Newspaper Archive of
The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
Lyft
December 8, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
PAGE 7     (7 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 7     (7 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
December 8, 1921
 

Newspaper Archive of The Ortonville Independent produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




DECEMBER 8, 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT i.i PAGE 7 The Farmers Corner DEVOTED ESPECIALLY TO THE ACqIVITIES OF FARMERS AND FARMER&apos;S CLUBS. Farmers Credit law Bureau Insists Net Income Be Recognized As Basis Of Americap Taxation. will be asked by 1,500,000 farmers to pass legislation present credit laws of the so as to guarantee adequate for agriculture on 12 and 24 paper. with this demand, the Farm Bureau federation and Irate federations will present a net income be recognized Sole measure of ability to pay and that the bulk of all taxes on that basis. the reportbrought back by delegation which attend- national convention of the Farm Bureau federation in ga. national farm bureau poll- by the convention, is sum- as follows in the report to federation: measure of ability to pay taxes )ort of the national govern- s net income, and the bulk of should be levied and collec- basis. should be progressive, that the income, the higher should be. are opposed to the issuing of t free securities, and request submit a constitutional to the several states to defect in our tax system. disapprove the repeal of the Profits tax. opposed to the principle of sales tax, of any similar as a general manufacturers of the Great Lakes-St. waterway, restoration of Powers to state railroad corn- and a strong objection to carriers to charge higher short hauls than for long planks in a transportation Submitted by the Minnesota and adopted. platform demands or drastic modificatian of law, and the repeal of Esch-Cummins act. the prindple of guar- upon fixed valuations of the United States," says, "and ask the re- 15-A, Esch-Cummins contains this feature. the Adamson law produces in the conduct of the rail- operate against the inter- Public, we ask its repeal or as speedily as possible." GRANTED FOR FARM STATE CONVENTION have been granted by to the Minnesota Farm for its annual state which opens at University Paul, on January 3. rates apply to all points according to an official received by the county The cut in passenger only on the atten- members showing pro- that they came to the by rail. The state federa- that 1,200 farmers will meeting. When all regula- COmpiled with, members will a buy return tickets at one- , the federation said in its the county bureau. to enable farmers and their attend both the Minnesota federation annual con- the sessions of Farmers' Makers' week this winter, expense, the convention for January 3, 4 and 5, armers, week at University rvice and university of- set aside the opening day as "Farm Bureau The first session of will be held in the an- University Farm, and all of Farmers' and Home will be suspended all everyone to attend the meeting. and third days' sessions will be in the cham- of representatives in automobile truck; a fireless cooker for every new mowing machine; their share of the t'arm income. In a nut- saell, they demand lhe same labor- saving ,,nachinery in the imuse which the husband (iemands in tile tlelds, and they have a right to ask it. Too often the comfort of the farmer's wife is the last thing considered on the farm. In agricultural states the in- sane asylums are largely recruited from the class of farmers' wives who have submitted to the slavery of Iceaseless household work until ex- hausted nature has given way. Of course, there is no reason why a man in Nebraska or Massachusetts or California should buy the latest labor-saving machinery for his work and leave his wife to the old laborious methods. He hould not be riding a tractor while his wife is doing her washing on an-old-fashioned wash- board. In making their demands the women are not unreasonable. If any life there must be time to rest and re- flect. Proper labor saving machines and running water in the house make farm life comfortable and pleasant. The Nebraska women are not only asking for their rights. ACCREDITED HERDS. Dairy farmers and breeders of pure- bred dairy cattle have shown more in- terest in establishing tuberculosis-free herds than was anticipated by those responsible for the plan for establish- mg accredited herds. When the ac- credited herd plan was adopted, there was some concern among those inter- ested in the elimination of bovine tu- berculosis as to whether cattle pwn- ers would take kindly to it. Sinc the inception of this method of eradica- ting tuberculosis, it has grown in fa- vor until today there is a larger de- mand for tuberculin testing among dairy farmers and breeders than can be met by the federal government. : The weekly news letter of the Amer- ican Farm Bureau federation dontains the following paragraph: "Testing of cattle for tuberculosiq and registering them with the United States Department of Agriculture as accredited herds can no longer be con-! tinned in Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, New Nork, North Carolina, Texas, Ver- mont, and Virginia unless an addi- tional federal appropriation is made The American Farm Bureau federa- tion has presented the problem of each member of the Senate and House Appropriations Committees other con- gressmen, and the DepL of Agricul- ture, Representative D. A. Reed of New York has introduced a bill which I calls for an appropriation o $600,000, I and it has been referred to the House I Appropriations committee. Some 72,-1 000 herds thruout the country are an-I der test, representing 858,000 cattle. I More than 15,000 herds are now on the j waiting list." I This shows that thinking dairy far-1 mers and breeders appreciate the im-/ portance of having their herds free] from tuberculosis. It is to be hoped! that Congress will see the importance I of passing the bill asking for an ap-! propriation of $600,000 and that the! work of eliminating bovine tuherculo-i sis may be carried on Without inter- ruption. This work is important to l not onlv the owners of cattle but to all people. --Hoard's Dairyman. Molasses for Calves. Experiments in feeding blackstrap molasses to young calves for the pur- pose of determining its physical effect upon them were carried on by Profes- sor R. C. Call0way of the Louisiana Experiment Station. Young calves were fed bl'ackstrap molasses as soon as they showed any inclination to eat grain, starting with two ounces per day. The amount of blackstrap molas- ses was gradually increased until at the end of three weeks some of the calves were receiving as high as one pound each per day. Professor Calloway draws this con- clusion: "Low grade sugar cane mp- lasses (blackstrap) may be fed to young calves with perfect safety, pro- vided not too much is fed at the be- ginning. One or two ounces may be given at each feeding and then gradu- ally increase the allowance as the calf develops. If the calf is permitted to eat all the molasses it may care for at any one time it will more than like- ly catfse scours which, if continued, will produce serious, if not fatal, con- sequences. Blackstrap molasses will put ealv6s in fine condition, regulate their bowels, and keep the skin and hair in good order." president of the I The object of te experiment was to Bureau federation;]test the physical effect of blaekstrap A. O: Preus, Sydney An-]molasses, and it was also found an of the joint congres-l economical feed for ealves.--Hoard's investigating agri- ] Dairyman. Mrs. Ellsworth ] ..... of Iowa, leader in faz I . and L. E. Potter, the Minnesota Federa-]-,lzl[lJl[J'f  'Peak at the opening ses- I  I  Uvotlyour' of 00Wives I ames- " Wd US Plltl ! en farmers wives of l  k I issued a bill of rights. [ 1 Dig IV h_  f mmt ux list nrm their husbands--  Pit a MgtW I g machine for every [  wr= .IBI". on the farm; a bath-] "m"ww''t,pUbmoo for every binder on[ I  , -- g water in the kit-[ W a - riding plow in the --  a  . . cook stove for every] - - thy Tone In 0 PRODUCERS JOIN U. S. GRAIN GROWERS ' k--- ]ll___l__il At the end of its third week of or- a o rk in Minnesota, the U I ". ' r vers, Inc., announced that Fed Sheep and Lambs Beginning to 256 ........ Arrive on Local Market Fat , iarmers and 4 emvaors m nve Lambs up to $9.75." t counties had contracted to market Monday's Closing-- Cattle 5,800. Market opened steady to strong', closing weak on beef steers. "5 CaNes 500. Bulk of good lights $,,0. ilogs 14,200. Market steady to 10e !ower. Bulk $6.00 to $6.75, bulk good pigs $7.00. Sheep 4,000. Market strong, best fed lambs $9.75, fed year- lip;s SS.00, fed ewes $4.50. So. St. Paul, Minn., Dec. 5, 1921:- While the strike situation caused some uncertainty in livestock circles at the week's opening, it ha(t little or no ap- paren affect on the market today. Cattle opened steady to strong with a brisk (lemand for good handiweight she stock, some of these latter ad- vancing 25e. Hogs sold stea(ly to 10c lower and there was a healthy demand for lambs and sheep at strong price:< Some fed stock is t)eginning!to ar- rive, best fed western lambs going to- day at $9.75, similar kinds of ewes $4.50 mad fed yearlings up to $8.00. No real good or choice fed beef steers arrived at the week's opening, best here going up around $6.75 to $7.00, with bulk of the steers from $5 to $6. Good 530 pound Dakota heif- ers sold up to $6 others going at $5.30 to $5.75, and bulk of the fat cows and heifers selling from $3.50 to $5.25. Canners and cutters ranged from $2.- 25 to $3.25, bologna bulls $2.50 to $3.50. Bulk of best light veal calves sohl at $7.50, with a few up to $8.00. Stockers and feeders were in healthy I demand and hulk of the sales were made from $4.50 to $5.00, with some up to $5.50. The hog market opened steady to 10e lower. Range of prices Monday $5.75 to $6.75, bulk of 135-1b hogs $6.75, bulk of 135 to 175-pound hogs $6.65 to $6.75, good butchers mostly $6.25 to $6.35, and heavy packers $5.75 to $6.00. About 2,500 pigs ar- rived and good pigs sold mostly at $7. Christmas Seals are on sale at T- ]er's Variety Store and both Drug Stores. Buy them now lest you forget. MICKIE SAYS Redwood Falls, Walnut Wells Drilled I I am prepared to put down your well in the least time and smallest cost to you. See me first. J. A. SMITH Phone 10-F-11 R. 3, Ortonville i Grove and Belview; in Watonwan, at Butterfield and LaSalle, and in Wright at An- namiale. Lyon county still holds the lead in number of farmers and eleva- tors signing contracts. In ll states, 767 elevators and 27,- 472 farmers have contracted to mar- ket 50,000,000 bushells thru the U. S. their grain thru the national co-oper-iGrain G,'owers. ative agency. } In Kittson county, elevators at Ken-] --Win a t)rize. Read "Who's WhC' nedy and Humbolt have signed up; in on page '2 or this L:sue. @ I Professional and Business Directory C. E. SIGLOti For [xpert WIRINGSERVIcEELECTRIC REPAIRING Phone 284-L Ortonviile, Minn. m ..__ 10th STREET AT FOURTH AVENUE =" MINNEAPOLIS _ The Northwest's Largest and Most Beautifnl Hostelry All Room, .r Outaid and Each Room has Privat Bath TARIFF: 75 Returns (Private Baths) Single at $2.00--Double $3.00 - 325 Rooms (Private Baths) Single at $2.50---Double $3.50 l -- 200 Rooms (Private Baths) Single at $3 00---Double $4.00 Others from $4.00 to $15.00 =i AI'kinds'c'00-'00i00adp*es00i00 U neatly done. Suits Made to Order. E , Ortonville, Minn. EC C D  ELECTRIC SHOE SHO00  E Shoes repaired neatly and prmpt- f 1 ly. Our Work Guaranteed, i JOHN SPANYERS 00urti00 i00otel _ Light lIaulingofallKinds DECEMBER 15th WILL BE LAVAL SERVICE DAY For &e benefit of out many customers and men of De Loyal C.mam Separator* we have estabed a De Laval Service Do2. On this day wz shall be glad to have any De Laval met brin hi. complete .eparator to our tto for a thoroush and cdul impec- . tim  limunent, which will be made free d r.ha Shodd any peru, due to unusual wear t aexldent, need to be replaced, this will be dine, the only charge beln for the pfiee d the new peru used. IV o charge will Se made for ihe service. A De Lava] relmtatlve will be.wlth us to m&t with this Wot. ,ing ill your De Lava! Separator that day md receive the benefit d h advice on the care and opealm d the machine, at well at the Ire* service. It is ouz  and tl d the De Lawl Company, that every us d a De I.a[ Sevmatm" get the mu- imum of service at  minimum of o and we therdce urge you to pl yourse of this free and  COME EARLY - - ORTOI MIHHESOTA "-" I I I I I _ _ Dodge Cars John Deere Immlements Jl[00]00lil i HEN iteomes to deliver. ing the goods on time we're there, ,that's all For big jobs or small jobs--lure. her sawed to the proper length and width--lumber for every practical purpose prac- tically priced. Geier Lmnber Co. ALUABLES placed in our SAFE DEPOSIT t VAULTS are safe as mo- dern ingenuity and skill can make them. And in addition to this safety we assure you the utmost in courteous at- tention and service when you visit this Bank. You are most cordially invited to become a user of our vaults and inspect our other departments. Illll Ill I I I First National Bank ORTONVIIJ MINNgSOTA Express and Baggage Telephone 287 Ortonville, Minn. PAUL DIRNBAUER Brick Layer and Plasterer Stone Mason and All Kinds of Cement Work. Ortonville, Minn. R.F.D. PETERSON & SON Dray Line Big Stone Lake Ice Phone 38 Ortonville, Min Kodak PRINTINGDEVELOPING '1 ENLARGING Prompt, Quality Service, Moderate Pris. THE REED STUDIO Ortonville Minn. DR. R. D. RIFENBARK OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN One block uhill from Gunderson's ,rug Store Vapor-Sulphur Cabinet Treatments (For rheumatism, neuritis, eta:.) F. L. BROWN THE JEWELER Ortonville, MinnHota TRUCK SERVICE and any kind of light and heavy draying Hausauer Bros. PHONE 268 All Orders Given Prompt Attentio] A. B. KAERCHER Attorney at Law Odd Fellows Building Ortonville, Minn. DR. F. W. DUNN. CHIROPRACTOR D. D. WHITE, D. C., PH. C. Spinographer , 12-13-14-15-16 Shumaker Bldg. Ortonville, Minn. CoL Wm. Wellendorf AUCTIONEER 80 years' experience. No prnetie- ig on your property. Call or write me early md get in on an early date. Ortonville, Mlnnemta J. A. JOHNSON PIANO TUNING AND REPAIRING PHONES--Residmm . 194 Furniture Store - 118 All Werk Guaranteed Ortonville, MAnnuotL WILL FINCH Experienced Palat Plume 2$-L All Work Guaranteed ELMER, SAtSURY l DECEMBER 8, 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT i.i PAGE 7 The Farmers Corner DEVOTED ESPECIALLY TO THE ACqIVITIES OF FARMERS AND FARMER'S CLUBS. Farmers Credit law Bureau Insists Net Income Be Recognized As Basis Of Americap Taxation. will be asked by 1,500,000 farmers to pass legislation present credit laws of the so as to guarantee adequate for agriculture on 12 and 24 paper. with this demand, the Farm Bureau federation and Irate federations will present a net income be recognized Sole measure of ability to pay and that the bulk of all taxes on that basis. the reportbrought back by delegation which attend- national convention of the Farm Bureau federation in ga. national farm bureau poll- by the convention, is sum- as follows in the report to federation: measure of ability to pay taxes )ort of the national govern- s net income, and the bulk of should be levied and collec- basis. should be progressive, that the income, the higher should be. are opposed to the issuing of t free securities, and request submit a constitutional to the several states to defect in our tax system. disapprove the repeal of the Profits tax. opposed to the principle of sales tax, of any similar as a general manufacturers of the Great Lakes-St. waterway, restoration of Powers to state railroad corn- and a strong objection to carriers to charge higher short hauls than for long planks in a transportation Submitted by the Minnesota and adopted. platform demands or drastic modificatian of law, and the repeal of Esch-Cummins act. the prindple of guar- upon fixed valuations of the United States," says, "and ask the re- 15-A, Esch-Cummins contains this feature. the Adamson law produces in the conduct of the rail- operate against the inter- Public, we ask its repeal or as speedily as possible." GRANTED FOR FARM STATE CONVENTION have been granted by to the Minnesota Farm for its annual state which opens at University Paul, on January 3. rates apply to all points according to an official received by the county The cut in passenger only on the atten- members showing pro- that they came to the by rail. The state federa- that 1,200 farmers will meeting. When all regula- COmpiled with, members will a buy return tickets at one- , the federation said in its the county bureau. to enable farmers and their attend both the Minnesota federation annual con- the sessions of Farmers' Makers' week this winter, expense, the convention for January 3, 4 and 5, armers, week at University rvice and university of- set aside the opening day as "Farm Bureau The first session of will be held in the an- University Farm, and all of Farmers' and Home will be suspended all everyone to attend the meeting. and third days' sessions will be in the cham- of representatives in automobile truck; a fireless cooker for every new mowing machine; their share of the t'arm income. In a nut- saell, they demand lhe same labor- saving ,,nachinery in the imuse which the husband (iemands in tile tlelds, and they have a right to ask it. Too often the comfort of the farmer's wife is the last thing considered on the farm. In agricultural states the in- sane asylums are largely recruited from the class of farmers' wives who have submitted to the slavery of Iceaseless household work until ex- hausted nature has given way. Of course, there is no reason why a man in Nebraska or Massachusetts or California should buy the latest labor-saving machinery for his work and leave his wife to the old laborious methods. He hould not be riding a tractor while his wife is doing her washing on an-old-fashioned wash- board. In making their demands the women are not unreasonable. If any life there must be time to rest and re- flect. Proper labor saving machines and running water in the house make farm life comfortable and pleasant. The Nebraska women are not only asking for their rights. ACCREDITED HERDS. Dairy farmers and breeders of pure- bred dairy cattle have shown more in- terest in establishing tuberculosis-free herds than was anticipated by those responsible for the plan for establish- mg accredited herds. When the ac- credited herd plan was adopted, there was some concern among those inter- ested in the elimination of bovine tu- berculosis as to whether cattle pwn- ers would take kindly to it. Sinc the inception of this method of eradica- ting tuberculosis, it has grown in fa- vor until today there is a larger de- mand for tuberculin testing among dairy farmers and breeders than can be met by the federal government. : The weekly news letter of the Amer- ican Farm Bureau federation dontains the following paragraph: "Testing of cattle for tuberculosiq and registering them with the United States Department of Agriculture as accredited herds can no longer be con-! tinned in Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, New Nork, North Carolina, Texas, Ver- mont, and Virginia unless an addi- tional federal appropriation is made The American Farm Bureau federa- tion has presented the problem of each member of the Senate and House Appropriations Committees other con- gressmen, and the DepL of Agricul- ture, Representative D. A. Reed of New York has introduced a bill which I calls for an appropriation o $600,000, I and it has been referred to the House I Appropriations committee. Some 72,-1 000 herds thruout the country are an-I der test, representing 858,000 cattle. I More than 15,000 herds are now on the j waiting list." I This shows that thinking dairy far-1 mers and breeders appreciate the im-/ portance of having their herds free] from tuberculosis. It is to be hoped! that Congress will see the importance I of passing the bill asking for an ap-! propriation of $600,000 and that the! work of eliminating bovine tuherculo-i sis may be carried on Without inter- ruption. This work is important to l not onlv the owners of cattle but to all people. --Hoard's Dairyman. Molasses for Calves. Experiments in feeding blackstrap molasses to young calves for the pur- pose of determining its physical effect upon them were carried on by Profes- sor R. C. Call0way of the Louisiana Experiment Station. Young calves were fed bl'ackstrap molasses as soon as they showed any inclination to eat grain, starting with two ounces per day. The amount of blackstrap molas- ses was gradually increased until at the end of three weeks some of the calves were receiving as high as one pound each per day. Professor Calloway draws this con- clusion: "Low grade sugar cane mp- lasses (blackstrap) may be fed to young calves with perfect safety, pro- vided not too much is fed at the be- ginning. One or two ounces may be given at each feeding and then gradu- ally increase the allowance as the calf develops. If the calf is permitted to eat all the molasses it may care for at any one time it will more than like- ly catfse scours which, if continued, will produce serious, if not fatal, con- sequences. Blackstrap molasses will put ealv6s in fine condition, regulate their bowels, and keep the skin and hair in good order." president of the I The object of te experiment was to Bureau federation;]test the physical effect of blaekstrap A. O: Preus, Sydney An-]molasses, and it was also found an of the joint congres-l economical feed for ealves.--Hoard's investigating agri- ] Dairyman. Mrs. Ellsworth ] ..... of Iowa, leader in faz I . and L. E. Potter, the Minnesota Federa-]-,lzl[lJl[J'f  'Peak at the opening ses- I  I  Uvotlyour' of 00Wives I ames- " Wd US Plltl ! en farmers wives of l  k I issued a bill of rights. [ 1 Dig IV h_  f mmt ux list nrm their husbands--  Pit a MgtW I g machine for every [  wr= .IBI". on the farm; a bath-] "m"ww''t,pUbmoo for every binder on[ I  , -- g water in the kit-[ W a - riding plow in the --  a  . . cook stove for every] - - thy Tone In 0 PRODUCERS JOIN U. S. GRAIN GROWERS ' k--- ]ll___l__il At the end of its third week of or- a o rk in Minnesota, the U I ". ' r vers, Inc., announced that Fed Sheep and Lambs Beginning to 256 ........ Arrive on Local Market Fat , iarmers and 4 emvaors m nve Lambs up to $9.75." t counties had contracted to market Monday's Closing-- Cattle 5,800. Market opened steady to strong', closing weak on beef steers. "5 CaNes 500. Bulk of good lights $,,0. ilogs 14,200. Market steady to 10e !ower. Bulk $6.00 to $6.75, bulk good pigs $7.00. Sheep 4,000. Market strong, best fed lambs $9.75, fed year- lip;s SS.00, fed ewes $4.50. So. St. Paul, Minn., Dec. 5, 1921:- While the strike situation caused some uncertainty in livestock circles at the week's opening, it ha(t little or no ap- paren affect on the market today. Cattle opened steady to strong with a brisk (lemand for good handiweight she stock, some of these latter ad- vancing 25e. Hogs sold stea(ly to 10c lower and there was a healthy demand for lambs and sheep at strong price:< Some fed stock is t)eginning!to ar- rive, best fed western lambs going to- day at $9.75, similar kinds of ewes $4.50 mad fed yearlings up to $8.00. No real good or choice fed beef steers arrived at the week's opening, best here going up around $6.75 to $7.00, with bulk of the steers from $5 to $6. Good 530 pound Dakota heif- ers sold up to $6 others going at $5.30 to $5.75, and bulk of the fat cows and heifers selling from $3.50 to $5.25. Canners and cutters ranged from $2.- 25 to $3.25, bologna bulls $2.50 to $3.50. Bulk of best light veal calves sohl at $7.50, with a few up to $8.00. Stockers and feeders were in healthy I demand and hulk of the sales were made from $4.50 to $5.00, with some up to $5.50. The hog market opened steady to 10e lower. Range of prices Monday $5.75 to $6.75, bulk of 135-1b hogs $6.75, bulk of 135 to 175-pound hogs $6.65 to $6.75, good butchers mostly $6.25 to $6.35, and heavy packers $5.75 to $6.00. About 2,500 pigs ar- rived and good pigs sold mostly at $7. Christmas Seals are on sale at T- ]er's Variety Store and both Drug Stores. Buy them now lest you forget. MICKIE SAYS Redwood Falls, Walnut Wells Drilled I I am prepared to put down your well in the least time and smallest cost to you. See me first. J. A. SMITH Phone 10-F-11 R. 3, Ortonville i Grove and Belview; in Watonwan, at Butterfield and LaSalle, and in Wright at An- namiale. Lyon county still holds the lead in number of farmers and eleva- tors signing contracts. In ll states, 767 elevators and 27,- 472 farmers have contracted to mar- ket 50,000,000 bushells thru the U. S. their grain thru the national co-oper-iGrain G,'owers. ative agency. } In Kittson county, elevators at Ken-] --Win a t)rize. Read "Who's WhC' nedy and Humbolt have signed up; in on page '2 or this L:sue. @ I Professional and Business Directory C. E. SIGLOti For [xpert WIRINGSERVIcEELECTRIC REPAIRING Phone 284-L Ortonviile, Minn. m ..__ 10th STREET AT FOURTH AVENUE =" MINNEAPOLIS _ The Northwest's Largest and Most Beautifnl Hostelry All Room, .r Outaid and Each Room has Privat Bath TARIFF: 75 Returns (Private Baths) Single at $2.00--Double $3.00 - 325 Rooms (Private Baths) Single at $2.50---Double $3.50 l -- 200 Rooms (Private Baths) Single at $3 00---Double $4.00 Others from $4.00 to $15.00 =i AI'kinds'c'00-'00i00adp*es00i00 U neatly done. Suits Made to Order. E , Ortonville, Minn. EC C D  ELECTRIC SHOE SHO00  E Shoes repaired neatly and prmpt- f 1 ly. Our Work Guaranteed, i JOHN SPANYERS 00urti00 i00otel _ Light lIaulingofallKinds DECEMBER 15th WILL BE LAVAL SERVICE DAY For &e benefit of out many customers and men of De Loyal C.mam Separator* we have estabed a De Laval Service Do2. On this day wz shall be glad to have any De Laval met brin hi. complete .eparator to our tto for a thoroush and cdul impec- . tim  limunent, which will be made free d r.ha Shodd any peru, due to unusual wear t aexldent, need to be replaced, this will be dine, the only charge beln for the pfiee d the new peru used. IV o charge will Se made for ihe service. A De Lava] relmtatlve will be.wlth us to m&t with this Wot. ,ing ill your De Lava! Separator that day md receive the benefit d h advice on the care and opealm d the machine, at well at the Ire* service. It is ouz  and tl d the De Lawl Company, that every us d a De I.a[ Sevmatm" get the mu- imum of service at  minimum of o and we therdce urge you to pl yourse of this free and  COME EARLY - - ORTOI MIHHESOTA "-" I I I I I _ _ Dodge Cars John Deere Immlements Jl[00]00lil i HEN iteomes to deliver. ing the goods on time we're there, ,that's all For big jobs or small jobs--lure. her sawed to the proper length and width--lumber for every practical purpose prac- tically priced. Geier Lmnber Co. ALUABLES placed in our SAFE DEPOSIT t VAULTS are safe as mo- dern ingenuity and skill can make them. And in addition to this safety we assure you the utmost in courteous at- tention and service when you visit this Bank. You are most cordially invited to become a user of our vaults and inspect our other departments. Illll Ill I I I First National Bank ORTONVIIJ MINNgSOTA Express and Baggage Telephone 287 Ortonville, Minn. PAUL DIRNBAUER Brick Layer and Plasterer Stone Mason and All Kinds of Cement Work. Ortonville, Minn. R.F.D. PETERSON & SON Dray Line Big Stone Lake Ice Phone 38 Ortonville, Min Kodak PRINTINGDEVELOPING '1 ENLARGING Prompt, Quality Service, Moderate Pris. THE REED STUDIO Ortonville Minn. DR. R. D. RIFENBARK OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN One block uhill from Gunderson's ,rug Store Vapor-Sulphur Cabinet Treatments (For rheumatism, neuritis, eta:.) F. L. BROWN THE JEWELER Ortonville, MinnHota TRUCK SERVICE and any kind of light and heavy draying Hausauer Bros. PHONE 268 All Orders Given Prompt Attentio] A. B. KAERCHER Attorney at Law Odd Fellows Building Ortonville, Minn. DR. F. W. DUNN. CHIROPRACTOR D. D. WHITE, D. C., PH. C. Spinographer , 12-13-14-15-16 Shumaker Bldg. Ortonville, Minn. CoL Wm. Wellendorf AUCTIONEER 80 years' experience. No prnetie- ig on your property. Call or write me early md get in on an early date. Ortonville, Mlnnemta J. A. JOHNSON PIANO TUNING AND REPAIRING PHONES--Residmm . 194 Furniture Store - 118 All Werk Guaranteed Ortonville, MAnnuotL WILL FINCH Experienced Palat Plume 2$-L All Work Guaranteed ELMER, SAtSURY l ,192l THE ORTONVlLLE INDEPENDENT PAGE 7 li Healthy Tone In The Farmers Corner F' " " "J ............ I[i at aneep luarKe[ DEVOTED ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF FARMERS jl .......... , ....... ? 2,::: 2:PA,?2/;'y ,o  =.Ill Lambs up to $9,75. au no e t uck. a fl ess cooke- re.  Farmers ..... n= og n : h oe her :,on,,, , ,,o,n  s:ell, they Credit Law ...................... y i,, __ I the husband delaaml in the held, BUreau Insists Net Income Be and they hae a right to ask it. Too Recognized As Basis (ff America7 t Taxation. lis the last thing considered on I fatal. In agneultaral k , 150000O I sue asylulns axe largely *erulu f  s >1   tie [ from the e[ass of farmers' wive who arme oZas e Sthenlh ..... bmittoi to the s]ave;y oi ara e u e Iceaseiess hoaehohl work until ex- =to . a ;  ha,,to,, ....... as ' ......... y. ol comae, there is no reason why - a nan n Neb'aska or Massachusetts thzs emmm m l = [or Calf6ruta shou]d buy the present SOls measure of ability to pay d that the bulk of t that hsis. bught back y delegatidn tiona/ convention of the Falml Buau federatlon in a. national fatal buau purl- by the convention, is sum- follows in the report to eleraon: aeasure of ability to paytaxes SUPport of the national gove- * net income, and the balk of a should be leied and cnll= that basis. tax should be pgressive, that ter the i o as, the higher loutd be. opposed to the issuing of so.titles, d request veral gates to defect in o tax system. the Feal of he opposed to the principle of of any similar wateay, a strong objection to to charge hJgh short hauls than for long lks in a traportation Submitted by the Minnesota adopted, mndifieatkm n law, d the peal Esch-Cmins act s, "and feature. produces public, we ask its repeal or aa speedily as possibl" 'I GRANTED FOR FARM STATE fame have be arrested by by the county The cut in members y ce to the " by rail. When all regla- th e fedemtion eount ann con- the sdssions Farmers' for January 8, 4 and 5, e t aid e the opening day labor-saving machinery He should not be riding a is doing hm , ashing o In making their unreasonable. If an)' life tl flt. Proper labor saving mhhl and running v ater in the house make fmm life cfortabie d pleasant. The Nebraska women al not only asking for their rights. AC h.s. Dairy bd daiq herds than was anticipated by tho sponsible for the plan for establish- ing credited herds. When the ac credited herd plan was adopted, there onrn ong thu as t. inception of ths tlng tuberculosis, it h gro in fa- vor until today the is a larger de- mand for tuberculin testing dairy farmers and br odors t] be met by" the fedora government. The weekly the following pga1: "Testing of cattIe for and registering them with the States Department of Agriculture s, iowa, Maryland, N Nork, North Calin Text, Yev meat, and Virginia unle an addi- tional federal appropriation is ramie The Americ Fa Bureau federa- tion h pnted the pblem of each mber of the Senate and House ad the Dept. of Agmeub tu, Representative D. A, Reed of New York has intdueed a bill which calls for  apprapeiation ol $600,000, AppmprlaUons committee. Some 72,- ooo herds thut the untry a an. test, psenting 88,000 cattle. waiting llst" This shows that thinking dairy far- portance of having their herds fe fm tuberlosis. It is to be hoped that CohEres will see the importan of pasing the bill asking for an ap- propriation of $6OO.OO0 and that the work of eliminating bone tubmulo- sis may be ied on mpton. This work is important to only the owners of cattle but to all people. --Hoard's Dairyman. Molaas for Calv Experiments in feeding blackstrap to youag ls for the pur- pose of detelining its physical effect upon them we aied on by Profes- sor R. C, Calloway of the Louisiana Experiment Station. Young calves blaekstrap meias as soon as they showed y inclination to eat grmn. starting with two uunces per day. The amot of biacktp moi- s was gradually inogsed until at the end of three wks some of the riving as high as pound each per day "Low grad e mlgar ue m#- . (blakstrap) may he fed t.o young calves with perft salty, pm- vidl not t much is fed at the he- ginning. One or Faro, and all suspended all meeting. zys' sessis repzentative in & investigating agri- M Ellvorth Iowa, potter, the Fe develops. If the calf is permitted to et atl the molses it may a for at any ly cae u which, if continued, will produ serious, if t fateJ put calves in fine ndifloa, regulate their bowers, d keep the The object of te experiment was to test the phyd] efft of blkstrap moluses, and it wa ale found a fd for Dairyman. of Farmers' Wiv fames' wives of e isued a bill of righta. from their husbavd- mhine for every the faro; a bath T binder en the Idt- riding plow Jn SIDES. F'I Rulk of good lights $7.50. lh,gs 14.200 Marke steady to 10c ower. Bulk $100 to $6;5, buk good; pig* S7.OO. Sheep L000. strong, best fed lambs $975, fl lins .s.00, fed ewes $4.5O. So. St. Paul, Minu,, Dec. 5, 1921:-- u,,rtainty in week's opening, it had Iiite er no ap- affect on the laarket teday. Cattle opened steady tn strong with a demand for good ham/iweiht she tock, some of thse lattcr a,I- ,a.cin 25e Hogs sold steady to 1( and sheep at strong prics. Some fl stock i* begio.iogto :,r rive, best fcd westeru lamhs going to- day at $975, similar kinds ol ewes $4.50 ad fed year/togs np to $8.OO. No al good sr cholee fed hLef at the week's opeoing. best here ,,in up around $6.7 to $7.0, with bulk of the steers f,m 48 to $6. Good 530 pouod Dakota heif- ers sold up te $6 others Wring at $5.3O to $5.75. heifers selling from 25 to .25, bologna buns $2.5O to $8.50. lulk of best light veal ca/yes sold at $7.50. with a few up to $00 Stoekers and feeders were i. healthv demand and hulk of the sales were mle fm $4.60 to $5.OO, wth some up to 45.50. The hog market opened steady to 10e lower. Range ef prices Men,Jay $5.75 to $6,75, bulk of $6.75, bulk of in5 to I75-pound hogs $6.5 to $6.75, geod butchers mostly 46.25 to $6..5. and heavy packers 45.75 to $6.OO About 2.5OO pigs ar- rived and good pigs sold mostly at $7. --Christmas Seals are on sale at le's Variety Store and both Dg Sts. Buy hem now lest you forget. MICKIE SAYS 256 PRODUCESS JOIN ]Redwood Falls, Walnut Gve d'O " _ U. S. GRAIN GROWERSiBeh'iew; Jn Wato wa, at Bu ered Professional find i -- iand LaSalle, and in Wrigh at A "l At the end of its thhd week of or- lmndale. Lyon count still holds the I  Business Directory ,an zat on wo k  sota the U lea nu uber of farmers and elcva-I r." .... ' Itor sinmg con facts C.E. SIGLOH , .rmers and 14 elevators in five147 faxers have contrted to mal I cam,ties hsd contracted to market ket 50OO0O09 bushells thru the U S, %IRING their grain thru tim oatlonal co-opel. I Glain Gloaters. | REPAIRING ath-e ugeney, I Phon e 284.L In Kittson cou"tv, elevators at Ken [ --Win a prize. Ornville, Minn, nedy aml Humholt" have sined up; is los paxe 2 of this isue. ....... JOE BAYER & SON '" .--IIHImIIIIIIIHIIHIIHI]IIIII!]IIIH[|HIIIIIHmHIII[[HHI[HIIHI]WHHIHIHIImmI Of the Ortenville Tailoring Co.  __ . -- tg d pssmg Suits Made to Order. Or t onvl]te, Minn. E C R ELECTRIC SHOE -* E o I M SHOP D ;hoes pared neatly and prompt. ly. Our Wolk Guaranteed. D N E N M JOHN SPANYERS i lTe nrtis {atd - Ligh'Expss IcI ....... .d ]aggtg el ........ IOth STREET AT FOURTH AVENUE MINNEAPOLIS  Telephone 287 Ortonvllle, Min T Northwest'a Large$1 and Most BautifulHosMDy --= ^, t ........ o=,ia, ..a e., aoo= . p,i,.,, m,i  PAUL DIRNBAUER - TARIFF: _. 75 R.I  (Private Rathe ) Single at $200--Double $3.00 i Brick Layer and Plasterer --- 32. Rln (Private Bathsl Single at $2.50--Double $3.50 2O0 R,me (private Bathe) Sin le at $3 00--Doubht M.00 Ste Ma and All Kd| of Othere [rom $4. to $15.00 Comet Wk. Mniun$uuunuiM .on.,* .i... R.r. v =    . PETERSON & SON Dray Line Big Stone Lake I DECEMBER 15th ,o... o....,... q[LL BE PRIIrlNO g LAYAL Kodak ,...**o'***' mmpt, quallkvi,  Mt, SERVICE DAY THE o.o.,mREED ...STUDIO DR. R. D. HIFENBARK Fm the baefit e o mmy etueme  theft c De Lava] OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICiaN fam  we ha established a De Lamal aw/t . One blk u MII from Guadem' .,A,   E, (a th davy w da][ be  to have any De Level me hdv Vapor-Sulphur Cabinet Trealaumta " "ltOg' Ol. 'r Ob', [mr due to umm=d wear m avdd=l, need to he m thi= w -  I  the =1 d h  e  d e sew mm reed. F. L BROWN " lqo charle win be made [at the  TRE JEWELER -. A De Laval rmtab  I.ith m ks e wh this )rtoavl]le, Mlaaett well  the bee *erie. h h o widh aad the d &e De La*d Compa. that every  d & De L  get the  and way kLd of ligkt aed heavy[ de=,| , hnunt d  at the mlmmum o cL md v thet tale ymt Io I tv=ii yoea d t hoe =ud mdul m'& ] Haufuer Bro PHONE  COME EARLY *n o,, o. ..., A, R. KAERCHER &Itont,ff at Law Odd ellows BtdldlN OrtonJle. MlmL orm l,tr0A _ _ DR. F. W. DUNN. CHIROPRACTOR Dodge Cars John Deere Immlements D.D. wma., c. re. a Sptnegratr ' 'I 12-1'14-15-16 Shaker Bldg. - Ortonlle, Minr. Wells Drilled co win. Wellendorf AUCTIONEER 80 als, eXlrle=,. No I  ,,,d to pu, dawn ' trig .n yo $oporty. lx=d ........ in the ........ VALUABLES o d n " ...... '   - - and ,..,,st .or to ou.  _lace_ i_ _,, ,,.. me .. --our SAFE DEPOSIT o,.,= .. J. A. SMITH VAULTS are safe as mo- . A. omso pIANO TUNING AND . .........  , o ...... dern ingenuity and skill .,.m PHON8--- . lt4 make u.*='. ,, " *" " = can Wrk Guaranteed OImVlL, Ktmmmot And in addition to this wcn IT WI oez to, safety we assure you the  e.,.. utmost in courteous at- n.. ,,=.,. tention and service when  w. you visit this Bank. BLMR,Uliy You are most cordially ,-,...... invited to become a user oa,., ,,.=, of our vaults and inspect WHEN R eemee to deilv- ., . . .. our other departments, w..= ,. . 'te tlre, bat% alL F ,  ft Jilt:  lm=v Zmtette hoe sawed to the txeper line Immk lmgth and width--Mmbor [or Old   t  every praetil lmtee in'so- OM lubb and   First National Bank tl am Ihw  Geier banber Co. ooIvIIJm  .x ,....... Ortmville Mlmt. The OrtonvHle Foundry W. F. MtW, I.;O% Pt. Iffmm la i DECEMBER 8, 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT i.i PAGE 7 The Farmers Corner DEVOTED ESPECIALLY TO THE ACqIVITIES OF FARMERS AND FARMER'S CLUBS. Farmers Credit law Bureau Insists Net Income Be Recognized As Basis Of Americap Taxation. will be asked by 1,500,000 farmers to pass legislation present credit laws of the so as to guarantee adequate for agriculture on 12 and 24 paper. with this demand, the Farm Bureau federation and Irate federations will present a net income be recognized Sole measure of ability to pay and that the bulk of all taxes on that basis. the reportbrought back by delegation which attend- national convention of the Farm Bureau federation in ga. national farm bureau poll- by the convention, is sum- as follows in the report to federation: measure of ability to pay taxes )ort of the national govern- s net income, and the bulk of should be levied and collec- basis. should be progressive, that the income, the higher should be. are opposed to the issuing of t free securities, and request submit a constitutional to the several states to defect in our tax system. disapprove the repeal of the Profits tax. opposed to the principle of sales tax, of any similar as a general manufacturers of the Great Lakes-St. waterway, restoration of Powers to state railroad corn- and a strong objection to carriers to charge higher short hauls than for long planks in a transportation Submitted by the Minnesota and adopted. platform demands or drastic modificatian of law, and the repeal of Esch-Cummins act. the prindple of guar- upon fixed valuations of the United States," says, "and ask the re- 15-A, Esch-Cummins contains this feature. the Adamson law produces in the conduct of the rail- operate against the inter- Public, we ask its repeal or as speedily as possible." GRANTED FOR FARM STATE CONVENTION have been granted by to the Minnesota Farm for its annual state which opens at University Paul, on January 3. rates apply to all points according to an official received by the county The cut in passenger only on the atten- members showing pro- that they came to the by rail. The state federa- that 1,200 farmers will meeting. When all regula- COmpiled with, members will a buy return tickets at one- , the federation said in its the county bureau. to enable farmers and their attend both the Minnesota federation annual con- the sessions of Farmers' Makers' week this winter, expense, the convention for January 3, 4 and 5, armers, week at University rvice and university of- set aside the opening day as "Farm Bureau The first session of will be held in the an- University Farm, and all of Farmers' and Home will be suspended all everyone to attend the meeting. and third days' sessions will be in the cham- of representatives in automobile truck; a fireless cooker for every new mowing machine; their share of the t'arm income. In a nut- saell, they demand lhe same labor- saving ,,nachinery in the imuse which the husband (iemands in tile tlelds, and they have a right to ask it. Too often the comfort of the farmer's wife is the last thing considered on the farm. In agricultural states the in- sane asylums are largely recruited from the class of farmers' wives who have submitted to the slavery of Iceaseless household work until ex- hausted nature has given way. Of course, there is no reason why a man in Nebraska or Massachusetts or California should buy the latest labor-saving machinery for his work and leave his wife to the old laborious methods. He hould not be riding a tractor while his wife is doing her washing on an-old-fashioned wash- board. In making their demands the women are not unreasonable. If any life there must be time to rest and re- flect. Proper labor saving machines and running water in the house make farm life comfortable and pleasant. The Nebraska women are not only asking for their rights. ACCREDITED HERDS. Dairy farmers and breeders of pure- bred dairy cattle have shown more in- terest in establishing tuberculosis-free herds than was anticipated by those responsible for the plan for establish- mg accredited herds. When the ac- credited herd plan was adopted, there was some concern among those inter- ested in the elimination of bovine tu- berculosis as to whether cattle pwn- ers would take kindly to it. Sinc the inception of this method of eradica- ting tuberculosis, it has grown in fa- vor until today there is a larger de- mand for tuberculin testing among dairy farmers and breeders than can be met by the federal government. : The weekly news letter of the Amer- ican Farm Bureau federation dontains the following paragraph: "Testing of cattle for tuberculosiq and registering them with the United States Department of Agriculture as accredited herds can no longer be con-! tinned in Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, New Nork, North Carolina, Texas, Ver- mont, and Virginia unless an addi- tional federal appropriation is made The American Farm Bureau federa- tion has presented the problem of each member of the Senate and House Appropriations Committees other con- gressmen, and the DepL of Agricul- ture, Representative D. A. Reed of New York has introduced a bill which I calls for an appropriation o $600,000, I and it has been referred to the House I Appropriations committee. Some 72,-1 000 herds thruout the country are an-I der test, representing 858,000 cattle. I More than 15,000 herds are now on the j waiting list." I This shows that thinking dairy far-1 mers and breeders appreciate the im-/ portance of having their herds free] from tuberculosis. It is to be hoped! that Congress will see the importance I of passing the bill asking for an ap-! propriation of $600,000 and that the! work of eliminating bovine tuherculo-i sis may be carried on Without inter- ruption. This work is important to l not onlv the owners of cattle but to all people. --Hoard's Dairyman. Molasses for Calves. Experiments in feeding blackstrap molasses to young calves for the pur- pose of determining its physical effect upon them were carried on by Profes- sor R. C. Call0way of the Louisiana Experiment Station. Young calves were fed bl'ackstrap molasses as soon as they showed any inclination to eat grain, starting with two ounces per day. The amount of blackstrap molas- ses was gradually increased until at the end of three weeks some of the calves were receiving as high as one pound each per day. Professor Calloway draws this con- clusion: "Low grade sugar cane mp- lasses (blackstrap) may be fed to young calves with perfect safety, pro- vided not too much is fed at the be- ginning. One or two ounces may be given at each feeding and then gradu- ally increase the allowance as the calf develops. If the calf is permitted to eat all the molasses it may care for at any one time it will more than like- ly catfse scours which, if continued, will produce serious, if not fatal, con- sequences. Blackstrap molasses will put ealv6s in fine condition, regulate their bowels, and keep the skin and hair in good order." president of the I The object of te experiment was to Bureau federation;]test the physical effect of blaekstrap A. O: Preus, Sydney An-]molasses, and it was also found an of the joint congres-l economical feed for ealves.--Hoard's investigating agri- ] Dairyman. Mrs. Ellsworth ] ..... of Iowa, leader in faz I . and L. E. Potter, the Minnesota Federa-]-,lzl[lJl[J'f  'Peak at the opening ses- I  I  Uvotlyour' of 00Wives I ames- " Wd US Plltl ! en farmers wives of l  k I issued a bill of rights. [ 1 Dig IV h_  f mmt ux list nrm their husbands--  Pit a MgtW I g machine for every [  wr= .IBI". on the farm; a bath-] "m"ww''t,pUbmoo for every binder on[ I  , -- g water in the kit-[ W a - riding plow in the --  a  . . cook stove for every] - - thy Tone In 0 PRODUCERS JOIN U. S. GRAIN GROWERS ' k--- ]ll___l__il At the end of its third week of or- a o rk in Minnesota, the U I ". ' r vers, Inc., announced that Fed Sheep and Lambs Beginning to 256 ........ Arrive on Local Market Fat , iarmers and 4 emvaors m nve Lambs up to $9.75." t counties had contracted to market Monday's Closing-- Cattle 5,800. Market opened steady to strong', closing weak on beef steers. "5 CaNes 500. Bulk of good lights $,,0. ilogs 14,200. Market steady to 10e !ower. Bulk $6.00 to $6.75, bulk good pigs $7.00. Sheep 4,000. Market strong, best fed lambs $9.75, fed year- lip;s SS.00, fed ewes $4.50. So. St. Paul, Minn., Dec. 5, 1921:- While the strike situation caused some uncertainty in livestock circles at the week's opening, it ha(t little or no ap- paren affect on the market today. Cattle opened steady to strong with a brisk (lemand for good handiweight she stock, some of these latter ad- vancing 25e. Hogs sold stea(ly to 10c lower and there was a healthy demand for lambs and sheep at strong price:< Some fed stock is t)eginning!to ar- rive, best fed western lambs going to- day at $9.75, similar kinds of ewes $4.50 mad fed yearlings up to $8.00. No real good or choice fed beef steers arrived at the week's opening, best here going up around $6.75 to $7.00, with bulk of the steers from $5 to $6. Good 530 pound Dakota heif- ers sold up to $6 others going at $5.30 to $5.75, and bulk of the fat cows and heifers selling from $3.50 to $5.25. Canners and cutters ranged from $2.- 25 to $3.25, bologna bulls $2.50 to $3.50. Bulk of best light veal calves sohl at $7.50, with a few up to $8.00. Stockers and feeders were in healthy I demand and hulk of the sales were made from $4.50 to $5.00, with some up to $5.50. The hog market opened steady to 10e lower. Range of prices Monday $5.75 to $6.75, bulk of 135-1b hogs $6.75, bulk of 135 to 175-pound hogs $6.65 to $6.75, good butchers mostly $6.25 to $6.35, and heavy packers $5.75 to $6.00. About 2,500 pigs ar- rived and good pigs sold mostly at $7. Christmas Seals are on sale at T- ]er's Variety Store and both Drug Stores. Buy them now lest you forget. MICKIE SAYS Redwood Falls, Walnut Wells Drilled I I am prepared to put down your well in the least time and smallest cost to you. See me first. J. A. SMITH Phone 10-F-11 R. 3, Ortonville i Grove and Belview; in Watonwan, at Butterfield and LaSalle, and in Wright at An- namiale. Lyon county still holds the lead in number of farmers and eleva- tors signing contracts. In ll states, 767 elevators and 27,- 472 farmers have contracted to mar- ket 50,000,000 bushells thru the U. S. their grain thru the national co-oper-iGrain G,'owers. ative agency. } In Kittson county, elevators at Ken-] --Win a t)rize. Read "Who's WhC' nedy and Humbolt have signed up; in on page '2 or this L:sue. @ I Professional and Business Directory C. E. SIGLOti For [xpert WIRINGSERVIcEELECTRIC REPAIRING Phone 284-L Ortonviile, Minn. m ..__ 10th STREET AT FOURTH AVENUE =" MINNEAPOLIS _ The Northwest's Largest and Most Beautifnl Hostelry All Room, .r Outaid and Each Room has Privat Bath TARIFF: 75 Returns (Private Baths) Single at $2.00--Double $3.00 - 325 Rooms (Private Baths) Single at $2.50---Double $3.50 l -- 200 Rooms (Private Baths) Single at $3 00---Double $4.00 Others from $4.00 to $15.00 =i AI'kinds'c'00-'00i00adp*es00i00 U neatly done. Suits Made to Order. E , Ortonville, Minn. EC C D  ELECTRIC SHOE SHO00  E Shoes repaired neatly and prmpt- f 1 ly. Our Work Guaranteed, i JOHN SPANYERS 00urti00 i00otel _ Light lIaulingofallKinds DECEMBER 15th WILL BE LAVAL SERVICE DAY For &e benefit of out many customers and men of De Loyal C.mam Separator* we have estabed a De Laval Service Do2. On this day wz shall be glad to have any De Laval met brin hi. complete .eparator to our tto for a thoroush and cdul impec- . tim  limunent, which will be made free d r.ha Shodd any peru, due to unusual wear t aexldent, need to be replaced, this will be dine, the only charge beln for the pfiee d the new peru used. IV o charge will Se made for ihe service. A De Lava] relmtatlve will be.wlth us to m&t with this Wot. ,ing ill your De Lava! Separator that day md receive the benefit d h advice on the care and opealm d the machine, at well at the Ire* service. It is ouz  and tl d the De Lawl Company, that every us d a De I.a[ Sevmatm" get the mu- imum of service at  minimum of o and we therdce urge you to pl yourse of this free and  COME EARLY - - ORTOI MIHHESOTA "-" I I I I I _ _ Dodge Cars John Deere Immlements Jl[00]00lil i HEN iteomes to deliver. ing the goods on time we're there, ,that's all For big jobs or small jobs--lure. her sawed to the proper length and width--lumber for every practical purpose prac- tically priced. Geier Lmnber Co. ALUABLES placed in our SAFE DEPOSIT t VAULTS are safe as mo- dern ingenuity and skill can make them. And in addition to this safety we assure you the utmost in courteous at- tention and service when you visit this Bank. You are most cordially invited to become a user of our vaults and inspect our other departments. Illll Ill I I I First National Bank ORTONVIIJ MINNgSOTA Express and Baggage Telephone 287 Ortonville, Minn. PAUL DIRNBAUER Brick Layer and Plasterer Stone Mason and All Kinds of Cement Work. Ortonville, Minn. R.F.D. PETERSON & SON Dray Line Big Stone Lake Ice Phone 38 Ortonville, Min Kodak PRINTINGDEVELOPING '1 ENLARGING Prompt, Quality Service, Moderate Pris. THE REED STUDIO Ortonville Minn. DR. R. D. RIFENBARK OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN One block uhill from Gunderson's ,rug Store Vapor-Sulphur Cabinet Treatments (For rheumatism, neuritis, eta:.) F. L. BROWN THE JEWELER Ortonville, MinnHota TRUCK SERVICE and any kind of light and heavy draying Hausauer Bros. PHONE 268 All Orders Given Prompt Attentio] A. B. KAERCHER Attorney at Law Odd Fellows Building Ortonville, Minn. DR. F. W. DUNN. CHIROPRACTOR D. D. WHITE, D. C., PH. C. Spinographer , 12-13-14-15-16 Shumaker Bldg. Ortonville, Minn. CoL Wm. Wellendorf AUCTIONEER 80 years' experience. No prnetie- ig on your property. Call or write me early md get in on an early date. Ortonville, Mlnnemta J. A. JOHNSON PIANO TUNING AND REPAIRING PHONES--Residmm . 194 Furniture Store - 118 All Werk Guaranteed Ortonville, MAnnuotL WILL FINCH Experienced Palat Plume 2$-L All Work Guaranteed ELMER, SAtSURY l