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The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
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December 8, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
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December 8, 1921
 

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THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT 3 t 2 ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8 1921  NUMBER 31 SEASON OPEN YOU GON'NA IT" QUESTION Prohibits Molesting iHousesHow to Trap Bothering the in this county have been the Auditor's office in asking for advice on laws. The present laws trapping of muskrat and December 1 this year to 1922. It is expressly made t mink or muskrat with a possess, or disturb any or- muskrat in any manner ex- injure or destroy any aink or beaver house, den that has been bother- of the "county who spend their at this time of year, are going to trap musk- the law strictly forbids a muskrat house. the muskrats in this coun- their homes in rat houses in sloughs and lakes, are a few bank rats in the In trapping "house trapper digs a hole in the and places his traps that the rats sit upon. covered up and the rat generally sits in the s is the only method in rats can be trapped, as Is spent wholly inside of in the winter, except dive down the water to fodder for themselves or Wheaton- Gazette-Report- the Attorney General holds that traps canffot muskrat houses, several lo- from that vicinity having matter to his attention. General replied without the law means that no a trap in a rat house. trappers Io not feel at the way the law reads, as the above pa- ls that trappers from will, if they follow the trap right shore and will and place their traps the South Dakota law has against digging into the trappers from South Catch all the rats on the the Minnesota trapper can a rat when it is running of the ice or some such the trapper can run up salt on his tail. Of is no law against trap- tm the cement sidewalks of trapping them in corn field, provided they to change their habitat. Sells the trapper a license and then says they can- in the only place where At least that is who want to trap up the situation." g trappers from houses is in Section 50 General Laws of 1919 follows: "No person shall or destroy any musk- beaver house, den, dam vlace except when nimals are injurihg my e commissioner may animals to be removed or permit the killing of and the destruction of or other structures erected Petition Minn. Ave. the city council at a of that body Monday building rejected by interested prop- the council to portion of Minne- ar the Ed. Shult resi- rejection were based of a section of the disposition unless all parties agreed. came before the those of a routine na- the allowance of bills. will be on Decem- for Davisous. at the Pioneer store and e Co. gave a surprise the home of Mr. and Tuesday evening Evelyn Doohar, who morning for her Progressive was played and lnnch leather purse Doohar as a Relief Corps Presents Flags to Boy Scouts On Tuesday evening, December 6, a very impllbssive ceremony was car- lied out at the high school gymna- sium. The Women's Relief Corps present- ed two Flags to the two local troops of Boy Scouts. The Patrol leaders stood at attention, while the presenta- tion speech was delivered by Miss Martha Rothwell, Corps Patriotic In- structor, the two senior patrol leaders, Donald Walker and Gerhard Walseth, came forward and received the Flags from Mrs. Chamberlain and Mrs. J. T. Crippen. Mr. Stegner then made a speech of thanks on behalf of the Scouts. Dr. E. N. Schoen in a few l words impressed on the boys the im- portance of the occasion. Mr. J. T. Crippen spoke of the love they should bear for the Flag, and Rev. P. J. Bockoven spoke briefly on the 10th Scout law, "A Scout is Brave," stres- sing the fact that moral heroism is a higher and nobler type than mere physical bravery. The formal part of the meeting was closed by all repeating the Flag sal- ute, "I pledge allegiance to my Flag and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation indivisible, with Liberty and Justice for all." Henry Dittes and Wife Have Narrow Escape Altho Henry Dittes and his wife were thrown completely clear of the buggy in which they were riding against a parked automobile in front of the Johnson Furniture company, i they miraculously escaped serious in- jury Tuesday afternoon, when the team they were driving became fright- i ened and ran away. Mr. Dittes who i lives south of town was driving up main street when one of the tugs be- came loose and the pole of his buggy d41opped to the ground, swerving the conveyance sharply to the left and col- liding with an automobile parked at the side of the street. Mr. Dittes sus- tained a lacerated cheek, while his wife escaped injury, altho she was badly frightened. The horses broke loose from the buggy after the collis- sion, and were captured further down :the street. COUNTY TO GIVE CORN TO NEAR HEAVY BIDDING DRIVES DOWN PRICE ON STATE HIGHWAY CONTRACTS Scully & Connelly Concerns get Work I n Big Stone CountymMakes Work for Men and Teams. The twenty-seven and one-half mile section of trunk highway No. 28, from Browns Valley eastward to Grace- ville will be gravel-surfaced at a cost of $67,856.41 under tentative contract awards by Charles M. Babcock, state highway commissioner, this week The big job is among 38 projects for 3b'0 miles of graveling and grading on the first group of winter jobs under the "more-work--better roads" move- ment to speed needed highway im- provements and relieve unemployment. The award in each case was made on the best bid, according to John H. Mullen, deputy commissioner and chief highway engineer, and large savings of trunk highway funds were ejected on extremely low bids due in part to wide competition. There were about 25 bidders for each job, against 10 to 12 ordinarily. Gravel surfacing W let at an average of $2,000 a male yard mile haul at 16 to 30 cents c'm, pared with 30 to 60 cents paid last season. The lowest bid on the single paving project was $2.17 a yard for concrete--about 20 per cent or more than $5,000 a mile under the regular season figure of $27,000. Other jobs are to be advertised soon, it was announced, to profit by current low prices and escape pos- sible increases next spring when gen- eral operations start, as well as to relieve unemployment this winter. Applications for work should be made direct to contractors, it was ad- ded, no hiring being done by the high- way department. Work is to start at once on most jobs which are to be com- pleted by April 1 or sooner under the contracts. The contract for graveling Trunk Highway No. 28 was "awarded to Scul- ly and Connelly companies of St. Paul, and the work will be done with trudks. Two,pits will be opened in Big Stone county, to furnish gravel for this work, one at West Toqua lake and the other at Beardsley. The pit at Beardsley it is understood will be equipped with a steam shovel to load the truek ...... Lutheran Choir to Give EAST SUFFERERS Song S00rvio A Christmas song service will be given by Dr. Richard 01son of Minne- apolis, and the Ortonville Lutheran Choir, at the Orpheum on Sunday eve- fling, December 18, to which the pub- lic is cordially invited to attend, Dr. J. Richard Olson is a speaker of note and very well known as church editor of the Minneapolis Journal.. Follow- ingAs the order of service. Christmas Gospel Invocation Holy Night, Peaceful Night ...... Gruber Hark! The Herald Angels Sing ...... .......................................... Mendelssohn The Light of Bethleham ................ Abt (Interpretation, Dr. J. Richard Olson) Today There is Ringing.:Christiansen Lift Up Your Heads .......... Wennerberg Intermission-- Beautiful Saviour-- Bleak Forth Into Joy ................ Barnby (Interpretation, Dr. J. Richard Olson) O So of God ...................... Curschman 'Tis The Evening's Holy Hour ........ ....................... Doxology-- . ........... :; ..... Beethoven Benediction-- A Lutheran song service--not a con- cert. Admission free. Note the date ---one week from next Sunday eve- ning. Ortonville Has Another Aviator; Maybe Airplanes have 1]fen so common humming over the cry the past year, that no special attention .was diverted to a machine appearing in the skies last Monday, coming from the north until those who granced at it noticed that it seemed very unsteady, making many dips, turns and wobbly motions, uncommon in straight flying. It was known that Jack Anderson had just flown in from Minneapolis in his ma- chine and when he was aet on the street some few hours later, 'he was asked whose machine that was doing all .the cavottihg.  ack solved the mystery by explaining that Chester Olson, local implement man piloted the machine down from Clinton, hving sole control of the ship on the flight, and that the new pilot had a hard time keeping the road. Legion Basketball Team Meets Madison Friday Friday evening, December 9, the Ortonville Legion Basketball quint will meet the Madison Legion team at the high school gymnasium here. The Ortonville boys won their first game of the season over the Milan boys last week, are expecting a tight game "with Madison as that team is claimed to be one of the best in the state. Remember the date. State Director of Near East -Relief Speaks at Farm Bureau Meeting-- Chas. A. Matthews Is Manager. Farmers of Big Stone county were the first in the state of Minnesota to respond to the Near East Relief Gift Grain Drive last year, which was con- ducted under direction of the Farm Bureau, said J. M. Davies, state di- rector who spoke at the annual meeting of the Big Stone County Farm Bureau held at Clinton last Thursday. Continuing, Mr. Davies said, "This is regarded by the Near East Relief and by the Farm Bureau as being of a good deal of value in setting an example which was fol- lowed by other counties thruout the state." Speaking in the interest of the drive now being conducted, Mr. Davies made the statement that the Near East Relief organization guarantees that 100 per cent of all gift corn do- nated for this cause will get into the hands of the sufferers. "All expenses of whatever nature are met from. oth- er sources," said the speaker, "and no grain whatever is to be sold for that purDose." The Near East Relief was incor- porated by an act of Congress in 1919 Mr. Davies explained, which necessi- tates that regular and complete re- ports be made to Congress of all its financial transactions. The last report issued showed that the expense for collection and administration of the charities of the Near East Relief was only 5 cents out of every dollar, leav- ing 95 cents of all cofitributions for actual relief, which is understood to be the best record of any charitable organization. A film entitled "Alice In Wonder- land" was shown. It was taken late this summer by a party of relief work- ers and depicted conditions in the Near East at the present time. The picture which was unpesed showed two sides of the conditions existing there--the conditions where the chil- dren and others are Under the care of the Relief workers and those out- side of their care. "One hundred and twenty-thousand orphan children are now under the care of the Near East Relief with pos- sibly two hundred thousand more in need of help whom we are unable to care for on account of lack of funds," said. Mr. Davies, adding that, "we have 229 orphanages and 63 hospitals, 112 clinics where 150,000 cases are treated monthlY. We have 11 homes for girls rescued from Turkish hat- (Continued on page 8) 4, Activity of County Nurse Shown In Reports Made The reports rendered by Miss Agnes Rogashaska, county nurse, covering the months of October and November, show great activities on her part in the different phases of the work as- signed to her. Her reports, for these months follow: School Districts No. 3, 7, 5, 54, 2, 21, 63, 39, 2,7, 60-:-Pupils Inspected 162, Talks to pupils in class 7, Defects: De- fective Vision 42, Defective hearing 5, Nasal Obstructions 12, Enlarged ton- sils 29, Cervical Adenites 7, Defective teeth 54, Underweight 78. Correc- tions: Tonsils treated 3, teeth treat- led 8, infant welfare visits i0, home visits to school children 15, sanitary inspection visits 20, attended meeting of nursing cormnittee, spent day at Glenwood seeing American Red Cross Pageant. Visits of two Red Cross of- ficials. Explained work to Civic ClUb of Clinton. Donations from W. C. T. U. of Malta for Loan Closet 2 white annel night gowns, 3 bath towels, wash cloths, 4 pillow slips, 3 hand towels, also some things for layettes, 01d clothes for needy families. " Conducted 4 classes a week in Home Hygiene.and Care of Sick: 1 at Odes- sa, 2 at Clinton, 1 at Ortonville. Mad. Dist. No. 50, 10, 9, 4, 6, 14--- Inspected 95 pupils. Weighed and measmxd 295, Defects noted: defec- tive vision 28, enlarged tonsils 13, de- fective teeth 23, underweight 106. Made 74 Child's Welfare calls. Gave talk on the underweight child at Far- mers' clffb in Prior town hall. Talk on Health crusade to parents of Dis- trict 10. Idade calls with Miss Colby of State Board of Control, who is su- pervisor of this district of children who are under gumMianship of the state. Conducted classes in Home Hy- giene, as before. Benno Menzel Dead; Funeral at Anoka Funeral services were conducted in tle Methodist Episcopal church at Anoka late yesterday for Benno Men- zel, formerly of Odessa, Minn., who died Thursday on his farm three miles est of Anoka. He was born in Ger- tny 58 years ago, came to Minne- sota in 1888 and first engaged in a mercantile business at Odessa with a brother, Hugo Menzel, now a bank- er there. Surviving him are the wid- ow, three sons and a daughter, who all live on the Menzel farm, and five brothers, one of whom is B. R. Men- zel, head of B. P Menzel & Co., fur- rters, 54 seventh St. S. Minneapolis. A brother, Max Menzel, is a druggist at Pipestone and another, Richard Menzel, is in the lumber business at Odessa.--Minneapolis Journal. Benno Menzel, well known to nearly everyone in the county, left Odessa  in 1915, moving with his family onto a farm he owned near Thief River Falls. After living there about three years he moved to Anoka. Hugo Menzel and Richard Menzel, with their wives, and Robert Engel- man, an uncle who lives at Correll attended the funeral. High School Quint Loses To Madison by 22-1 Score Showing pluck and endurance, the Ortonville High School basketball team went down in defeat last Friday night before the Madison squad, with a ore of 22 to 1. The Ortonville team, handicapped by the absence of sev- eral of the players from last year's teanh who could not qualify on ac- count of the no smoking rule, was too light for the visitors. The home boys stayed grittily with the Madison play- ers and held them well the fore part of the game, but the weight of their opponents soon made itself felt and Madison went over for a victory. Followers of high school basketball give the boys credit for having a good team, and regardless of the loss of their first game, believe that a stiff bunch of players will be developed with more experience before the sea- son has been advanced very far. Larkin Construction Co. To Dissolve Partnership Martin D. Larkin of Barry, Minne- sota, and Robert Schoen of this city, who have been successfully engaged in the road building business under 1921 Auto Tax Must Be Paid to Get New License New 1922 motor vehicle licenses on sale January 3, Mike Holm, secretary of state, announced this week, can be issued lawfully on 1921 and older cars only after taxes are paid in full. The statement is intended to correct a common mistake that it was not necessary in 1921 to register cars not in use or temporarily out of repair. "It is important for applicants to remember that the 1921 registration certificate, or a sworn statement in case it has been lost, ,must be sent in with the application for 1922 registra- tion and license," said Secretary Holm. Duplicate certificates can be had from this office by making a sworn statement of ownership and paying the 25 cent fee required by law." Secretary Holm reports ' that regis- tration of motor vehlcles for 1921 is nearly ended but that lack of funds among some and lacl of indications n the part of others is causing some delay. Community Civics Class Makes Survey of Homes As a part of their duties in eom- munity civics, H. N. Tragethon had his class in that subject make a sur- vey of the city to ascertain the total number of houses here, and the pro- portion of actual home owners to those renting their living quarters. The class was divided in four sections, headed by four workers, Verona Mow- ery, Josephine Anderson, Elton Hess, and Donald Stegner. The city was di- vided into four fields for their investi- gation, and the following is a sum- mary of their survey: Southwest Section (Korner Kafe W., South Main and Cashtown)--Ownm,s 30, Renters 23, Total 53. Southeast Gunderson's E., and South Main)- Owners 94, Renters 37, Total 131. Northwest (Pioneer Store W. to Lake Shore, North Main) Owners 56, Rent- e.rs 19, Total 75. Northeast (Mark's Store E., North Main)--Owners 73, Renters 23, 'Total 96. Total owners, 253; Total renters, 102; Total owners and renters, 355. As the figures given by local real estate men is 350 homes, the workers feel that the survey is fairly accurate. DOWLING FUND GROWS; MUCH MANY ATTEND FARM BUREAU ANNUAL MEET ounty Agent Gives Annual Report. Bureau Has Suc- cessful Year. Many New Members Enrolled. A good attendance turned out to the fourth annual meeting of the Big Stone County Farm Bureau held at Clinton last Thursday. The meeting was called to order at eleven o'clock by Chas. Matthsws, president of the organization, followed by the report of the secretary- treasurer. The bust messmen of Clinton served a fine lun- cheon at noon to all those attending the meeting. The afternoon meeting included the annual report of the County Agent, report on State and National Farm Bureau, business session, a talk on the war finance loan and an illustra- tive talk on the Near East Relief work. The old executive board ws reelected by acclamation to serve un- til sufficient votes were received to ef- fect the legal change over to a board of directors composed of chairman of the township unitS. A brief'outline of the work carried on in the county for the past twelve months deducted frQm the County Agent's report is as folows: Organization -- Membership cam- paign put on, 611 members secured on permanent $5.00 basis. Township units are organized and some commit- tees appointed on plan of work for community. This work may be com- pleted in the near future. Arrange- ments are being made to change fmma of government of organization tO township unit plan. Farm Crops-. Certified seed of al- falfa, clover, wheat, rye, barley, and oats put out in each township. Yields checked on these. 2. 1,000 pounds grimm alfalfa secured thru this office. 3,380 pounds clover and timothy se- cured thru office. 3332 pounds sweet clover secured thru office. 3,100 bush- els of rye, barley and wheat. 3. Weed survey made of county, assis- tance given in eradication of noxious weeds. Four patches of sow thistle located and eradicated. 4. Orchard spraying demonstrations conducted" Liveetockl. Shipping associatio organized at Odessa and Correll. Meet- ings held of other associations on eo- MORE NEEDED[ perative market00n00 plan at suth St- Paul. 2. Two cars of high grade and Memorial Fund Receives Donation From "An Un- known Giver"--Commit- tee "On the Job." Success of the drive being made for a 'fund robe used in erecting a school for crippled children in Minne- sota, to be known as the Dowling Me- morial School, is certain if donations are made by all in the spirit of the "unknown giver," who gave what she thought she could give out of a grate- ful heart, as evidenced by the letter which accompanied her offering. Her letter, dated at Ortonville, reads, "Realizing how fortunate our family has been in escaping injury or handi- cap such as Mr. Dowling experienced, I wish to add a bit, my dollar, to the Dowling MemOrial Fund, Yours for the little ones. (Signed) An unknown giver." The Dowling Fund, with donations received the past week, stands as fol- lows: Previously Reported ............ $169.05 Unknown Giver .................. 1.0(P Geier Brothers .................... 10.00t_ Tracy-Shumaker Co ............ 500 . Oft. Elev. & Mill Co ............. 5.00"" Barry School Children ...... 2.75 " A. I Moore .......................... 2.00 " A. C. Saeger ........................ 2.00 '" Grosenick's .......................... 2.00  C. C. Olsen .......................... 2.00"" H. W. Sarvis ........................ 2.00 " Korner Kafe ........................ 2.00 " A. A. Zwiener .................... 1.OOV T A. Farrell .......................... 1.00 w" A Friend ................................ 1.(}Or.," M. A. Mogren ...................... 1.OOv" G. C. Tyler .......................... 1.00 / H. J. Shelver ...................... 1.00 ' D. M. O'Donnell ................ 1.00 " H. H. Tyler ............. : ............. LOO t/ TOTAL .............................. $212.80 Ortonville Pin Busters Win Over Madison pure-bred dairy cattle brought into the county. 3. Assisted in consign- ment sales and distribution of live stock. 4, Assisted in disease control. Four outbreaks of cholera checked in hogs. Four hundred head of cattle tested under the federal accredited. plan. Demonstrations of tuberculosis in poultry put on. 5. Poultry show put on, coops secured for show. $40Q paid out in premiums. 6. Ten poultry culling demonstrations put on in dif- ferent parts of county. SoilsL Solid acidity tests made of different sections of county. 2. Four- teen acid phosphate trials made oa different soils of county and plots checked as to yield. 3. Four trials made in using sweet clover as a gree manur Economics.l. 164 farm laborers placed on farms. 2. Building plans furnished for farm buildings. 3. Cost eros. Armenian girls numbering 25,o 000 have been rescued and returned to their homes and from 150,000 to 200,- 000 still remain captives. We are em- ploying in our own factories 23,000. Children are being educated. Last year more than 3,000,000 garments were sent in." In connection with the campaign the Near East Relief is making an ef- (Continued on page S) Save! Do Your Christmas Shopping In Ortonville People of Ortonville and the sur- rounding territory are being offered exceptional bargains in many lines of merckandise by the merchants of Or- tonville at a timd when it is very unusual for stores to make reductions" on thei goods. The Ortonville Hard- ware Store cut loose with a sale on November 26 which is to last unt21 De- cember 24, in which practically every article on their shelves has been ' ed down. . ..The M. M. Johnson Furniture C_m- pany has something that promises to be a "qmock-out" blow to the gentle- the firm name of "The Larkin Con- . -- struction Company,, will dissolve part- The OrtonviUe . Bow|ing, Quint de- nership,.to take etfect s JanUary 1, feared the Madison Mineraltim tow. ntxt, it was announced on Tuesday by ] era by a margin of. 19 pins Tuesday Mr. Schoen following the decision of[night at Madison. Owing to the con- Mr. Larkin to retire from active work | dition of the alleys, together with in- because of impred healS. | efficient pin-setting, the setups failed |  $, The Larkin Construction Conpany to respond to the groove balls nu- has maintained veral large grading outfits and their operations have ex- tended into adjoining counties, besides having been successful in obtaining contracts near Luden, North Dakota. where a large crew was at work dur- ing the greater part of last season Under what name Mr. Schoen wil! conduct the business after the dissolu- tion was not made known. merously whanged in by both teams, aakiug the five men totals fall far be- low par, 2,300 pins being the total for he stellar Quint. A return match =rill be played on the Palace Alleys of his city, Friday, December 9. Mr. and Mrs. Otto Harris entertain- ed seven telephone operators a a veni son dinner the latter part of rest week man epremfitlng high prices. Their circulars Wilt  mailed m on flint ofnext week to every home t this eeetion. Following the big sale recently put. on by the Kollitz Mercantile Company they are to conduct one especially for Christmas Shoppers and in order that each family might receive  their sche- dule of "new 'prices" that company will mail out special circulars to all in this territory, In next week's issue of the Inde- pendent you will find advertisements from practically every merchant in the city with special prices and induce- ments to buy where you will save money. THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT 3 t 2 ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8 1921  NUMBER 31 SEASON OPEN YOU GON'NA IT" QUESTION Prohibits Molesting iHousesHow to Trap Bothering the in this county have been the Auditor's office in asking for advice on laws. The present laws trapping of muskrat and December 1 this year to 1922. It is expressly made t mink or muskrat with a possess, or disturb any or- muskrat in any manner ex- injure or destroy any aink or beaver house, den that has been bother- of the "county who spend their at this time of year, are going to trap musk- the law strictly forbids a muskrat house. the muskrats in this coun- their homes in rat houses in sloughs and lakes, are a few bank rats in the In trapping "house trapper digs a hole in the and places his traps that the rats sit upon. covered up and the rat generally sits in the s is the only method in rats can be trapped, as Is spent wholly inside of in the winter, except dive down the water to fodder for themselves or Wheaton- Gazette-Report- the Attorney General holds that traps canffot muskrat houses, several lo- from that vicinity having matter to his attention. General replied without the law means that no a trap in a rat house. trappers Io not feel at the way the law reads, as the above pa- ls that trappers from will, if they follow the trap right shore and will and place their traps the South Dakota law has against digging into the trappers from South Catch all the rats on the the Minnesota trapper can a rat when it is running of the ice or some such the trapper can run up salt on his tail. Of is no law against trap- tm the cement sidewalks of trapping them in corn field, provided they to change their habitat. Sells the trapper a license and then says they can- in the only place where At least that is who want to trap up the situation." g trappers from houses is in Section 50 General Laws of 1919 follows: "No person shall or destroy any musk- beaver house, den, dam vlace except when nimals are injurihg my e commissioner may animals to be removed or permit the killing of and the destruction of or other structures erected Petition Minn. Ave. the city council at a of that body Monday building rejected by interested prop- the council to portion of Minne- ar the Ed. Shult resi- rejection were based of a section of the disposition unless all parties agreed. came before the those of a routine na- the allowance of bills. will be on Decem- for Davisous. at the Pioneer store and e Co. gave a surprise the home of Mr. and Tuesday evening Evelyn Doohar, who morning for her Progressive was played and lnnch leather purse Doohar as a Relief Corps Presents Flags to Boy Scouts On Tuesday evening, December 6, a very impllbssive ceremony was car- lied out at the high school gymna- sium. The Women's Relief Corps present- ed two Flags to the two local troops of Boy Scouts. The Patrol leaders stood at attention, while the presenta- tion speech was delivered by Miss Martha Rothwell, Corps Patriotic In- structor, the two senior patrol leaders, Donald Walker and Gerhard Walseth, came forward and received the Flags from Mrs. Chamberlain and Mrs. J. T. Crippen. Mr. Stegner then made a speech of thanks on behalf of the Scouts. Dr. E. N. Schoen in a few l words impressed on the boys the im- portance of the occasion. Mr. J. T. Crippen spoke of the love they should bear for the Flag, and Rev. P. J. Bockoven spoke briefly on the 10th Scout law, "A Scout is Brave," stres- sing the fact that moral heroism is a higher and nobler type than mere physical bravery. The formal part of the meeting was closed by all repeating the Flag sal- ute, "I pledge allegiance to my Flag and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation indivisible, with Liberty and Justice for all." Henry Dittes and Wife Have Narrow Escape Altho Henry Dittes and his wife were thrown completely clear of the buggy in which they were riding against a parked automobile in front of the Johnson Furniture company, i they miraculously escaped serious in- jury Tuesday afternoon, when the team they were driving became fright- i ened and ran away. Mr. Dittes who i lives south of town was driving up main street when one of the tugs be- came loose and the pole of his buggy d41opped to the ground, swerving the conveyance sharply to the left and col- liding with an automobile parked at the side of the street. Mr. Dittes sus- tained a lacerated cheek, while his wife escaped injury, altho she was badly frightened. The horses broke loose from the buggy after the collis- sion, and were captured further down :the street. COUNTY TO GIVE CORN TO NEAR HEAVY BIDDING DRIVES DOWN PRICE ON STATE HIGHWAY CONTRACTS Scully & Connelly Concerns get Work I n Big Stone CountymMakes Work for Men and Teams. The twenty-seven and one-half mile section of trunk highway No. 28, from Browns Valley eastward to Grace- ville will be gravel-surfaced at a cost of $67,856.41 under tentative contract awards by Charles M. Babcock, state highway commissioner, this week The big job is among 38 projects for 3b'0 miles of graveling and grading on the first group of winter jobs under the "more-work--better roads" move- ment to speed needed highway im- provements and relieve unemployment. The award in each case was made on the best bid, according to John H. Mullen, deputy commissioner and chief highway engineer, and large savings of trunk highway funds were ejected on extremely low bids due in part to wide competition. There were about 25 bidders for each job, against 10 to 12 ordinarily. Gravel surfacing W let at an average of $2,000 a male yard mile haul at 16 to 30 cents c'm, pared with 30 to 60 cents paid last season. The lowest bid on the single paving project was $2.17 a yard for concrete--about 20 per cent or more than $5,000 a mile under the regular season figure of $27,000. Other jobs are to be advertised soon, it was announced, to profit by current low prices and escape pos- sible increases next spring when gen- eral operations start, as well as to relieve unemployment this winter. Applications for work should be made direct to contractors, it was ad- ded, no hiring being done by the high- way department. Work is to start at once on most jobs which are to be com- pleted by April 1 or sooner under the contracts. The contract for graveling Trunk Highway No. 28 was "awarded to Scul- ly and Connelly companies of St. Paul, and the work will be done with trudks. Two,pits will be opened in Big Stone county, to furnish gravel for this work, one at West Toqua lake and the other at Beardsley. The pit at Beardsley it is understood will be equipped with a steam shovel to load the truek ...... Lutheran Choir to Give EAST SUFFERERS Song S00rvio A Christmas song service will be given by Dr. Richard 01son of Minne- apolis, and the Ortonville Lutheran Choir, at the Orpheum on Sunday eve- fling, December 18, to which the pub- lic is cordially invited to attend, Dr. J. Richard Olson is a speaker of note and very well known as church editor of the Minneapolis Journal.. Follow- ingAs the order of service. Christmas Gospel Invocation Holy Night, Peaceful Night ...... Gruber Hark! The Herald Angels Sing ...... .......................................... Mendelssohn The Light of Bethleham ................ Abt (Interpretation, Dr. J. Richard Olson) Today There is Ringing.:Christiansen Lift Up Your Heads .......... Wennerberg Intermission-- Beautiful Saviour-- Bleak Forth Into Joy ................ Barnby (Interpretation, Dr. J. Richard Olson) O So of God ...................... Curschman 'Tis The Evening's Holy Hour ........ ....................... Doxology-- . ........... :; ..... Beethoven Benediction-- A Lutheran song service--not a con- cert. Admission free. Note the date ---one week from next Sunday eve- ning. Ortonville Has Another Aviator; Maybe Airplanes have 1]fen so common humming over the cry the past year, that no special attention .was diverted to a machine appearing in the skies last Monday, coming from the north until those who granced at it noticed that it seemed very unsteady, making many dips, turns and wobbly motions, uncommon in straight flying. It was known that Jack Anderson had just flown in from Minneapolis in his ma- chine and when he was aet on the street some few hours later, 'he was asked whose machine that was doing all .the cavottihg.  ack solved the mystery by explaining that Chester Olson, local implement man piloted the machine down from Clinton, hving sole control of the ship on the flight, and that the new pilot had a hard time keeping the road. Legion Basketball Team Meets Madison Friday Friday evening, December 9, the Ortonville Legion Basketball quint will meet the Madison Legion team at the high school gymnasium here. The Ortonville boys won their first game of the season over the Milan boys last week, are expecting a tight game "with Madison as that team is claimed to be one of the best in the state. Remember the date. State Director of Near East -Relief Speaks at Farm Bureau Meeting-- Chas. A. Matthews Is Manager. Farmers of Big Stone county were the first in the state of Minnesota to respond to the Near East Relief Gift Grain Drive last year, which was con- ducted under direction of the Farm Bureau, said J. M. Davies, state di- rector who spoke at the annual meeting of the Big Stone County Farm Bureau held at Clinton last Thursday. Continuing, Mr. Davies said, "This is regarded by the Near East Relief and by the Farm Bureau as being of a good deal of value in setting an example which was fol- lowed by other counties thruout the state." Speaking in the interest of the drive now being conducted, Mr. Davies made the statement that the Near East Relief organization guarantees that 100 per cent of all gift corn do- nated for this cause will get into the hands of the sufferers. "All expenses of whatever nature are met from. oth- er sources," said the speaker, "and no grain whatever is to be sold for that purDose." The Near East Relief was incor- porated by an act of Congress in 1919 Mr. Davies explained, which necessi- tates that regular and complete re- ports be made to Congress of all its financial transactions. The last report issued showed that the expense for collection and administration of the charities of the Near East Relief was only 5 cents out of every dollar, leav- ing 95 cents of all cofitributions for actual relief, which is understood to be the best record of any charitable organization. A film entitled "Alice In Wonder- land" was shown. It was taken late this summer by a party of relief work- ers and depicted conditions in the Near East at the present time. The picture which was unpesed showed two sides of the conditions existing there--the conditions where the chil- dren and others are Under the care of the Relief workers and those out- side of their care. "One hundred and twenty-thousand orphan children are now under the care of the Near East Relief with pos- sibly two hundred thousand more in need of help whom we are unable to care for on account of lack of funds," said. Mr. Davies, adding that, "we have 229 orphanages and 63 hospitals, 112 clinics where 150,000 cases are treated monthlY. We have 11 homes for girls rescued from Turkish hat- (Continued on page 8) 4, Activity of County Nurse Shown In Reports Made The reports rendered by Miss Agnes Rogashaska, county nurse, covering the months of October and November, show great activities on her part in the different phases of the work as- signed to her. Her reports, for these months follow: School Districts No. 3, 7, 5, 54, 2, 21, 63, 39, 2,7, 60-:-Pupils Inspected 162, Talks to pupils in class 7, Defects: De- fective Vision 42, Defective hearing 5, Nasal Obstructions 12, Enlarged ton- sils 29, Cervical Adenites 7, Defective teeth 54, Underweight 78. Correc- tions: Tonsils treated 3, teeth treat- led 8, infant welfare visits i0, home visits to school children 15, sanitary inspection visits 20, attended meeting of nursing cormnittee, spent day at Glenwood seeing American Red Cross Pageant. Visits of two Red Cross of- ficials. Explained work to Civic ClUb of Clinton. Donations from W. C. T. U. of Malta for Loan Closet 2 white annel night gowns, 3 bath towels, wash cloths, 4 pillow slips, 3 hand towels, also some things for layettes, 01d clothes for needy families. " Conducted 4 classes a week in Home Hygiene.and Care of Sick: 1 at Odes- sa, 2 at Clinton, 1 at Ortonville. Mad. Dist. No. 50, 10, 9, 4, 6, 14--- Inspected 95 pupils. Weighed and measmxd 295, Defects noted: defec- tive vision 28, enlarged tonsils 13, de- fective teeth 23, underweight 106. Made 74 Child's Welfare calls. Gave talk on the underweight child at Far- mers' clffb in Prior town hall. Talk on Health crusade to parents of Dis- trict 10. Idade calls with Miss Colby of State Board of Control, who is su- pervisor of this district of children who are under gumMianship of the state. Conducted classes in Home Hy- giene, as before. Benno Menzel Dead; Funeral at Anoka Funeral services were conducted in tle Methodist Episcopal church at Anoka late yesterday for Benno Men- zel, formerly of Odessa, Minn., who died Thursday on his farm three miles est of Anoka. He was born in Ger- tny 58 years ago, came to Minne- sota in 1888 and first engaged in a mercantile business at Odessa with a brother, Hugo Menzel, now a bank- er there. Surviving him are the wid- ow, three sons and a daughter, who all live on the Menzel farm, and five brothers, one of whom is B. R. Men- zel, head of B. P Menzel & Co., fur- rters, 54 seventh St. S. Minneapolis. A brother, Max Menzel, is a druggist at Pipestone and another, Richard Menzel, is in the lumber business at Odessa.--Minneapolis Journal. Benno Menzel, well known to nearly everyone in the county, left Odessa  in 1915, moving with his family onto a farm he owned near Thief River Falls. After living there about three years he moved to Anoka. Hugo Menzel and Richard Menzel, with their wives, and Robert Engel- man, an uncle who lives at Correll attended the funeral. High School Quint Loses To Madison by 22-1 Score Showing pluck and endurance, the Ortonville High School basketball team went down in defeat last Friday night before the Madison squad, with a ore of 22 to 1. The Ortonville team, handicapped by the absence of sev- eral of the players from last year's teanh who could not qualify on ac- count of the no smoking rule, was too light for the visitors. The home boys stayed grittily with the Madison play- ers and held them well the fore part of the game, but the weight of their opponents soon made itself felt and Madison went over for a victory. Followers of high school basketball give the boys credit for having a good team, and regardless of the loss of their first game, believe that a stiff bunch of players will be developed with more experience before the sea- son has been advanced very far. Larkin Construction Co. To Dissolve Partnership Martin D. Larkin of Barry, Minne- sota, and Robert Schoen of this city, who have been successfully engaged in the road building business under 1921 Auto Tax Must Be Paid to Get New License New 1922 motor vehicle licenses on sale January 3, Mike Holm, secretary of state, announced this week, can be issued lawfully on 1921 and older cars only after taxes are paid in full. The statement is intended to correct a common mistake that it was not necessary in 1921 to register cars not in use or temporarily out of repair. "It is important for applicants to remember that the 1921 registration certificate, or a sworn statement in case it has been lost, ,must be sent in with the application for 1922 registra- tion and license," said Secretary Holm. Duplicate certificates can be had from this office by making a sworn statement of ownership and paying the 25 cent fee required by law." Secretary Holm reports ' that regis- tration of motor vehlcles for 1921 is nearly ended but that lack of funds among some and lacl of indications n the part of others is causing some delay. Community Civics Class Makes Survey of Homes As a part of their duties in eom- munity civics, H. N. Tragethon had his class in that subject make a sur- vey of the city to ascertain the total number of houses here, and the pro- portion of actual home owners to those renting their living quarters. The class was divided in four sections, headed by four workers, Verona Mow- ery, Josephine Anderson, Elton Hess, and Donald Stegner. The city was di- vided into four fields for their investi- gation, and the following is a sum- mary of their survey: Southwest Section (Korner Kafe W., South Main and Cashtown)--Ownm,s 30, Renters 23, Total 53. Southeast Gunderson's E., and South Main)- Owners 94, Renters 37, Total 131. Northwest (Pioneer Store W. to Lake Shore, North Main) Owners 56, Rent- e.rs 19, Total 75. Northeast (Mark's Store E., North Main)--Owners 73, Renters 23, 'Total 96. Total owners, 253; Total renters, 102; Total owners and renters, 355. As the figures given by local real estate men is 350 homes, the workers feel that the survey is fairly accurate. DOWLING FUND GROWS; MUCH MANY ATTEND FARM BUREAU ANNUAL MEET ounty Agent Gives Annual Report. Bureau Has Suc- cessful Year. Many New Members Enrolled. A good attendance turned out to the fourth annual meeting of the Big Stone County Farm Bureau held at Clinton last Thursday. The meeting was called to order at eleven o'clock by Chas. Matthsws, president of the organization, followed by the report of the secretary- treasurer. The bust messmen of Clinton served a fine lun- cheon at noon to all those attending the meeting. The afternoon meeting included the annual report of the County Agent, report on State and National Farm Bureau, business session, a talk on the war finance loan and an illustra- tive talk on the Near East Relief work. The old executive board ws reelected by acclamation to serve un- til sufficient votes were received to ef- fect the legal change over to a board of directors composed of chairman of the township unitS. A brief'outline of the work carried on in the county for the past twelve months deducted frQm the County Agent's report is as folows: Organization -- Membership cam- paign put on, 611 members secured on permanent $5.00 basis. Township units are organized and some commit- tees appointed on plan of work for community. This work may be com- pleted in the near future. Arrange- ments are being made to change fmma of government of organization tO township unit plan. Farm Crops-. Certified seed of al- falfa, clover, wheat, rye, barley, and oats put out in each township. Yields checked on these. 2. 1,000 pounds grimm alfalfa secured thru this office. 3,380 pounds clover and timothy se- cured thru office. 3332 pounds sweet clover secured thru office. 3,100 bush- els of rye, barley and wheat. 3. Weed survey made of county, assis- tance given in eradication of noxious weeds. Four patches of sow thistle located and eradicated. 4. Orchard spraying demonstrations conducted" Liveetockl. Shipping associatio organized at Odessa and Correll. Meet- ings held of other associations on eo- MORE NEEDED[ perative market00n00 plan at suth St- Paul. 2. Two cars of high grade and Memorial Fund Receives Donation From "An Un- known Giver"--Commit- tee "On the Job." Success of the drive being made for a 'fund robe used in erecting a school for crippled children in Minne- sota, to be known as the Dowling Me- morial School, is certain if donations are made by all in the spirit of the "unknown giver," who gave what she thought she could give out of a grate- ful heart, as evidenced by the letter which accompanied her offering. Her letter, dated at Ortonville, reads, "Realizing how fortunate our family has been in escaping injury or handi- cap such as Mr. Dowling experienced, I wish to add a bit, my dollar, to the Dowling MemOrial Fund, Yours for the little ones. (Signed) An unknown giver." The Dowling Fund, with donations received the past week, stands as fol- lows: Previously Reported ............ $169.05 Unknown Giver .................. 1.0(P Geier Brothers .................... 10.00t_ Tracy-Shumaker Co ............ 500 . Oft. Elev. & Mill Co ............. 5.00"" Barry School Children ...... 2.75 " A. I Moore .......................... 2.00 " A. C. Saeger ........................ 2.00 '" Grosenick's .......................... 2.00  C. C. Olsen .......................... 2.00"" H. W. Sarvis ........................ 2.00 " Korner Kafe ........................ 2.00 " A. A. Zwiener .................... 1.OOV T A. Farrell .......................... 1.00 w" A Friend ................................ 1.(}Or.," M. A. Mogren ...................... 1.OOv" G. C. Tyler .......................... 1.00 / H. J. Shelver ...................... 1.00 ' D. M. O'Donnell ................ 1.00 " H. H. Tyler ............. : ............. LOO t/ TOTAL .............................. $212.80 Ortonville Pin Busters Win Over Madison pure-bred dairy cattle brought into the county. 3. Assisted in consign- ment sales and distribution of live stock. 4, Assisted in disease control. Four outbreaks of cholera checked in hogs. Four hundred head of cattle tested under the federal accredited. plan. Demonstrations of tuberculosis in poultry put on. 5. Poultry show put on, coops secured for show. $40Q paid out in premiums. 6. Ten poultry culling demonstrations put on in dif- ferent parts of county. SoilsL Solid acidity tests made of different sections of county. 2. Four- teen acid phosphate trials made oa different soils of county and plots checked as to yield. 3. Four trials made in using sweet clover as a gree manur Economics.l. 164 farm laborers placed on farms. 2. Building plans furnished for farm buildings. 3. Cost eros. Armenian girls numbering 25,o 000 have been rescued and returned to their homes and from 150,000 to 200,- 000 still remain captives. We are em- ploying in our own factories 23,000. Children are being educated. Last year more than 3,000,000 garments were sent in." In connection with the campaign the Near East Relief is making an ef- (Continued on page S) Save! Do Your Christmas Shopping In Ortonville People of Ortonville and the sur- rounding territory are being offered exceptional bargains in many lines of merckandise by the merchants of Or- tonville at a timd when it is very unusual for stores to make reductions" on thei goods. The Ortonville Hard- ware Store cut loose with a sale on November 26 which is to last unt21 De- cember 24, in which practically every article on their shelves has been ' ed down. . ..The M. M. Johnson Furniture C_m- pany has something that promises to be a "qmock-out" blow to the gentle- the firm name of "The Larkin Con- . -- struction Company,, will dissolve part- The OrtonviUe . Bow|ing, Quint de- nership,.to take etfect s JanUary 1, feared the Madison Mineraltim tow. ntxt, it was announced on Tuesday by ] era by a margin of. 19 pins Tuesday Mr. Schoen following the decision of[night at Madison. Owing to the con- Mr. Larkin to retire from active work | dition of the alleys, together with in- because of impred healS. | efficient pin-setting, the setups failed |  $, The Larkin Construction Conpany to respond to the groove balls nu- has maintained veral large grading outfits and their operations have ex- tended into adjoining counties, besides having been successful in obtaining contracts near Luden, North Dakota. where a large crew was at work dur- ing the greater part of last season Under what name Mr. Schoen wil! conduct the business after the dissolu- tion was not made known. merously whanged in by both teams, aakiug the five men totals fall far be- low par, 2,300 pins being the total for he stellar Quint. A return match =rill be played on the Palace Alleys of his city, Friday, December 9. Mr. and Mrs. Otto Harris entertain- ed seven telephone operators a a veni son dinner the latter part of rest week man epremfitlng high prices. Their circulars Wilt  mailed m on flint ofnext week to every home t this eeetion. Following the big sale recently put. on by the Kollitz Mercantile Company they are to conduct one especially for Christmas Shoppers and in order that each family might receive  their sche- dule of "new 'prices" that company will mail out special circulars to all in this territory, In next week's issue of the Inde- pendent you will find advertisements from practically every merchant in the city with special prices and induce- ments to buy where you will save money. THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT [I ORTONVILLEt MINN THURSDAY. DECEMBER $ 1921 UMBER 31 rSEASONOPEN 0 IT" QUESTION Prohibits IlOase-How 1 :y have been Auditor's omce in for advice on "l"ae pnt la tmppjng of leemlr 1 this ye to It is expssly made mink or muskrat with a , possess, or disturb any ot- injure destroy y , den the law strictly the muskrats in this nun- their homes in rat hours tpping plas his traps sit upon. up and the rat sits In the the only be trapped, as wholly inside of winter, expt do the Wheatau-Gazette-Repor t- Attc mey General that traps canrt raUskrat houses , a fro m that vicinity having matter to his y Genera[ replied without t a trap in a rat house. o not the law ads, that trappe fm if they follow the s and  a against digging into the trappers from South the Minnesota trapper rat when it is rrming top ef the lee or me ah th e tpper n mt lt on his tsdh Of ia no law against tp- * the cemt sidewalks of against trapping them in field, provided they e their habitat. s the trapper a license they to trap is in Seetlon 0, General destroy any dam place except when animals a imhg ny The commissioner may tmimals to be removed or prmi t the killing is and the destruction of that body Monday by intested pohibits dispoBiton parties me befor the of a tme n 1 Party foe Davis , :he Pioneer ste and e Co, gave a snrpldse a Tuesday evenlng Dhar, who morn for hei tie. Pgresslv was olved d nr heantifu/ leather 3ul Miss Doohar as Relief Corps Presents Flags to Boy Scouts On Tuesday evening. Dber 6, a ry implssive remony rJed out at the high sehI siu The Women's Relief Corps pnt- ed two Flags to the of Boy Scouts. The Patrol stood at attention, while the presenta- tion sph was delived by Miss Martha Rothwel], Cor structor, the two senior patrol leaden, Walseth, the Flags Chamberlain d Crippen. Mr. speech of thks on Dr. E. N. Schoen in words impssed on the boys portance of the occasion. Mr. J. T. Ctlppen spoke of the love they should bear for the Flag, attd Rev. p. J. Bkoven sPOke briefly on the 10th Sout law. "A Sut is Brave," sts- sing higher and nobler type than phyMva] bravery. c[oed by all peating the Flag sam- ate. "I pledge aileglan to my Flag and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation indivisible, with Liberty and Justice for all." Henry Dittos and Wife Have Narrow Escape A]tho Henry Dittos we thro mpletely clear of the buggy in which they we riding against a parked automobile in of the Johnson Furnitu they miraculously eped jury Tuesday ateoon, when the beam they were driving became fright- ened d ran away. Mr Ditte who lis south of to was driving up main stt hen one of the tugs he pole of his buggy d4pped to the ground, sing the :onveyance sharply ]iding with an automobile pked at the side of the street. Mr. lacerated cheek, while his wife eaped hJury, aitho she was badly frightened, siun, and were COUNTY TO GIVE CORN TO NEAR EAST SUFFERERS State Director of Near East "Relief Speaks at Farm Bureau Meeting-- Chas. A. Matthews Is Manager. Farme of Big Stone eounl the flt in the state Grain Drive last yevx. dueled Bau, said J. M. Davies, state dL who spoke at the meeting of the Big Ston e County Fa Bureau held at Clinton lt Thursday. Continuing, Mr. Davies said. "This is garded by the Near being of a good deal of vai in tting an examgie which was fol- lowed by other counties thruout Spiking now being conducted, Mr. made the statement that the organization guarantees that i00 per cent of all gift  do- nated for this e will get into the hds of the suffere. "All extnses ee sou," said the speaker, "d no grain whatever is to be The Near East porat ed by  act of Congl in 1919, Mr. Davies explIned, tates that gular and complete - ports be made to Congress of all its financial tranctio. showed that the expense for m d administration of the charities of the Ne East Relief wts only  nts out of ery dollar, lv- ins 95 nts of lief, whih is trade.toed to be tha best rd of n eMaStable A film entitled "AHee this mer by a party o era and depicted nditlons in the Near Bast at the present time. The #eture which W unpoed two there--t others are "One hundred orphan ehildn are now under aibly HEAVY BIDDING DRIVES DOWN PRICE ON STATE HIGHWAY CONTRACTS Scully & Conney Concerns*Activity of County Nurse get Work I n Big Stone Shown In Reports Made County--Makes Work for The orts ne by MIS. A?es Men and Teams. Roghk, county nurse, The twenty-seven and one-half mile ghway No. 28, fm Valley eastward awards by Charles M. Babck, state highway eoiioner, this ek The big job is among 38 projts for 3 xrles of gmveng and gredinl the fit gup of vnter jobs under the "more-work--bettm speed needed highway im- pvements and ]ieve unploymet. The award in each e the best bid, orivg to John H. Mullea, deputy highway engineer, end large vings on extmely low bids due in part to wide competitis. 12 ordlnarily. let at an ave yard pared with 30 to 0 nts paid It seasoa. The lowest bid on the single paving project was $2.17 a yard or mo gular than $5.0OO a mle under the sean figu of $27,OOO. Other jobs are to be soon. it was nounced, to profit by prices and eape pos- pring when gen- eral operations start, relieve unemployment this wlntor. Applications for work should be , it was l- Isd. ns hiring bein done hy the high way departme. Work is to start at The contract for gveling Highway ly and Connelly campanles of St. paul. and the work will be done with tdks. lo'pits will be opened in Big Stone to ftrnish gravel for this work, one at West Toua Ibe and the other at Beardsley. Tke pit at Beardsley It Is tood will be euinped with a atez shovel to loed Lutheran Choir to Give Christmas Song Servio A Chrlstn.s ng lee ill be given by Dr. Riahard Olson of Minn apoli% and the Ortonville Choir, at the Orpheum en Sunday eve- idg, De--her 18, to which the tmb- lie is rdieJ[y invited to attend. Dr. vpeakr of note d very of the Mlunpolis Jouai.. ins is the order of tmlde Chdstm Gasps- Holy Night, Peaceful Nlght___Grubr Hk! The Herald Angels Sing ...... The Light of (InterptaUon, Dr. ft. Richard Olson) Today Tbe is Ringing.Christisen Lift Up (Interpretation, Dr. J. 0 So of God Evening's Holy Hour ....... Doxology-- Admission fe. Note the date fm next Sunday eve- Ortonvilie Has Another Aviator; Maybe Airplanes have tteen hming over the c, the past yr, to a machine appearing in the ski last Monday, coming from the nolff.h, who ginned at it noticed e very my dips, turns and wobbly motion, that Jk Ax4ern had just chine and wh he w aet  the street some f hoe later, he w w doing vettihg. wived the myster T by exptrang that Olaan. local implet  piloted the down from CIltn, htng on the flight. Ft4day evening, Dember 9, th Ortonville Legion Basketball qint xtl show gat tivities on her part the diffent phases of te work signed to her. Her portyor these School Districts No. 3.7, 5, 54, 2, 21, 63, 39, 2, 60z-Pupils Inspected 162, Talks to pupils in ]s 7, Defts: Do- g 5, Nai Ohstctions 12, Enlarged ton- sils 29, Ceil Adenites 7, Deftive teeth 54, Undeeight 78. Cor tons: Tonsils tated 3, tth treat- ed 8, infant welfa ,its I0, home cIdn 15, nitary inspection visits 20, attended mtng oittee, spent day at pagea. Visits of two ficial Exptained work to Donations from W. C. T. Lo Closet 2 white rdght gowns, 3 al some things for layettes, Clinton, 1 at Ortonville. Mad. Dist. No. 5O, 10, 9, 4, 6, l- Inspted 95 pupils. Weighed and measuld 295, Defts noted: defoe tive vision 28, enlarged tonsil 13, de- teeth 23, undeeight 106. calls. Gave under'eight child me' elub in Prior town ha]h Talk on Health crusade to parents of Dis- i,lade calls with Miss Colby su perdsor of this district nf who a under gua.lianship of the tate. Ccndueted classes in Home Hy- giene, as before. Benno Menzel Dead; Funeral at Anoka Funeral seie were the Methodist Epiopal chuh at Anoka late yesterday for Benno Men- tel, foerly of Odsa, Min, who died Thursday on his fa thee miles o Anoka. He ny 58 ye ago, flint engaged in a broths. Hugo Menze], now ow, the cons and a daughter, who all live on the Menl f, and five bthors, One of whom i . R. Men- ], head of B. P Menl & Co. f rle, 4 eventh SL S, Minneapolis. A btber, Mx Men.l, is a druggist at Pir and another, Richard Menzel, is in the Benno Menzel. well kno to nearly , left Odsa in 1915, roving with his family to a fa he o L  Thl River Falls After living them about three yem he moved to Anok. Hugo Monet and Richard Menl, with their wives, and Robert Easel- man, an eIe who lives at High School Quint Loses To Madison by 22.1 Scor Showing pluck d endurance, the Ortonville Higl y night the Madison squad, with a 22 , I. The Ortonville team, handicapped by the absence of v- eral of the playe from last year's qlify on g me, w too light for the visitor. stayed glttS[y with the Madison play- held them well the fo part of the gmme, but the weight of their soon made itself Followers of high eh] basketball give the boys credit for having a good t, and gardless of the Loss of their first game, believe that a stiff playe will he de.loped on  been ndvced wry far. Larkin Construction Co. To Dissolve Fartnersldp Marn D. Larkln of Barry, Minne- sota, and Rob.t Schoen of thi city, Who ha been esully enged in the road building bme nder of "The Lrkin Con- ersidp to take tffeet ett /an xt, it  tmeed o Tae Mr. Laridu to retire from active work beeau of impirnd he The Larkin Constet[on Compay outte and their 1921 Auto Tax Must Be Paid to Get New 922 motor vehicle sale Juary 3, Mike Holm, seettat of state, announced this week, can be tawfu]ty on 1921 and older ears only after taxes  paid in full a commdn mistake that it necsary in 1921 to gister  not in u or temporarily out of repair. "It is important for applicants to that the 1921 glstmtio certifiers, or a with the applltion for 1922 gistTa- tion and lieee," said Stary Holm, Duplicate certificates can  ad fm this omee by making a sworn of ownership and paying by law." Seetary Holm ports that regis- of motor vehicles for 1921 is nrly ended bat that Jack of funds me and laelt of Community Civics Class Makes Survey of Homes As a part of their inanity civics, H. N. q'gethen had his ela s ia t t sub,oct make a sur- vey of the city to asrtain the total number of houses here, and the pro- portion of actual home owners to those nting their Hying quarte. headed by four workers, Verona Mow- ery, Josephine Anderson, Elton Hess, and Donald Stegner. The city was di- gatlon, and the following is a mary of their surly: Southwest Set,on (Koer 1Offe W, South Main and Cashtown) Ownel 3O, Beaters 28, Total 53. (Gumlcrson's E., and South Main) Owners 94, Rentem 37, Total 181. Pionr Store W. to Lake Sho, North Main) ors 19, Total 75. No, thcnst (Mark's Stere E, Noah Main--Owners 78 Renters 28, 'Total 96. Total owne, 258; Total renters, 102; Total owners and rentc, 355. As the flus given by local al men is 350 homes, the feel that the sudsy is fairly DOWLING FUND GROWS; MUCH MORE NEEDED Memorial Fund Receives Donation From "An Un- Imown Giver"--Commit- tee "On the Job." SU of the drive being made to be used is sota, to be known as the Dowling M rinl Sdaool, is rtain if donations are made by aH in the spirit 'ankn giver," who gave what be thought she u]d give out of a grate- fu[ heart, as evidenced by the letter letter, dated "Realising Dowling Memorial Fund. You for (Signed) An unknown giver." The Dowing Fund, with the past week, stands  fol- lows: Pviously Reported . $69.05 ,Unknown Giver ................. Geier Brotbe ............ Traey-Shumaker Co ........... Or Blev. & Mill Co ........... Barry Schl Children ... 2,75 * A. C. Saeger .................. 2.0 Grosenlek's ................. 00  C. C. Olin .......................... H. W. Sa'Is ...................... Korner Kale ............... 2.OO " A. A. Zwiener ............... T A, Farretl ............ 1.0tt " A Friend .............................. M. A. Mogren ................ G. C. Tyler ......................... 1.00  J. Shelver ..................... 1.00 D. M. O'Donrll ................ I.:. H. Tyler ............. : ............. TOTAL .............. $21280 Ortonvm n Win Over Madison ers b F a ar ofl9 p8 tendgy ight at Madison. Owing to the n- dition of the alley, tgh with tn- eficit pintting, the etps failed to spond to the " bslls" n ,neusly whanged in by beth ttmrat, risking the five n totals fsdl far he- need of help whom we mt the Madison Igion team at th tended nto aden n ng ties, bee de ow par, 2,300 pLna being the tokl foi igh school gymnasium bore. The having bn e leeesfl quint A return mate aid Mr. Davies, adding that, 0rtonville boy: near Laden, vll be played on the Pale Alleys ol ave 229 orphanages and 68 hsplta sf the on aver the whe a Ig his eity, Friday, December 9. 112 ellnies where lfi0,000 s ar boys lst week, are exlmeting a tight ins the gtator part of lt trted monthly. We have 11 homes ge with Madison as that team is Under what me Mr. 8h wip Mr. tu for girls sd fm qMrkish hat.! elaimed to be one of the best In the dissolu- d ven telelhone operato a  vei (Continued on page 8) not made kno. son dinner the latter MANY ATTEND FARM BUREAU ANNUAL MEET County Agent Gives Annual Report Bureau Has Suc- cessful Year. Many New Members Enrolled. A good attendan ted out, to e fourth annul eting of the Big Stone County Fa Bau held at Clinton last Thursday. The mtintf was called to order at eleven o'elodt by Ch. Matthaws, psident of tile organization, fo]lod by the port f the stary tasUl-. The b inessmen of CI nh a d , fine I- cheon at nn to all tbe attending the mting. The v.fteooa mttng included the port of the County Agent, State and National Fa Bureau, biness session, a talk on the war fiance loan d  lllustra- the Near East Relief work. The old eeutve board wa leeted by lation to serve . legal change or to a boad )re ,topos, o: ehaian of the ts]dp urals. A brief outlipm for the past twelve months deducted y Agent's report is a Organization -- Member sip e. paign put on, 611 memhs sured on permanent $5.OO basis. Tosidp units a organized and so mmit- tees appointed on plan of work for community. This work may be com- pleted in the near future. Affe- menL a being mle to change fo of gove, nment of organization to to.ship unit plan. Farm Crops--. Certified seed of aI. fails, clover, wheat, rye, h']ey, and Yields on the. 2. 1,0o0 pounds gimm alfalfa sumd thru this offi. 3,880 pounds clover anti timothy . 3,100 bush- ef 1Te, biey and wheat* , Weed sney mode of count),, sis- tunes given in eradication of noxious FO patches of s thistle erated. 4. Orchard spraying demonstrations eonduet Livetoek--L Shipping as.iati inga held of other oeiations on opetive marketing pl at South St. lal. 2. Two cars of high grade and pure.bre4 dairy cattle brought into the anty. 3. Aeted in eonsigl. tnent tes d distribution of lime steek, 4. Asistd in di eontteL Fo outbaks of cholera checked in hogs. Four hundred head of tested d the federal eredtd pl. I)manstrao of tvesflo in poultry put om 5. Poetry show put on, coops ar f show. $ paid oat in predg 6. Ten poultry lling demonstLione put on in dif. feren papa of vy, Soi]L Solid idlt y teats made of 2. F teen add pbehto trials mad tat different I of unty d plots to yield, g Four tala made in using swat clover  a Enomics.--1. 164 farm hl,bore placed on fas, 2. Building pln* fnished for f building 3. Coat sins. Aenian girls nberlng 2,- 000 have been reaed d mtuad to playing in our own ftorles 28,00. are being tatL Last year mum than 3,000,000 gata we nt in." In eoeetlon with the epig an of- (Gentaued o pm 8) Save! Do Your Christmas Shopping In Ortonville Pple of OrtonviHe d the su uding territory  begng offered exptiol bargains ia many lla of merekandise by the merchants of Or. a tmd whe it is very on th gond The Ortonville Hard- were Stere t loose with a nlg on ember 4, n which psetNealby ar The M. M. Johann Furniture Cam- pny has sorath that pmltt to be a 'qoe.k-t  bl0w to the gent- n ttatt bih ptie. Tr dry.Ira's will  mailed t on flint of next  te e home k FOII the big sid recently pu on by the Kollitl Metil Comp&ny they m to ndtt one especially for Chrlstm Shoppers d in eer that each family might redw'tbeir aeh dale of "n'prices" t mpany wll mdl out spetil circulars to all in this territory. In next week's Issue of the Ind endent you will find artisemts rom practically every meremt in the ciW with Sl0ial pti m,M indue, meats to buy where you will v, THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT 3 t 2 ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8 1921  NUMBER 31 SEASON OPEN YOU GON'NA IT" QUESTION Prohibits Molesting iHousesHow to Trap Bothering the in this county have been the Auditor's office in asking for advice on laws. The present laws trapping of muskrat and December 1 this year to 1922. It is expressly made t mink or muskrat with a possess, or disturb any or- muskrat in any manner ex- injure or destroy any aink or beaver house, den that has been bother- of the "county who spend their at this time of year, are going to trap musk- the law strictly forbids a muskrat house. the muskrats in this coun- their homes in rat houses in sloughs and lakes, are a few bank rats in the In trapping "house trapper digs a hole in the and places his traps that the rats sit upon. covered up and the rat generally sits in the s is the only method in rats can be trapped, as Is spent wholly inside of in the winter, except dive down the water to fodder for themselves or Wheaton- Gazette-Report- the Attorney General holds that traps canffot muskrat houses, several lo- from that vicinity having matter to his attention. General replied without the law means that no a trap in a rat house. trappers Io not feel at the way the law reads, as the above pa- ls that trappers from will, if they follow the trap right shore and will and place their traps the South Dakota law has against digging into the trappers from South Catch all the rats on the the Minnesota trapper can a rat when it is running of the ice or some such the trapper can run up salt on his tail. Of is no law against trap- tm the cement sidewalks of trapping them in corn field, provided they to change their habitat. Sells the trapper a license and then says they can- in the only place where At least that is who want to trap up the situation." g trappers from houses is in Section 50 General Laws of 1919 follows: "No person shall or destroy any musk- beaver house, den, dam vlace except when nimals are injurihg my e commissioner may animals to be removed or permit the killing of and the destruction of or other structures erected Petition Minn. Ave. the city council at a of that body Monday building rejected by interested prop- the council to portion of Minne- ar the Ed. Shult resi- rejection were based of a section of the disposition unless all parties agreed. came before the those of a routine na- the allowance of bills. will be on Decem- for Davisous. at the Pioneer store and e Co. gave a surprise the home of Mr. and Tuesday evening Evelyn Doohar, who morning for her Progressive was played and lnnch leather purse Doohar as a Relief Corps Presents Flags to Boy Scouts On Tuesday evening, December 6, a very impllbssive ceremony was car- lied out at the high school gymna- sium. The Women's Relief Corps present- ed two Flags to the two local troops of Boy Scouts. The Patrol leaders stood at attention, while the presenta- tion speech was delivered by Miss Martha Rothwell, Corps Patriotic In- structor, the two senior patrol leaders, Donald Walker and Gerhard Walseth, came forward and received the Flags from Mrs. Chamberlain and Mrs. J. T. Crippen. Mr. Stegner then made a speech of thanks on behalf of the Scouts. Dr. E. N. Schoen in a few l words impressed on the boys the im- portance of the occasion. Mr. J. T. Crippen spoke of the love they should bear for the Flag, and Rev. P. J. Bockoven spoke briefly on the 10th Scout law, "A Scout is Brave," stres- sing the fact that moral heroism is a higher and nobler type than mere physical bravery. The formal part of the meeting was closed by all repeating the Flag sal- ute, "I pledge allegiance to my Flag and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation indivisible, with Liberty and Justice for all." Henry Dittes and Wife Have Narrow Escape Altho Henry Dittes and his wife were thrown completely clear of the buggy in which they were riding against a parked automobile in front of the Johnson Furniture company, i they miraculously escaped serious in- jury Tuesday afternoon, when the team they were driving became fright- i ened and ran away. Mr. Dittes who i lives south of town was driving up main street when one of the tugs be- came loose and the pole of his buggy d41opped to the ground, swerving the conveyance sharply to the left and col- liding with an automobile parked at the side of the street. Mr. Dittes sus- tained a lacerated cheek, while his wife escaped injury, altho she was badly frightened. The horses broke loose from the buggy after the collis- sion, and were captured further down :the street. COUNTY TO GIVE CORN TO NEAR HEAVY BIDDING DRIVES DOWN PRICE ON STATE HIGHWAY CONTRACTS Scully & Connelly Concerns get Work I n Big Stone CountymMakes Work for Men and Teams. The twenty-seven and one-half mile section of trunk highway No. 28, from Browns Valley eastward to Grace- ville will be gravel-surfaced at a cost of $67,856.41 under tentative contract awards by Charles M. Babcock, state highway commissioner, this week The big job is among 38 projects for 3b'0 miles of graveling and grading on the first group of winter jobs under the "more-work--better roads" move- ment to speed needed highway im- provements and relieve unemployment. The award in each case was made on the best bid, according to John H. Mullen, deputy commissioner and chief highway engineer, and large savings of trunk highway funds were ejected on extremely low bids due in part to wide competition. There were about 25 bidders for each job, against 10 to 12 ordinarily. Gravel surfacing W let at an average of $2,000 a male yard mile haul at 16 to 30 cents c'm, pared with 30 to 60 cents paid last season. The lowest bid on the single paving project was $2.17 a yard for concrete--about 20 per cent or more than $5,000 a mile under the regular season figure of $27,000. Other jobs are to be advertised soon, it was announced, to profit by current low prices and escape pos- sible increases next spring when gen- eral operations start, as well as to relieve unemployment this winter. Applications for work should be made direct to contractors, it was ad- ded, no hiring being done by the high- way department. Work is to start at once on most jobs which are to be com- pleted by April 1 or sooner under the contracts. The contract for graveling Trunk Highway No. 28 was "awarded to Scul- ly and Connelly companies of St. Paul, and the work will be done with trudks. Two,pits will be opened in Big Stone county, to furnish gravel for this work, one at West Toqua lake and the other at Beardsley. The pit at Beardsley it is understood will be equipped with a steam shovel to load the truek ...... Lutheran Choir to Give EAST SUFFERERS Song S00rvio A Christmas song service will be given by Dr. Richard 01son of Minne- apolis, and the Ortonville Lutheran Choir, at the Orpheum on Sunday eve- fling, December 18, to which the pub- lic is cordially invited to attend, Dr. J. Richard Olson is a speaker of note and very well known as church editor of the Minneapolis Journal.. Follow- ingAs the order of service. Christmas Gospel Invocation Holy Night, Peaceful Night ...... Gruber Hark! The Herald Angels Sing ...... .......................................... Mendelssohn The Light of Bethleham ................ Abt (Interpretation, Dr. J. Richard Olson) Today There is Ringing.:Christiansen Lift Up Your Heads .......... Wennerberg Intermission-- Beautiful Saviour-- Bleak Forth Into Joy ................ Barnby (Interpretation, Dr. J. Richard Olson) O So of God ...................... Curschman 'Tis The Evening's Holy Hour ........ ....................... Doxology-- . ........... :; ..... Beethoven Benediction-- A Lutheran song service--not a con- cert. Admission free. Note the date ---one week from next Sunday eve- ning. Ortonville Has Another Aviator; Maybe Airplanes have 1]fen so common humming over the cry the past year, that no special attention .was diverted to a machine appearing in the skies last Monday, coming from the north until those who granced at it noticed that it seemed very unsteady, making many dips, turns and wobbly motions, uncommon in straight flying. It was known that Jack Anderson had just flown in from Minneapolis in his ma- chine and when he was aet on the street some few hours later, 'he was asked whose machine that was doing all .the cavottihg.  ack solved the mystery by explaining that Chester Olson, local implement man piloted the machine down from Clinton, hving sole control of the ship on the flight, and that the new pilot had a hard time keeping the road. Legion Basketball Team Meets Madison Friday Friday evening, December 9, the Ortonville Legion Basketball quint will meet the Madison Legion team at the high school gymnasium here. The Ortonville boys won their first game of the season over the Milan boys last week, are expecting a tight game "with Madison as that team is claimed to be one of the best in the state. Remember the date. State Director of Near East -Relief Speaks at Farm Bureau Meeting-- Chas. A. Matthews Is Manager. Farmers of Big Stone county were the first in the state of Minnesota to respond to the Near East Relief Gift Grain Drive last year, which was con- ducted under direction of the Farm Bureau, said J. M. Davies, state di- rector who spoke at the annual meeting of the Big Stone County Farm Bureau held at Clinton last Thursday. Continuing, Mr. Davies said, "This is regarded by the Near East Relief and by the Farm Bureau as being of a good deal of value in setting an example which was fol- lowed by other counties thruout the state." Speaking in the interest of the drive now being conducted, Mr. Davies made the statement that the Near East Relief organization guarantees that 100 per cent of all gift corn do- nated for this cause will get into the hands of the sufferers. "All expenses of whatever nature are met from. oth- er sources," said the speaker, "and no grain whatever is to be sold for that purDose." The Near East Relief was incor- porated by an act of Congress in 1919 Mr. Davies explained, which necessi- tates that regular and complete re- ports be made to Congress of all its financial transactions. The last report issued showed that the expense for collection and administration of the charities of the Near East Relief was only 5 cents out of every dollar, leav- ing 95 cents of all cofitributions for actual relief, which is understood to be the best record of any charitable organization. A film entitled "Alice In Wonder- land" was shown. It was taken late this summer by a party of relief work- ers and depicted conditions in the Near East at the present time. The picture which was unpesed showed two sides of the conditions existing there--the conditions where the chil- dren and others are Under the care of the Relief workers and those out- side of their care. "One hundred and twenty-thousand orphan children are now under the care of the Near East Relief with pos- sibly two hundred thousand more in need of help whom we are unable to care for on account of lack of funds," said. Mr. Davies, adding that, "we have 229 orphanages and 63 hospitals, 112 clinics where 150,000 cases are treated monthlY. We have 11 homes for girls rescued from Turkish hat- (Continued on page 8) 4, Activity of County Nurse Shown In Reports Made The reports rendered by Miss Agnes Rogashaska, county nurse, covering the months of October and November, show great activities on her part in the different phases of the work as- signed to her. Her reports, for these months follow: School Districts No. 3, 7, 5, 54, 2, 21, 63, 39, 2,7, 60-:-Pupils Inspected 162, Talks to pupils in class 7, Defects: De- fective Vision 42, Defective hearing 5, Nasal Obstructions 12, Enlarged ton- sils 29, Cervical Adenites 7, Defective teeth 54, Underweight 78. Correc- tions: Tonsils treated 3, teeth treat- led 8, infant welfare visits i0, home visits to school children 15, sanitary inspection visits 20, attended meeting of nursing cormnittee, spent day at Glenwood seeing American Red Cross Pageant. Visits of two Red Cross of- ficials. Explained work to Civic ClUb of Clinton. Donations from W. C. T. U. of Malta for Loan Closet 2 white annel night gowns, 3 bath towels, wash cloths, 4 pillow slips, 3 hand towels, also some things for layettes, 01d clothes for needy families. " Conducted 4 classes a week in Home Hygiene.and Care of Sick: 1 at Odes- sa, 2 at Clinton, 1 at Ortonville. Mad. Dist. No. 50, 10, 9, 4, 6, 14--- Inspected 95 pupils. Weighed and measmxd 295, Defects noted: defec- tive vision 28, enlarged tonsils 13, de- fective teeth 23, underweight 106. Made 74 Child's Welfare calls. Gave talk on the underweight child at Far- mers' clffb in Prior town hall. Talk on Health crusade to parents of Dis- trict 10. Idade calls with Miss Colby of State Board of Control, who is su- pervisor of this district of children who are under gumMianship of the state. Conducted classes in Home Hy- giene, as before. Benno Menzel Dead; Funeral at Anoka Funeral services were conducted in tle Methodist Episcopal church at Anoka late yesterday for Benno Men- zel, formerly of Odessa, Minn., who died Thursday on his farm three miles est of Anoka. He was born in Ger- tny 58 years ago, came to Minne- sota in 1888 and first engaged in a mercantile business at Odessa with a brother, Hugo Menzel, now a bank- er there. Surviving him are the wid- ow, three sons and a daughter, who all live on the Menzel farm, and five brothers, one of whom is B. R. Men- zel, head of B. P Menzel & Co., fur- rters, 54 seventh St. S. Minneapolis. A brother, Max Menzel, is a druggist at Pipestone and another, Richard Menzel, is in the lumber business at Odessa.--Minneapolis Journal. Benno Menzel, well known to nearly everyone in the county, left Odessa  in 1915, moving with his family onto a farm he owned near Thief River Falls. After living there about three years he moved to Anoka. Hugo Menzel and Richard Menzel, with their wives, and Robert Engel- man, an uncle who lives at Correll attended the funeral. High School Quint Loses To Madison by 22-1 Score Showing pluck and endurance, the Ortonville High School basketball team went down in defeat last Friday night before the Madison squad, with a ore of 22 to 1. The Ortonville team, handicapped by the absence of sev- eral of the players from last year's teanh who could not qualify on ac- count of the no smoking rule, was too light for the visitors. The home boys stayed grittily with the Madison play- ers and held them well the fore part of the game, but the weight of their opponents soon made itself felt and Madison went over for a victory. Followers of high school basketball give the boys credit for having a good team, and regardless of the loss of their first game, believe that a stiff bunch of players will be developed with more experience before the sea- son has been advanced very far. Larkin Construction Co. To Dissolve Partnership Martin D. Larkin of Barry, Minne- sota, and Robert Schoen of this city, who have been successfully engaged in the road building business under 1921 Auto Tax Must Be Paid to Get New License New 1922 motor vehicle licenses on sale January 3, Mike Holm, secretary of state, announced this week, can be issued lawfully on 1921 and older cars only after taxes are paid in full. The statement is intended to correct a common mistake that it was not necessary in 1921 to register cars not in use or temporarily out of repair. "It is important for applicants to remember that the 1921 registration certificate, or a sworn statement in case it has been lost, ,must be sent in with the application for 1922 registra- tion and license," said Secretary Holm. Duplicate certificates can be had from this office by making a sworn statement of ownership and paying the 25 cent fee required by law." Secretary Holm reports ' that regis- tration of motor vehlcles for 1921 is nearly ended but that lack of funds among some and lacl of indications n the part of others is causing some delay. Community Civics Class Makes Survey of Homes As a part of their duties in eom- munity civics, H. N. Tragethon had his class in that subject make a sur- vey of the city to ascertain the total number of houses here, and the pro- portion of actual home owners to those renting their living quarters. The class was divided in four sections, headed by four workers, Verona Mow- ery, Josephine Anderson, Elton Hess, and Donald Stegner. The city was di- vided into four fields for their investi- gation, and the following is a sum- mary of their survey: Southwest Section (Korner Kafe W., South Main and Cashtown)--Ownm,s 30, Renters 23, Total 53. Southeast Gunderson's E., and South Main)- Owners 94, Renters 37, Total 131. Northwest (Pioneer Store W. to Lake Shore, North Main) Owners 56, Rent- e.rs 19, Total 75. Northeast (Mark's Store E., North Main)--Owners 73, Renters 23, 'Total 96. Total owners, 253; Total renters, 102; Total owners and renters, 355. As the figures given by local real estate men is 350 homes, the workers feel that the survey is fairly accurate. DOWLING FUND GROWS; MUCH MANY ATTEND FARM BUREAU ANNUAL MEET ounty Agent Gives Annual Report. Bureau Has Suc- cessful Year. Many New Members Enrolled. A good attendance turned out to the fourth annual meeting of the Big Stone County Farm Bureau held at Clinton last Thursday. The meeting was called to order at eleven o'clock by Chas. Matthsws, president of the organization, followed by the report of the secretary- treasurer. The bust messmen of Clinton served a fine lun- cheon at noon to all those attending the meeting. The afternoon meeting included the annual report of the County Agent, report on State and National Farm Bureau, business session, a talk on the war finance loan and an illustra- tive talk on the Near East Relief work. The old executive board ws reelected by acclamation to serve un- til sufficient votes were received to ef- fect the legal change over to a board of directors composed of chairman of the township unitS. A brief'outline of the work carried on in the county for the past twelve months deducted frQm the County Agent's report is as folows: Organization -- Membership cam- paign put on, 611 members secured on permanent $5.00 basis. Township units are organized and some commit- tees appointed on plan of work for community. This work may be com- pleted in the near future. Arrange- ments are being made to change fmma of government of organization tO township unit plan. Farm Crops-. Certified seed of al- falfa, clover, wheat, rye, barley, and oats put out in each township. Yields checked on these. 2. 1,000 pounds grimm alfalfa secured thru this office. 3,380 pounds clover and timothy se- cured thru office. 3332 pounds sweet clover secured thru office. 3,100 bush- els of rye, barley and wheat. 3. Weed survey made of county, assis- tance given in eradication of noxious weeds. Four patches of sow thistle located and eradicated. 4. Orchard spraying demonstrations conducted" Liveetockl. Shipping associatio organized at Odessa and Correll. Meet- ings held of other associations on eo- MORE NEEDED[ perative market00n00 plan at suth St- Paul. 2. Two cars of high grade and Memorial Fund Receives Donation From "An Un- known Giver"--Commit- tee "On the Job." Success of the drive being made for a 'fund robe used in erecting a school for crippled children in Minne- sota, to be known as the Dowling Me- morial School, is certain if donations are made by all in the spirit of the "unknown giver," who gave what she thought she could give out of a grate- ful heart, as evidenced by the letter which accompanied her offering. Her letter, dated at Ortonville, reads, "Realizing how fortunate our family has been in escaping injury or handi- cap such as Mr. Dowling experienced, I wish to add a bit, my dollar, to the Dowling MemOrial Fund, Yours for the little ones. (Signed) An unknown giver." The Dowling Fund, with donations received the past week, stands as fol- lows: Previously Reported ............ $169.05 Unknown Giver .................. 1.0(P Geier Brothers .................... 10.00t_ Tracy-Shumaker Co ............ 500 . Oft. Elev. & Mill Co ............. 5.00"" Barry School Children ...... 2.75 " A. I Moore .......................... 2.00 " A. C. Saeger ........................ 2.00 '" Grosenick's .......................... 2.00  C. C. Olsen .......................... 2.00"" H. W. Sarvis ........................ 2.00 " Korner Kafe ........................ 2.00 " A. A. Zwiener .................... 1.OOV T A. Farrell .......................... 1.00 w" A Friend ................................ 1.(}Or.," M. A. Mogren ...................... 1.OOv" G. C. Tyler .......................... 1.00 / H. J. Shelver ...................... 1.00 ' D. M. O'Donnell ................ 1.00 " H. H. Tyler ............. : ............. LOO t/ TOTAL .............................. $212.80 Ortonville Pin Busters Win Over Madison pure-bred dairy cattle brought into the county. 3. Assisted in consign- ment sales and distribution of live stock. 4, Assisted in disease control. Four outbreaks of cholera checked in hogs. Four hundred head of cattle tested under the federal accredited. plan. Demonstrations of tuberculosis in poultry put on. 5. Poultry show put on, coops secured for show. $40Q paid out in premiums. 6. Ten poultry culling demonstrations put on in dif- ferent parts of county. SoilsL Solid acidity tests made of different sections of county. 2. Four- teen acid phosphate trials made oa different soils of county and plots checked as to yield. 3. Four trials made in using sweet clover as a gree manur Economics.l. 164 farm laborers placed on farms. 2. Building plans furnished for farm buildings. 3. Cost eros. Armenian girls numbering 25,o 000 have been rescued and returned to their homes and from 150,000 to 200,- 000 still remain captives. We are em- ploying in our own factories 23,000. Children are being educated. Last year more than 3,000,000 garments were sent in." In connection with the campaign the Near East Relief is making an ef- (Continued on page S) Save! Do Your Christmas Shopping In Ortonville People of Ortonville and the sur- rounding territory are being offered exceptional bargains in many lines of merckandise by the merchants of Or- tonville at a timd when it is very unusual for stores to make reductions" on thei goods. The Ortonville Hard- ware Store cut loose with a sale on November 26 which is to last unt21 De- cember 24, in which practically every article on their shelves has been ' ed down. . ..The M. M. Johnson Furniture C_m- pany has something that promises to be a "qmock-out" blow to the gentle- the firm name of "The Larkin Con- . -- struction Company,, will dissolve part- The OrtonviUe . Bow|ing, Quint de- nership,.to take etfect s JanUary 1, feared the Madison Mineraltim tow. ntxt, it was announced on Tuesday by ] era by a margin of. 19 pins Tuesday Mr. Schoen following the decision of[night at Madison. Owing to the con- Mr. Larkin to retire from active work | dition of the alleys, together with in- because of impred healS. | efficient pin-setting, the setups failed |  $, The Larkin Construction Conpany to respond to the groove balls nu- has maintained veral large grading outfits and their operations have ex- tended into adjoining counties, besides having been successful in obtaining contracts near Luden, North Dakota. where a large crew was at work dur- ing the greater part of last season Under what name Mr. Schoen wil! conduct the business after the dissolu- tion was not made known. merously whanged in by both teams, aakiug the five men totals fall far be- low par, 2,300 pins being the total for he stellar Quint. A return match =rill be played on the Palace Alleys of his city, Friday, December 9. Mr. and Mrs. Otto Harris entertain- ed seven telephone operators a a veni son dinner the latter part of rest week man epremfitlng high prices. Their circulars Wilt  mailed m on flint ofnext week to every home t this eeetion. Following the big sale recently put. on by the Kollitz Mercantile Company they are to conduct one especially for Christmas Shoppers and in order that each family might receive  their sche- dule of "new 'prices" that company will mail out special circulars to all in this territory, In next week's issue of the Inde- pendent you will find advertisements from practically every merchant in the city with special prices and induce- ments to buy where you will save money.