmhouse, the doctor tied the animal to a post near which hung a rope attached to a large bell, used as a dinner signal for the work- men. Then he went in to see his pa- tient. A few minutes later the bell rang violently. The doctor looked out, but could see nothing. Again the bell CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PLATE How the Spirit of Giving Was Mani- fested in the Churches a Hun- dred Years Ago. Fresh.laid eggs are frequently de- posited on the contribution plate in some of the backwoods Episcopal churches of the South. Which goes to show that the spirit of giving hasn't changed so very much in the hundred years or so of the (Ynurch Missionary society. The first report of the so- ciety dated May 30, 1823, was dug up the other day, and while it shows no contribution of eggs, a score of other articles of/merchandise seem to have found their way to the plate from the people who gave "according to their means." This report, for instance, shows that back in 1821 David Sneth- an gave a basket of groceries for the support of the missionaries; Stephen North contributed a medicine chest; William Rawland, a cross-cut saw; Joe and 3ohn Needles, two sieves; S. Massey, a coffee mill. John and T. Clully contributed, alas, a singularly empty gift--s safe. 3ohn Burson came along with a tub, whether bath or wash is hot stated. O. Buckley is credited on the books with "deduction on hat," $1.50; John McAllister do- nates a thermometer. Among. other miscellanies are hymn books, slates, spad__es , sh?es, trouse_rs, chairs, soap, rang At the tHrd rt-ng concealed himself behind s the yard, and kept watch on! rope. Then, to his his horse lift up his rope between its teeth, and violent pull. After that sprang out and faced the which put on a look of canoe. Poking his nose into a which a cat lay curled up, horse got a nasty scratch for h!s pains. The careful aim, kicked the cat sky-high and then trotted low chuckle of Let Us Bid On Your Plumbing Work You will find our pri- ces are most reasona- ble, the materials of the best grade, and we guarantee you satisfac- tion with the complet- ed job. IF YOU ARE IN NEED OF A FURNACE SEE Aug. ChrisCtmas Greetings! DR. A. J. SIMPSON EYE SPECIALIST 803 Medloal Bldg,, Minneapolis, Dr. Simpson is a Graduate of one of the best Op- tical Colleges, this with his twenty years practical ex- perience enables him to give his patients the most Skilful and Scien- tific service in the treatment of their ees. In addition to the ormrmry sewing and reading glames required by everyone SOon after the age of forty, Dr. Simp- son is prepared to take care of the most complicated cases of Headache, Pain in the ]lyes, Burning and Smarting of the IAdm, Cross yes in Children, Falli Vision, Nervousness and other troubles caused by ye-strain. He makes all examinations with the new "Ratine- scope," a new lnetrument and a new method that does away with the slow. old fashioned and dangerous drug meth- od. This instrument reveals the inner earl of the eyes so strikingly and per- ctly that diagnosis is extremely easy. It is an instrument of precision and can be operated in a light room makin an actual pleasure of what by the old method was a trying ordeal for both the hatient and operator, It makes use of e direct method o Retinoscopy, the latest and most valuable method of testing for glasses, because: (1) it re- quires no answers from the pg'tient, and (2) because of its wonderful exactness. If your eyes trouble you, you can. not see well, you need glasses or your old lenses changed be sure and see Dr. Simpson on this visit. He will tell you the condition of your eyes, what you need and the cost of hav- ing your work done FRIE OF CHARGE. He will be at PALM'S JEWELRY STORE ORTONVILLE DECEMBER 6 CLINTON, DECEMBER 7 ODESSA, DECEMBER II II II II Belva TEACHER OF PIANO HARMONY Ortonville, Minn, / ! The custom of sending greeting cards during the holiday season is growing, both for personal and business use. To avoid being disappointed, orders for these cards can be placed at once. We have some very attractive samples and'can give prices now. Many suggestions and new designs that are shown in our line of samples might be of help to you, and its best to select the good designs early. Our line of samples of 1921 cards is the largest and best line we have ever had, and the prices are very reasona- ble. Call at our office and see them or telephone 297 and a representative will call on you. The 0rtonville Independent Ortonville, Minnesota , i! m