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December 8, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
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December 8, 1921
 

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DECEMBER 8, 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT file Independent EVERY THURSDAY by the & Merchants Printing Co. President Harris, Vice-president L. E. Lundgren, Secreta4y Walter Dinnell, Treasurer 0ARD OF DIRECTORS Walter Dinnell John Kaercher 01son L.E. Indgren Grace F. Kaercher A. B. Kaereher Kaercher Mana Editor as second-class matter 1920, at the post office at Minn., under the Act of 1879. $2.00 PER YEAR Rates on Application Advt. Representative. SELECT LIST. Bank, - St. Paul St., - - Minneapolis Kep 1 WORK NEEDED. C. Atkeson, representative at Washington in his said many very pointed le things from which we of the gloomy out look at of the year, and des- the situation has been for on the farms and else- is, I believe, a lifting of clouds that have depress- readjustment, which all PeOple know must come, has thoughtless people poorly to meet its distress- The higher we fly of prosperity, the harder we of adversity, and there statute or economic law to against their own fol- Agriculture has seen before and came up stall- it is going to do tiffs time, country, our and the best gov- ever devised, however dis- be we must continue to World in agriculture, indus- and constructive remedy for much of the unrest and discontent little more good old fash- There is no necess- considerable idleness in if every man in it were to work at any job he- the price he can get for weeks ago President led an unemployment con- last week of the con- of' agrl- the Washington of the National Grange, to the membership. The on Agriculture made a report which was outstanding effort of seemed to be to get it Without doing or saying offend represen- labor. to make the Grange of deliberate thought action rather than a bureau. In- to formulate public been my hope to focal- at least so fat" as Grange is concerned, up- and the administrative of the government, and and consideration by the soundness of UPon public and economic has convinced that an unhealthy con- too much from leg- the government. The is that which governs Put it in another way, should end its activi- equal op- citizens. Progress personal initiative human aspiration for Our people should not government to do for should do. for them- AND CITIZENSHIP. ways for your neigh- You--by the backyard and by the front in winter. Any be detected in an quickly. and front' side- of a community re- A man who takes and who strives things in life can conditions. There in his backyard. and simple; so is lot. There may OWers and nice green case the whole will of order and neat- and the man who neat will no- front sidewalk clean. for this. It lies it, who takes pride in! Who has the interests ty ,t heart, who likes World a better place put his be- at home first. His the welcome path to aeighbors. 00.00---00-'Congress I Convene£ i I r• III I who is indifferent to civic affairs an(l whose thoughts do not rise above self. He may swe.ep his porch stoop, but his front sidewalk will be packed with snow and ice. SHOW THE CONFREENCE. American arm officers watched a centrifugal machine gun, firing 1,200 shots a minute, riddle a steel target at Sea Girt, N. J., the other day. The same week a new bomb, weigh- ing 4,300 pounds, was dropped 4,100 feet from an airplane at the Mary- lond proving grounds. It tore a cra- ter in the earth 100 feet across an(l 25 feet deep. Dropped in the cente of a city block the force of such an )xplosion would shatter all the build- rags in it and kill every living soul they contained. It wouldn't sink a battleship, it would blow it to pieces, detonating the ship's own magazine, and shattering fragments of it and of the 1,500 men who manned her far and near over the water. • Uncle Sam should stage a few such demonstrations for the entertain- ment of the Disanmament Conference. Even if he had to blow up several 42-i million-dollar battleships, it would be money well spent.--Capper's Weekly. MANUFACTURER'S PRICES MUST DROP. Most of the food consumed by cit- izens of this country, comes from or is made from farm products. At the present time prices to the farmers of food products raised are within a few cents of the 1913 pre-war prices. The farmer gets 20c per bushel for his oats, about $1.00 for good wheat, 28c for corn and 6c per pound for his pork. What do the consumers pay for it? About fifty per cent more than they paid in 1913. Where is all this spread going to ? Locate the spread and you have the reason for the high cost of living. The farmers' products ar down to the same old price and the consumer pays fifty per cent more than he did before the war. The far- mer has taken his loss, but laborers in the manufacturing districts are still getting from 50 to 65 per cent more in wages than in 1913, according to figures given out by the U. S. Depart- ment of Labor in November, and the manufactmr, used to the war-time profiteering days, is reluctant to get back to his fonmer scale of profits. As the little magazine, "Farm Life" says it, "you say you can't reduce your prices for manufactured goods because the cost of living is so high that wages must stay up. And you complain that the farmer is not a lib- eral buyer of this expensive manu- factured product. Thus things are in a jam and the restoration of pros- perous times is delayed. The farmel has take his medicine. He had to take it. He is helpless to straighten out the tangle in the industrial centers." It is plainly apparent that the "high cost of living" must be reduced thru co-operation of laborers and manufac- turers in the manufacturing centers Those living in the cities should try. to solve this problem at once. One thing is certain, manufactured goods must come down in price to meet the drop in farm. products, or the lrice of farm products must come up, and soon too, or there will be a scarcity of farmers. COSTLY NEGLECT. In commenting upon the indifference of some farmers to produce good milk, Mr. Gordon H. Shepard, mmmger of the Eau Claire, Wis., Milk Producers' association said: "Why is it that the tory. A few eytra minutes devoted average farmer wilt work so hard get- ting in the preliminary process, and when it comes to the final step of uarketing the milk he wi!l he so care- less? Bv marketing I mean the care of the milk from the time it is milked until it is delivered to the fac-: few extra minutes devoted to the fac- tors,. A few extra miuutes devoted to the process of cooling the milk and consider the man seeing that all utensils are y sterilized and cleaned would undoubt- edly mean a large increase in the re- turns from the product marketed." This is a pointed •question and should lead the indifferent man to re- alize that he has gone to a large ex- pense in producing milk and that it is highly imoprtant that h gets highly important thaf he gives it the right kind of care and that he cleans the utensils properly, if he is to re- ceive the highest price for his pro- duct. No step in milk production will return so large a profit as that of giv- ing attention to the production of ciean, wholesome milk and properly cooling it before delivering it to the factory. If the buttermaker is to make good butter,.or the cheesemaker good cheese, the producer Lmust pay attention to the care of the milk. CORRECTING PETE PERKINS. Pete Perkins says "The hoppers, the heat, the hail and drought, embezzle all mv coppers and nearly starve me I out! "The pip assails my chickens, the ] cholera my swine, while crickets raise I the dickens with pure Manila twine! I My horses catch the colic, the stag-i gers and the bots, while pocket goph- ers frolic across my garden plots! I] make a war on thistles and have them ] in retreat, when lo, a cyclone whistles / across my field of wheat! In spring, with fleeting bunions, with ginger in] my arm, I start to planting onions] upon my smiling farm. In glee I sow/ tomatoes, my water-cress and wheat, my egg-plant and potatoes and other things to eat. I toil until the leather is smooth upon my shins, forgiving worms and weather for all preeedmtng sins. There is no cause for mourn- ing till June is on the track, then with- out word or warning the fiends come tripping back! This program's been repeated each season without fail! I call myself defeated; my property's for salel" "I get your line f blueing," says I to Neighbor Pete, "but what's the good in chewing the ragIets of defeat ? Since Adam started disking the jun- gles by request, tornadoes have been frisking across this mortal nest! We've had our floods and freezes, our days of scanty rain our bugs and our diseases, and thistles in our grain. When first I started farming, I says to dad, says I, 'I might as well be arming to fight the Hessian fly,--the Hessian fly and chiggers, the colic and the blight, and all the other jig-In gers who think they want a fight; but I| dad, I'm more than willing, I hanker I for the fun; I know I'll make a kill-I| ing before the scrap is done! Youi will, too, Peter Perkins, so ditch thi: t line of wail; stay by your gourds and gherkins; forget about the saleP' --By J. Edward Tufft. Five 8ete of Twine. Weston, Is.--Mrs. Rose McOombs, wife of a farmer living rner here, is the mother of the fifth pair of twim in eight years. All the ten children are well. A simter of Mrs. McOombs, Mrs. Arle Forbes of Sioux City, re- cently became the mother of her sec- ond set of triplets. Another sister of Mrs. McCombs, who lives in Sacra- mento, Cal., has two pair of twins. i i With the recklessness o" a cowboy, Albert B. Fall, Secretary of the In- terior, joined in with "cowpunchers" and assisted in stemming a buffalo stampede at the buffalo farm in Yel- lowstone Park. Only an expert horse- buffalos become blind with fright and fury and charge at anything. ALL ROAD WORK and new buildings are re- rted by The Improvement letin. Gives calls for bids of State Highway Com- mission; 52 numbers for $6.00 with Daily Re- mlnder FREE if sub- scription is paid this month. eae day.  Improvement Bulletin CIothbound  Minneapolis, Minn. THE WEST HOTEL ' Minneapolis, Minnesota. ii Following t h e downward trend in prices is now offer° ing rooms at-- $1%0 to $2.00---Without Bath $2.00 to $5.00---With Bath ,, ii i i With Moderate Priced Cafe-- In Connection Trucking It doesn't make any difference to us whether your job of hauling takes us 1 mile or 250 miles from Ortonville-- we are prepared to go --promptly a n d eco- nomically. We make a specialty of "long dis- tance hauling." Just Phone 91 • III I Wm. Cummens Ortonville, Minn. JUST THINK ! A LIBERTY BELL FREE OF CHARGE. This bank wants every boy and girl of this city to have one of these unique home safes. They will help you save your dimes and nickles. Open a Savings Account today and get a Liberty Bell Bank. 5 PER CENT PAID ON ALL SAVINGS ORTONVILLE STATE BANK John Carlson, President. "C. J. Stark, Cashier. H.A. Stucke, Ass't. Cashier. PAGE S @ at lt00an$ ToYou A stylish, well-made, trim looking shoe with a "shock absorber" built into the eole. That's what you get when you buy a Dr. A. Reed Cushion Shoe. The famous inner sole is to your foot what the tire is o your wheel--it takes the bumps and makes going a pleasure. Come in and "feel" the Cushion ./ Prices Reduced On All Styles I I I Orfonvi I I e, Mi n n esota i i The Pie House Special Plate Dinner Tasty. Lunches Home Cooking Home Baking Special attention to show and dance people " Yours for Quality and Service C. A. BEARD, Proprietor The new Granite taken frtm our quarries recently develop- ed near Odessa will be vailed Ortonville Ruby Red Granite We can recommend this Granite as the most beautiful ad finest for tombstones and other purposes where Granite is used. ' If interested see our display. See Our Prkes lk00ore suy00n00 0RI000VIL[[ MOHUM[MI WORKS JOHNSON & LINDHOM, Props. DECEMBER 8, 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT file Independent EVERY THURSDAY by the & Merchants Printing Co. President Harris, Vice-president L. E. Lundgren, Secreta4y Walter Dinnell, Treasurer 0ARD OF DIRECTORS Walter Dinnell John Kaercher 01son L.E. Indgren Grace F. Kaercher A. B. Kaereher Kaercher Mana Editor as second-class matter 1920, at the post office at Minn., under the Act of 1879. $2.00 PER YEAR Rates on Application Advt. Representative. SELECT LIST. Bank, - St. Paul St., - - Minneapolis Kep 1 WORK NEEDED. C. Atkeson, representative at Washington in his said many very pointed le things from which we of the gloomy out look at of the year, and des- the situation has been for on the farms and else- is, I believe, a lifting of clouds that have depress- readjustment, which all PeOple know must come, has thoughtless people poorly to meet its distress- The higher we fly of prosperity, the harder we of adversity, and there statute or economic law to against their own fol- Agriculture has seen before and came up stall- it is going to do tiffs time, country, our and the best gov- ever devised, however dis- be we must continue to World in agriculture, indus- and constructive remedy for much of the unrest and discontent little more good old fash- There is no necess- considerable idleness in if every man in it were to work at any job he- the price he can get for weeks ago President led an unemployment con- last week of the con- of' agrl- the Washington of the National Grange, to the membership. The on Agriculture made a report which was outstanding effort of seemed to be to get it Without doing or saying offend represen- labor. to make the Grange of deliberate thought action rather than a bureau. In- to formulate public been my hope to focal- at least so fat" as Grange is concerned, up- and the administrative of the government, and and consideration by the soundness of UPon public and economic has convinced that an unhealthy con- too much from leg- the government. The is that which governs Put it in another way, should end its activi- equal op- citizens. Progress personal initiative human aspiration for Our people should not government to do for should do. for them- AND CITIZENSHIP. ways for your neigh- You--by the backyard and by the front in winter. Any be detected in an quickly. and front' side- of a community re- A man who takes and who strives things in life can conditions. There in his backyard. and simple; so is lot. There may OWers and nice green case the whole will of order and neat- and the man who neat will no- front sidewalk clean. for this. It lies it, who takes pride in! Who has the interests ty ,t heart, who likes World a better place put his be- at home first. His the welcome path to aeighbors. 00.00---00-'Congress I Convene£ i I r• III I who is indifferent to civic affairs an(l whose thoughts do not rise above self. He may swe.ep his porch stoop, but his front sidewalk will be packed with snow and ice. SHOW THE CONFREENCE. American arm officers watched a centrifugal machine gun, firing 1,200 shots a minute, riddle a steel target at Sea Girt, N. J., the other day. The same week a new bomb, weigh- ing 4,300 pounds, was dropped 4,100 feet from an airplane at the Mary- lond proving grounds. It tore a cra- ter in the earth 100 feet across an(l 25 feet deep. Dropped in the cente of a city block the force of such an )xplosion would shatter all the build- rags in it and kill every living soul they contained. It wouldn't sink a battleship, it would blow it to pieces, detonating the ship's own magazine, and shattering fragments of it and of the 1,500 men who manned her far and near over the water. • Uncle Sam should stage a few such demonstrations for the entertain- ment of the Disanmament Conference. Even if he had to blow up several 42-i million-dollar battleships, it would be money well spent.--Capper's Weekly. MANUFACTURER'S PRICES MUST DROP. Most of the food consumed by cit- izens of this country, comes from or is made from farm products. At the present time prices to the farmers of food products raised are within a few cents of the 1913 pre-war prices. The farmer gets 20c per bushel for his oats, about $1.00 for good wheat, 28c for corn and 6c per pound for his pork. What do the consumers pay for it? About fifty per cent more than they paid in 1913. Where is all this spread going to ? Locate the spread and you have the reason for the high cost of living. The farmers' products ar down to the same old price and the consumer pays fifty per cent more than he did before the war. The far- mer has taken his loss, but laborers in the manufacturing districts are still getting from 50 to 65 per cent more in wages than in 1913, according to figures given out by the U. S. Depart- ment of Labor in November, and the manufactmr, used to the war-time profiteering days, is reluctant to get back to his fonmer scale of profits. As the little magazine, "Farm Life" says it, "you say you can't reduce your prices for manufactured goods because the cost of living is so high that wages must stay up. And you complain that the farmer is not a lib- eral buyer of this expensive manu- factured product. Thus things are in a jam and the restoration of pros- perous times is delayed. The farmel has take his medicine. He had to take it. He is helpless to straighten out the tangle in the industrial centers." It is plainly apparent that the "high cost of living" must be reduced thru co-operation of laborers and manufac- turers in the manufacturing centers Those living in the cities should try. to solve this problem at once. One thing is certain, manufactured goods must come down in price to meet the drop in farm. products, or the lrice of farm products must come up, and soon too, or there will be a scarcity of farmers. COSTLY NEGLECT. In commenting upon the indifference of some farmers to produce good milk, Mr. Gordon H. Shepard, mmmger of the Eau Claire, Wis., Milk Producers' association said: "Why is it that the tory. A few eytra minutes devoted average farmer wilt work so hard get- ting in the preliminary process, and when it comes to the final step of uarketing the milk he wi!l he so care- less? Bv marketing I mean the care of the milk from the time it is milked until it is delivered to the fac-: few extra minutes devoted to the fac- tors,. A few extra miuutes devoted to the process of cooling the milk and consider the man seeing that all utensils are y sterilized and cleaned would undoubt- edly mean a large increase in the re- turns from the product marketed." This is a pointed •question and should lead the indifferent man to re- alize that he has gone to a large ex- pense in producing milk and that it is highly imoprtant that h gets highly important thaf he gives it the right kind of care and that he cleans the utensils properly, if he is to re- ceive the highest price for his pro- duct. No step in milk production will return so large a profit as that of giv- ing attention to the production of ciean, wholesome milk and properly cooling it before delivering it to the factory. If the buttermaker is to make good butter,.or the cheesemaker good cheese, the producer Lmust pay attention to the care of the milk. CORRECTING PETE PERKINS. Pete Perkins says "The hoppers, the heat, the hail and drought, embezzle all mv coppers and nearly starve me I out! "The pip assails my chickens, the ] cholera my swine, while crickets raise I the dickens with pure Manila twine! I My horses catch the colic, the stag-i gers and the bots, while pocket goph- ers frolic across my garden plots! I] make a war on thistles and have them ] in retreat, when lo, a cyclone whistles / across my field of wheat! In spring, with fleeting bunions, with ginger in] my arm, I start to planting onions] upon my smiling farm. In glee I sow/ tomatoes, my water-cress and wheat, my egg-plant and potatoes and other things to eat. I toil until the leather is smooth upon my shins, forgiving worms and weather for all preeedmtng sins. There is no cause for mourn- ing till June is on the track, then with- out word or warning the fiends come tripping back! This program's been repeated each season without fail! I call myself defeated; my property's for salel" "I get your line f blueing," says I to Neighbor Pete, "but what's the good in chewing the ragIets of defeat ? Since Adam started disking the jun- gles by request, tornadoes have been frisking across this mortal nest! We've had our floods and freezes, our days of scanty rain our bugs and our diseases, and thistles in our grain. When first I started farming, I says to dad, says I, 'I might as well be arming to fight the Hessian fly,--the Hessian fly and chiggers, the colic and the blight, and all the other jig-In gers who think they want a fight; but I| dad, I'm more than willing, I hanker I for the fun; I know I'll make a kill-I| ing before the scrap is done! Youi will, too, Peter Perkins, so ditch thi: t line of wail; stay by your gourds and gherkins; forget about the saleP' --By J. Edward Tufft. Five 8ete of Twine. Weston, Is.--Mrs. Rose McOombs, wife of a farmer living rner here, is the mother of the fifth pair of twim in eight years. All the ten children are well. A simter of Mrs. McOombs, Mrs. Arle Forbes of Sioux City, re- cently became the mother of her sec- ond set of triplets. Another sister of Mrs. McCombs, who lives in Sacra- mento, Cal., has two pair of twins. i i With the recklessness o" a cowboy, Albert B. Fall, Secretary of the In- terior, joined in with "cowpunchers" and assisted in stemming a buffalo stampede at the buffalo farm in Yel- lowstone Park. Only an expert horse- buffalos become blind with fright and fury and charge at anything. ALL ROAD WORK and new buildings are re- rted by The Improvement letin. Gives calls for bids of State Highway Com- mission; 52 numbers for $6.00 with Daily Re- mlnder FREE if sub- scription is paid this month. eae day.  Improvement Bulletin CIothbound  Minneapolis, Minn. THE WEST HOTEL ' Minneapolis, Minnesota. ii Following t h e downward trend in prices is now offer° ing rooms at-- $1%0 to $2.00---Without Bath $2.00 to $5.00---With Bath ,, ii i i With Moderate Priced Cafe-- In Connection Trucking It doesn't make any difference to us whether your job of hauling takes us 1 mile or 250 miles from Ortonville-- we are prepared to go --promptly a n d eco- nomically. We make a specialty of "long dis- tance hauling." Just Phone 91 • III I Wm. Cummens Ortonville, Minn. JUST THINK ! A LIBERTY BELL FREE OF CHARGE. This bank wants every boy and girl of this city to have one of these unique home safes. They will help you save your dimes and nickles. Open a Savings Account today and get a Liberty Bell Bank. 5 PER CENT PAID ON ALL SAVINGS ORTONVILLE STATE BANK John Carlson, President. "C. J. Stark, Cashier. H.A. Stucke, Ass't. Cashier. PAGE S @ at lt00an$ ToYou A stylish, well-made, trim looking shoe with a "shock absorber" built into the eole. That's what you get when you buy a Dr. A. Reed Cushion Shoe. The famous inner sole is to your foot what the tire is o your wheel--it takes the bumps and makes going a pleasure. Come in and "feel" the Cushion ./ Prices Reduced On All Styles I I I Orfonvi I I e, Mi n n esota i i The Pie House Special Plate Dinner Tasty. Lunches Home Cooking Home Baking Special attention to show and dance people " Yours for Quality and Service C. A. BEARD, Proprietor The new Granite taken frtm our quarries recently develop- ed near Odessa will be vailed Ortonville Ruby Red Granite We can recommend this Granite as the most beautiful ad finest for tombstones and other purposes where Granite is used. ' If interested see our display. See Our Prkes lk00ore suy00n00 0RI000VIL[[ MOHUM[MI WORKS JOHNSON & LINDHOM, Props. ,1921 THE ORTONYILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE J 0rtonville Independent EVERY THURSDAY by the gC t Harris, Vlee-premdt Walter WaLter Dinnell John Krcher L. E. lmudgmn Grace F. Kaercher . Managing F Congress Convenes the post omee at the Act et il 1879. I PPlicati°n [ Advt. Repr ttuntative. SELECT LIST. Bk, - - I - - o MianeapoUs ] C. Atken, psentatlve said many very pointed e thlng which f tile gloomy out look 'g of the year, and des. le against their own came up smil- e h is going to do this thee, country, , and the best gov- de, ised. may i, agriltul, indus- and : remedy unst and Y Considerable idhine in if every man in it were the price he n get for dn unemployment n- It week of the con- the Wuhigon to the membership• The Ag¢ulture made a port which was to get ;t without doing or 8eying offend repremn- is, I believe, a lifting oJ who is indiffelnt to civic affui an(] readjustment, which whose thoughts do not dee above e)f. He may sweep his perch stoop, bu h i front idewalk wilt be packed with The higher we fly meet its stss- no,," and ice• I SHOW THE CONFREENCE harder we  • merlcmX arm emcees watched a I.'entrfugal mhine gun. firing 1,200 a minute, riddle Girt, N. J., the ther day. The ame week a new bomb, cigh- big 4,3OO pounds, was dropped 4,100 eet from a airplane at the Mary- h,.d provhi grounds, h to a ¢ra- 26 feet deep• cf a city block the force of such an inge in it and kill ery living soul they contained• It wouldn't sik a battleship, it would blow it to pleces, detonating the ship's own ig fragments of it and of the 1#30 men who mned her far and near over the water• Uncle S should stage a f such demonstrations for the Even if he had to blow up everal 42- battlesblps, it would be money well spent.- Cpper's Weekty. MANUFACTURER'S PRICES " MUST DROP. Most o the food nsumed by t. i of this try, preset time pe to the fcme of pe, The farmer gets 20e per bushel for hi8 oats, about $1.00 for good wht 28e or rn and 6c per pound for his pork, What do the eonsers pay About fifty pr cent mo than they • In- paid in 1913. Whe  all this spad to regulate public going to? Locate the spad and have the reaon for the high ease of living. The faers' produe are do to the same old price and the fifty per nt more goverent, and before the war. The far- mer has taken his loss, but aborei etting fm 5O to 5 per cent tn wage th in 1913, gus given out I of Labor h Noember. and th 'manufacture. used to the pfitling days, back to his fom,er sle of proflt A the little magazine, "Farm Life' says it, "you say your prices for ¸ manaetud gd bause the t of ling is  hig that wages must stay up. And yon oral buyer of si faetud product. Thus thig are i a jam and the storation of ps- porous time is delayed. The ha take his medlein  He is helpless to straighten ou 'o ways for your neigh- the tangle in the industrial nters. '¸ You--by the b-kyard It is plainly appnt that the "high of llng" must be ldueed th in the mufturtng tckLy. Those living in the cities shld try sid this problem at ones. One of a community re- thing is rtain, muftumd good* must come down in price to mee th dwhostrives drop in f pduct, or the pdee things of fa products mt me up. and soon too, or there will be a ty and simple; so is There may COSTLY NEGLECT. ni gree In eommenti.g upon the indlffenee Y ee the whole will of ome faera to produce good milk, Mr. Gordon H. Shepard, manager of Eau Clai, Wis. Milk Produee' y is tory. A few eytra minutes frot sidewalk, averag this. th,g in the prellminary press, a.d who takes rlde in when it comes to the final step of ,arketing the milk he wilt be so ea- herL who likes less? By marketi. I mean the ears a better place f the mlk from th he until t s delivered so the f t home first. IIis few extra minute eva ed to the fac- h? welcame pth to tsry. A few extra mi,,utes dove sd elghbors. to the peess of cooling the milk and leeelng that all utensil are zeg Th( put it goarteed equal op. l1 its citizens• Progs edly mean a large inerea iu tutus from the product marketed." This i a pohied question ad hould lead the indifferent man to re- alize that he h g,,ne to a large e )nse in produciag milk sod t] highly moprtant that h get hihb r important tha he gves it the right kirl,l of ears and that he elean the utensils pperh', f he eeve the hghest prlee for his pro No step in milk production wiJl tum  large a profit as that of gin ng attention to the production of clean, wholesome ilk and pmperly ecolin it befo ellvering it to the factory. If the buttermaker is to make good butter good cheese, the producer ,must to the care of the mlk, CORRECTING PIfE PERKINS. Pete Perkis says "The hoppers, the heat, the hell and drought, bezzle all ny coppers and nely starve m out/ The pip assails my chickens, the cholera my wlne, while erlekets raise dickens with pu Mardla ho tch the calls, the stag- d the bat. while pocket goph- rs fm[ie ress my garden plots! I in tat, when hi. a cyclone whistles , field of wheat! In sprng, with flting bunlon, with ginger in my , I star to planting onions upon my sn-dllng fa. In glee I sow tomatoes, my water-cross d wheat my sgg-plt d potatoes and other thing to ea upon my shnz, forgiving predndng sin The is no cause for [ng till June is on the trek, then with- or waing the fiends me Lr(pping bk! This program's been 1 :all mv]f defeated; my property's [or salel" "! get your [ to Neighbor Pete, "but what's the d in ehewtng the mgiets of defeat ? startl diskin the juu- les by quest, risking ro thls mortal nt We've had our floods and /xzes, our :ays of scanty rain our bug8 and our i isses and thistles in air gran ¸When first I starte( farmlng, *ays l to dad, says I. 'I might as wel he[ aing to fight the Hessian fly--the[ fly and ehlgge, the ¢diie and the blight, and all the other Jig-I gers who think they want a fight: but.I dad, I'm mote th Willing. I hankez fun; in hefo the seep is do' You will, too, Peter Peddns, so ditch thi line of wail; stay by your gourds and gherkins; forget about the saleI ' --By J. Edward Tuff Fl &tel of TWlra Wuton. Ia.--Mrl ltete McOomha a frier fining ntr be. fifth pair of twtao I  elL  mtt of r MeOeha e $'oebet  81OU tv re- n beea th mother t h toe- of ripts Xnot¢ etw of 8aert mtut OtI hu two at of twin With the reek]essuess o a cowboy, Albert B. Fall, Seemtary of the In. terlm, joined in with "cowpunchers" assisted in stemmhg stample at the buffalo farm in ye)- Only m expert horm- ght and fury a(] charge at anything. .r mte Ikhwy Com- mllon: 2 nmbrs tar 0 with L).a e- THE WEST HOTEL Minnet poll L Mllt not a. Follog t h e dowwgrd td in ptts Is now offer- leg root at-- $I.0 to $2.00--Without Bath t2.00 to $.O0--With Bath With Moderate Priced --Care-- if Cnbeetlea Trucking I It doesn't make my difference to us whether your job of hauling takes us 1 mile or 250 miles from OrtonviUe-- we are prepared to go --promptly a n d eco- nomically. We make a specialty of 'qong dis- tahoe hauling." Just Phone 91 Win. Cummens Ornville, Minn. JUST THII/K ! A LIBERTY BELL FREE OF CHARGE. This bank want every boy and girl of this city to have one of these tdque home safes• They wiU help you ve your dim and nickles. Open a Savings Aunt today d get a Liberty Bell Bauk. 5 PER CENT PAID ON ALL SAVINGS ORTONVIL LE STATE BANK John Clson, Psidet. "C. $. Stark, Cashier. H.A. Stuek A't. Cashier. • A st 'llth, wen.made, tflm looking shoe with a "ehock absorber  built lrto the eels. That's what you get when you buy a Dr. A. Reed Cushion hoe. The famous inner soIe is to your foot what the tire ia o your wheel-lit takes the bumpo and makes going a plegaure. Come in and "tael" the Cmhion Prices Reduced On All Styles Ortonville, " o+a The Pie House Special Plate Dinner Tasty. Lunches Home Cooking Home Baking Special attention to show and dance people Yours for Quality and Service C. A. BEARD, Proprietor The new Gite taken frem our quarries focally delo- ed nr Odema Will be called 0rtonville Ruby Red Granite We ¢a reeomtaead tkb Gzaaito u the mint beautlftd mul finest for tombetnm and oth ppos where Grtnite i uled. If inteteted see our display. ORIO00VILL[ MONUM[00I W00KS JOHNSON & LINDHOM, Props. DECEMBER 8, 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT file Independent EVERY THURSDAY by the & Merchants Printing Co. President Harris, Vice-president L. E. Lundgren, Secreta4y Walter Dinnell, Treasurer 0ARD OF DIRECTORS Walter Dinnell John Kaercher 01son L.E. Indgren Grace F. Kaercher A. B. Kaereher Kaercher Mana Editor as second-class matter 1920, at the post office at Minn., under the Act of 1879. $2.00 PER YEAR Rates on Application Advt. Representative. SELECT LIST. Bank, - St. Paul St., - - Minneapolis Kep 1 WORK NEEDED. C. Atkeson, representative at Washington in his said many very pointed le things from which we of the gloomy out look at of the year, and des- the situation has been for on the farms and else- is, I believe, a lifting of clouds that have depress- readjustment, which all PeOple know must come, has thoughtless people poorly to meet its distress- The higher we fly of prosperity, the harder we of adversity, and there statute or economic law to against their own fol- Agriculture has seen before and came up stall- it is going to do tiffs time, country, our and the best gov- ever devised, however dis- be we must continue to World in agriculture, indus- and constructive remedy for much of the unrest and discontent little more good old fash- There is no necess- considerable idleness in if every man in it were to work at any job he- the price he can get for weeks ago President led an unemployment con- last week of the con- of' agrl- the Washington of the National Grange, to the membership. The on Agriculture made a report which was outstanding effort of seemed to be to get it Without doing or saying offend represen- labor. to make the Grange of deliberate thought action rather than a bureau. In- to formulate public been my hope to focal- at least so fat" as Grange is concerned, up- and the administrative of the government, and and consideration by the soundness of UPon public and economic has convinced that an unhealthy con- too much from leg- the government. The is that which governs Put it in another way, should end its activi- equal op- citizens. Progress personal initiative human aspiration for Our people should not government to do for should do. for them- AND CITIZENSHIP. ways for your neigh- You--by the backyard and by the front in winter. Any be detected in an quickly. and front' side- of a community re- A man who takes and who strives things in life can conditions. There in his backyard. and simple; so is lot. There may OWers and nice green case the whole will of order and neat- and the man who neat will no- front sidewalk clean. for this. It lies it, who takes pride in! Who has the interests ty ,t heart, who likes World a better place put his be- at home first. His the welcome path to aeighbors. 00.00---00-'Congress I Convene£ i I r• III I who is indifferent to civic affairs an(l whose thoughts do not rise above self. He may swe.ep his porch stoop, but his front sidewalk will be packed with snow and ice. SHOW THE CONFREENCE. American arm officers watched a centrifugal machine gun, firing 1,200 shots a minute, riddle a steel target at Sea Girt, N. J., the other day. The same week a new bomb, weigh- ing 4,300 pounds, was dropped 4,100 feet from an airplane at the Mary- lond proving grounds. It tore a cra- ter in the earth 100 feet across an(l 25 feet deep. Dropped in the cente of a city block the force of such an )xplosion would shatter all the build- rags in it and kill every living soul they contained. It wouldn't sink a battleship, it would blow it to pieces, detonating the ship's own magazine, and shattering fragments of it and of the 1,500 men who manned her far and near over the water. • Uncle Sam should stage a few such demonstrations for the entertain- ment of the Disanmament Conference. Even if he had to blow up several 42-i million-dollar battleships, it would be money well spent.--Capper's Weekly. MANUFACTURER'S PRICES MUST DROP. Most of the food consumed by cit- izens of this country, comes from or is made from farm products. At the present time prices to the farmers of food products raised are within a few cents of the 1913 pre-war prices. The farmer gets 20c per bushel for his oats, about $1.00 for good wheat, 28c for corn and 6c per pound for his pork. What do the consumers pay for it? About fifty per cent more than they paid in 1913. Where is all this spread going to ? Locate the spread and you have the reason for the high cost of living. The farmers' products ar down to the same old price and the consumer pays fifty per cent more than he did before the war. The far- mer has taken his loss, but laborers in the manufacturing districts are still getting from 50 to 65 per cent more in wages than in 1913, according to figures given out by the U. S. Depart- ment of Labor in November, and the manufactmr, used to the war-time profiteering days, is reluctant to get back to his fonmer scale of profits. As the little magazine, "Farm Life" says it, "you say you can't reduce your prices for manufactured goods because the cost of living is so high that wages must stay up. And you complain that the farmer is not a lib- eral buyer of this expensive manu- factured product. Thus things are in a jam and the restoration of pros- perous times is delayed. The farmel has take his medicine. He had to take it. He is helpless to straighten out the tangle in the industrial centers." It is plainly apparent that the "high cost of living" must be reduced thru co-operation of laborers and manufac- turers in the manufacturing centers Those living in the cities should try. to solve this problem at once. One thing is certain, manufactured goods must come down in price to meet the drop in farm. products, or the lrice of farm products must come up, and soon too, or there will be a scarcity of farmers. COSTLY NEGLECT. In commenting upon the indifference of some farmers to produce good milk, Mr. Gordon H. Shepard, mmmger of the Eau Claire, Wis., Milk Producers' association said: "Why is it that the tory. A few eytra minutes devoted average farmer wilt work so hard get- ting in the preliminary process, and when it comes to the final step of uarketing the milk he wi!l he so care- less? Bv marketing I mean the care of the milk from the time it is milked until it is delivered to the fac-: few extra minutes devoted to the fac- tors,. A few extra miuutes devoted to the process of cooling the milk and consider the man seeing that all utensils are y sterilized and cleaned would undoubt- edly mean a large increase in the re- turns from the product marketed." This is a pointed •question and should lead the indifferent man to re- alize that he has gone to a large ex- pense in producing milk and that it is highly imoprtant that h gets highly important thaf he gives it the right kind of care and that he cleans the utensils properly, if he is to re- ceive the highest price for his pro- duct. No step in milk production will return so large a profit as that of giv- ing attention to the production of ciean, wholesome milk and properly cooling it before delivering it to the factory. If the buttermaker is to make good butter,.or the cheesemaker good cheese, the producer Lmust pay attention to the care of the milk. CORRECTING PETE PERKINS. Pete Perkins says "The hoppers, the heat, the hail and drought, embezzle all mv coppers and nearly starve me I out! "The pip assails my chickens, the ] cholera my swine, while crickets raise I the dickens with pure Manila twine! I My horses catch the colic, the stag-i gers and the bots, while pocket goph- ers frolic across my garden plots! I] make a war on thistles and have them ] in retreat, when lo, a cyclone whistles / across my field of wheat! In spring, with fleeting bunions, with ginger in] my arm, I start to planting onions] upon my smiling farm. In glee I sow/ tomatoes, my water-cress and wheat, my egg-plant and potatoes and other things to eat. I toil until the leather is smooth upon my shins, forgiving worms and weather for all preeedmtng sins. There is no cause for mourn- ing till June is on the track, then with- out word or warning the fiends come tripping back! This program's been repeated each season without fail! I call myself defeated; my property's for salel" "I get your line f blueing," says I to Neighbor Pete, "but what's the good in chewing the ragIets of defeat ? Since Adam started disking the jun- gles by request, tornadoes have been frisking across this mortal nest! We've had our floods and freezes, our days of scanty rain our bugs and our diseases, and thistles in our grain. When first I started farming, I says to dad, says I, 'I might as well be arming to fight the Hessian fly,--the Hessian fly and chiggers, the colic and the blight, and all the other jig-In gers who think they want a fight; but I| dad, I'm more than willing, I hanker I for the fun; I know I'll make a kill-I| ing before the scrap is done! Youi will, too, Peter Perkins, so ditch thi: t line of wail; stay by your gourds and gherkins; forget about the saleP' --By J. Edward Tufft. Five 8ete of Twine. Weston, Is.--Mrs. Rose McOombs, wife of a farmer living rner here, is the mother of the fifth pair of twim in eight years. All the ten children are well. A simter of Mrs. McOombs, Mrs. Arle Forbes of Sioux City, re- cently became the mother of her sec- ond set of triplets. Another sister of Mrs. McCombs, who lives in Sacra- mento, Cal., has two pair of twins. i i With the recklessness o" a cowboy, Albert B. Fall, Secretary of the In- terior, joined in with "cowpunchers" and assisted in stemming a buffalo stampede at the buffalo farm in Yel- lowstone Park. Only an expert horse- buffalos become blind with fright and fury and charge at anything. ALL ROAD WORK and new buildings are re- rted by The Improvement letin. Gives calls for bids of State Highway Com- mission; 52 numbers for $6.00 with Daily Re- mlnder FREE if sub- scription is paid this month. eae day.  Improvement Bulletin CIothbound  Minneapolis, Minn. THE WEST HOTEL ' Minneapolis, Minnesota. ii Following t h e downward trend in prices is now offer° ing rooms at-- $1%0 to $2.00---Without Bath $2.00 to $5.00---With Bath ,, ii i i With Moderate Priced Cafe-- In Connection Trucking It doesn't make any difference to us whether your job of hauling takes us 1 mile or 250 miles from Ortonville-- we are prepared to go --promptly a n d eco- nomically. We make a specialty of "long dis- tance hauling." Just Phone 91 • III I Wm. Cummens Ortonville, Minn. JUST THINK ! A LIBERTY BELL FREE OF CHARGE. This bank wants every boy and girl of this city to have one of these unique home safes. They will help you save your dimes and nickles. Open a Savings Account today and get a Liberty Bell Bank. 5 PER CENT PAID ON ALL SAVINGS ORTONVILLE STATE BANK John Carlson, President. "C. J. Stark, Cashier. H.A. Stucke, Ass't. Cashier. PAGE S @ at lt00an$ ToYou A stylish, well-made, trim looking shoe with a "shock absorber" built into the eole. That's what you get when you buy a Dr. A. Reed Cushion Shoe. The famous inner sole is to your foot what the tire is o your wheel--it takes the bumps and makes going a pleasure. Come in and "feel" the Cushion ./ Prices Reduced On All Styles I I I Orfonvi I I e, Mi n n esota i i The Pie House Special Plate Dinner Tasty. Lunches Home Cooking Home Baking Special attention to show and dance people " Yours for Quality and Service C. A. BEARD, Proprietor The new Granite taken frtm our quarries recently develop- ed near Odessa will be vailed Ortonville Ruby Red Granite We can recommend this Granite as the most beautiful ad finest for tombstones and other purposes where Granite is used. ' If interested see our display. See Our Prkes lk00ore suy00n00 0RI000VIL[[ MOHUM[MI WORKS JOHNSON & LINDHOM, Props.