Newspaper Archive of
The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
Lyft
December 1, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
PAGE 7     (7 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 7     (7 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
December 1, 1921
 

Newspaper Archive of The Ortonville Independent produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




DECEMBER 1, 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE 7 i[ Is Low Time Past Farmers Corner . o. .. . ........ ..... m 00neep luarKet.r ESPECIALLY TO THE ACtrlVITIES OF FARMERS AND FARMER S CLUBS. Lamb Values Have Advances Sharply Under Influence of Light Re- Raises Blue Hogs. New Rockford, N. D., County Agent A. C. Peterson of Eddy county in notes recently published, reports that Roy Pierson, a falner of this county has started a herd of Sapphire or blue hogs which have many unusual char- acteristics. The foundation stock was brought in from Massachusetts. T he hog is of bacon type, long and straight with strongly arched back heavily fleshed over the hams and shoulders. The hogs are said never to squeal, they are light eaters, eating only a small amount at a time; then lie down until it is digested; and they are re- markably prolific; producing litters of from 13 to 15 young.--Grant County Herald. Re-Elected Bureau Chief Purchases Herd Sire. Harold Erickson, Chester White hog breeder, of Wheaton, visited Kaercher- dale Falm this week, and purchased a herd sire. The Big Stone County Agricultural Society also bought a Chester White boar for their herd at Clinton. Best Monday $9.00. Monday's Closing-- Cattle, 6,800. Market closing strong to 25c higher, bulk of beef steers $5 to $6, few up to $7. Calves 400. Mar- ket mostly steady, practical packer top $7. Hogs 13,000. Market aver- aging about 10 to 15c lower, Range $6 to $7. Bulk $6.40 to $6.75, bulk good pigs $7.25. Sheep 5,600. Mar- ket steady to 25c higher, bulk good lambs $8.75, few loads $9.00, bulk good fat ewes $3.25 to $3.50. So. St. Paul, Minn., Nov. 28, 1921.- Sharp curtailment of sheep and lambs receipts the past two weeks and a fairly healthy dressed trade, especially in lamb, have combined to bring about a sharp advance in the lamb market. Several loads of choice lambs reached $9.00 late Monday or the highest price paid on this market since in Septem- ber, and many traders feel that the low time has been passed for this year. Bulk of good fat lambs sold at $8.75, with bulk of fat ewes $3.25 to $3.50. With moderate receipts of cattle American Federation Unanimously To Sac- ceed Himself. Howard, Iowa farmer, is third term as president Farm Bureau fed- was unanimously re- delegates from all over the assembled in the an- convention of the or- L in Atlanta, Ga. Ohio farmer, was outstanding features of was the report of the department, which American Farm Bu- backed by the state and county bureaus, had instrumental in getting the last session of con- agricultural legislation passed by any other the gavel fell for the congress." secretary of agri'- Senator W. S. Kenyon, the senate agricultural prominent speak- 'Convention program his re-election as presi- pledged the Ameri- federation to the as its guide in 12 E1 Sig here and elsewhere Monday, trade in evat0rs n that 00ivi00ioo o,oo0000 GO a 00t,oo00 to [ 25c higher basis, better grades of beef Nti 1 v--" .... ., steers and butcher she stock showing a 0Ila 0II[l'at:[imost gain. A few good beef steers sold in small lots up to $7.00, with 140 Minnesota Farmers Pledge Crop others at $6.50, and bulk of beef steers To Be Marketed Thru U.S. from $5.00 to $6.00. Bulk of the but- cher cows and heifers sold from $3.25 Grain Growers. Twelve country elevators and more than 150 farmers have joined the U. S. Grain Growers, Inc., according to one place to go to study reports summarizing the second week have come up be- of the organization's membership my fellow far-. drive in Minnesota. "I have looked at every t At the end o fthe second week of the it might affect me back t organization campaign eight Lyon In other words, I have [ county elevators had signed contracts national problem fromto market thru the national farmers' back home. I shall leo_operative selling corporation, to- that. gether with two Watonwan county ale- in this nation vators, and one each in Wright and to every farmer, Kittson counties. no ess differences in "It's eming fine," J. S. Jones, or- The finest thing ganization director of the Minnesota Farn Bureau fed- Farm Bureau federation, and manager inspiring thing, is that it of the U. S. Grain Growers' member- together the different ele- i shi p drive in Minnesota, reported to national agriculture as officers of the national corporation. ever has. The the west and the north HEREFORD BREEDERS and the bond of mu- HONOR MINNESOTAN is helping us to put piece of work. -- Thomas E. Cashman of Owatonna, co-operation and president of the Minnesota Livestock that have brought us Breeders association, and a member of way are going to take tse executive board of the Minnesota of the way. I consider Farm Bureau federation, was elected few years are going to vice president of the American Here- in American his- ford Breeders association at the the leadership of the American Roya 1 livestock show at When I spea kof the lead- Kansas City. nation I refer both to and to such or- RAI'N INSURANCE PUTS as our own--is construe- $2,500 IN STRONG BOX destructive, and is for all the people and not Because it rained more than one- ). tenth of an inch on the Pope county overruns the farms of fair, the fair association received Will also grow in the $2,500 insurance, A. P. Henderson towns of America. The Pope county agent, reports. Under cities are beginning to the terms of the agreement the fair ' I believe there is a bet- association was to receive the insur- toward agriculture than ance if it rained more than one tenth in this country before." of an inch on any day of the fair be- tween 7:00 a. m. and 7 p.m. For this comes to our door protection the fair association paid [ $200. to $4.50, with a fair showing of sales up to $5.00, and best heifers reaching $5.50 in several cases. Canners and cutters sold largely from $2.25 to $3, Bologna bulls sold tram $2.50 to $3, an occasional choice heavy bologna up to $3.25. Bulk of the best veal calves sold to packers at $7.00, a few extra choice vealers reaching $7.50. Strong prices were received for stockers and feeders at the week's opening. Bes in lots sold up around $5.50, with bulk from $4 to $5. Choice 140 to 175 pound hogs sold strong at the week's opening, bulk of such kinds going Monday from $6.85 to $7.00, with most of the good mixed butcher hogs selling from $6.50 to $6.60, and heavy packers $6.00 to $6.25. Bulk of the good pigs here brought $7.25. PREMIUMS FOR MINNESOTA CROP SHOW TOTAL $4,000 With three state crop organizations, the State Horticultural society, Crop Improvement association and the Po- tato Growers' association co-ope.ra- ting, the Minnesota Crop show will be held in the Hennepin county court- house in Minneapolis December 13 to 16, 1921. This, according to R. S. Mackintosh, secretary of the Horticul- tural society, is the first time these three organizations have joined forces in staging a crop show. The premium list, which includes corn, fruits, grains, potatoes, vegetables, plants and cut flowers will total about $4,000. Starting Tuesday, December 13 and continuing four days, the State Hor- ticultural society will hold its usual program at the courthouse. Meetings of the Crop Improvement association and the Potato Growers will come wednesday, December 14, Thurshay, December 15, and Friday, December 16. On the afternoon of these three days combined meetings will be ad- dressed by Governor J. A. O. Preus, Likely to Be Used For Fuel; ,on. Sydney Anderson, representa- tive in Congress from the first Minne- seta district and chairman of the spe- TB C 1I S o. [ eial commission on agricultural in- an 0a n 0me 5ecu0ns quiry; G. J. R. Malcolm, minister of ,.....__ ,- . • .. • _ 'lagriculture for Manitoba with head- Corn at 22 cents a bushel equals l ,._..._ race ox me epar, , ..... ! l coat at xx per on ture said recently: " I f ........ ALL ROAD WORK at 2" - "u h-" i Corn at 23 cents a bushel equals j  and new buildtn are r$- U cents a o s el s .  7 Ported by The Improvement Val ^ . ,: .... a ,€ coal at $11.50 per on. ue tv  .LO.aL .0,,, ,.,.  .... 1 . :]3ulletln. Gives calls for bids co orn a za cents a bushel equals  .*lL--, of. State HighwAy Co ra- al at approximately ...... n --x-,  mmsion; 52 numbers tot I coal at tz per o n districts where corn ..... • .... - \\; $6.00 with Daily Re- ow .... II torn a zo cents a ousneI enuals t-.L_-x mlnder F]REI if sub- ne coal is usua y ........ n - __ _ ,a-.--\\; scription is paid this  • ,sS t ,noFlth r cam at z Go per o grade and is selling • " page for "" " U d--suC-e--d'-" Corn at 26 cents a bushel equals e: .  Improveme.t e..®tm n [ 11 t IBIOBS ....... a .... ,, coal at $13 per ton Clobodnd===: Minneapolis, Minm .... torn a z7 cents a bushel equals o use corn msea(] coal at $13.50 per ton. i Corn at 28 cents a bushel equals IT'S 'OOD LUMBER THP, T1 of the variation, in quail- coal at $14 per ton. and coal it is difficult Corn at 29 cents a bushel equals f0U N "I.LFUJ$[ experiments the re- coal at $14.50 per ton. 'T '' "0 I| are applicable every- Corn at 30 cents a bushel equals generally, the coal at $15 per ton. values of corn and Corn at 31 cents a bushel as follows: coal at $15.50 per ton. cents a bushel equals coal Corn at 32 cents a bushel equals ton. coal at $16 per ton. cents a bushel equals "The drier the corn the higher its ton. fuel value. It can be burned either cents a bushel equals on the ear or shelled, but better on ton. the ear. cents a bushel equals "In times past, when corn was very ton. cheap, it has been burned as fuel in the United States, but mostly on the cents a bushel equals farms. In Argentina beth corn and ton. small grain are sometimes burned as cents a bushel equals fuel, not alone on the farms but in er ton. power plants. Undoubtedly large cents a bushel equals quantities of corn will be burned on n. i western farms this winter unless the cents a bushel equals prices should materially advance. The ton. farmer will find the corn cheaper fuel Cents a bushel equals than coal, and in addition will save ton. the cost of hauling the corn to town Cents a bushel equals and hauling the coal back. People in ton. the country towns in the sections of cheap corn will probably find it will cents a bushel equals pay them to buy ear corn for their ton. - furnaces and heating stoves unless ents a bushel equals coal should decrease considerably in 1 ton. price or corn should advance." quarters at Winnepeg; Dean W. C. Coffey, of the department of agricul- ture, N. J. Holmberg, state commis- sioner of agriculture and Dean Alfred Vivian of the Ohio State University, department of agriculture. EARLY OPENING OF SILO ADVISED BY EXPERTS Requiring animals to clean up grass and corn stalks at this season is all right if it is not carried to a point of causing a drop in milk production, ac- cording to C. H. Eckles, chief of the dairy husbandry division at the Uni- versity of Minnesota. The tendency, is, he says, to wait too long before opening the silo. When this is done the moldy silage on top should be taken off and hauled away to sme field where cattle can not get at it. ,, Experiments at the Minnesota Expert-! ment station at University Farm have shown that moldy silage is not likely to cause sickness with cattle but the experience of stockmen indi- cate that sheep or horses may be in- jured, according to Professor Eckles. You Need Printing We Do Printing Let us get together and both will be satisfied. Tilt 0RTONVILL[ IND[P[NI)[M € Professional and * T ucking 'i Business DirectorYLoH [0r [xpett WIRINGSERVIcEELECTRIC It doesn't make any REPAIRING difference to us whether Pho 8-L Ortonviile, Minn, your job of hauling takes us 1 mile or 250 JOE BAYER & SON miles from Ortonville--- of the Ortonville Tailoring Co. All kinds of cleaning and pressing we are prepared to go neatly done. --promptly a n d eco- Shits Made to Order. Ortonville, Minn. nomically. We make a specialty of "long dis- i ELECTRIC SHOE tance hauling." I SHOP Shoes repaired neatly and prorapt- Just Phone I ly. Our Work Guaranteed. GUS. E. ANDERSON, Prop. 91 • JOHN SPANYERS I Light Hauling of all Kinds [ Express and Baggage [ vm. Cummens ,Teleph°ne 287 Ortonville, Minn. Ortonville, Minn. ---"Try a Want Ad" i ii New here--old in Dixie Land of the long leaf pine gives the world a famous vapor rub for all cold troubles. I The famous healing odors of the long-leaf pine are to be had, even if you can't go South. For people subject to colds, a North Carolina druggist some years ago worked out a vaporizing salve, containing the very as- sauce of pine sap, together with other healing penetrating vapors. This wonderful preparation, Vicks VapoRub, has been the Just rub it on and breathe in the vapors standby for years in Southern homes. Year by year and State by State its reputation has grown until today Vicks is the favorite treatment throughout the country for all cold troubles, croup, catarrh--neuralgic pains, skin hurts and itching skin troubles. Druggists are stocked now. Get a good supply at once. PAUL DIRNBAUER ] Brick Layer and Plasterer I Stone Mason and All Kinds of [ Cement Work. Ortonville, Minn. R.F.D. PETERSON & SON Dray Line Big Stone Lake Ice Phone 38 Ortonville, Minn o t Kodak PRINTIN{ ENLARGING Prompt, Quality Service, Moderate Pric. THE REED STUDIO Ortonviile Minn. i DR. R. D. RIFENBARK OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN One block uphill frarr, Gunderson' rrug Stere Vapor-Sulphur Cabinet Treatments (For rheumatism, neuritis, etc.) 0 ] F.L. BROWN x , .F s v TRUCK = E I i:::==: C t' : ]and any kind of light and heavy ! "- " ' ""  " ] draying | j i , f .... E  = j HausauerBros. ] tAll Orders Given Prompt Attention| i ,, , , 00urIi00 00otel  I[ A. B.AtteyKAERCHERnt Law _ J0th STREET AT FOURTH AVENUE E " MINNEAPOLIS  Oddortonville,Fellows BuildingMinn. _. The Northwest' Largut and Mot Beautiful Hostelry - All Rooms sr. Outsld. and Each Room . Privat Bath i I I m ---'-- TARIFF: --.. 75 Rooms (Private Baths) Single at $2.00--Double $3.00 325 Room, (Private Baths) Single at $2.50--Double $3.50 | 200 Rooms (Private Baths) Single at $3 0&-Double $4.00 " OtKera from $4.00 to $15.00 .,iliIMllllMImm$1111111MlilIMImMlllIMmllllillllmiMllmlJ ALUABLES placed in our SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS are safe as mo- dern ingenuity and skill can make them. And in addition to this safety we assure you the utmost in courteous at- tention and service when you vmit this Bank. You are most cordially invited to become a user V DR. F. W. DUNN. CHIROPRACTOR D. D. WHITE, D. C., PH. C. Spinographer 12-13-14-15-16 Shumaker Bldg. Ortenville, Minn. CoL Win. WeIlendorf AUCTIONEER 80 years' e.xperiene No pracel_e. i on your property. Call ot write me early mad got ia oa an early date. Ortonvflle,. , Mhmea L A. JOHNSON PIANO TErNING AND REPAIRING ,. Store - |$ ll Work Guarantd Ortonvi.e, Minnwots. F- , ,, ., WILL FINCH Experlea©l Pat Phone 25-L l] All Work Guaranteed EIDER SALSBIBgy I WBLL DPQ]' Flftm Ym' Ortonville, Mhu I F. D. of our vaults and inspect ........... WHEN it comes to deliver- ,¥ ing the goods on time our other departments. we're there, that's alL For big jobs or small jobs--lum- ber sawed to the proper length and width--hmher for I I every practical purpose prac- tically priced. First National Bank Geier Lumber Co. OaTO00VILLE MINNESOTA Ortonvill® I • I DECEMBER 1, 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE 7 i[ Is Low Time Past Farmers Corner . o. .. . ........ ..... m 00neep luarKet.r ESPECIALLY TO THE ACtrlVITIES OF FARMERS AND FARMER S CLUBS. Lamb Values Have Advances Sharply Under Influence of Light Re- Raises Blue Hogs. New Rockford, N. D., County Agent A. C. Peterson of Eddy county in notes recently published, reports that Roy Pierson, a falner of this county has started a herd of Sapphire or blue hogs which have many unusual char- acteristics. The foundation stock was brought in from Massachusetts. T he hog is of bacon type, long and straight with strongly arched back heavily fleshed over the hams and shoulders. The hogs are said never to squeal, they are light eaters, eating only a small amount at a time; then lie down until it is digested; and they are re- markably prolific; producing litters of from 13 to 15 young.--Grant County Herald. Re-Elected Bureau Chief Purchases Herd Sire. Harold Erickson, Chester White hog breeder, of Wheaton, visited Kaercher- dale Falm this week, and purchased a herd sire. The Big Stone County Agricultural Society also bought a Chester White boar for their herd at Clinton. Best Monday $9.00. Monday's Closing-- Cattle, 6,800. Market closing strong to 25c higher, bulk of beef steers $5 to $6, few up to $7. Calves 400. Mar- ket mostly steady, practical packer top $7. Hogs 13,000. Market aver- aging about 10 to 15c lower, Range $6 to $7. Bulk $6.40 to $6.75, bulk good pigs $7.25. Sheep 5,600. Mar- ket steady to 25c higher, bulk good lambs $8.75, few loads $9.00, bulk good fat ewes $3.25 to $3.50. So. St. Paul, Minn., Nov. 28, 1921.- Sharp curtailment of sheep and lambs receipts the past two weeks and a fairly healthy dressed trade, especially in lamb, have combined to bring about a sharp advance in the lamb market. Several loads of choice lambs reached $9.00 late Monday or the highest price paid on this market since in Septem- ber, and many traders feel that the low time has been passed for this year. Bulk of good fat lambs sold at $8.75, with bulk of fat ewes $3.25 to $3.50. With moderate receipts of cattle American Federation Unanimously To Sac- ceed Himself. Howard, Iowa farmer, is third term as president Farm Bureau fed- was unanimously re- delegates from all over the assembled in the an- convention of the or- L in Atlanta, Ga. Ohio farmer, was outstanding features of was the report of the department, which American Farm Bu- backed by the state and county bureaus, had instrumental in getting the last session of con- agricultural legislation passed by any other the gavel fell for the congress." secretary of agri'- Senator W. S. Kenyon, the senate agricultural prominent speak- 'Convention program his re-election as presi- pledged the Ameri- federation to the as its guide in 12 E1 Sig here and elsewhere Monday, trade in evat0rs n that 00ivi00ioo o,oo0000 GO a 00t,oo00 to [ 25c higher basis, better grades of beef Nti 1 v--" .... ., steers and butcher she stock showing a 0Ila 0II[l'at:[imost gain. A few good beef steers sold in small lots up to $7.00, with 140 Minnesota Farmers Pledge Crop others at $6.50, and bulk of beef steers To Be Marketed Thru U.S. from $5.00 to $6.00. Bulk of the but- cher cows and heifers sold from $3.25 Grain Growers. Twelve country elevators and more than 150 farmers have joined the U. S. Grain Growers, Inc., according to one place to go to study reports summarizing the second week have come up be- of the organization's membership my fellow far-. drive in Minnesota. "I have looked at every t At the end o fthe second week of the it might affect me back t organization campaign eight Lyon In other words, I have [ county elevators had signed contracts national problem fromto market thru the national farmers' back home. I shall leo_operative selling corporation, to- that. gether with two Watonwan county ale- in this nation vators, and one each in Wright and to every farmer, Kittson counties. no ess differences in "It's eming fine," J. S. Jones, or- The finest thing ganization director of the Minnesota Farn Bureau fed- Farm Bureau federation, and manager inspiring thing, is that it of the U. S. Grain Growers' member- together the different ele- i shi p drive in Minnesota, reported to national agriculture as officers of the national corporation. ever has. The the west and the north HEREFORD BREEDERS and the bond of mu- HONOR MINNESOTAN is helping us to put piece of work. -- Thomas E. Cashman of Owatonna, co-operation and president of the Minnesota Livestock that have brought us Breeders association, and a member of way are going to take tse executive board of the Minnesota of the way. I consider Farm Bureau federation, was elected few years are going to vice president of the American Here- in American his- ford Breeders association at the the leadership of the American Roya 1 livestock show at When I spea kof the lead- Kansas City. nation I refer both to and to such or- RAI'N INSURANCE PUTS as our own--is construe- $2,500 IN STRONG BOX destructive, and is for all the people and not Because it rained more than one- ). tenth of an inch on the Pope county overruns the farms of fair, the fair association received Will also grow in the $2,500 insurance, A. P. Henderson towns of America. The Pope county agent, reports. Under cities are beginning to the terms of the agreement the fair ' I believe there is a bet- association was to receive the insur- toward agriculture than ance if it rained more than one tenth in this country before." of an inch on any day of the fair be- tween 7:00 a. m. and 7 p.m. For this comes to our door protection the fair association paid [ $200. to $4.50, with a fair showing of sales up to $5.00, and best heifers reaching $5.50 in several cases. Canners and cutters sold largely from $2.25 to $3, Bologna bulls sold tram $2.50 to $3, an occasional choice heavy bologna up to $3.25. Bulk of the best veal calves sold to packers at $7.00, a few extra choice vealers reaching $7.50. Strong prices were received for stockers and feeders at the week's opening. Bes in lots sold up around $5.50, with bulk from $4 to $5. Choice 140 to 175 pound hogs sold strong at the week's opening, bulk of such kinds going Monday from $6.85 to $7.00, with most of the good mixed butcher hogs selling from $6.50 to $6.60, and heavy packers $6.00 to $6.25. Bulk of the good pigs here brought $7.25. PREMIUMS FOR MINNESOTA CROP SHOW TOTAL $4,000 With three state crop organizations, the State Horticultural society, Crop Improvement association and the Po- tato Growers' association co-ope.ra- ting, the Minnesota Crop show will be held in the Hennepin county court- house in Minneapolis December 13 to 16, 1921. This, according to R. S. Mackintosh, secretary of the Horticul- tural society, is the first time these three organizations have joined forces in staging a crop show. The premium list, which includes corn, fruits, grains, potatoes, vegetables, plants and cut flowers will total about $4,000. Starting Tuesday, December 13 and continuing four days, the State Hor- ticultural society will hold its usual program at the courthouse. Meetings of the Crop Improvement association and the Potato Growers will come wednesday, December 14, Thurshay, December 15, and Friday, December 16. On the afternoon of these three days combined meetings will be ad- dressed by Governor J. A. O. Preus, Likely to Be Used For Fuel; ,on. Sydney Anderson, representa- tive in Congress from the first Minne- seta district and chairman of the spe- TB C 1I S o. [ eial commission on agricultural in- an 0a n 0me 5ecu0ns quiry; G. J. R. Malcolm, minister of ,.....__ ,- . • .. • _ 'lagriculture for Manitoba with head- Corn at 22 cents a bushel equals l ,._..._ race ox me epar, , ..... ! l coat at xx per on ture said recently: " I f ........ ALL ROAD WORK at 2" - "u h-" i Corn at 23 cents a bushel equals j  and new buildtn are r$- U cents a o s el s .  7 Ported by The Improvement Val ^ . ,: .... a ,€ coal at $11.50 per on. ue tv  .LO.aL .0,,, ,.,.  .... 1 . :]3ulletln. Gives calls for bids co orn a za cents a bushel equals  .*lL--, of. State HighwAy Co ra- al at approximately ...... n --x-,  mmsion; 52 numbers tot I coal at tz per o n districts where corn ..... • .... - \\; $6.00 with Daily Re- ow .... II torn a zo cents a ousneI enuals t-.L_-x mlnder F]REI if sub- ne coal is usua y ........ n - __ _ ,a-.--\\; scription is paid this  • ,sS t ,noFlth r cam at z Go per o grade and is selling • " page for "" " U d--suC-e--d'-" Corn at 26 cents a bushel equals e: .  Improveme.t e..®tm n [ 11 t IBIOBS ....... a .... ,, coal at $13 per ton Clobodnd===: Minneapolis, Minm .... torn a z7 cents a bushel equals o use corn msea(] coal at $13.50 per ton. i Corn at 28 cents a bushel equals IT'S 'OOD LUMBER THP, T1 of the variation, in quail- coal at $14 per ton. and coal it is difficult Corn at 29 cents a bushel equals f0U N "I.LFUJ$[ experiments the re- coal at $14.50 per ton. 'T '' "0 I| are applicable every- Corn at 30 cents a bushel equals generally, the coal at $15 per ton. values of corn and Corn at 31 cents a bushel as follows: coal at $15.50 per ton. cents a bushel equals coal Corn at 32 cents a bushel equals ton. coal at $16 per ton. cents a bushel equals "The drier the corn the higher its ton. fuel value. It can be burned either cents a bushel equals on the ear or shelled, but better on ton. the ear. cents a bushel equals "In times past, when corn was very ton. cheap, it has been burned as fuel in the United States, but mostly on the cents a bushel equals farms. In Argentina beth corn and ton. small grain are sometimes burned as cents a bushel equals fuel, not alone on the farms but in er ton. power plants. Undoubtedly large cents a bushel equals quantities of corn will be burned on n. i western farms this winter unless the cents a bushel equals prices should materially advance. The ton. farmer will find the corn cheaper fuel Cents a bushel equals than coal, and in addition will save ton. the cost of hauling the corn to town Cents a bushel equals and hauling the coal back. People in ton. the country towns in the sections of cheap corn will probably find it will cents a bushel equals pay them to buy ear corn for their ton. - furnaces and heating stoves unless ents a bushel equals coal should decrease considerably in 1 ton. price or corn should advance." quarters at Winnepeg; Dean W. C. Coffey, of the department of agricul- ture, N. J. Holmberg, state commis- sioner of agriculture and Dean Alfred Vivian of the Ohio State University, department of agriculture. EARLY OPENING OF SILO ADVISED BY EXPERTS Requiring animals to clean up grass and corn stalks at this season is all right if it is not carried to a point of causing a drop in milk production, ac- cording to C. H. Eckles, chief of the dairy husbandry division at the Uni- versity of Minnesota. The tendency, is, he says, to wait too long before opening the silo. When this is done the moldy silage on top should be taken off and hauled away to sme field where cattle can not get at it. ,, Experiments at the Minnesota Expert-! ment station at University Farm have shown that moldy silage is not likely to cause sickness with cattle but the experience of stockmen indi- cate that sheep or horses may be in- jured, according to Professor Eckles. You Need Printing We Do Printing Let us get together and both will be satisfied. Tilt 0RTONVILL[ IND[P[NI)[M € Professional and * T ucking 'i Business DirectorYLoH [0r [xpett WIRINGSERVIcEELECTRIC It doesn't make any REPAIRING difference to us whether Pho 8-L Ortonviile, Minn, your job of hauling takes us 1 mile or 250 JOE BAYER & SON miles from Ortonville--- of the Ortonville Tailoring Co. All kinds of cleaning and pressing we are prepared to go neatly done. --promptly a n d eco- Shits Made to Order. Ortonville, Minn. nomically. We make a specialty of "long dis- i ELECTRIC SHOE tance hauling." I SHOP Shoes repaired neatly and prorapt- Just Phone I ly. Our Work Guaranteed. GUS. E. ANDERSON, Prop. 91 • JOHN SPANYERS I Light Hauling of all Kinds [ Express and Baggage [ vm. Cummens ,Teleph°ne 287 Ortonville, Minn. Ortonville, Minn. ---"Try a Want Ad" i ii New here--old in Dixie Land of the long leaf pine gives the world a famous vapor rub for all cold troubles. I The famous healing odors of the long-leaf pine are to be had, even if you can't go South. For people subject to colds, a North Carolina druggist some years ago worked out a vaporizing salve, containing the very as- sauce of pine sap, together with other healing penetrating vapors. This wonderful preparation, Vicks VapoRub, has been the Just rub it on and breathe in the vapors standby for years in Southern homes. Year by year and State by State its reputation has grown until today Vicks is the favorite treatment throughout the country for all cold troubles, croup, catarrh--neuralgic pains, skin hurts and itching skin troubles. Druggists are stocked now. Get a good supply at once. PAUL DIRNBAUER ] Brick Layer and Plasterer I Stone Mason and All Kinds of [ Cement Work. Ortonville, Minn. R.F.D. PETERSON & SON Dray Line Big Stone Lake Ice Phone 38 Ortonville, Minn o t Kodak PRINTIN{ ENLARGING Prompt, Quality Service, Moderate Pric. THE REED STUDIO Ortonviile Minn. i DR. R. D. RIFENBARK OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN One block uphill frarr, Gunderson' rrug Stere Vapor-Sulphur Cabinet Treatments (For rheumatism, neuritis, etc.) 0 ] F.L. BROWN x , .F s v TRUCK = E I i:::==: C t' : ]and any kind of light and heavy ! "- " ' ""  " ] draying | j i , f .... E  = j HausauerBros. ] tAll Orders Given Prompt Attention| i ,, , , 00urIi00 00otel  I[ A. B.AtteyKAERCHERnt Law _ J0th STREET AT FOURTH AVENUE E " MINNEAPOLIS  Oddortonville,Fellows BuildingMinn. _. The Northwest' Largut and Mot Beautiful Hostelry - All Rooms sr. Outsld. and Each Room . Privat Bath i I I m ---'-- TARIFF: --.. 75 Rooms (Private Baths) Single at $2.00--Double $3.00 325 Room, (Private Baths) Single at $2.50--Double $3.50 | 200 Rooms (Private Baths) Single at $3 0&-Double $4.00 " OtKera from $4.00 to $15.00 .,iliIMllllMImm$1111111MlilIMImMlllIMmllllillllmiMllmlJ ALUABLES placed in our SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS are safe as mo- dern ingenuity and skill can make them. And in addition to this safety we assure you the utmost in courteous at- tention and service when you vmit this Bank. You are most cordially invited to become a user V DR. F. W. DUNN. CHIROPRACTOR D. D. WHITE, D. C., PH. C. Spinographer 12-13-14-15-16 Shumaker Bldg. Ortenville, Minn. CoL Win. WeIlendorf AUCTIONEER 80 years' e.xperiene No pracel_e. i on your property. Call ot write me early mad got ia oa an early date. Ortonvflle,. , Mhmea L A. JOHNSON PIANO TErNING AND REPAIRING ,. Store - |$ ll Work Guarantd Ortonvi.e, Minnwots. F- , ,, ., WILL FINCH Experlea©l Pat Phone 25-L l] All Work Guaranteed EIDER SALSBIBgy I WBLL DPQ]' Flftm Ym' Ortonville, Mhu I F. D. of our vaults and inspect ........... WHEN it comes to deliver- ,¥ ing the goods on time our other departments. we're there, that's alL For big jobs or small jobs--lum- ber sawed to the proper length and width--hmher for I I every practical purpose prac- tically priced. First National Bank Geier Lumber Co. OaTO00VILLE MINNESOTA Ortonvill® I • I , DECEMBER 1, 1921 THE ORTONVlLLE INDEPENDENT PAGE 7 Farmers Corner AND FARMER'S CLUBS. lta"e-"ec'e" ..........  .... New Rockford, N. D., County Agenl A. C, Peteln of Eday county it cotes rently published, reports thai Roy Pierson, a Bureau teed Himself, Rowar, Bureau fed- unanimously re- i Atlanta, Ga. Ohio faer, , outstanding featus of ,port by the d eout instlumental in getting legislation pascal by any other ............... 12 Elevators Sign t eongss2' agricuitul speak- re eLection as presi gnlide than 150 farmers have joined the U. S, Grain Gwers, Inc., aording to the end wk up be- of the organization's membership far- driv e in Mimlesot every A the end o fthe second wk of the it might affect me bk orgmdzatioa mpaig n eight Lyon In other words, I have i county elevato had signed ¢ontts datlo] pb lem from o market th the national faers' or back home, I shall on.operative elling corporation, to- that. gethe r with two Water,wan county ele. n0 proh em in hl nat4on rotors, and one eh n Wr ght and sply to every fa, "It'D cling fine," J. S. $ones, or- , and mager thing, is that Jt • the diffent ele- ship drive in Minnesota, reported ta agriculture  oflirs of the national corporation. the BRF, EDERS and the bond of mu- helping us to put Thomas E. Cashman of Owatonna, Minnesota Livestock exutive board of the )f th e way. federation, was yearn am ging to vlce ford Beders association at the leadership of the el Roya I livestk show at ns City, I fer both to INSURANCE PUTS our own--ls $5,500 IN STRONG destetive, and i fox all the people and not Bau it ined more on the Pope county fair, the fair oiatlon Will also grow in tht $200 Insurance, A. P. • towns of Amel. Tin Pope county agent, port ©itles are beginning  the terns of the agreement the fail I believe the is a bet. to eeive the insur agriculture any day I tween 7:00 a, m. and 7 p. m. is Likely to Be Used For Fuel; eaper Than C0al In S0me Sections Co at 22 cents a bushel equals coal at $11 per ton. at 20 nts a bushel is Corn at 23 cents a bushel equals VMue to a fair grade of $11.50 per ton. ; COal at appalmately C0 at 24 cents a bushel equals In districts whe  $12 per ton. is usually Cor n at 25 oent a bushel eqls • ado and is selling ¢1 at $19.60 per ton. Under such conditions Co at 26 nts a bushel equals people anal at $13 per ton. Co at 27 cts a bushel equals In Sheep Market? Advances Sharply tudor Influence of Light R Best Monday $9.00. Monday's Closing-- Cattle, 6200. Market closing strong to 25e higher, balk of beef to $6, few up to $7. Calves 400. ket mostly steady, prtieal packet hogs which have many unus] char. top $7. Hogs 13 fl00. actexistles- aging ahout 10 to 15c lower, Rang ulught in from Masshusetts. $6 to $5. Bulk $6.40 to $6.75, blk T he hog good pigs $7.25. Sheep 5,600. Mar straight with strongly ahed bk ket steady to 25¢ higher, bulk go heavily fleshed over the hams mbs $5.75, few loads $500, bulk gout at ewes $3.25 to $3.50. The hogs are said never to squeal, they a light eaters, eating only a small mount at a time; then lie down So. St. Paul, Minm, Nov. 28, 192L-- until it is dighted; and they a Sharp curtailment of sheep and lamb markably prolific; prodding litter of lipts the past two wks and a from 13 to 15 young.--Graat County fairly healthy dssed trade, espia/ly Herald . in lamb, have combined to bring about a sharp advance purchases Herd Sire. Se veral los, Harold Erickson, Chester White hog $ 90 ]ate Momlay or the highest price eder, of Wheaton, rip.lied Kaeher- Pa id on this market since in Septem- week, anti purehad bet, and many a he,at sire. The Big Stone County low time has been passed for this Agricultural Society also bought a ea r. Bulk of good fat lambs sold at boar for their heI at $8.75, with hulk of fat $5.5fl. With moderate eipts of elsewhe Monday, trade ]n opened on a strong to 25c hgher basis, better gr,les of beef National Contact ............. up to $7.00, with Minnesota Farmers pledge Crop others at $650, To Be Marketed Thru U.S. from $5.00 to $6.00. Grain Grower. $3.25 to $4.5o, with a fair showing of sales -- up to $5.00, and best heifers reaching $5.50 in several cases. Canners and cutters sold lal'ge]y fm $2,5 to $8, Bologna bull sold fr $2.50 to $3, y bologna up sold to packe at $5.00. a few extra choice vealers  mehin $7.50. Strong prices were eeived for stockers sad feeders at the week's opening. Be in lots ld up around $5.50, with bulk frum $4 to $5. Choi 140 to 175 pound hogs sold stng at tile week' opening, bulk of going Monday fm $5. to $7.00, with most of the good mixed hogs selling from $5,50 to $6.60, and heavy pkers $6.00 to $6.25. Bulk of the good pigs here brought $7.25. MINNESOTA CROP SHOW TOTAL $4.000 With thee stat crop organizations, Horticultural siety, Crop ]mpvement aiation and the po- tato Growers' association  opera tig, the Minnesota Crop show will be 16, ]921. This, aollng to R. S. Mackintosh, cretary of the Horticul- tural ¢iety, thee organizations have joined forc in staging a cp show• The pmium list, which includes ecru, fits, grains potatoes, getables, plants and flowers will total about $5,000. Strtlng Tuesday, continuing four days, ociety ill hold d the Potato Gtwers wednesday, De--her 14, Thnrshay De.tuber 15 and Friday, De.rebel ]6. lays mbinl meetings will dsd hy Goveor Sydney Andeon, psenta cial commission on agriltural ]n- qulry; G. $. R. MaleoIm, minister o agriculture for guali- are applicable erally, the g values of corn and ta a bushel eqtus coal to. a husbel equals er ton. cents a bushel equals ton. lual. eats a bbel equal, ton. i cents a bushel equals Cents a bushel equals ton ah ents a bushel equah toy. cents a bushel equah and hating the enid bk. be ¢ountr beap eora qll probably find It wl ¸ cents a bsbel eqdl pay them to buy e  for their bushel eqls coal thould d¢rease onslderabl y in coal at $18.50 per ton. Corn st 28 nts a bushel equals coal at $14 per ten, Corn nt 29 cents n bushel equals l at $14.50 per tom C* at $0 cents a bushel equals coal at $15 per ton. Corn nt 31 nts s bushel equals a] at $15.50 per ton. Co at 32 eent n bushel eq)s coal at $16 per ton. "The drier the eom the higher its fuel value. It e t on the e or shelled, but better on the e. "In times pt, when corn was very cheap, it has bn bed  fuel in , but mostly on the In Argentina beth ¢o and all grain are sometimes burned as fl. not alone oa the farms but in )wet plants. Undoubtedly large qntittos nf corn wil) be hued ou stern fas this winter than al, Is Low Time Past .......... i ........... w, c. Coffey, of the department of agril- Professional and .............. +g - 00,g00rud':n00 Business Directory department of agriculture. OAD WORK IF IT' HEN it mes to deliver. Wing the goods  time we're there, that's alL For big nh# er small jobe--4nm- her cawed to the veer Imgth end wMth--4umber for every raetleal tre pr. tinnily prked, Geie Lumber Co. Ortonvt Minv. Requiring anti corn stalks at this season is all right if it is not carried to a point ot eauslng a drop in milk production, ae cording to C. H Eeklcs, chief of the dairy husbandry versity of Minnesota. The tendency, is, he says, to wait too long befo opening the silo. he moldy silage on top should bt token off and hauled away to some cattle can not get at it Exporments at the Minnesota Experi. men station at University have shom that moldy silage likely to cause sickns with out the expefien of stockmen indi- shp or horses may be in iuled, aeColdlng to Professor It doesn't make any difference to us whether your job of hauling takes us 1 mile or 250 miles from Ortonvlile-- we are prepared to go --promptly and eco- nomically. We make a specialty of "long dis- tance hauling." Just Phone 91 You Need Printing We Do Printing Let us get together and both xill be satisfied. THE 0RI0VlLL[ II}[P[X[T Wm. Cummens Or tonville, Minn. --"Try a Want Ad" New here--old in Dixie ]] ]1 The famous healing odors of standby for yeats in Southern the long-lead pine are to be had, homes. Year by year and 8tote even if you can t go South. For b State its re utation has • Y P people subject to colds, a North grown until today Vicks is the Carolina dmggmt some years a o rked out a v "'n favote treatment throughout Vieks g WOvapoRub, has apormbeen the g now. Getagoodsupplyatonce. salve, containing the very es- the country for all cold troubles, stance of pine sap t eth with croup catarrh--nearalglc pains • g . . . . . otherbealmgpenetratmgvapors, skin hurts and ttehmg skin This wond.¢dul proportion, troubles. Dr'aggsts are stocked Ju.t rub it on and IS breathe in the vaPors ,y Ov,  flllllmUMiiIiiiiIIiiiiimllllllmllfllllllllllllllmlllllllllllllllllllllllllfll gg "g f, "€ , ]NNA POL[ i --- Th lqort wst ' l.mr[et and Mot B*autiful HotDy ffi All m* at. Ootsid* led Eaeb Room m Prlvat. Bath TAR 75 Rma (private Baths) Single at $2.C--Double $3.00 325 Rm (Private Bath/ gin¢le at $2 $0Double $3.$0 200 Rn* (pdvate Bath Sin le at $3 00Double $4.O0 Otke mm $4. ,n $1s.0o VALUABLES placed in our SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS are safe as mo- dern ingenuity and skill can make them. And in addition to this safety we assure you the utmost in courteous at- tention and service when you visit this Bank. You are most cordially invited to become a user of our vaults and inspect our other departments. First National Bank ORTONVILLE MINNESOTA C. E. SIGLOH ELECTRIC SERVICE [0f [xmt., .... l REPAIRING Pho &L 0rtonvine, Mlnm JOE BAYER & SON the Ortonvllto Tailoring Co* of eleing d psaiag neafl dons, Suits Made to Order. Dr tonville, ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP Slices  ai neatl and prompt- y. r Work utd. GUS. F ANDERSON* Prop. JOHN SPANYERS Light Hauling of all Kinds Express and Baggage TeIephone 287 Ortonvlile, Minn. PAUL DIRNBAUER Brick Layer and Plasterer Ste Mason and All Kindi of Comet WeIk. /rtonville, Minm R.F. D PETERSON & SON Dra IA Big Ste Lake I 38 Or tonvilI Mira Kodak owo,+. PRINTING ENLARGIN THE REED STUDIO Or tonville DP R. D. RIFENBARK OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICL One block u hill frn Gndnnma'l Vapor-Sulphur Cabinet Treatment| (For rheall, nem'ttt, ) F. L. BROWN THE JEWELER Minnt FOR TRUCK SERVICE d any kind of light and heav draying Hausauer Eros. PHONE 268 A. B. KAERCHER Attowney at Iw Odd Fellows ]ui'Ai Ortonille, DR. F. W. DUNN. CHIRORAC']R D. D. WHIT] D. C PH. C Spimgaldr 12-13-15.15-16 Sbumaket Bld. Ortonville, Minm CoL Win. Wellendorf AUCr IONFR 0 ywr# ¢orprlem NO p write me eurl md get a a aa Mrly date. J. A. JOHNSON PIANO TUNING &ND RPAIRIN PliONES---ltltc . $5ti Femitare 8tor . iS All Work Gtmtmd Or t vll Minaret . WILL FINCH Expetll Palata All Wosh Gasrantmd ELMER 8ALSBUgY Ft fte Tesr l4m.kmm wille.  IL p. D.I We rdll IY tim $51inwls ttom f Ilk: Old limb 14.00 to $11U0 imr tl Coppce ntl kee'r7 Beas4c te  lm" p.d. Otdltttt ttttit Old lhtbbtcs aml Tt'e 5 mat Pi Iflttinse, Bttss Belthx and   lit titS..tett Wat The Ortonville Fmmdry DECEMBER 1, 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE 7 i[ Is Low Time Past Farmers Corner . o. .. . ........ ..... m 00neep luarKet.r ESPECIALLY TO THE ACtrlVITIES OF FARMERS AND FARMER S CLUBS. Lamb Values Have Advances Sharply Under Influence of Light Re- Raises Blue Hogs. New Rockford, N. D., County Agent A. C. Peterson of Eddy county in notes recently published, reports that Roy Pierson, a falner of this county has started a herd of Sapphire or blue hogs which have many unusual char- acteristics. The foundation stock was brought in from Massachusetts. T he hog is of bacon type, long and straight with strongly arched back heavily fleshed over the hams and shoulders. The hogs are said never to squeal, they are light eaters, eating only a small amount at a time; then lie down until it is digested; and they are re- markably prolific; producing litters of from 13 to 15 young.--Grant County Herald. Re-Elected Bureau Chief Purchases Herd Sire. Harold Erickson, Chester White hog breeder, of Wheaton, visited Kaercher- dale Falm this week, and purchased a herd sire. The Big Stone County Agricultural Society also bought a Chester White boar for their herd at Clinton. Best Monday $9.00. Monday's Closing-- Cattle, 6,800. Market closing strong to 25c higher, bulk of beef steers $5 to $6, few up to $7. Calves 400. Mar- ket mostly steady, practical packer top $7. Hogs 13,000. Market aver- aging about 10 to 15c lower, Range $6 to $7. Bulk $6.40 to $6.75, bulk good pigs $7.25. Sheep 5,600. Mar- ket steady to 25c higher, bulk good lambs $8.75, few loads $9.00, bulk good fat ewes $3.25 to $3.50. So. St. Paul, Minn., Nov. 28, 1921.- Sharp curtailment of sheep and lambs receipts the past two weeks and a fairly healthy dressed trade, especially in lamb, have combined to bring about a sharp advance in the lamb market. Several loads of choice lambs reached $9.00 late Monday or the highest price paid on this market since in Septem- ber, and many traders feel that the low time has been passed for this year. Bulk of good fat lambs sold at $8.75, with bulk of fat ewes $3.25 to $3.50. With moderate receipts of cattle American Federation Unanimously To Sac- ceed Himself. Howard, Iowa farmer, is third term as president Farm Bureau fed- was unanimously re- delegates from all over the assembled in the an- convention of the or- L in Atlanta, Ga. Ohio farmer, was outstanding features of was the report of the department, which American Farm Bu- backed by the state and county bureaus, had instrumental in getting the last session of con- agricultural legislation passed by any other the gavel fell for the congress." secretary of agri'- Senator W. S. Kenyon, the senate agricultural prominent speak- 'Convention program his re-election as presi- pledged the Ameri- federation to the as its guide in 12 E1 Sig here and elsewhere Monday, trade in evat0rs n that 00ivi00ioo o,oo0000 GO a 00t,oo00 to [ 25c higher basis, better grades of beef Nti 1 v--" .... ., steers and butcher she stock showing a 0Ila 0II[l'at:[imost gain. A few good beef steers sold in small lots up to $7.00, with 140 Minnesota Farmers Pledge Crop others at $6.50, and bulk of beef steers To Be Marketed Thru U.S. from $5.00 to $6.00. Bulk of the but- cher cows and heifers sold from $3.25 Grain Growers. Twelve country elevators and more than 150 farmers have joined the U. S. Grain Growers, Inc., according to one place to go to study reports summarizing the second week have come up be- of the organization's membership my fellow far-. drive in Minnesota. "I have looked at every t At the end o fthe second week of the it might affect me back t organization campaign eight Lyon In other words, I have [ county elevators had signed contracts national problem fromto market thru the national farmers' back home. I shall leo_operative selling corporation, to- that. gether with two Watonwan county ale- in this nation vators, and one each in Wright and to every farmer, Kittson counties. no ess differences in "It's eming fine," J. S. Jones, or- The finest thing ganization director of the Minnesota Farn Bureau fed- Farm Bureau federation, and manager inspiring thing, is that it of the U. S. Grain Growers' member- together the different ele- i shi p drive in Minnesota, reported to national agriculture as officers of the national corporation. ever has. The the west and the north HEREFORD BREEDERS and the bond of mu- HONOR MINNESOTAN is helping us to put piece of work. -- Thomas E. Cashman of Owatonna, co-operation and president of the Minnesota Livestock that have brought us Breeders association, and a member of way are going to take tse executive board of the Minnesota of the way. I consider Farm Bureau federation, was elected few years are going to vice president of the American Here- in American his- ford Breeders association at the the leadership of the American Roya 1 livestock show at When I spea kof the lead- Kansas City. nation I refer both to and to such or- RAI'N INSURANCE PUTS as our own--is construe- $2,500 IN STRONG BOX destructive, and is for all the people and not Because it rained more than one- ). tenth of an inch on the Pope county overruns the farms of fair, the fair association received Will also grow in the $2,500 insurance, A. P. Henderson towns of America. The Pope county agent, reports. Under cities are beginning to the terms of the agreement the fair ' I believe there is a bet- association was to receive the insur- toward agriculture than ance if it rained more than one tenth in this country before." of an inch on any day of the fair be- tween 7:00 a. m. and 7 p.m. For this comes to our door protection the fair association paid [ $200. to $4.50, with a fair showing of sales up to $5.00, and best heifers reaching $5.50 in several cases. Canners and cutters sold largely from $2.25 to $3, Bologna bulls sold tram $2.50 to $3, an occasional choice heavy bologna up to $3.25. Bulk of the best veal calves sold to packers at $7.00, a few extra choice vealers reaching $7.50. Strong prices were received for stockers and feeders at the week's opening. Bes in lots sold up around $5.50, with bulk from $4 to $5. Choice 140 to 175 pound hogs sold strong at the week's opening, bulk of such kinds going Monday from $6.85 to $7.00, with most of the good mixed butcher hogs selling from $6.50 to $6.60, and heavy packers $6.00 to $6.25. Bulk of the good pigs here brought $7.25. PREMIUMS FOR MINNESOTA CROP SHOW TOTAL $4,000 With three state crop organizations, the State Horticultural society, Crop Improvement association and the Po- tato Growers' association co-ope.ra- ting, the Minnesota Crop show will be held in the Hennepin county court- house in Minneapolis December 13 to 16, 1921. This, according to R. S. Mackintosh, secretary of the Horticul- tural society, is the first time these three organizations have joined forces in staging a crop show. The premium list, which includes corn, fruits, grains, potatoes, vegetables, plants and cut flowers will total about $4,000. Starting Tuesday, December 13 and continuing four days, the State Hor- ticultural society will hold its usual program at the courthouse. Meetings of the Crop Improvement association and the Potato Growers will come wednesday, December 14, Thurshay, December 15, and Friday, December 16. On the afternoon of these three days combined meetings will be ad- dressed by Governor J. A. O. Preus, Likely to Be Used For Fuel; ,on. Sydney Anderson, representa- tive in Congress from the first Minne- seta district and chairman of the spe- TB C 1I S o. [ eial commission on agricultural in- an 0a n 0me 5ecu0ns quiry; G. J. R. Malcolm, minister of ,.....__ ,- . • .. • _ 'lagriculture for Manitoba with head- Corn at 22 cents a bushel equals l ,._..._ race ox me epar, , ..... ! l coat at xx per on ture said recently: " I f ........ ALL ROAD WORK at 2" - "u h-" i Corn at 23 cents a bushel equals j  and new buildtn are r$- U cents a o s el s .  7 Ported by The Improvement Val ^ . ,: .... a ,€ coal at $11.50 per on. ue tv  .LO.aL .0,,, ,.,.  .... 1 . :]3ulletln. Gives calls for bids co orn a za cents a bushel equals  .*lL--, of. State HighwAy Co ra- al at approximately ...... n --x-,  mmsion; 52 numbers tot I coal at tz per o n districts where corn ..... • .... - \\; $6.00 with Daily Re- ow .... II torn a zo cents a ousneI enuals t-.L_-x mlnder F]REI if sub- ne coal is usua y ........ n - __ _ ,a-.--\\; scription is paid this  • ,sS t ,noFlth r cam at z Go per o grade and is selling • " page for "" " U d--suC-e--d'-" Corn at 26 cents a bushel equals e: .  Improveme.t e..®tm n [ 11 t IBIOBS ....... a .... ,, coal at $13 per ton Clobodnd===: Minneapolis, Minm .... torn a z7 cents a bushel equals o use corn msea(] coal at $13.50 per ton. i Corn at 28 cents a bushel equals IT'S 'OOD LUMBER THP, T1 of the variation, in quail- coal at $14 per ton. and coal it is difficult Corn at 29 cents a bushel equals f0U N "I.LFUJ$[ experiments the re- coal at $14.50 per ton. 'T '' "0 I| are applicable every- Corn at 30 cents a bushel equals generally, the coal at $15 per ton. values of corn and Corn at 31 cents a bushel as follows: coal at $15.50 per ton. cents a bushel equals coal Corn at 32 cents a bushel equals ton. coal at $16 per ton. cents a bushel equals "The drier the corn the higher its ton. fuel value. It can be burned either cents a bushel equals on the ear or shelled, but better on ton. the ear. cents a bushel equals "In times past, when corn was very ton. cheap, it has been burned as fuel in the United States, but mostly on the cents a bushel equals farms. In Argentina beth corn and ton. small grain are sometimes burned as cents a bushel equals fuel, not alone on the farms but in er ton. power plants. Undoubtedly large cents a bushel equals quantities of corn will be burned on n. i western farms this winter unless the cents a bushel equals prices should materially advance. The ton. farmer will find the corn cheaper fuel Cents a bushel equals than coal, and in addition will save ton. the cost of hauling the corn to town Cents a bushel equals and hauling the coal back. People in ton. the country towns in the sections of cheap corn will probably find it will cents a bushel equals pay them to buy ear corn for their ton. - furnaces and heating stoves unless ents a bushel equals coal should decrease considerably in 1 ton. price or corn should advance." quarters at Winnepeg; Dean W. C. Coffey, of the department of agricul- ture, N. J. Holmberg, state commis- sioner of agriculture and Dean Alfred Vivian of the Ohio State University, department of agriculture. EARLY OPENING OF SILO ADVISED BY EXPERTS Requiring animals to clean up grass and corn stalks at this season is all right if it is not carried to a point of causing a drop in milk production, ac- cording to C. H. Eckles, chief of the dairy husbandry division at the Uni- versity of Minnesota. The tendency, is, he says, to wait too long before opening the silo. When this is done the moldy silage on top should be taken off and hauled away to sme field where cattle can not get at it. ,, Experiments at the Minnesota Expert-! ment station at University Farm have shown that moldy silage is not likely to cause sickness with cattle but the experience of stockmen indi- cate that sheep or horses may be in- jured, according to Professor Eckles. You Need Printing We Do Printing Let us get together and both will be satisfied. Tilt 0RTONVILL[ IND[P[NI)[M € Professional and * T ucking 'i Business DirectorYLoH [0r [xpett WIRINGSERVIcEELECTRIC It doesn't make any REPAIRING difference to us whether Pho 8-L Ortonviile, Minn, your job of hauling takes us 1 mile or 250 JOE BAYER & SON miles from Ortonville--- of the Ortonville Tailoring Co. All kinds of cleaning and pressing we are prepared to go neatly done. --promptly a n d eco- Shits Made to Order. Ortonville, Minn. nomically. We make a specialty of "long dis- i ELECTRIC SHOE tance hauling." I SHOP Shoes repaired neatly and prorapt- Just Phone I ly. Our Work Guaranteed. GUS. E. ANDERSON, Prop. 91 • JOHN SPANYERS I Light Hauling of all Kinds [ Express and Baggage [ vm. Cummens ,Teleph°ne 287 Ortonville, Minn. Ortonville, Minn. ---"Try a Want Ad" i ii New here--old in Dixie Land of the long leaf pine gives the world a famous vapor rub for all cold troubles. I The famous healing odors of the long-leaf pine are to be had, even if you can't go South. For people subject to colds, a North Carolina druggist some years ago worked out a vaporizing salve, containing the very as- sauce of pine sap, together with other healing penetrating vapors. This wonderful preparation, Vicks VapoRub, has been the Just rub it on and breathe in the vapors standby for years in Southern homes. Year by year and State by State its reputation has grown until today Vicks is the favorite treatment throughout the country for all cold troubles, croup, catarrh--neuralgic pains, skin hurts and itching skin troubles. Druggists are stocked now. Get a good supply at once. PAUL DIRNBAUER ] Brick Layer and Plasterer I Stone Mason and All Kinds of [ Cement Work. Ortonville, Minn. R.F.D. PETERSON & SON Dray Line Big Stone Lake Ice Phone 38 Ortonville, Minn o t Kodak PRINTIN{ ENLARGING Prompt, Quality Service, Moderate Pric. THE REED STUDIO Ortonviile Minn. i DR. R. D. RIFENBARK OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN One block uphill frarr, Gunderson' rrug Stere Vapor-Sulphur Cabinet Treatments (For rheumatism, neuritis, etc.) 0 ] F.L. BROWN x , .F s v TRUCK = E I i:::==: C t' : ]and any kind of light and heavy ! "- " ' ""  " ] draying | j i , f .... E  = j HausauerBros. ] tAll Orders Given Prompt Attention| i ,, , , 00urIi00 00otel  I[ A. B.AtteyKAERCHERnt Law _ J0th STREET AT FOURTH AVENUE E " MINNEAPOLIS  Oddortonville,Fellows BuildingMinn. _. The Northwest' Largut and Mot Beautiful Hostelry - All Rooms sr. Outsld. and Each Room . Privat Bath i I I m ---'-- TARIFF: --.. 75 Rooms (Private Baths) Single at $2.00--Double $3.00 325 Room, (Private Baths) Single at $2.50--Double $3.50 | 200 Rooms (Private Baths) Single at $3 0&-Double $4.00 " OtKera from $4.00 to $15.00 .,iliIMllllMImm$1111111MlilIMImMlllIMmllllillllmiMllmlJ ALUABLES placed in our SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS are safe as mo- dern ingenuity and skill can make them. And in addition to this safety we assure you the utmost in courteous at- tention and service when you vmit this Bank. You are most cordially invited to become a user V DR. F. W. DUNN. CHIROPRACTOR D. D. WHITE, D. C., PH. C. Spinographer 12-13-14-15-16 Shumaker Bldg. Ortenville, Minn. CoL Win. WeIlendorf AUCTIONEER 80 years' e.xperiene No pracel_e. i on your property. Call ot write me early mad got ia oa an early date. Ortonvflle,. , Mhmea L A. JOHNSON PIANO TErNING AND REPAIRING ,. Store - |$ ll Work Guarantd Ortonvi.e, Minnwots. F- , ,, ., WILL FINCH Experlea©l Pat Phone 25-L l] All Work Guaranteed EIDER SALSBIBgy I WBLL DPQ]' Flftm Ym' Ortonville, Mhu I F. D. of our vaults and inspect ........... WHEN it comes to deliver- ,¥ ing the goods on time our other departments. we're there, that's alL For big jobs or small jobs--lum- ber sawed to the proper length and width--hmher for I I every practical purpose prac- tically priced. First National Bank Geier Lumber Co. OaTO00VILLE MINNESOTA Ortonvill® I • I