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December 1, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
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December 1, 1921
 

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AGE 8 THE ORTONVILI P. XNDEPENDENT THURSDAY WANT ADS I i O LOSTBlack and white "Lewelyn Set- r. Notify Martin Schoen, Orton- ville, Minn., for reward. FOR SA--Duroc Jersey Boars, Eligible to registry. Walter Han son, Ortonville, Minn., R 1. 28 SEWINCr--Plain Sewing. CaU gx rooms over Mark Clothing stre. 29-2-p FOR SALE--Two Shropohire Bucks at. $10.00 each if taken at once Phone Roy Wellendorf, or write. Address Odessa, Minn., RFD. *28-2 FOt SALE--Duroc Jersey Boars, eli- Mgibie to registry. Walter Hanson, R. 3., Ortonville, Minn. 28-4-p !W A N T E D--Ladies' and Gents' clothes to clean and press. City Tailor Shop. A. W. Young, pro- prietor. *12-tf FOP GORN--I have a limited amount of nice shelled white rice pop corn, raised two years ago for sale at 10c per poun& Willard Fish. Phone 213-J. 29-2 uAgents Make 24c on Every 25c Sale. ALESLADY--Wanted to sell a pop- ular and practical ga.nent. No in- vestment. No deliveries. Exclusive territory. Write for particulars. tate age and experience. Manu- facturer's Mercantile Co., 325 2nd Ave. So., Minneapolis, Minn. 'OR SALE--Ladies' and Gents' Tail- ored Suits for sale at the City Tail- or Shop. *12-tf INEMSTITCHING--Will do hemstitch- iflg at 10c per yard. Mrs. A. L. Waddans. 27-tf-c FOR SALE--10 Poland China Male Hogs, weighing from 200 to 350 lbs. Also 30 sows and gilts for March and April Farrow. Write or call Sam Johnson, Wheaten, Minn. 29-4 I HAVE TAKEN THE AGENCY fez the Jennings Guaranteed Hosiery I will call "on you in a few days Some real bargains. Just what you are looking for. Save me you orders. Mrs. Wm. Mills, Clinton Minn. 30-1 A one-million volt electrical curren' thas been transmitted over a wire, : Criumph ending 30 years' experiment .]ng by the General' Electric Company LOCAL MARKET. JFarmera Elevator and Fuel Compan3 Northern Spring, .No. 1 .......... $1.15 Flax .......................................... 1.51 Oats ........................................... 22 ye ............................................. 67 Corn ............................................. 28 Barley ......................................... 31 Tracy-Shumaker Co. "Turkeys, No. 1 ............................. 25 Geese ......................................... 13 )Ducks ......................................... 14 $Srings ....................................... 12 d Roosters ............................... 08 Hens, general run ....................... 13 Egg ............................................. 50 Ortonville Creamery Butterfat ............................... ,qQ t I You Need Printing We Do Printing Let us get together and both will be satisfied. Ill[ 0RIONYIIt[ IND[P[ND[NT I i i r Gff00IflGHEST PRICE No Work is to intricate for us to handle when it comes to Machine Re- pairing. We have the equipment to handle this work promptly and efficiently. Bring It In A. S. HALLS Ortonville MOLIERE UNHAPPY IN LIF reat French Playwright and Corned. fan Seems to Have Had the Usual Fate of Genius. Armande BeJart, beautiful, witty THRESHING MADE A PASTlfvlE Italian Families Beat Wheat From Straw in Rhythm, and Seem to Enjoy the Work. Oasparino Dante got up early Sun- and quick tempered, an actress of rare day morning, and before the sun was ability and charm, was the wife of very high hls day's work was well Molters. the leading comedian of his started on his farm near Capula, Italy. time, and one of the greatest ib the The two daughters---one eighteen and world's history. Under twenty when ]the other fifteen--started (and fin- she married the playwright, then a man of forty, given to spells of mood- iness and abstraction and endowed with all the eccentricities of genius, it would, as offe biographer has said, he little short of a miracle had the marriage been a har,y one. Attracted by b;. beauty, the play- wright, once mtrrled, did little to show his ]o,-e. HIs Interest in his work kept h[m away from his young bride n large part of the time. and the e,'.l story of the neglected wife w. the result. Armande loved ad- miration, and when she did not get It from her husband, she flirted, harm- lessly to be sure, but sufficiently to arouse his fierce Jealousy. The pair quarreled constantly, even bringing their disagreements before Louis XIV, with whom they were favorites. When their first son was born Louis acted as godfather. In spite of their stormy life. they were passionately attached to each other. and Moilers wrote many of his plays to provide Armande with suitable roles. They were married only 11 years when he died. WOULD PROVE HE WROTE JOB Australian Naturally Ildlgnant When HIs Claim to Authorship Became Matter of Dispute. Here Is an extract from an Aus- tralian paper: For the first time since I established my lending library in Melbourne a new patron the other day took out the Bible on the customary terms, value down, and 3d. charged for the reading. He had come in asking for "The Book of ,.Tob/' He looked like a person fresh from Tood- lembuck as I ran a puzzled eye over him. "The Book of Job?" said L "I haven't It separately, but you'll find It in the Bible." "Glmme one. and show me where," said the caller. I pointed out the Book of Job. and my new customer took the Bible out. He returned it on the third day. "When was that writ?, said he. I ex- plained that it was about 2.000 years since it was first put upon the mar- ket, "I s'pose an old chap name of Job up at the Slip couldn't have writ it?'' I didn't think it at all likely "I always told the misses Job was a liar." said the new customer. He went away, but about a week later I re- ceived a letter from the Slip. It as- sured me that Hefts 3ob. livin' there. did write this book. and what's more said he'd do it again if any city bloke disbelieved him. Find a Mummified Dinosaur. The vast ice fields of Siberia have In many instances acted as a natural cold-storage plant for the preservation of the flesh of the mammoth, this pre- hlstcHc cousin of the elephant, having been dug out of his chilly grave intact on numerous occasions. It has always been supposed, however, that this was the only instance In which anything more than the bare bones of the fauna of past geological epochs had come down to us. Doubtless this mammoth will continue to stand unique in this respect: but he is no longer unap- preached. There has recently been put on exhibition In the Senlkenberg museum. Frankfort-am-Main, a dino- saur skeleton which carries with it a considerable portion of the skin of the animal, In mummified form. In partic- ular the epidermis over the animal's back is present practically intact. The skeleton has been mounted in flying position, and makes altogether an Im- pressive exhiblt.--Scientific American,. Human Stature Unchangsd. The stories of the pygmies go with the fables of the giants. The men of ancient times were of the same, or nearly the same, height as those of the present day. The doors of an- cient houses, ancient armor, the Egyp- tlon mummies, as well as the fossil bones of men, prove that there has been little or no variation. Among famous tall men was the Roman Emperor Maximin. whose stat- ure was seven and three-qtmrter feet. Maxlm|n was a young barbarian, the son of a Gothic father, who first at- tracted the attdmtion of the Romans by overcoming sixteen of the strong. eat men, one after another, in a wrestling match, and, having been made a centurion, he fought and in- trigued his way to the imperial throne. The normal stature of men and women ranges between five feet and six feet four inches. The Height oY Man. There is no evidence that men have ever had a greater average height than they have now. For a long time there existed in France, near the Junction of the Ieere and Rhone riv- ers, a deposit of gigantic bones known as the "giants' field." In recent times bones have been exhumed there which were believed to be human and were said to be those of TeutoboduS, the king of the Tautens, who were over- come near the spot by Marius, the Roman general. The researches of Cuvier proved, however, that these bones, together with all the others exhumed In the same place, were those of an extinct animal of the tapir species, which measured about twenty feet In length. lshed) the day with the men. The younger children were too small to be og any help, although the boy of ten |cattered wheat over the stone thresh- ing floor so that it would be ready when the older members of the family had" finished with breakfast--bread and cheese and coffee, for Dante can afford coffee In the morning. He owns thirty acres. When threshing started, the father paired with the oldest girl on the side of the floor; the other couple stood side by side opposite. The four flails were poised high In the air an instant and then at a shout from the farmer one pair descended and as they were lifted the couple opposite struck. The four beat the grain, keeping perfect time and pausing only while the boy raked the straw into a pile at one side of the floor and swep the kernels of wheat into another heap, and threw down a fresh supply. Then, with a shouted signal that seemed to welcome the new onslaught the rhythm of the thumping started again. The manner of the threshers was more like that of couples dancing an old-fashioned quadrille than that of harvest toilers under the blister- ing, blinding midsummer sun of south- era Italy. SWEPT OFF "ALL VEGETATION Ancient Records Tell of Visitation ofLoeusts That Were Followed by Dire Famine. A passage of locusts in France, In 1613, entirely cut up even to the roots more than 15,000 acres of corn near Aries, and had even penetrated into the barns and granaries, when, as it were by Providence, many hundreds of birds, especially starlings, came to diminish their numbers. Notwith- standing this, nothing could be more astonishing than their multlplication, for the fecundity of the locust is re- markable. Upon an order issued by the govern- ment for the collection of their eggs, more than 3,000 measures were col- lected, from each of which, it was calculated, would have issued nearly two millions of young ones. In 1650 they entered Russia in Immense di- visions in three places, thence passed over into Poland and Lithuania. where the air was darkened by their num- bers. In many parts they lay dead to the depth of four feet. Sometimes they covered the surface of the earth llke a dark cloud, loaded the trees, and the destruction which they produced exceeded all calculation. In 1645 immense swarms visited the islands of Formosa and Tayowan gnd caused such a famine that 8,000 per- sons died of hunger. "Voices" of Crickets. Crickets sing with their wings and not with their legs. And katydids do the same. You do not believe It? Since you were a little child you have been told that crickets made their chirping sounds by rubbing their hind legs together or scraping their legs against their wings or sides, or some- thing like that. At any rate. they made what might be called foot notes or sang by leg power. Insect students have settled the question. They'say that crickets, like nearly all other varieties of singing Insects. have "strlngulatlng organs" at the base of their wings. Rubbing these organs together, they produce vibrations and the wings, which are hollow, serve as sounding boards and increase the volume of the sound. The "stringulatlng organs" look llke two small folded wings having saw- llke edges. The insect rasps these two saw edges together. Origin of Famous Phrase. There was a time when "Let'er go, Gallagher," meaning start or "cut loose," was heard In all parts of the United States. The exclamation was originated by a 3udge Beaver, of Mor- gan county, Ky., during a trotting meeting in Tippon county. The Judge had entered a mare which was driven by one Gallagher, the city marshal of Harrodsburg. Some of the sporting fraternity, thinking to catch the Judge napping, entered a famous fast trotter against his horse. At the end of the first half-mile the two racers approached the wire neck and neck at a 2:40 lyaee. At this moment the Judge shouted: *'Let'er go GallagherW Gallagher haHng the words, loosed the reins and the mare rushed for- ward and won by almost a dozen lengths, Hareld'a Dtlnztion. Harold's parents had Just recently moved to town, and one of his little friends invited him to a party. Harold went, but did not enjoy himself. The games seemed so sUly, and the girls were always giggling, and Harold was not sure that he was not the subject Of their mirth. He endured it for a while, but finally slipped from the room, expecting to leave unnoticed. But Just as he was opening the door, the little host's mother saw him and asked: "Why, what's the matter, Harold?" To which he replied: "Aw, there's nothing the matter with Harold, but he are Kolng home." J SCHOOL NOTES t 0 The remnants of the faculty had a feed and sleigh ride Saturday night. The Senior English II Class are now studying the fundamentals of debate. The football squad had their pic- tures taken Tuesday noon. Defeat. This is a peculiar word. So often our hopes are shattered on the rocks. The teachers that went home for Thanksgiving returned to their duties Monday. The Senior High school home train- ing girls have begun on their new winter dresses. The basketball team is is working hard in preparation for the game with Madison here Friday night. Troop II of the Boy Scouts took a hike down to the river toward the quarries Saturday, where many of them passed their cooking and fire building tests. Floyd Bolsta and Fred Meyers act- ed as attorneys for the plaintiff, Lyle Stotesbury, Albert McLane and Hoken Gjengdahl were attorneys for the de- fendant, Glen Hadlay. It seems at times as if a person is doomed to be a failure. Heavy thots are turning in our heads when we don't acquire the desired goal, or when all hopes or dreams don't come into realization. The Commercial students met Tues- day neon to arrange for a Business Club. Floyd Bolsta was elected tem- porary chairman and Leo Hennessey was elected to act as temporary sec- retary. A committee of five was ap- pointed to help in drawingup plans for the club. The Senior Class had a sleigh ride party Monday night after which the boys surprised the party with an in- vitation to a feed. We wondered why some faces were so clean the next morning. Ask Bonnie if he got a mouthful and ask Albin why he left us so suddenly. Miss Meaiey made an announce- ment to the Public Speaking Class that the class would be divided three days a week. Those taking the dis- cussion work will be under the in- struction of Mr. Snesrud, ahd those taking Declamatory work will be un- der the charge of Miss Mealey. The other two days the class will work to- gether as usual. The Commercial Law students en- jo.ed a delicious box of candy Tues- day afternoon during the regular class period. Mr. Tragethon suggested that if any candy was left after the box was passed around once, that the re- mainder should be given to the judge. Mr. Tragethon was evidently looking out for his own interests, as he took the part of the judge. The jury was dismissed from the room to make their decision. Re-en- tering the roam,, they were somewhat confused as to just what they had de- cided. They were again excused for a short intermission. When they re- turned they sent in a verdict in favor of the plaintiff. The penalty to be paid will be in the form of a box of  candy which will be received next Tuesday. Some very original ideas were carried out as to dress, particu- larly by the attorneys. From all ap- pearances, the plaintiff was suffering great pain thru the entire proceedings. But this is the very thing that makes real men. If everything went easily and smoothly there would be very little development. H.N. Beech- Basket Ball ORTONVILLE VS. MADISON fRIDAY. Df(. [, 8 P. H High School Gym. er says: "It is defeat that turns bone to flint, and gristle to muscle, and makes men invincible, and forms those heroic natures that are now in the as- cendency of the world. Do not then be afraid of defeat. You are never so near to victory as when defeated in a good cause." Every year there are defeats. This year we have had a poor showing in football and those lt- tle defeats will help to build a strong- er force for basketball and future games. There is no defeat if you are in the right. The Commercial Law Class spent an" interesting afternoon last Monday afternoon in performing their first trial in the high school gymnasitm.. The sheriff, Lee Hennessey, read the summons. Lyle Stotesbury, the cul- prit, was sueing the railroad company for $3,000, for damages inflicted upon him due to carelessnes on the part of tics any specific details Stotesbury was, etc. The the plaintiff were Miss Loy nursed the weeks in the hospital. She very interesting information nature of the disease the accident. The culprit and right arm were broken. suffered some mental pressure on the brain. plained his actions in the also his attitude while out She explained that on the condition was very critical. nesses for the plaintiff Clark and Warren Eversom Loy was state witness. and cruel cross-examination, monies were given. Floyd torney for the plMntiff, powerful plea after the hear& Albert McLane the railroad Co. The representative torneys plea for the from the railroad company waGlen , _ Hadley, superintendent. Warran Ever- son, an aged engineer, was running Ancient English Food the train at the the time of the aeci- There were pure food dent. His costume was very fitting land as long ago as the for his station in life. and those who violated Each of the members of the jury punishment to fit the crime. : and the witnesses were requested to The Guildhall librarian h 1 hold up their right hand to Ruth May- ploring an old box of er, clerk of court, and say: "I prom- posited long ago with the ise to tell the truth if I don't forget." by the Poulters company. Mr. Tragethon took the part of the Habits are long-lived In Judge. Elizabeth Lambrecht and El- Poultry has been sold sine sie Martinson were Court Stenograph- die of the Fourteenth centU era: Everything that was said was enhall, where the city men taken down by the stenographers in a bird to take home In shorthand. The jury consisted of six But nowadays a goose members, namely, Bernice Holmes, than sixpence. On the Marjory White, Geneva Beck, Viola poulterer who unluckily Ulrich, Ruth Holman, and Thelma Ca- cons has got to stand In wood. The witnesses for the defense while the pigeons are were Harry Gloege, but not on duty his nose. at the time of the accident. He saw This happened In 1381 to ! the open switch that caused the acci- tar" who sold 16 pigeons ,,in dent, however, and his statements of the city and deceit of proved very effective in proving the for that the same were case. Dorothy Wilkins, a passerby, abomination to happened to notice the train as it was Correspondence of the pulling into town but she did not no- World. The Pie Special Plate Dinner Tasty Lunches Home Cooking Home Baking Special attention to show and dance people Yours for Quality and Service C. A. BEARD, / Style with is the thing Good style in clothes is" but fine quality and rich make good style even better Hart Schaffner & Marx suits overcoats have it all; smart new colorings and the best fabrics GROSENICK' 5 AGE 8 THE ORTONVILI P. XNDEPENDENT THURSDAY WANT ADS I i O LOSTBlack and white "Lewelyn Set- r. Notify Martin Schoen, Orton- ville, Minn., for reward. FOR SA--Duroc Jersey Boars, Eligible to registry. Walter Han son, Ortonville, Minn., R 1. 28 SEWINCr--Plain Sewing. CaU gx rooms over Mark Clothing stre. 29-2-p FOR SALE--Two Shropohire Bucks at. $10.00 each if taken at once Phone Roy Wellendorf, or write. Address Odessa, Minn., RFD. *28-2 FOt SALE--Duroc Jersey Boars, eli- Mgibie to registry. Walter Hanson, R. 3., Ortonville, Minn. 28-4-p !W A N T E D--Ladies' and Gents' clothes to clean and press. City Tailor Shop. A. W. Young, pro- prietor. *12-tf FOP GORN--I have a limited amount of nice shelled white rice pop corn, raised two years ago for sale at 10c per poun& Willard Fish. Phone 213-J. 29-2 uAgents Make 24c on Every 25c Sale. ALESLADY--Wanted to sell a pop- ular and practical ga.nent. No in- vestment. No deliveries. Exclusive territory. Write for particulars. tate age and experience. Manu- facturer's Mercantile Co., 325 2nd Ave. So., Minneapolis, Minn. 'OR SALE--Ladies' and Gents' Tail- ored Suits for sale at the City Tail- or Shop. *12-tf INEMSTITCHING--Will do hemstitch- iflg at 10c per yard. Mrs. A. L. Waddans. 27-tf-c FOR SALE--10 Poland China Male Hogs, weighing from 200 to 350 lbs. Also 30 sows and gilts for March and April Farrow. Write or call Sam Johnson, Wheaten, Minn. 29-4 I HAVE TAKEN THE AGENCY fez the Jennings Guaranteed Hosiery I will call "on you in a few days Some real bargains. Just what you are looking for. Save me you orders. Mrs. Wm. Mills, Clinton Minn. 30-1 A one-million volt electrical curren' thas been transmitted over a wire, : Criumph ending 30 years' experiment .]ng by the General' Electric Company LOCAL MARKET. JFarmera Elevator and Fuel Compan3 Northern Spring, .No. 1 .......... $1.15 Flax .......................................... 1.51 Oats ........................................... 22 ye ............................................. 67 Corn ............................................. 28 Barley ......................................... 31 Tracy-Shumaker Co. "Turkeys, No. 1 ............................. 25 Geese ......................................... 13 )Ducks ......................................... 14 $Srings ....................................... 12 d Roosters ............................... 08 Hens, general run ....................... 13 Egg ............................................. 50 Ortonville Creamery Butterfat ............................... ,qQ t I You Need Printing We Do Printing Let us get together and both will be satisfied. Ill[ 0RIONYIIt[ IND[P[ND[NT I i i r Gff00IflGHEST PRICE No Work is to intricate for us to handle when it comes to Machine Re- pairing. We have the equipment to handle this work promptly and efficiently. Bring It In A. S. HALLS Ortonville MOLIERE UNHAPPY IN LIF reat French Playwright and Corned. fan Seems to Have Had the Usual Fate of Genius. Armande BeJart, beautiful, witty THRESHING MADE A PASTlfvlE Italian Families Beat Wheat From Straw in Rhythm, and Seem to Enjoy the Work. Oasparino Dante got up early Sun- and quick tempered, an actress of rare day morning, and before the sun was ability and charm, was the wife of very high hls day's work was well Molters. the leading comedian of his started on his farm near Capula, Italy. time, and one of the greatest ib the The two daughters---one eighteen and world's history. Under twenty when ]the other fifteen--started (and fin- she married the playwright, then a man of forty, given to spells of mood- iness and abstraction and endowed with all the eccentricities of genius, it would, as offe biographer has said, he little short of a miracle had the marriage been a har,y one. Attracted by b;. beauty, the play- wright, once mtrrled, did little to show his ]o,-e. HIs Interest in his work kept h[m away from his young bride n large part of the time. and the e,'.l story of the neglected wife w. the result. Armande loved ad- miration, and when she did not get It from her husband, she flirted, harm- lessly to be sure, but sufficiently to arouse his fierce Jealousy. The pair quarreled constantly, even bringing their disagreements before Louis XIV, with whom they were favorites. When their first son was born Louis acted as godfather. In spite of their stormy life. they were passionately attached to each other. and Moilers wrote many of his plays to provide Armande with suitable roles. They were married only 11 years when he died. WOULD PROVE HE WROTE JOB Australian Naturally Ildlgnant When HIs Claim to Authorship Became Matter of Dispute. Here Is an extract from an Aus- tralian paper: For the first time since I established my lending library in Melbourne a new patron the other day took out the Bible on the customary terms, value down, and 3d. charged for the reading. He had come in asking for "The Book of ,.Tob/' He looked like a person fresh from Tood- lembuck as I ran a puzzled eye over him. "The Book of Job?" said L "I haven't It separately, but you'll find It in the Bible." "Glmme one. and show me where," said the caller. I pointed out the Book of Job. and my new customer took the Bible out. He returned it on the third day. "When was that writ?, said he. I ex- plained that it was about 2.000 years since it was first put upon the mar- ket, "I s'pose an old chap name of Job up at the Slip couldn't have writ it?'' I didn't think it at all likely "I always told the misses Job was a liar." said the new customer. He went away, but about a week later I re- ceived a letter from the Slip. It as- sured me that Hefts 3ob. livin' there. did write this book. and what's more said he'd do it again if any city bloke disbelieved him. Find a Mummified Dinosaur. The vast ice fields of Siberia have In many instances acted as a natural cold-storage plant for the preservation of the flesh of the mammoth, this pre- hlstcHc cousin of the elephant, having been dug out of his chilly grave intact on numerous occasions. It has always been supposed, however, that this was the only instance In which anything more than the bare bones of the fauna of past geological epochs had come down to us. Doubtless this mammoth will continue to stand unique in this respect: but he is no longer unap- preached. There has recently been put on exhibition In the Senlkenberg museum. Frankfort-am-Main, a dino- saur skeleton which carries with it a considerable portion of the skin of the animal, In mummified form. In partic- ular the epidermis over the animal's back is present practically intact. The skeleton has been mounted in flying position, and makes altogether an Im- pressive exhiblt.--Scientific American,. Human Stature Unchangsd. The stories of the pygmies go with the fables of the giants. The men of ancient times were of the same, or nearly the same, height as those of the present day. The doors of an- cient houses, ancient armor, the Egyp- tlon mummies, as well as the fossil bones of men, prove that there has been little or no variation. Among famous tall men was the Roman Emperor Maximin. whose stat- ure was seven and three-qtmrter feet. Maxlm|n was a young barbarian, the son of a Gothic father, who first at- tracted the attdmtion of the Romans by overcoming sixteen of the strong. eat men, one after another, in a wrestling match, and, having been made a centurion, he fought and in- trigued his way to the imperial throne. The normal stature of men and women ranges between five feet and six feet four inches. The Height oY Man. There is no evidence that men have ever had a greater average height than they have now. For a long time there existed in France, near the Junction of the Ieere and Rhone riv- ers, a deposit of gigantic bones known as the "giants' field." In recent times bones have been exhumed there which were believed to be human and were said to be those of TeutoboduS, the king of the Tautens, who were over- come near the spot by Marius, the Roman general. The researches of Cuvier proved, however, that these bones, together with all the others exhumed In the same place, were those of an extinct animal of the tapir species, which measured about twenty feet In length. lshed) the day with the men. The younger children were too small to be og any help, although the boy of ten |cattered wheat over the stone thresh- ing floor so that it would be ready when the older members of the family had" finished with breakfast--bread and cheese and coffee, for Dante can afford coffee In the morning. He owns thirty acres. When threshing started, the father paired with the oldest girl on the side of the floor; the other couple stood side by side opposite. The four flails were poised high In the air an instant and then at a shout from the farmer one pair descended and as they were lifted the couple opposite struck. The four beat the grain, keeping perfect time and pausing only while the boy raked the straw into a pile at one side of the floor and swep the kernels of wheat into another heap, and threw down a fresh supply. Then, with a shouted signal that seemed to welcome the new onslaught the rhythm of the thumping started again. The manner of the threshers was more like that of couples dancing an old-fashioned quadrille than that of harvest toilers under the blister- ing, blinding midsummer sun of south- era Italy. SWEPT OFF "ALL VEGETATION Ancient Records Tell of Visitation ofLoeusts That Were Followed by Dire Famine. A passage of locusts in France, In 1613, entirely cut up even to the roots more than 15,000 acres of corn near Aries, and had even penetrated into the barns and granaries, when, as it were by Providence, many hundreds of birds, especially starlings, came to diminish their numbers. Notwith- standing this, nothing could be more astonishing than their multlplication, for the fecundity of the locust is re- markable. Upon an order issued by the govern- ment for the collection of their eggs, more than 3,000 measures were col- lected, from each of which, it was calculated, would have issued nearly two millions of young ones. In 1650 they entered Russia in Immense di- visions in three places, thence passed over into Poland and Lithuania. where the air was darkened by their num- bers. In many parts they lay dead to the depth of four feet. Sometimes they covered the surface of the earth llke a dark cloud, loaded the trees, and the destruction which they produced exceeded all calculation. In 1645 immense swarms visited the islands of Formosa and Tayowan gnd caused such a famine that 8,000 per- sons died of hunger. "Voices" of Crickets. Crickets sing with their wings and not with their legs. And katydids do the same. You do not believe It? Since you were a little child you have been told that crickets made their chirping sounds by rubbing their hind legs together or scraping their legs against their wings or sides, or some- thing like that. At any rate. they made what might be called foot notes or sang by leg power. Insect students have settled the question. They'say that crickets, like nearly all other varieties of singing Insects. have "strlngulatlng organs" at the base of their wings. Rubbing these organs together, they produce vibrations and the wings, which are hollow, serve as sounding boards and increase the volume of the sound. The "stringulatlng organs" look llke two small folded wings having saw- llke edges. The insect rasps these two saw edges together. Origin of Famous Phrase. There was a time when "Let'er go, Gallagher," meaning start or "cut loose," was heard In all parts of the United States. The exclamation was originated by a 3udge Beaver, of Mor- gan county, Ky., during a trotting meeting in Tippon county. The Judge had entered a mare which was driven by one Gallagher, the city marshal of Harrodsburg. Some of the sporting fraternity, thinking to catch the Judge napping, entered a famous fast trotter against his horse. At the end of the first half-mile the two racers approached the wire neck and neck at a 2:40 lyaee. At this moment the Judge shouted: *'Let'er go GallagherW Gallagher haHng the words, loosed the reins and the mare rushed for- ward and won by almost a dozen lengths, Hareld'a Dtlnztion. Harold's parents had Just recently moved to town, and one of his little friends invited him to a party. Harold went, but did not enjoy himself. The games seemed so sUly, and the girls were always giggling, and Harold was not sure that he was not the subject Of their mirth. He endured it for a while, but finally slipped from the room, expecting to leave unnoticed. But Just as he was opening the door, the little host's mother saw him and asked: "Why, what's the matter, Harold?" To which he replied: "Aw, there's nothing the matter with Harold, but he are Kolng home." J SCHOOL NOTES t 0 The remnants of the faculty had a feed and sleigh ride Saturday night. The Senior English II Class are now studying the fundamentals of debate. The football squad had their pic- tures taken Tuesday noon. Defeat. This is a peculiar word. So often our hopes are shattered on the rocks. The teachers that went home for Thanksgiving returned to their duties Monday. The Senior High school home train- ing girls have begun on their new winter dresses. The basketball team is is working hard in preparation for the game with Madison here Friday night. Troop II of the Boy Scouts took a hike down to the river toward the quarries Saturday, where many of them passed their cooking and fire building tests. Floyd Bolsta and Fred Meyers act- ed as attorneys for the plaintiff, Lyle Stotesbury, Albert McLane and Hoken Gjengdahl were attorneys for the de- fendant, Glen Hadlay. It seems at times as if a person is doomed to be a failure. Heavy thots are turning in our heads when we don't acquire the desired goal, or when all hopes or dreams don't come into realization. The Commercial students met Tues- day neon to arrange for a Business Club. Floyd Bolsta was elected tem- porary chairman and Leo Hennessey was elected to act as temporary sec- retary. A committee of five was ap- pointed to help in drawingup plans for the club. The Senior Class had a sleigh ride party Monday night after which the boys surprised the party with an in- vitation to a feed. We wondered why some faces were so clean the next morning. Ask Bonnie if he got a mouthful and ask Albin why he left us so suddenly. Miss Meaiey made an announce- ment to the Public Speaking Class that the class would be divided three days a week. Those taking the dis- cussion work will be under the in- struction of Mr. Snesrud, ahd those taking Declamatory work will be un- der the charge of Miss Mealey. The other two days the class will work to- gether as usual. The Commercial Law students en- jo.ed a delicious box of candy Tues- day afternoon during the regular class period. Mr. Tragethon suggested that if any candy was left after the box was passed around once, that the re- mainder should be given to the judge. Mr. Tragethon was evidently looking out for his own interests, as he took the part of the judge. The jury was dismissed from the room to make their decision. Re-en- tering the roam,, they were somewhat confused as to just what they had de- cided. They were again excused for a short intermission. When they re- turned they sent in a verdict in favor of the plaintiff. The penalty to be paid will be in the form of a box of  candy which will be received next Tuesday. Some very original ideas were carried out as to dress, particu- larly by the attorneys. From all ap- pearances, the plaintiff was suffering great pain thru the entire proceedings. But this is the very thing that makes real men. If everything went easily and smoothly there would be very little development. H.N. Beech- Basket Ball ORTONVILLE VS. MADISON fRIDAY. Df(. [, 8 P. H High School Gym. er says: "It is defeat that turns bone to flint, and gristle to muscle, and makes men invincible, and forms those heroic natures that are now in the as- cendency of the world. Do not then be afraid of defeat. You are never so near to victory as when defeated in a good cause." Every year there are defeats. This year we have had a poor showing in football and those lt- tle defeats will help to build a strong- er force for basketball and future games. There is no defeat if you are in the right. The Commercial Law Class spent an" interesting afternoon last Monday afternoon in performing their first trial in the high school gymnasitm.. The sheriff, Lee Hennessey, read the summons. Lyle Stotesbury, the cul- prit, was sueing the railroad company for $3,000, for damages inflicted upon him due to carelessnes on the part of tics any specific details Stotesbury was, etc. The the plaintiff were Miss Loy nursed the weeks in the hospital. She very interesting information nature of the disease the accident. The culprit and right arm were broken. suffered some mental pressure on the brain. plained his actions in the also his attitude while out She explained that on the condition was very critical. nesses for the plaintiff Clark and Warren Eversom Loy was state witness. and cruel cross-examination, monies were given. Floyd torney for the plMntiff, powerful plea after the hear& Albert McLane the railroad Co. The representative torneys plea for the from the railroad company waGlen , _ Hadley, superintendent. Warran Ever- son, an aged engineer, was running Ancient English Food the train at the the time of the aeci- There were pure food dent. His costume was very fitting land as long ago as the for his station in life. and those who violated Each of the members of the jury punishment to fit the crime. : and the witnesses were requested to The Guildhall librarian h 1 hold up their right hand to Ruth May- ploring an old box of er, clerk of court, and say: "I prom- posited long ago with the ise to tell the truth if I don't forget." by the Poulters company. Mr. Tragethon took the part of the Habits are long-lived In Judge. Elizabeth Lambrecht and El- Poultry has been sold sine sie Martinson were Court Stenograph- die of the Fourteenth centU era: Everything that was said was enhall, where the city men taken down by the stenographers in a bird to take home In shorthand. The jury consisted of six But nowadays a goose members, namely, Bernice Holmes, than sixpence. On the Marjory White, Geneva Beck, Viola poulterer who unluckily Ulrich, Ruth Holman, and Thelma Ca- cons has got to stand In wood. The witnesses for the defense while the pigeons are were Harry Gloege, but not on duty his nose. at the time of the accident. He saw This happened In 1381 to ! the open switch that caused the acci- tar" who sold 16 pigeons ,,in dent, however, and his statements of the city and deceit of proved very effective in proving the for that the same were case. Dorothy Wilkins, a passerby, abomination to happened to notice the train as it was Correspondence of the pulling into town but she did not no- World. The Pie Special Plate Dinner Tasty Lunches Home Cooking Home Baking Special attention to show and dance people Yours for Quality and Service C. A. BEARD, / Style with is the thing Good style in clothes is" but fine quality and rich make good style even better Hart Schaffner & Marx suits overcoats have it all; smart new colorings and the best fabrics GROSENICK' 5 THE ORTONVILI INDEPENDENT THURSDAI 'AGE B e WANT ADS L 4* * ffOST--Blaek and white Lewe yn Set tar. Notify Martin Sehn, Orton. ille, Minu, for rd. FOR SAl.aDuroe Jery E[igiMe to gistry. Walter Has eun, Ortonville, Mini, R 1+ EWINGPlain Sng, rm or 29-2-i FOR SALE--Two ShImhi Buck at. $10.00 each L taken at once Phnne Roy Wellendorf. or Address Odessa, Minn., RFD. *28-2 IFOB SALDue Jey Boare, eIi- iibie t registry. Wdr Hson, R, 8., Orinille, Minn. 28tp  A N T E D--Ladies' and uloth to clan and pres City Tailor Shop. A. W. Yotmg, pr prietor. of nice helle Per un& Willard Fijh. 213. genta Make 24 on Every 25e Sale, ALESLADY--Wanted ul and practical gaenL veatment. No delivees. [ rritory, Write for particulars. ta ge rid experience. lacturer's Me--utile C% $25 A. So, Minneapolis, Minn. 'OR SALLies' and n' od %its for ]e at the City Tail- or op. IHEMSTITCHINWill do hetitch- ig at 10c per yard. M. Wadda. )FOR SALF-10 Poland China M]e Hogs, weighing fm 200 to 350 Ibs. AlSo 8O wa nd #lt far d April Faow. Write Sam Johnson, Wheaten. Minn. the Jennings Guanteed Hnsiery I will callon you in a few days Some al bargains. Jusl whJ L yet re Iking for. Save me you orders. Mrs. Wm. Mills, Clinton Minn. A onmilliun volt eleettl eus, leas been tnsmitted over wire., triumph ending 80 yers' experiment Jag hy the Genel'Eleetrlu Cnmpany LOCAL MAIIKr. r lat mad Fuel Compan Northern .qprlng, .No. 1 .... $1,15 Flax ............................... Ihl Oats ................................ 22 n ............................... 2 Barley ................... 31 Traey-Shnmaker Ca. "Turkeye, No, I ..... 25 Geese ................................ I3 Durk m ................... 14 rings ........... 12 led Roosters ....... .08 Hens, general n .................. 13 Eggs .......................................... 5O Oroavl[le Creamery Butterfat ...................  I You Need Printing We Do Printing No Work is to intricate for us to handle when it comes to Machine Re- lilting. We have the equipment to handle this work promptly mad efficiently. Bring It In t A. S. HALLS 0rtonville MOLIERE UNHAPPY IN LIF!THRESltlNG MADE A PASTIME tan Seam to Have Mad the UlUll [ Straw In Rhythm, and tleem to Fate t anlus. J nJey the Wer -- p -- Aande BeJart, beautiful, witty Oasparino Dante got up early Sun- and qutek temd, an aetress of  day mnrnhag+ and before tt  su ability and charm, was the wife of very high his day's work wae Mnlle ' the leading comedian of his stained on his flt near Capala. Italy. gatt Ih Ihe he two Under twenty ,hea I te other flfteentarted (and ln- married he paywrtgh, : allhed) he day wlh he non man of orty, gle to spells of mood abstraction and endowed of any help, although the bo of ten wRh all the ecnteltles of genlns+ tted wheat ner the stone thresh- It wouhl, as o binlher be ld, lng dr so thnt It would be .ady be little short of a nllraele had the hen the oilier members of the family marriage b a hn,'v one+ he finished wRh hrkfast--had Attraet by o: IauW, the play- aud che and 11'+ wright, once n,'nrled* did little to fft'd coffee In tba morning. bB I-e. Ills tntest In ls owns thirty ans. from hts young When tllhing started, the father Parge Part of the time, and paired with Ihe oldest girt on the 'l stay eft the neglted wife side of the floor; tile other etplo Aaude loved sd slol side by side opplte. ' did net gt It flails were poLed h#l In the she flirted, ha- bmtaat and then at a shout from LS]y tn he , but sumelenfly t farmer one pair desee,ml 0rid as tey arouse his fierce Jealousy. ere lifted the couple opposite stek. he pair quarreled nstantly, e The four beat the gn. keeping brngnz their disagreements perft time and pausing only XlV, wRh wh they we ked the straw  When tbr fist s was heru Louis acted as godfather. In of wheat into anOther heap. spite of their stoy life, tbe we and threw down a fresh supply. sslanlely attltehed tn each her. I The, with a shnuted lgnal to pvlde Armude with Suitable the rhythm of the thumping started les. They we maLed ly ll again. 'Ie manner of tl Fea when he died. was mo like that of nples dancing -- sn old-fashioned quadrlne than that of hat toHe under tile blister- WOULD PROVE HE WROTE JOB tg,b.namg Ildlgnat Wb HII Claim to Authohip Bsms Matt.r * mt SWEPT OFF'ALL VEGETATION ere Is an eztmet from an Au Ros Tell o + _e ler ys: "It is defeat that ts bone[ti any I SCHOOL NOTES [Ito m,,t, d gmue t .... In, and!Stotesbmy ..... u. I makes men invincible, and fes those ] the plaintiff were Ruby rihe remnants of the faculty had a Iheroic natures that aM now in the - ] Miss LeT ursed the rid sleigh ride Saturday night, tendency of the world. Do not then of defeat. You a never very n natal studying the fundntais The football squad had their pie- Every year there a The eulprit'$ noon. This year we have had a poor showing in foutbal[ nd those lit- suffered some Defeat. pressum on Ths is a peculiar word. er force for basketball plained his ctlons our hopes a shattered on the games. The is no defeat if you are also his attitude while nut 1 The teachers that went home in the right. "/hanksgiving The CommereiaI Law Class spent ry critical. Monday- an intesting afteoon last Momlay The Senior Higi in perfoing their ilrt lug girls have begun on gh school gyvanasim. Loy was state witness, The sheriff, Lee Hennessey, read the The bketball summons. Lyle Stotesbury, the cul- we gin. prit, was seeing tJ for the here Friday night, for $8.000, for damages inflicted upon Troop II of the Bo him due to earelessnes on tile part of Albert ike do to th, river toward Txa presentative toeys plea for the quarries Saturday where man m them passed their cooking and building test, son, an aged engineer, was Floyd Bolsta and Fred Meyers ae the train t the There we ed ms attorneys for the plaintiff, Lyle dent- His costume wee very fitting [an aa long ago a the Stotesbry ' for his station in life. an d th  wh v plated thta Ojengdahl we ttorneys for the d Each of the members of the jury pnnlshment to fit the erltm fendt, Glen Hadlay, The OultdhaU llhmrlan bl 1 It seems at times as if a pecan iz hold up their right hand to Ruth May- plating pelted be failu. Heavy that+ ]ts clerk of court, nd say: "1 pm- by the Pauline mpany. ( a turning h our don.taequithedesidgoahor who n Mr. Tragethon took the part of the HahtS a ong-lved m Judge. Punlt d him beau 8ld 8ln I all hopes or dreams don't realizatin" ty m t The C a bWd to tka home day non to Th e jury nsisted of six But nowadays a gooe Ciub. Fiuy membe ' nameiy, Bernice Hut--s than sixln. Mrjory White, Geneva Beck, .]iote polte r w was elated to act s temporary Ulrleh, Ruth He]man, ns h t to stand In tary. A committee of flea was ap- pointed to help in drawing up plans we Harry Gloege. au no at tile time of the accident. He Thla happed In 1851 to The Senior Class hd a sleigh lid the open switch pigeons 'el party Monday nig] dent, however, and his of the city and dlt of boys surprised the party with an in- proved very efftive in pdng the Dothy Wilkins, a passerby to Coespunden of the pulling i established my lending IIhry In by Vies Famln Memo.me a new paten the other da -- we so dean the morning. Ask Belie if he nut the lllble un the eu*tomar A pasgs of luste 1 ' h ,, vel dawn. and Sd. charged 161S, entlly t np ev and aek A bm why e f the reading He had come la mn than 1,000 acres of corn us s suddly. ask ng far "The Bk of Job," He Arlee, and had even peuetrate Miss Medley made an ai rm Iked eke a pen fresh f om Td- he bums and granar ca, wh, as I meat to the Pubh Spekmg C]as uk as I ran a puzzh I eye over, were by pmvdenee, many hundreds of that t eiass wnuld be d,vided thr: "The I ef 3oh " said L "i ( blrde, elalZy starlngs, me o I ays a wk. Those takin the d!s. ......... but yuu' .......................... I ion work .willsheuder or mr. nosfl, the in It In the Bible." "Olmme one, and show me whe," said the ller. I than taking Declamatory pointed t the Rook of Job, ndlt] ]er the charge of Miss Mealey, The my new customer tk the Bible out. )thor two days the class will work to. He tumed It  the third day. Upon an order issued by the govern- gather as usual, ,.When was that wrttV' ald he. 1 e lent for the collection of their eggs, The Congenial Law plalned that it wM boat 2,OOO year* m than 3,O0O measaws we eel- jo.d a delieious box of candy Tues+ slnt It wee first pat upon the ma letted, from Leh of which, It was lay afternoon during the regular class ket. "] s'pe an old chap name nf ealZated, would have Issued nrly Mr. Tragethsn suggested that Job up at the Slip In 1650 if any candy was left trY' I didn't think It at all likely. "[ they tered Russia in Immense dl- was pass ed around once, that the - always told the misses Job wa a liar," lsis in three places, tben eased should be given to the judge. said the new customer. He went Mr. Tragethon was evidently looking away, but about a wk later I . the air was darkened by there hum- out for his own intense,  he touk It as- be. In many parts they lay dead to lhe part of the judg e. d  that Heels Job, Ilvln' the, the depth of four ft, The jury was dismissed dtd write this book, nd what's tno they c-ered the srfa of the make their dision. it again If any city bloke earth lie a dark cloud, loaded the teeing the n, they ts, sad the detctlun which they con'used as to ust what they had de- produced exceeded fill ealelntl. In aided. They we again excused Find a Mummflsd Olnosaur, 1fl45 immense ewarms visited the a short intermission. Wen they re- The vast tee fleld of end turned they sent in a verdict in favor In many instances acted as a such a famine that 8,OOO of the plaintiff. The penalty to be enid.storage plant for the prervati paid will be in the fo of a box of this p candy which wilI be received next olll ,e O Crickets. Tuesday. Some very original ideas bn dug nut of his chilly gve intact Crickets sing with their wtnga ;' Parti it with their legs. And katydids do marly bY the attoe. From all ap- , th e same, Yon do not believe It?. peara ns, the plaintiff was suffering lnstan In which anything Since you e a little child you have great pain th the entire proceedings. been told that crickets made their qut this is the very thing of PaSt g logieal eP ochs had chirping sounds by rnbbtng their bind m" If everything went do to us. Doubtless t his legs together or seeping their legs easily and smoothly there will utlnue to stand nntque in against their wlng or sides, or som little development. H. no longer thing like that, At any rale, they preached. ere has made what might be called foot put on exhtbltt in the 8entkenberg or ng by leg power+ Pnktt-am Main, a dln Inet studente have settled the question. hey say that erlcketS like animal, ha mummified fut. In partlc- have "strtngallatlng organs" base of their wings. Rubbing these organs together, bn vibrations nd the volume of the -- The "strlngulating organs '+ look Hutnau atatu Uhnod. two smaR Tbo stories of the pyk'mles like edges, i#ant. The men of w edges together, we of the ma, or nearly the .m height as those of Orig In  FmouI Prm, pnt day. The dr e[ an- There was a time when go, Oa[igher," maMng start or '+cut tl mumml, as well  the fodl Ioe," was heard la all parts of th u[ n, pve that the h The been little or nu vaelatlun, originated hy a Judge Beaver, uf Mo Among famous tall ma was the fi unty, 1., d.rmg a Ran mmlmr Maxlmtn, whcw star- metlag In Tlplmn eountlL ure was se d thrqrtr feel  Jud Msi[mln waa a yoang barbarian, the w dd, by one Glllagher. the city sou of a Ontble father, who t at- mtimtlon of the sporting ftelty, thtnklng tu teb by eveoming sixt of the the J.dge napta :t m, o attar aetlmr. In ft ttter agalUt hB horl wrutllng teh, and, havlg been d of the llt half-mile the two made a emtuon, he fat ann In- me apgroaened the wire n and trlued his wsy to th imerhd kat a 2:4O pace. At thlmomt the Judl abated: Tim D0I statu 'et' go Oallaghl" Galtagher Iertng Inches. the tus and the ma rushed fat- ward lad WOD by hlmt a dn 3 "ha Ha;#t or Man, leltbe. .................. +' " ............. Basket Ball th they have now. For tt long time Illd's Parents had Just flY Free. near ire an d he ii. t mdl ttga  wen, but d d no enjoy h easel The I ...................... s r.l ...... .,,,.t., .e,.:' + ORTONVILLE ileh we always giggling, nd Harold wa were not su that he wa not me subject VS. said to be thee of Teutobudul, of their mtrth. He dud It f a ....... b ..................... MADISON come negr the spot by MarLus. om, ezptln to leave unnoticed. Roman geneh But Just as hn wa| opening the dr, ..................... d, ........... ' .......... lflu, 0 OIDAL D[(. & 8 P. that the bon+ tugether asked: "Why, what's the mttr, the mV' To which he pHed: "AW, the,s High School Gym. of the taptr speel, the matter wlth Harold, but ft In tmath, be am inln h om" The Pie Hous, Special Plate Dinner Tasty Lunches Home Cooking Home Baking Special attention to show and dance people Yours for Quality and Service C. A. BEARD but fine ' and rich make even better Hart Schaffner & Marx overcoats have it all; smart new colorings fabrics GROSEN AGE 8 THE ORTONVILI P. XNDEPENDENT THURSDAY WANT ADS I i O LOSTBlack and white "Lewelyn Set- r. Notify Martin Schoen, Orton- ville, Minn., for reward. FOR SA--Duroc Jersey Boars, Eligible to registry. Walter Han son, Ortonville, Minn., R 1. 28 SEWINCr--Plain Sewing. CaU gx rooms over Mark Clothing stre. 29-2-p FOR SALE--Two Shropohire Bucks at. $10.00 each if taken at once Phone Roy Wellendorf, or write. Address Odessa, Minn., RFD. *28-2 FOt SALE--Duroc Jersey Boars, eli- Mgibie to registry. Walter Hanson, R. 3., Ortonville, Minn. 28-4-p !W A N T E D--Ladies' and Gents' clothes to clean and press. City Tailor Shop. A. W. Young, pro- prietor. *12-tf FOP GORN--I have a limited amount of nice shelled white rice pop corn, raised two years ago for sale at 10c per poun& Willard Fish. Phone 213-J. 29-2 uAgents Make 24c on Every 25c Sale. ALESLADY--Wanted to sell a pop- ular and practical ga.nent. No in- vestment. No deliveries. Exclusive territory. Write for particulars. tate age and experience. Manu- facturer's Mercantile Co., 325 2nd Ave. So., Minneapolis, Minn. 'OR SALE--Ladies' and Gents' Tail- ored Suits for sale at the City Tail- or Shop. *12-tf INEMSTITCHING--Will do hemstitch- iflg at 10c per yard. Mrs. A. L. Waddans. 27-tf-c FOR SALE--10 Poland China Male Hogs, weighing from 200 to 350 lbs. Also 30 sows and gilts for March and April Farrow. Write or call Sam Johnson, Wheaten, Minn. 29-4 I HAVE TAKEN THE AGENCY fez the Jennings Guaranteed Hosiery I will call "on you in a few days Some real bargains. Just what you are looking for. Save me you orders. Mrs. Wm. Mills, Clinton Minn. 30-1 A one-million volt electrical curren' thas been transmitted over a wire, : Criumph ending 30 years' experiment .]ng by the General' Electric Company LOCAL MARKET. JFarmera Elevator and Fuel Compan3 Northern Spring, .No. 1 .......... $1.15 Flax .......................................... 1.51 Oats ........................................... 22 ye ............................................. 67 Corn ............................................. 28 Barley ......................................... 31 Tracy-Shumaker Co. "Turkeys, No. 1 ............................. 25 Geese ......................................... 13 )Ducks ......................................... 14 $Srings ....................................... 12 d Roosters ............................... 08 Hens, general run ....................... 13 Egg ............................................. 50 Ortonville Creamery Butterfat ............................... ,qQ t I You Need Printing We Do Printing Let us get together and both will be satisfied. Ill[ 0RIONYIIt[ IND[P[ND[NT I i i r Gff00IflGHEST PRICE No Work is to intricate for us to handle when it comes to Machine Re- pairing. We have the equipment to handle this work promptly and efficiently. Bring It In A. S. HALLS Ortonville MOLIERE UNHAPPY IN LIF reat French Playwright and Corned. fan Seems to Have Had the Usual Fate of Genius. Armande BeJart, beautiful, witty THRESHING MADE A PASTlfvlE Italian Families Beat Wheat From Straw in Rhythm, and Seem to Enjoy the Work. Oasparino Dante got up early Sun- and quick tempered, an actress of rare day morning, and before the sun was ability and charm, was the wife of very high hls day's work was well Molters. the leading comedian of his started on his farm near Capula, Italy. time, and one of the greatest ib the The two daughters---one eighteen and world's history. Under twenty when ]the other fifteen--started (and fin- she married the playwright, then a man of forty, given to spells of mood- iness and abstraction and endowed with all the eccentricities of genius, it would, as offe biographer has said, he little short of a miracle had the marriage been a har,y one. Attracted by b;. beauty, the play- wright, once mtrrled, did little to show his ]o,-e. HIs Interest in his work kept h[m away from his young bride n large part of the time. and the e,'.l story of the neglected wife w. the result. Armande loved ad- miration, and when she did not get It from her husband, she flirted, harm- lessly to be sure, but sufficiently to arouse his fierce Jealousy. The pair quarreled constantly, even bringing their disagreements before Louis XIV, with whom they were favorites. When their first son was born Louis acted as godfather. In spite of their stormy life. they were passionately attached to each other. and Moilers wrote many of his plays to provide Armande with suitable roles. They were married only 11 years when he died. WOULD PROVE HE WROTE JOB Australian Naturally Ildlgnant When HIs Claim to Authorship Became Matter of Dispute. Here Is an extract from an Aus- tralian paper: For the first time since I established my lending library in Melbourne a new patron the other day took out the Bible on the customary terms, value down, and 3d. charged for the reading. He had come in asking for "The Book of ,.Tob/' He looked like a person fresh from Tood- lembuck as I ran a puzzled eye over him. "The Book of Job?" said L "I haven't It separately, but you'll find It in the Bible." "Glmme one. and show me where," said the caller. I pointed out the Book of Job. and my new customer took the Bible out. He returned it on the third day. "When was that writ?, said he. I ex- plained that it was about 2.000 years since it was first put upon the mar- ket, "I s'pose an old chap name of Job up at the Slip couldn't have writ it?'' I didn't think it at all likely "I always told the misses Job was a liar." said the new customer. He went away, but about a week later I re- ceived a letter from the Slip. It as- sured me that Hefts 3ob. livin' there. did write this book. and what's more said he'd do it again if any city bloke disbelieved him. Find a Mummified Dinosaur. The vast ice fields of Siberia have In many instances acted as a natural cold-storage plant for the preservation of the flesh of the mammoth, this pre- hlstcHc cousin of the elephant, having been dug out of his chilly grave intact on numerous occasions. It has always been supposed, however, that this was the only instance In which anything more than the bare bones of the fauna of past geological epochs had come down to us. Doubtless this mammoth will continue to stand unique in this respect: but he is no longer unap- preached. There has recently been put on exhibition In the Senlkenberg museum. Frankfort-am-Main, a dino- saur skeleton which carries with it a considerable portion of the skin of the animal, In mummified form. In partic- ular the epidermis over the animal's back is present practically intact. The skeleton has been mounted in flying position, and makes altogether an Im- pressive exhiblt.--Scientific American,. Human Stature Unchangsd. The stories of the pygmies go with the fables of the giants. The men of ancient times were of the same, or nearly the same, height as those of the present day. The doors of an- cient houses, ancient armor, the Egyp- tlon mummies, as well as the fossil bones of men, prove that there has been little or no variation. Among famous tall men was the Roman Emperor Maximin. whose stat- ure was seven and three-qtmrter feet. Maxlm|n was a young barbarian, the son of a Gothic father, who first at- tracted the attdmtion of the Romans by overcoming sixteen of the strong. eat men, one after another, in a wrestling match, and, having been made a centurion, he fought and in- trigued his way to the imperial throne. The normal stature of men and women ranges between five feet and six feet four inches. The Height oY Man. There is no evidence that men have ever had a greater average height than they have now. For a long time there existed in France, near the Junction of the Ieere and Rhone riv- ers, a deposit of gigantic bones known as the "giants' field." In recent times bones have been exhumed there which were believed to be human and were said to be those of TeutoboduS, the king of the Tautens, who were over- come near the spot by Marius, the Roman general. The researches of Cuvier proved, however, that these bones, together with all the others exhumed In the same place, were those of an extinct animal of the tapir species, which measured about twenty feet In length. lshed) the day with the men. The younger children were too small to be og any help, although the boy of ten |cattered wheat over the stone thresh- ing floor so that it would be ready when the older members of the family had" finished with breakfast--bread and cheese and coffee, for Dante can afford coffee In the morning. He owns thirty acres. When threshing started, the father paired with the oldest girl on the side of the floor; the other couple stood side by side opposite. The four flails were poised high In the air an instant and then at a shout from the farmer one pair descended and as they were lifted the couple opposite struck. The four beat the grain, keeping perfect time and pausing only while the boy raked the straw into a pile at one side of the floor and swep the kernels of wheat into another heap, and threw down a fresh supply. Then, with a shouted signal that seemed to welcome the new onslaught the rhythm of the thumping started again. The manner of the threshers was more like that of couples dancing an old-fashioned quadrille than that of harvest toilers under the blister- ing, blinding midsummer sun of south- era Italy. SWEPT OFF "ALL VEGETATION Ancient Records Tell of Visitation ofLoeusts That Were Followed by Dire Famine. A passage of locusts in France, In 1613, entirely cut up even to the roots more than 15,000 acres of corn near Aries, and had even penetrated into the barns and granaries, when, as it were by Providence, many hundreds of birds, especially starlings, came to diminish their numbers. Notwith- standing this, nothing could be more astonishing than their multlplication, for the fecundity of the locust is re- markable. Upon an order issued by the govern- ment for the collection of their eggs, more than 3,000 measures were col- lected, from each of which, it was calculated, would have issued nearly two millions of young ones. In 1650 they entered Russia in Immense di- visions in three places, thence passed over into Poland and Lithuania. where the air was darkened by their num- bers. In many parts they lay dead to the depth of four feet. Sometimes they covered the surface of the earth llke a dark cloud, loaded the trees, and the destruction which they produced exceeded all calculation. In 1645 immense swarms visited the islands of Formosa and Tayowan gnd caused such a famine that 8,000 per- sons died of hunger. "Voices" of Crickets. Crickets sing with their wings and not with their legs. And katydids do the same. You do not believe It? Since you were a little child you have been told that crickets made their chirping sounds by rubbing their hind legs together or scraping their legs against their wings or sides, or some- thing like that. At any rate. they made what might be called foot notes or sang by leg power. Insect students have settled the question. They'say that crickets, like nearly all other varieties of singing Insects. have "strlngulatlng organs" at the base of their wings. Rubbing these organs together, they produce vibrations and the wings, which are hollow, serve as sounding boards and increase the volume of the sound. The "stringulatlng organs" look llke two small folded wings having saw- llke edges. The insect rasps these two saw edges together. Origin of Famous Phrase. There was a time when "Let'er go, Gallagher," meaning start or "cut loose," was heard In all parts of the United States. The exclamation was originated by a 3udge Beaver, of Mor- gan county, Ky., during a trotting meeting in Tippon county. The Judge had entered a mare which was driven by one Gallagher, the city marshal of Harrodsburg. Some of the sporting fraternity, thinking to catch the Judge napping, entered a famous fast trotter against his horse. At the end of the first half-mile the two racers approached the wire neck and neck at a 2:40 lyaee. At this moment the Judge shouted: *'Let'er go GallagherW Gallagher haHng the words, loosed the reins and the mare rushed for- ward and won by almost a dozen lengths, Hareld'a Dtlnztion. Harold's parents had Just recently moved to town, and one of his little friends invited him to a party. Harold went, but did not enjoy himself. The games seemed so sUly, and the girls were always giggling, and Harold was not sure that he was not the subject Of their mirth. He endured it for a while, but finally slipped from the room, expecting to leave unnoticed. But Just as he was opening the door, the little host's mother saw him and asked: "Why, what's the matter, Harold?" To which he replied: "Aw, there's nothing the matter with Harold, but he are Kolng home." J SCHOOL NOTES t 0 The remnants of the faculty had a feed and sleigh ride Saturday night. The Senior English II Class are now studying the fundamentals of debate. The football squad had their pic- tures taken Tuesday noon. Defeat. This is a peculiar word. So often our hopes are shattered on the rocks. The teachers that went home for Thanksgiving returned to their duties Monday. The Senior High school home train- ing girls have begun on their new winter dresses. The basketball team is is working hard in preparation for the game with Madison here Friday night. Troop II of the Boy Scouts took a hike down to the river toward the quarries Saturday, where many of them passed their cooking and fire building tests. Floyd Bolsta and Fred Meyers act- ed as attorneys for the plaintiff, Lyle Stotesbury, Albert McLane and Hoken Gjengdahl were attorneys for the de- fendant, Glen Hadlay. It seems at times as if a person is doomed to be a failure. Heavy thots are turning in our heads when we don't acquire the desired goal, or when all hopes or dreams don't come into realization. The Commercial students met Tues- day neon to arrange for a Business Club. Floyd Bolsta was elected tem- porary chairman and Leo Hennessey was elected to act as temporary sec- retary. A committee of five was ap- pointed to help in drawingup plans for the club. The Senior Class had a sleigh ride party Monday night after which the boys surprised the party with an in- vitation to a feed. We wondered why some faces were so clean the next morning. Ask Bonnie if he got a mouthful and ask Albin why he left us so suddenly. Miss Meaiey made an announce- ment to the Public Speaking Class that the class would be divided three days a week. Those taking the dis- cussion work will be under the in- struction of Mr. Snesrud, ahd those taking Declamatory work will be un- der the charge of Miss Mealey. The other two days the class will work to- gether as usual. The Commercial Law students en- jo.ed a delicious box of candy Tues- day afternoon during the regular class period. Mr. Tragethon suggested that if any candy was left after the box was passed around once, that the re- mainder should be given to the judge. Mr. Tragethon was evidently looking out for his own interests, as he took the part of the judge. The jury was dismissed from the room to make their decision. Re-en- tering the roam,, they were somewhat confused as to just what they had de- cided. They were again excused for a short intermission. When they re- turned they sent in a verdict in favor of the plaintiff. The penalty to be paid will be in the form of a box of  candy which will be received next Tuesday. Some very original ideas were carried out as to dress, particu- larly by the attorneys. From all ap- pearances, the plaintiff was suffering great pain thru the entire proceedings. But this is the very thing that makes real men. If everything went easily and smoothly there would be very little development. H.N. Beech- Basket Ball ORTONVILLE VS. MADISON fRIDAY. Df(. [, 8 P. H High School Gym. er says: "It is defeat that turns bone to flint, and gristle to muscle, and makes men invincible, and forms those heroic natures that are now in the as- cendency of the world. Do not then be afraid of defeat. You are never so near to victory as when defeated in a good cause." Every year there are defeats. This year we have had a poor showing in football and those lt- tle defeats will help to build a strong- er force for basketball and future games. There is no defeat if you are in the right. The Commercial Law Class spent an" interesting afternoon last Monday afternoon in performing their first trial in the high school gymnasitm.. The sheriff, Lee Hennessey, read the summons. Lyle Stotesbury, the cul- prit, was sueing the railroad company for $3,000, for damages inflicted upon him due to carelessnes on the part of tics any specific details Stotesbury was, etc. The the plaintiff were Miss Loy nursed the weeks in the hospital. She very interesting information nature of the disease the accident. The culprit and right arm were broken. suffered some mental pressure on the brain. plained his actions in the also his attitude while out She explained that on the condition was very critical. nesses for the plaintiff Clark and Warren Eversom Loy was state witness. and cruel cross-examination, monies were given. Floyd torney for the plMntiff, powerful plea after the hear& Albert McLane the railroad Co. The representative torneys plea for the from the railroad company waGlen , _ Hadley, superintendent. Warran Ever- son, an aged engineer, was running Ancient English Food the train at the the time of the aeci- There were pure food dent. His costume was very fitting land as long ago as the for his station in life. and those who violated Each of the members of the jury punishment to fit the crime. : and the witnesses were requested to The Guildhall librarian h 1 hold up their right hand to Ruth May- ploring an old box of er, clerk of court, and say: "I prom- posited long ago with the ise to tell the truth if I don't forget." by the Poulters company. Mr. Tragethon took the part of the Habits are long-lived In Judge. Elizabeth Lambrecht and El- Poultry has been sold sine sie Martinson were Court Stenograph- die of the Fourteenth centU era: Everything that was said was enhall, where the city men taken down by the stenographers in a bird to take home In shorthand. The jury consisted of six But nowadays a goose members, namely, Bernice Holmes, than sixpence. On the Marjory White, Geneva Beck, Viola poulterer who unluckily Ulrich, Ruth Holman, and Thelma Ca- cons has got to stand In wood. The witnesses for the defense while the pigeons are were Harry Gloege, but not on duty his nose. at the time of the accident. He saw This happened In 1381 to ! the open switch that caused the acci- tar" who sold 16 pigeons ,,in dent, however, and his statements of the city and deceit of proved very effective in proving the for that the same were case. Dorothy Wilkins, a passerby, abomination to happened to notice the train as it was Correspondence of the pulling into town but she did not no- World. The Pie Special Plate Dinner Tasty Lunches Home Cooking Home Baking Special attention to show and dance people Yours for Quality and Service C. A. BEARD, / Style with is the thing Good style in clothes is" but fine quality and rich make good style even better Hart Schaffner & Marx suits overcoats have it all; smart new colorings and the best fabrics GROSENICK' 5