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December 9, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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December 9, 2003
 

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Ortonvflle with a heart" INDE E00NDENT "A Constructive Newspaper In A Live Community" ahtonka II may soon be seen afloat again on Big Stone Lake " ': " " ..... " " " ' "" " 'Eahtonka ti O0 ?th  thtemtr; ;l s n'l tbtk:n b e -'rhCe I tE ,}l.ltlobn rchdsY been o w ncd b y tha'ldS feasible committee will als 0 !USTICE FAMILY studies pictures of their deployed National Guardsman father, Joe Eustice. From are Amber, Mariana, Hannah, John, Erin, Joseph, Thomas, and Benjamin. mily awaits father's return "year-old Hannah Eustice tlta for only one thing this bring her dad Joe home for Her morn says she has it :d out; Santa can drop by his sleigh, pick up her dad, In the parking lot across from to deliver him home on llah, her eight siblings g, 9 months; Mariana, 2; 3; Joseph, 6; John, 11; ;Patrick, 15; and Amber, 16), morn Renee said goodbye to on August 13 in St. James, a first sergeant with the unit of the Army National trrently serves at R.A.F. in England. Eustice. a sixth-grade teacher at James Knoll Elementary and head wrestling coach at OHS, took a promotion to first sergeant and joined the St. James unit about three years ago, after serving 18 years in the New Uhn unit. Eustice's two brothers, members of the same battalion but different units, are also on active duty in Italy at two different bases. Another brother who works full-time with the National Guard in the Twin Cities remains stateside. Because Eustice belongs to the St. James unit, instead of the nondeployed-at-this-time Ortonville unit, he is one of the few Ortonville residents on active duty, a situation that Renee says can be difficult. "I do feel kind of displaced," she says. Negative comments and actions-signs Don't be alone for Christmas Come enjoy a free Christmas din- ner, which will include turkey, ham, and all the holiday trimmings. It will be held on Christmas Day, Thursday, Dec. 25, at St. John's Catholic Church in Ortonville. Serving will be 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Reservations are needed. Please call 1-800-519-7075 by Friday, Dec. 19, and leave a message with number of persons who will be attending. Sponsored by anonymous local businesses and individuals. /" Only 16 Days UNTIL CHRISTMAS supporting the military have been stolen from their backyard twice-discomfit Renee. She knows any American base can be the target of terrorism. "It doesn't matter where you're serving your country," she explains. "There is one army and everything depends on someone else doing their job; one job might be more dangerous at one particular time." Renee says she tries to overlook the negative reactions and focus on the people who have been so supportive to her and her family. Second- and third-grade students at the elementary schoo; recently c,, a care package to Joe. Friends helped install a webcam on the Eustices' home computer so the children could see and talk with their dad. Others bring food or stop to say hi or take the kids on special outings. Renee keeps a book for Joe that tracks all of the kind things people have done for the family; she plans to share it with him when he returns. She says she has a list of people who've offered to help, and contractors who'll help with home repairs. And Renee considers the support and prayers of church friends some of the greatest help the family's received. South Dakota families have contacted Renee offering their support, and this week the Big Stone City Superintendent delivered two large bags of gifts collected by the faculty. Renee admits she cried and found it "very touching, especially since my husband doesn't teach there." With a six-hour time difference between England and Minnesota, the Eustice family finds it easiest to stay in touch on weekends. Renee stays up late or gets up early to talk with her husband, but the kids have the best opportunity on weekends. Pictures help keep their father (Continued on page 9) HEY KIDS! San!a's Coming WITH GOODIES FOR ALL TO BIG STONE CITY & BELLINGHAM This Saturday, Dec. 13th lSee ads inside for further information)_.# First letter sent to Santa Edi. note: This is the first letter to Santa this year. A copy of the letter appears here. Watch upcoming issues for more Santa letters: Dear Santa: How are you doing? I would like a toy grain truck and a toy bucket tractor. Your friend, Christopher Danielson Ortonville Age 8 --MMAAA^ ! i  INTEERING during the holidays are Clyde Weros, at left and both of Ortonville. They put up Christmas decorations center on Ortonville's main street. Big Stone Lake this summer under new ownership. Bonanza Educational Center has '.brined a committee that is working toward purchasing the Eahtonka II for BEC. According to Matyi Sundheim, BEC Director, the boat will continue to run as it has in the past, with public and private excursions. He is also hoping that the boat will eventually be tied into BEC, and could be used for educational purposes such as water testing, aquatic animal studies, and cultural and geological history of the Big Stone Lake Area. "The Eahtonka will remain docked at the foot of Big Stone Lake if BEC is able to purchase the boat," said Sundheim. Burton Nypen, who is serving on the Eahtonka committee, mentioned that currently the group is working to raise the funds necessary to purchase the boat, as well as for costs to get the boat ready to be on the water. Because BEC is a non-profit orga- nization, they rely primarily on grants and donations. "We would happily accept any donations given to BEC for the Eahtonka, or for any other pur- pose," said Nypen. Nypen also mentioned that the committee has approached govern- mental authorities, including Senators Gary Kubly and Keith Langseth, as well as Representatives Aaron Peterson and Paul Marquardt. "Senator Kubly has agreed to sponsor legislation on our behalf," said Nypen. "All tour men have been very receptive to the idea, and through them, we learned about the Minnesota Bonding Program." According to Nypen, the commit- tee is currently working with the oonding program, and are working out a budget to present. Nypen esti- mates that the Eahtonka committee will request approximately $300,000 for the project, which will be used for the purchase of the boat, an updated docking area, and minor maintenance needed to get the boat up and running. "Overall, the boat is in excellent condition," said Sundheim. "There is very little work that needs to be done former Ortonville resident Judy Beckman, and operated by Neil Speckeen for approximately eight years. Last summer was the only summer that the boat was not avail- able fi)r excursions along Big Stone Lake. Beckman is excited about the prospect of having the boat back on Big Stone Lake, and is currently working with the committee to ensure be asking local residents to send let- ters of support for this project, which will aid in acquiring needed funding, as well as in legislature. Anyone wishing to write a letter of support can send it to Bonanza Educational Center c/o Matyas Sundheim, 31167 Big Stone Lake Park Road, Clinton, MN 56225. For more information regard- ing the Eahtonka project, contact Matyi at BEC. THE LUCKY WINNER of $50 in scrip from the Ortonville Independent's Christmaspromotion is Jeff Koch of Ortonville. His name was drawn on Saturday. He received his scrip from Val Henrichs of Ortonville's VFW, where he registered earlier in the week. The next two drawings are set for this Friday and Saturday, Dec. 12 and 13 at 1 p.m. both days. Friday's drawing has rown to $1,450 if the winner is present. Be sure to register at a participating business. See sponsors elsewhere this issue. Parker shares memories of war, days of youth (Edi. note: Ortonville native Vince Parker, now retired in Stillwater, Writes today of some World War II memories and of his fond days of growing up in Ortonville. We are happy to share these with our readers, along with some war photos of Vince's tour of duty in Italy, from October of 1944 to July of 1945, serving as a tail gunner on a B-17 bomber.) ***** Thanks for sending me an auto- graphed copy of the book I'm Off To War Mother But I'll Be Back. The story line "reflections of WWII tail gunner Wayne Whiting" as told by his son, Jerry, took me back to Italy and the war. Wayne flew in a B-24 bomber and I flew in a B-17. As tail gunners, we rode through the war backwards look- ing out the rear view window. And it wasn't always a very pleasant picture or a very comfortable ride. After the war, I seem to recall a conversation with Wayne, not about the combat stuff, but a few of the lighter things that happened. Such as turning for home after having dropped our bombs, letting down from the tar- get area grateful to have survived the murderous barrage of flak. Exhausted and hungry, we would gather in the radio room for lunch. Our radio operator, Cliff Faust from Chandler, Arizona, a bit of a character, would pass the palms of his hands in a sweeping motion back and forth over the canvas bag that contained our lunch, like he was performing magic. Then he would pick up the bag, put his ear to it and yell "surprise!" and out would tumble frozen Spam sand- wiches and.a cold thermos of coffee. One time when he turned the bag upside down, it was empty. Clarence Patching, our skinny waist gunner, .a farm boy from Clalskanie, Oregon, grabbed Cliff's parachute and threatened to toss it out of the plane. Cliff yelled "surprise!" and suddenly discovered our lunch (Continued on page 9) VINCE ASTRIDE THE TAIL of a B-17 bomber just before taking off for a mission to Vienna. He was with the 301st bomb group, 32nd bomb squadron with the 15th Air Force flying out of Italy, from Oct. 24, 1944 to July 6, 1945. He flew 41 missions and 24 sorties, having enlisted at the age of 17, called in at 18 and discharged at age 19. Ortonvflle with a heart" INDE E00NDENT "A Constructive Newspaper In A Live Community" ahtonka II may soon be seen afloat again on Big Stone Lake " ': " " ..... " " " ' "" " 'Eahtonka ti O0 ?th  thtemtr; ;l s n'l tbtk:n b e -'rhCe I tE ,}l.ltlobn rchdsY been o w ncd b y tha'ldS feasible committee will als 0 !USTICE FAMILY studies pictures of their deployed National Guardsman father, Joe Eustice. From are Amber, Mariana, Hannah, John, Erin, Joseph, Thomas, and Benjamin. mily awaits father's return "year-old Hannah Eustice tlta for only one thing this bring her dad Joe home for Her morn says she has it :d out; Santa can drop by his sleigh, pick up her dad, In the parking lot across from to deliver him home on llah, her eight siblings g, 9 months; Mariana, 2; 3; Joseph, 6; John, 11; ;Patrick, 15; and Amber, 16), morn Renee said goodbye to on August 13 in St. James, a first sergeant with the unit of the Army National trrently serves at R.A.F. in England. Eustice. a sixth-grade teacher at James Knoll Elementary and head wrestling coach at OHS, took a promotion to first sergeant and joined the St. James unit about three years ago, after serving 18 years in the New Uhn unit. Eustice's two brothers, members of the same battalion but different units, are also on active duty in Italy at two different bases. Another brother who works full-time with the National Guard in the Twin Cities remains stateside. Because Eustice belongs to the St. James unit, instead of the nondeployed-at-this-time Ortonville unit, he is one of the few Ortonville residents on active duty, a situation that Renee says can be difficult. "I do feel kind of displaced," she says. Negative comments and actions-signs Don't be alone for Christmas Come enjoy a free Christmas din- ner, which will include turkey, ham, and all the holiday trimmings. It will be held on Christmas Day, Thursday, Dec. 25, at St. John's Catholic Church in Ortonville. Serving will be 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Reservations are needed. Please call 1-800-519-7075 by Friday, Dec. 19, and leave a message with number of persons who will be attending. Sponsored by anonymous local businesses and individuals. /" Only 16 Days UNTIL CHRISTMAS supporting the military have been stolen from their backyard twice-discomfit Renee. She knows any American base can be the target of terrorism. "It doesn't matter where you're serving your country," she explains. "There is one army and everything depends on someone else doing their job; one job might be more dangerous at one particular time." Renee says she tries to overlook the negative reactions and focus on the people who have been so supportive to her and her family. Second- and third-grade students at the elementary schoo; recently c,, a care package to Joe. Friends helped install a webcam on the Eustices' home computer so the children could see and talk with their dad. Others bring food or stop to say hi or take the kids on special outings. Renee keeps a book for Joe that tracks all of the kind things people have done for the family; she plans to share it with him when he returns. She says she has a list of people who've offered to help, and contractors who'll help with home repairs. And Renee considers the support and prayers of church friends some of the greatest help the family's received. South Dakota families have contacted Renee offering their support, and this week the Big Stone City Superintendent delivered two large bags of gifts collected by the faculty. Renee admits she cried and found it "very touching, especially since my husband doesn't teach there." With a six-hour time difference between England and Minnesota, the Eustice family finds it easiest to stay in touch on weekends. Renee stays up late or gets up early to talk with her husband, but the kids have the best opportunity on weekends. Pictures help keep their father (Continued on page 9) HEY KIDS! San!a's Coming WITH GOODIES FOR ALL TO BIG STONE CITY & BELLINGHAM This Saturday, Dec. 13th lSee ads inside for further information)_.# First letter sent to Santa Edi. note: This is the first letter to Santa this year. A copy of the letter appears here. Watch upcoming issues for more Santa letters: Dear Santa: How are you doing? I would like a toy grain truck and a toy bucket tractor. Your friend, Christopher Danielson Ortonville Age 8 --MMAAA^ ! i  INTEERING during the holidays are Clyde Weros, at left and both of Ortonville. They put up Christmas decorations center on Ortonville's main street. Big Stone Lake this summer under new ownership. Bonanza Educational Center has '.brined a committee that is working toward purchasing the Eahtonka II for BEC. According to Matyi Sundheim, BEC Director, the boat will continue to run as it has in the past, with public and private excursions. He is also hoping that the boat will eventually be tied into BEC, and could be used for educational purposes such as water testing, aquatic animal studies, and cultural and geological history of the Big Stone Lake Area. "The Eahtonka will remain docked at the foot of Big Stone Lake if BEC is able to purchase the boat," said Sundheim. Burton Nypen, who is serving on the Eahtonka committee, mentioned that currently the group is working to raise the funds necessary to purchase the boat, as well as for costs to get the boat ready to be on the water. Because BEC is a non-profit orga- nization, they rely primarily on grants and donations. "We would happily accept any donations given to BEC for the Eahtonka, or for any other pur- pose," said Nypen. Nypen also mentioned that the committee has approached govern- mental authorities, including Senators Gary Kubly and Keith Langseth, as well as Representatives Aaron Peterson and Paul Marquardt. "Senator Kubly has agreed to sponsor legislation on our behalf," said Nypen. "All tour men have been very receptive to the idea, and through them, we learned about the Minnesota Bonding Program." According to Nypen, the commit- tee is currently working with the oonding program, and are working out a budget to present. Nypen esti- mates that the Eahtonka committee will request approximately $300,000 for the project, which will be used for the purchase of the boat, an updated docking area, and minor maintenance needed to get the boat up and running. "Overall, the boat is in excellent condition," said Sundheim. "There is very little work that needs to be done former Ortonville resident Judy Beckman, and operated by Neil Speckeen for approximately eight years. Last summer was the only summer that the boat was not avail- able fi)r excursions along Big Stone Lake. Beckman is excited about the prospect of having the boat back on Big Stone Lake, and is currently working with the committee to ensure be asking local residents to send let- ters of support for this project, which will aid in acquiring needed funding, as well as in legislature. Anyone wishing to write a letter of support can send it to Bonanza Educational Center c/o Matyas Sundheim, 31167 Big Stone Lake Park Road, Clinton, MN 56225. For more information regard- ing the Eahtonka project, contact Matyi at BEC. THE LUCKY WINNER of $50 in scrip from the Ortonville Independent's Christmaspromotion is Jeff Koch of Ortonville. His name was drawn on Saturday. He received his scrip from Val Henrichs of Ortonville's VFW, where he registered earlier in the week. The next two drawings are set for this Friday and Saturday, Dec. 12 and 13 at 1 p.m. both days. Friday's drawing has rown to $1,450 if the winner is present. Be sure to register at a participating business. See sponsors elsewhere this issue. Parker shares memories of war, days of youth (Edi. note: Ortonville native Vince Parker, now retired in Stillwater, Writes today of some World War II memories and of his fond days of growing up in Ortonville. We are happy to share these with our readers, along with some war photos of Vince's tour of duty in Italy, from October of 1944 to July of 1945, serving as a tail gunner on a B-17 bomber.) ***** Thanks for sending me an auto- graphed copy of the book I'm Off To War Mother But I'll Be Back. The story line "reflections of WWII tail gunner Wayne Whiting" as told by his son, Jerry, took me back to Italy and the war. Wayne flew in a B-24 bomber and I flew in a B-17. As tail gunners, we rode through the war backwards look- ing out the rear view window. And it wasn't always a very pleasant picture or a very comfortable ride. After the war, I seem to recall a conversation with Wayne, not about the combat stuff, but a few of the lighter things that happened. Such as turning for home after having dropped our bombs, letting down from the tar- get area grateful to have survived the murderous barrage of flak. Exhausted and hungry, we would gather in the radio room for lunch. Our radio operator, Cliff Faust from Chandler, Arizona, a bit of a character, would pass the palms of his hands in a sweeping motion back and forth over the canvas bag that contained our lunch, like he was performing magic. Then he would pick up the bag, put his ear to it and yell "surprise!" and out would tumble frozen Spam sand- wiches and.a cold thermos of coffee. One time when he turned the bag upside down, it was empty. Clarence Patching, our skinny waist gunner, .a farm boy from Clalskanie, Oregon, grabbed Cliff's parachute and threatened to toss it out of the plane. Cliff yelled "surprise!" and suddenly discovered our lunch (Continued on page 9) VINCE ASTRIDE THE TAIL of a B-17 bomber just before taking off for a mission to Vienna. He was with the 301st bomb group, 32nd bomb squadron with the 15th Air Force flying out of Italy, from Oct. 24, 1944 to July 6, 1945. He flew 41 missions and 24 sorties, having enlisted at the age of 17, called in at 18 and discharged at age 19.