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The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
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December 9, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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December 9, 2003
 

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Good news on Hobo Soup, via this letter: "To The Creators of the World's Best Soup: Thank you very much for your wonderful product. I would like to see Hobo Soup stocked more often than currently is in my city, Minneapolis, but I am able to find it on occasion. One occasion ear- lier this fall, my girlfriend and I were traveling to her hometown of Aberdeen, South Dakota. Along the way, we stopped for a bathroom break at a small grocery store where we had the pleasure to meet the man--Jim--who proclaimed himself the heir of the Hobo Soup legacy. Nice guy. Upon autographing a can of Hobo soup, we left purchasing many cans and enjoying every one. Thanks again for indulging the world with such a fine product." Karl Leitz Bob Pflueger sheds some .... more light in our mention last week of the passing of famous Mpls. personality, Louise Saunders, long-time owner of Charlie's Cafe Exceptional. Bob Says he remembers that in addition to her other talents, a few if which we focused on last week, she was also an excel- lent ice speed skater. Another small worlder...actually two in one. While departing from Lund's market in Wayzata recently, a lady, checking out next to us, noticed our "Ortonville Independent" logo on the back of our jacket...and she asked if we knew her uncle in Ortonville, namely John Cunningham. "We sure do," was our reply. The nice-looking young lady's name was Carrie Svendahl of Plymouth, just north of Wayzata. The now "at home morn" said to be sure "and greet John and Sheri!" We just 1 Pre-owned Chrysler 300M's Luxury Sport Sedans County approves feedlot ordinance, explores law enforcement with city Big Stone County Commissioners approved amendments to the county's feedlot ordinance last week. In a 4-1 vote, the board adopted the amended policy that included recom- mendations from Environmental Officer Darren Wilke. Commission- ers Athey, Lane, Maas, and Torgerson supported the amendments, while Commissioner Swigerd voted against them. Wilke recommended the inclusion of public churches and cemeteries as receptors, a prohibition on new open- air liquid-manure storage structures, a cap of 3,000 animal units per feedlot with a 2,000-animal cap on swine, and a one-half mile setback for residences. The setback could be reduced to a one-quarter mile distance with signed waivers from the property and feedlot owners. Commissioner Torgerson initiated the motion to adopt the amended ordi- nance; Commissioner Athey seconded the action. Both Torgerson and Athey served on the committee set up to study the feedlot ordinance. Commissioner Torgerson called the process one of the toughest things he's done. "There are things I can say I wish hadn't happened," he told the commission and others in attendance. Wilke stressed the restrictive nature of the proposed amendments. "We're catching a lot of heat from producer groups and State agencies," he stated. He pointed out that future applications will be subject to condi- tional-use hearings. Any operation involving over 300 animal units requires a public hearing on conditional use. Commissioner restricting operations from critical areas. Commissioner Swigerd voiced concerns over odor and air quality near large operations. "Air quality is the number one gripe on feedlots," admitted Wilke. Wilke explained that air quality monitoring occurs if there are repeat complaints directed toward a facility. Commissioner Torgerson urged the board to act on the proposed amend- ments, saying that further delay would only worsen the situation. "We're destroying our trust in one another," he explained. About 35 citizens attended Tuesday's meeting. The board com- pleted its regular business and then moved upstairs to the courtroom for the feedlot discussion and vote. In other business, the commission heard from Ortonville City Councilmember Dan Oakes regarding a joint committee to explore the rela- tionship between the county sheriff's office and the Ortonviile Police Department. Councilmember Artie Arndt, City Clerk Char Grossman, and Police Chief Curt Hormann also appeared before the board. Councilmember Oakes explained that the city was facing a shortfall of over $280,000 by 2005 due to state Local Government Aid (LGA)fund- ing cuts. He said he and Council- member Arndt met with County Auditor Michelle Knutson and County Sheriff Joe Berning to discuss the fea- sibility and cost of the sheriff's depart- ment patrolling the city of Ortonville; currently the city does not utilize county patrol services. be required to include Ortonviile, amounting to $216,000 a year. "Would it not make sense for the county to subsidize the police force?" queried Councilmember Oakes. Oakes explained that the city coun- cil would like to form a joint commit- tee with county representatives to explore various options. The joint committee would include Council- members Oakes and Arndt, Police Chief Curt Hormann, City Clerk Char Grossman, County Auditor Michelle Knutson, County Sheriff Joe Beming, and two representatives from the Big Stone County Board of Commission- ers. Commissioners Bruce Swigerd and Alvin Maas volunteered to represent the county board. County Attorney Bill Watson also offered to sit in on meetings. The group plans to meet for the first time in January. In other action, the board accepted the resignation of Joe Berning as Emergency Management Director of Big Stone County. "Since 9/11, this emergency management position has gone crazy," explained Berning. "It's basically just about a full-time posi- tion." Berning recommended Darlene Nichols-Born as his replacement, and the board approved Nichols-Barn's appointment in a 4-1 vote, with Commissioner Athey casting the dis- senting vote. Commissioners also reviewed Auditor Knutson's records on forfeit- ed properties. The board reviewed and adjusted valuations for several properties in Ortonviile, Barry, Graceville, Clinton, Beardsley, and did, via this report! Then, but a few Torgerson maintained that conditional seconds later the man bagginggro- use policies will be a great help in i cerie fO:;ltawe:tvere 6m ' ....... , ......  ............... .: .... Ortonville, Xtt he asf originally from Appleton and asked if we knew his brother-in-law, Curt Johnson, for- mer editor- owner of the Appleton Press. The man's name was Alan Ulstad. Anne (nee Parent) Elton, formerly of Ortonville, and who we met at the recent 50th anniversary of Arlen and Ardell LaCombe, asks us if we remember a Molly Bishop, a former first grade teacher in Ortonville, who lived at the Columbian Hotel while here. Ann says "she dated your friend Art Anderson in those days, about 1952 or '53. I met her a couple years ago." By the way, the LaCombe anniversary had special meaning for us, as we introduced the two way back when! A nice thank you note today from Sharon Smith, Secretary of the Big Stone Lake Area Chapter of Habitat for Humanity. "Thanks for the excel- lent ad recently promoting 'grocery day' at Bill's Super Valu Plus. It was a very successful fund raiser and we are happy to have had your help in 'spreading the word!'" Another small worlder...while riding recently in an elevator in the Phillips Eye Institute building, carrying a couple cans of Hobo Soup, the man who entered on one of the floors, upon seeing the soup, exclaimed "why you must be from Ortonville." Had a nice but all too brief chat with the young man, Roger Fossen, Jr., son of Roger Fossen, Sr. of Beardsley, He works at Abbott- Northwestern Hospital in Mpls. fkddo on the germ-oR! I I Too late. to classd00 I I Ii II IIII FOR SALE-Old, antique dining room buffet, 60" long by 19" wide, with matching large beveled glass mirror. Both in excellent condition - $200, 320-273-2168. 46-1" County representatives estimated that three additional deputies would - Granaw Food Co-op- 47 NW 2nd St. Ortonville, MN 320-839-6204 Making that special holiday treat?. Only need one teaspooon of that special spice that makes it just right? And won't use it again 'ill next year? AT THE GRANARY, YOU CAN BUY ONE TEASPOON. BRING IN YOUR.RECIPE AND BUY JUST WHAT YOU NEED! "Buy a pinch or a poundt." OPEN MONDAY THRU SATURDAY 10.00AM-3-00PM COME CHECK OUT THE Lennox Hearth Products AND SEE OUR WORKING DISPLAY IN THE ORTONVILLE STORE! Shop locally and register for Christmas scrip/ Larry's Refrigeration & Heating, Inc. Two locations to serve you better/ 225 NW 2nd St, Ortonville 321 - 6th Ave. Madison 320-839-3882 320-598-3334 Correll. A public sale will be held on Tuesday, December 30, at 9 a.m. Happenings By Bob Dybvig The past two summers have been extremely hot and dry. Any grass that didn't receive irrigation suffered to the point that some didn't survive. We will have to wait until spring to evaluate the damage. * Some trees very slow to leaf out...flowering crabs north of the clinic flowered in late October. First time I've ever seen this happen, and will be anxious to see what happens to them over winter. The Autumn Blaze maples on the south side of the athletic field suffered extreme stress from lack of proper watering. Most of them lost most of their leaves, but put on new leaves after they were watered deeply and mulched. This happened in late September and it remains to be seen if these trees will survive the winter. * The rose garden project was again a success. Dan Nelson and I did a major spring pruning mainly on the south end all though both ends had a lot of winter damage. Dan did the watering and fertilizing again this year. Thanks to Dan for his continued interest and support * I have completed my 14th year of work at the golf course. Much effort has been the beautification of the course. The Gen Hausauer Garden was one of the first to be developed using funds from her estate, plus money donated by her close relatives. The Swede Hansen Memorial Garden was also from monies donated by some of his remaining. relatives. Through the years there have been many trees given to the course in memory of loved ones. The greatest accomplishment was getting the rock and plaque honoring Marquerite a Stegner for the addition nine holes. They donated i Vince had the new nine money raising events, completed gave it to the Cil the years they have supporters of our City in ways. I consider myself have worked with the Ste The tree program has main focus during the 14 to 400 trees have been course. There is a large trees. We have started those that are resistant to Elm Disease. We have used Bur Oak, as they are area. Most of the trees are the name of the tree and planted. The golf course is like arboretum. If you are planting trees, you can visit! course and see them Have a nice holiday True Minnesota. Some things are distinctly Minnesotan -- like Blue Cross and Blue Minnesota, recognized for delivering quality health care plans for nead years. That's why more MinnesOtans choose Blue Cross than any other Call me for individual or group plans or plans that work with Medicare. Tom Oakes Agem 40 NW 2nd Street Ortonvllle, MN 56278 320-839-2118 or 800-630-4978 BlueCross of Minnesota Congratulations Dale & Kathy!! Dale Martig and Kathy Zahn have been with Clinton State Bank for 30 years. Please join us in congratulating them at our annual LIDAY COOKIE & CIDER - Friday, December 12 9 a.m.- 4 p.m. Sign up r prizes to be given away. Your Community Bank for 100 Years Page 2  INDEPENDENT Tuesday, Dec. 9,' Good news on Hobo Soup, via this letter: "To The Creators of the World's Best Soup: Thank you very much for your wonderful product. I would like to see Hobo Soup stocked more often than currently is in my city, Minneapolis, but I am able to find it on occasion. One occasion ear- lier this fall, my girlfriend and I were traveling to her hometown of Aberdeen, South Dakota. Along the way, we stopped for a bathroom break at a small grocery store where we had the pleasure to meet the man--Jim--who proclaimed himself the heir of the Hobo Soup legacy. Nice guy. Upon autographing a can of Hobo soup, we left purchasing many cans and enjoying every one. Thanks again for indulging the world with such a fine product." Karl Leitz Bob Pflueger sheds some .... more light in our mention last week of the passing of famous Mpls. personality, Louise Saunders, long-time owner of Charlie's Cafe Exceptional. Bob Says he remembers that in addition to her other talents, a few if which we focused on last week, she was also an excel- lent ice speed skater. Another small worlder...actually two in one. While departing from Lund's market in Wayzata recently, a lady, checking out next to us, noticed our "Ortonville Independent" logo on the back of our jacket...and she asked if we knew her uncle in Ortonville, namely John Cunningham. "We sure do," was our reply. The nice-looking young lady's name was Carrie Svendahl of Plymouth, just north of Wayzata. The now "at home morn" said to be sure "and greet John and Sheri!" We just 1 Pre-owned Chrysler 300M's Luxury Sport Sedans County approves feedlot ordinance, explores law enforcement with city Big Stone County Commissioners approved amendments to the county's feedlot ordinance last week. In a 4-1 vote, the board adopted the amended policy that included recom- mendations from Environmental Officer Darren Wilke. Commission- ers Athey, Lane, Maas, and Torgerson supported the amendments, while Commissioner Swigerd voted against them. Wilke recommended the inclusion of public churches and cemeteries as receptors, a prohibition on new open- air liquid-manure storage structures, a cap of 3,000 animal units per feedlot with a 2,000-animal cap on swine, and a one-half mile setback for residences. The setback could be reduced to a one-quarter mile distance with signed waivers from the property and feedlot owners. Commissioner Torgerson initiated the motion to adopt the amended ordi- nance; Commissioner Athey seconded the action. Both Torgerson and Athey served on the committee set up to study the feedlot ordinance. Commissioner Torgerson called the process one of the toughest things he's done. "There are things I can say I wish hadn't happened," he told the commission and others in attendance. Wilke stressed the restrictive nature of the proposed amendments. "We're catching a lot of heat from producer groups and State agencies," he stated. He pointed out that future applications will be subject to condi- tional-use hearings. Any operation involving over 300 animal units requires a public hearing on conditional use. Commissioner restricting operations from critical areas. Commissioner Swigerd voiced concerns over odor and air quality near large operations. "Air quality is the number one gripe on feedlots," admitted Wilke. Wilke explained that air quality monitoring occurs if there are repeat complaints directed toward a facility. Commissioner Torgerson urged the board to act on the proposed amend- ments, saying that further delay would only worsen the situation. "We're destroying our trust in one another," he explained. About 35 citizens attended Tuesday's meeting. The board com- pleted its regular business and then moved upstairs to the courtroom for the feedlot discussion and vote. In other business, the commission heard from Ortonville City Councilmember Dan Oakes regarding a joint committee to explore the rela- tionship between the county sheriff's office and the Ortonviile Police Department. Councilmember Artie Arndt, City Clerk Char Grossman, and Police Chief Curt Hormann also appeared before the board. Councilmember Oakes explained that the city was facing a shortfall of over $280,000 by 2005 due to state Local Government Aid (LGA)fund- ing cuts. He said he and Council- member Arndt met with County Auditor Michelle Knutson and County Sheriff Joe Berning to discuss the fea- sibility and cost of the sheriff's depart- ment patrolling the city of Ortonville; currently the city does not utilize county patrol services. be required to include Ortonviile, amounting to $216,000 a year. "Would it not make sense for the county to subsidize the police force?" queried Councilmember Oakes. Oakes explained that the city coun- cil would like to form a joint commit- tee with county representatives to explore various options. The joint committee would include Council- members Oakes and Arndt, Police Chief Curt Hormann, City Clerk Char Grossman, County Auditor Michelle Knutson, County Sheriff Joe Beming, and two representatives from the Big Stone County Board of Commission- ers. Commissioners Bruce Swigerd and Alvin Maas volunteered to represent the county board. County Attorney Bill Watson also offered to sit in on meetings. The group plans to meet for the first time in January. In other action, the board accepted the resignation of Joe Berning as Emergency Management Director of Big Stone County. "Since 9/11, this emergency management position has gone crazy," explained Berning. "It's basically just about a full-time posi- tion." Berning recommended Darlene Nichols-Born as his replacement, and the board approved Nichols-Barn's appointment in a 4-1 vote, with Commissioner Athey casting the dis- senting vote. Commissioners also reviewed Auditor Knutson's records on forfeit- ed properties. The board reviewed and adjusted valuations for several properties in Ortonviile, Barry, Graceville, Clinton, Beardsley, and did, via this report! Then, but a few Torgerson maintained that conditional seconds later the man bagginggro- use policies will be a great help in i cerie fO:;ltawe:tvere 6m ' ....... , ......  ............... .: .... Ortonville, Xtt he asf originally from Appleton and asked if we knew his brother-in-law, Curt Johnson, for- mer editor- owner of the Appleton Press. The man's name was Alan Ulstad. Anne (nee Parent) Elton, formerly of Ortonville, and who we met at the recent 50th anniversary of Arlen and Ardell LaCombe, asks us if we remember a Molly Bishop, a former first grade teacher in Ortonville, who lived at the Columbian Hotel while here. Ann says "she dated your friend Art Anderson in those days, about 1952 or '53. I met her a couple years ago." By the way, the LaCombe anniversary had special meaning for us, as we introduced the two way back when! A nice thank you note today from Sharon Smith, Secretary of the Big Stone Lake Area Chapter of Habitat for Humanity. "Thanks for the excel- lent ad recently promoting 'grocery day' at Bill's Super Valu Plus. It was a very successful fund raiser and we are happy to have had your help in 'spreading the word!'" Another small worlder...while riding recently in an elevator in the Phillips Eye Institute building, carrying a couple cans of Hobo Soup, the man who entered on one of the floors, upon seeing the soup, exclaimed "why you must be from Ortonville." Had a nice but all too brief chat with the young man, Roger Fossen, Jr., son of Roger Fossen, Sr. of Beardsley, He works at Abbott- Northwestern Hospital in Mpls. fkddo on the germ-oR! I I Too late. to classd00 I I Ii II IIII FOR SALE-Old, antique dining room buffet, 60" long by 19" wide, with matching large beveled glass mirror. Both in excellent condition - $200, 320-273-2168. 46-1" County representatives estimated that three additional deputies would - Granaw Food Co-op- 47 NW 2nd St. Ortonville, MN 320-839-6204 Making that special holiday treat?. Only need one teaspooon of that special spice that makes it just right? And won't use it again 'ill next year? AT THE GRANARY, YOU CAN BUY ONE TEASPOON. BRING IN YOUR.RECIPE AND BUY JUST WHAT YOU NEED! "Buy a pinch or a poundt." OPEN MONDAY THRU SATURDAY 10.00AM-3-00PM COME CHECK OUT THE Lennox Hearth Products AND SEE OUR WORKING DISPLAY IN THE ORTONVILLE STORE! Shop locally and register for Christmas scrip/ Larry's Refrigeration & Heating, Inc. Two locations to serve you better/ 225 NW 2nd St, Ortonville 321 - 6th Ave. Madison 320-839-3882 320-598-3334 Correll. A public sale will be held on Tuesday, December 30, at 9 a.m. Happenings By Bob Dybvig The past two summers have been extremely hot and dry. Any grass that didn't receive irrigation suffered to the point that some didn't survive. We will have to wait until spring to evaluate the damage. * Some trees very slow to leaf out...flowering crabs north of the clinic flowered in late October. First time I've ever seen this happen, and will be anxious to see what happens to them over winter. The Autumn Blaze maples on the south side of the athletic field suffered extreme stress from lack of proper watering. Most of them lost most of their leaves, but put on new leaves after they were watered deeply and mulched. This happened in late September and it remains to be seen if these trees will survive the winter. * The rose garden project was again a success. Dan Nelson and I did a major spring pruning mainly on the south end all though both ends had a lot of winter damage. Dan did the watering and fertilizing again this year. Thanks to Dan for his continued interest and support * I have completed my 14th year of work at the golf course. Much effort has been the beautification of the course. The Gen Hausauer Garden was one of the first to be developed using funds from her estate, plus money donated by her close relatives. The Swede Hansen Memorial Garden was also from monies donated by some of his remaining. relatives. Through the years there have been many trees given to the course in memory of loved ones. The greatest accomplishment was getting the rock and plaque honoring Marquerite a Stegner for the addition nine holes. They donated i Vince had the new nine money raising events, completed gave it to the Cil the years they have supporters of our City in ways. I consider myself have worked with the Ste The tree program has main focus during the 14 to 400 trees have been course. There is a large trees. We have started those that are resistant to Elm Disease. We have used Bur Oak, as they are area. Most of the trees are the name of the tree and planted. The golf course is like arboretum. If you are planting trees, you can visit! course and see them Have a nice holiday True Minnesota. Some things are distinctly Minnesotan -- like Blue Cross and Blue Minnesota, recognized for delivering quality health care plans for nead years. That's why more MinnesOtans choose Blue Cross than any other Call me for individual or group plans or plans that work with Medicare. Tom Oakes Agem 40 NW 2nd Street Ortonvllle, MN 56278 320-839-2118 or 800-630-4978 BlueCross of Minnesota Congratulations Dale & Kathy!! Dale Martig and Kathy Zahn have been with Clinton State Bank for 30 years. Please join us in congratulating them at our annual LIDAY COOKIE & CIDER - Friday, December 12 9 a.m.- 4 p.m. Sign up r prizes to be given away. Your Community Bank for 100 Years Page 2  INDEPENDENT Tuesday, Dec. 9,'