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Ortonville, Minnesota
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December 9, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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Editorial comment m n u m m m m m m m n m m m m m n m m m n m m ORTONiflII£1NBEPfNDENTREADER$ i any | I New or Used I i . Bi B in n Vehicle over i I , +++. urr +,,ooo ,, m 1 coupon per purchase. Expires Dec. 20, 2003 m i We Appreciate Business , Letters to the editor To the Editor: Throw the Bums Out! The old adage concerning politicians who say "You, You" when they want your vote and "Me, Me'* after they have been elected no longer stands true for only Washington and St Paul. All of the Big Stone County Commissioners, except Bruce Swigerd, voted against the publics wishes and for a feedlot ordinance that will be very detrimental to Big Stone County. The feediot ordinance was revisited when a controversial hog operation was being planned. Planned next to a turkey operation that was already having a negative effect on neighbors, tourists, Big Stone Lake, and an area of South Dakota across the lake. Although nearly a years effort of information and facts did bring some good changes to the new feedlot ordinance it was not able to accomplish its original intention, that being to stop 6000 hogs from being added to an already big turkey operation near the lake. When the commissioners approved the ordinance and adjourned their meeting, the proponents for large feedlots were grinning from ear to ear and shaking each others hands. The neighbors of the feedlot and concerned citizens for the lake left that meeting extremely frustrated with way to protect the county's resources and its citizens. One really has to wonder how these commissioners can feel that one building with 6000 hogs is more important than the well-being of a thousand people. People who not only pay their taxes, but willingly serve their country and support its schools, churches, businesses, and its people. Feedlot operations are moving through Minnesota. Commissioners from the Carolinas to Iowa have fallen in with the hog confinement interests believing that in some way it will save their small towns. The opposite is true as in their wake large hog confinements have put small farmers out of business, damaged the environment, lowered property values, offended whole communities by their smell and made enemies of neighbors by the thousands. Now in Big Stone County, a county which is known for its natural resources and its beauty, the hog confinement industry has more rights than its citizens. Citizens for Big Stone Lake Steering Committee Cal Gunnick, Karl Henneberg, Curtis Bailey and Linda Bailey To the Editor: It's hard around this time of the year being 1,500 miles from home. It's always nice to receive a cheerful card around the holidays. Thank you, SPC Saeger US Army, Republic of Korea Man charged with felony, burglary Jesse John Schmidt, 18, of Milbank, SD, made his first court appearance Wednesday, Nov. 26, on charges of burglary in the third degree. He appeared before Judge Peter Hoff of Big Stone County. Schmidt allegedly drove a vehicle used in a burglary at the Sioux Historic Pavillion on October 16, 2003. Man charged with co-op burglary Bryan Scott Keufler, 19, of Ortonviile came before Judge Peter Hoff in Big Stone County Court Wednesday, Nov. 26. Keufler entered a plea of guilty to charges of con- sumption, one count of disorderly the validity of this pol'itical process. I would like to thank everyone conduct, and one count of burglary. Judge Hoff sentenced Keufler to 30 But, determined to continue ?  toe,find+ a, from+Ortorwille for the greelingrcards. .... +daysja.+,. for each offense, to be served ......... c0ndui-rentl')/? + Fins + tttalllng $1,070 T t"--'--q -- r Z , +, + ,+ i-" l 4 ) its l 17 !o Z6 33 16 tO 14 5O 51 58 t6 2 3 ' ---jill-- )7 18 39 )i i62 I [ .-.- --  .... Clues ACROSS Clues DOWN 1. Small lake 1. A wild goat 5. Albert __, French 2. Phil _, former CIA philosopher 3. Monetary unit of Iran 10. Australian aborigine 4. A knot, knob or (slang) swelling 14. Premium or discount 5. Shuts 41. on bills of exchange 6. Opened 42. from other countries 7. Floor or table 45. 15. A woody climbing coverings 46. plant 8. Univ. of New 47. 16. A very wise person Hampshire (abbr.) 49. 17. Escape from town 9. So (Scottish) 50. 20. Lets go 10. Filipinos, for example 51. 21. Kind of chair 11. Used for healing or 52. 22. A place to sleep soothing 23. Farm building 12. A way to look 25. Artiodactyls 13. Dried leaves of the 29. "Death of a" hemp plant 33. Lower in esteem 18. Legends 34. Elder Gershwin 19. This place 35. Company's first offer 23. Exposes to sell stock to the 24. Expression of sorrow 56. public or pity 36. Huron and Erie 25. California (abbr.) 57. 37. Poem of six six-line 26. Manila hemp 59. stanzas and a triplet 27. Manufacturer 40. Decorate with frosting 28. Compass point 60. 41. Netherlands river 29. Plant fiber used for 43.Feel deep affection for making rope 44. Goodbye ,  ,,.. aS+ +,1, 47. Hurts (slang) ; ,'v: +i. )+i, 48. Friend (slang) ,  ai- .i, .i,i, 49. South Sea arrowroot i- -  ,__o , 50. Feet or measures (poetry) mmmm+. 53. Remove oil . 58. Overreact (slang) i-- o ,--  61. Sports aficionados ;--;- 62. Throw with great effort ;--;- , . 63. Afrikaans m [] 64. Affirmatives ', +,- m 65, Did not compare r - =-+- +,. 66. Spheres , o ,i, ,i,i,: : ,2_ .,oi.+,io !m!im !l| 30. Inferior in importance 31. Aside 32. Smelling organs 38. __ Karsavina, Nijinski's partner 39. Potato state, abbr. Became acquainted Brew A way to impdnt A homeless child Breathed deeply Annoy Not definite (slang) Wings (archaic) Tropical Asian starlings 53. Woody herb with showy yellow flowers and flattish pods 54. Within, prefix 55. Hebrew calendar month Thick piece of something Soft-finned fishes Frictional horse- power, abbr. Extensively culti- vated in China and Japan and India iv a I .,. r i,,, ,,i =, i llmll IW Y' dl y,-1 r;-, T were waived. Judge Hoff also placed Keufler on probation for a period of five years, prohibited the use/posses- sion of alcohol or drugs, and ordered a psychological evaluation. The charges against Keufler stem from a July 7 burglary involving the Country Partners Coop station in Beardsley. @,.+003 Aothelter Posl-Bultetin Co, L.LC. Ed Fischer Syndicste flsc her pos Cbu Iletiu+com Ross wins $100 on instant millionaire Robert Ross of Ortonville was one of Minnesota's 34 at-home players on a recent episode of Powerball Instant Millionaire. Ross won $100 on the show that aired on Nov. 29. Minnesota's TV contestant, Nancy Hartner of Robbinsdale, won $ 1,100 on the show. The bonus round contes- tant, Pete Reid of Oregon, won $5,000 on the show. Powerball Instant Millionaire is taped at The Venetian® in Las Vegas and is hosted by Todd Newton, who is well known to audiences for his work on E! Entertainment Television and on the Game Show Network. The show is broadcast Saturdays at 5:30 p.m. in the Twin Cities on KSTC-TV Channel 45 and Saturdays at 5 p.m. on KTTC-TV Channel 10 in Rochester. The show also airs on Sundays at 11:30 p.m. on WDIO-TV Channel 10 in Duluth. For a chance to be an at-home player or to appear on Powerball Instant Millionaire, players scratch the red Powerball® on the bottom of the Venetian Nights Scratch ticket. If the word 'ENTRY,' appears, the play- er simply mails the entry stub to the Lottery according to the instructions on the ticket. The Lottery conducts a drawing every week to select one TV contes- tant and their at-home players. At home players win either $100, $500 or $10,000. For more information about Powerball Instant Millionaire, visit the Lottery's Web site at www.mnlot- tery.com. Christmas at the Museum Come and join us for Christmas at the Museum on Sunday, Dec. 14th, at the intersections of Highways 12 and 7 at Hilltop in Ortonville. You will have an opportunity to see local tal- ents displayed. We will have a table for children to decorate a Christmas package, and then begin to fill it with gifts for their mothers and fathers. They will also be decorating cookies, How to make lefse will be demonstrated+with addi- tional lefse for sale. Locally made honey, bird houses, bird feeders, quilts, rosemaled items, and other crafts will be for sale. Demonstrations on how to use the spinning wheel, and how to carve a canoe paddle will also take place. Hand made woolen items will be for sale. Our gift shop will be open with books, cards, and other items for sale. During the afternoon, various musical entertainment will enhance the atmosphere. Sleigh rides on the new fallen snow will be enjoyed as you view the recently improved grounds. There are many new and interesting things for you to see at our museum. So come and see the many changes that have recently been made. The smell of hot appPe cider will beqn the air ataff coffee and goodies + will be served foFa free wilFdonation. Come and see the MINNESOTA, EATS OUT book, with notations about Ortonville mentioned twice in its printing. See the history book containing information about the newly re-dis- covered MINNESOTA/DAKOTA boundary marker. Come and spend an enjoyable afternoon with us here at YOUR COUNTY MUSEUM. National Guardsman presents flag, tells students of life in Iraq County(C°urteSYReview,°f Grant CODY McMAHON RECEIVES FLAG on behalf of James Knoll Elementary as his grandfather Sergeant Darrel Gullickson and principal Joel Statte|man look on; the flag flew in Kuwait and Iraq on August 24. enroll Gullickson's grandchildren: Cody McMahon in Ortonviile, Aiyssa and Tanner Robertson in Milbank, and J.C., Zachary, and Jessie Zempler in Wilmot. Gullickson prepared a slide show of photographs showing the camp area where he and his unit, the 740th Transportation Company out of Milbank and Brookings, are stationed. "It's easi- er to talk about a picture," explains Gullickson. He focused his presentation on the company's living conditions. Gullickson's slides showed stu- dents diverse slices of life in Iraq, everything from transport vehicles to a booth that sells subway sandwiches. Pictures of a 30,000-gallon water It all started when Cody McMahon of Ortonville wanted to bring his grand- pa Sargeant Darrel Gullickson of Milbank to show-and-tell. What start- ed as a child's simple wish turned into visits and presentations to four area schools. Gullickson, a National Guard offi- cer on leave from Iraq, ended up shar- ing his story with four area schools over a two-day period. He visited Wilmot, SD, and Big Stone City, SD, schools on Nov. 25th and Koch (Milbank) and Ortonville schools on Nov. 26th. "My grandchildren wanted me to come to school," Gullickson explains. Three of the four schools he visited bladder used for showers and fire- fighting and huge generators used for the camp's power supply illustrate the self-contained resources of the post. Photographs of satellite television dishes and a state-of-the-art internet facility let the children know that the soldiers are still linked to U.S. culture and loved ones. Gullickson says he received a lot of questions about weapons from the kids. "I tried to stay away from that as much as I could," he explains. The students still wanted to know about various types of weapons and what weapon Gullickson has, he says. Snakes and bugs occupied some of the young listeners, too, according to Gullickson. Gullickson relates that sticky flies, continually looking for moisture on humans and animals, have been the worst, and that scorpi- ons are starting to surface now as the weather cools. Gullickson says temperatures at night get down to the mid-40s. Tents with heat and air-conditioning keep the troops comfortable inside, though. Gullickson considers his presenta- tion in Ortonville particularly impor- tant and enjoyable. Two of the stu- dents attending the assembly have a father who is now on duty; Joe Eustice, an Ortonville sixth-grade teacher and high school wrestling coach, is stationed in England. Gullickson concluded his visit with a presentation of a flag flown in Kuwait and Iraq on Aug. 24, 2003. The flag Gullickson presented to the Ortonville Elementary School will be on display and flown on special occa- sions, according to Principal Joel Stattelman. Guilickson wants students to come away with "some idea of what we're doing and how we live." He com- ments, "I hope they have some under- standing of the Guard...and how we're protecting their freedom." Gullickson's unit is scheduled to be on duty for one year, through April 19, 2004. He says his unit has not received its orders yet, however, so that date has not been confirmed. Gullickson has been asked to return for a whole-school assembly when his tour of duty ends. The Ortonvilli IndeF (U.S.P.S. 412-460) JAMES°D °. Publisher / Managing SUZE'n'E Editor and Advertising ARLENE WIESE Office Manager KATHIE LANTIS Computer and Comeposition EMILEE Compositor / Rece BILL DWYER Pressman BOB SHEROD Pressman BETH FULLER Advertising/Print Sale6 TIM GRONFELD Camera Department NANCY SCOBLIC Collater PHIL BLAKE Layout KRIS GOEHRING Reporter / Photo( Tues., Dec. 9, 2003 Vol. 85;1 Continuing the ORTONVILLE Published Ever Ortonville+ MN 56278 Periodicals Postage Paid at SUBSCRIPTION $30.00 per year in Big Parle, Traverse and Swift Minnesota, Grant and in South Dakota. $34.00 counties All others, $38.00 per year. Postmaster: Send address The Ortonville Independent, Ortonville, Minnesota 56278. NEW SUBSCRIPTION RATE SCHEDULE ° A FEBRUARY 1ST DUE Big Stone, Lac qui Parle, Swift Counties in Grant and Roberts in South February .......... 3000 August .... March ............... 2750 Apdl ............. 25 00 May ................... 2250 June ............... 2000 July .................. 1750 Januar ALL OTHERS IN MINN. February ........ 34.00 March ................ 31 24 Apnl ............ 28.40 May .............. 2556 June .................. 2272 July ............... 19 88 January ...... ALL AND SO. DAK. February ........... 3800 March .............. 3487 September. Apnl .................. 31 70 October .... May ............ 2853 June ............ 2536 Decernbet July .............. 22 19 "PUBLISHerS LIABIMTY The Publisher shall not changes or typographical not lessen the value of an The Publisher's liability for omissions in connection tisement is strictly limited to pu the advertisement in any issue or the refund of an, the advertisement. DEADLINES Church notes - Saturday mail Display ads - Friday mail .. Correspondence - Monday mail Pictures - 5 p.m. Friday News - Friday afternoon Classified ads - Friday noon (Any ad brought in later will to classify.) OFFICE HOURS A Monday: 8 AM-5 PM A Tuesday: 8 AM-5 PM A Wednesday: 8 AM-12 NOON; A Thursday: 8 AM-12 NOON; A Friday: 8 AM-5 PM t Holidays may affect office LETTERS POLICY Letters to the editor munity issues are writers should be Independent reserves the and/or condense letters for isaper also reserves the right h letters that it might be held legally liable. Letters should contain printed or typed name, address and telephone . Addresses and telephone not be published. Letter writers are asked to selves to one letter keep letter brief, words, and to the point. AD vs. NEWS The Ortonvilte IndE determining what is is news is based on one sire If an individual business zation charges for for an item or for a service, sidered advertising. In other you charge, we charge." Advertising is the life-bloOd paper. Without it a cease to exist. The receives for subscription paper sales is used to pay paper used in producing no longer does so increases. It still covers the and a small portion of the Advertising to a news crops and livestoc products to the grocer; and underwear to the and plows and tractors to the dealer. Without any of those particular business would not hess. ADS: We reserve the right advertising without obli our decision. POLICIES: News: Our goal is to report t fully and accurately as staff's opinions will opinion page. Editorials: Opinions page, whether locally row other sources is late thinking and readers. Opinions tor are her own and not of other staff members expressed in items from tions may be contradictory own views, but are eral interest. Phone 320-839-6163 839-3761 to place sifted advertising Ortonville Inde mail @ ortonvilleinde 00INDEPENDENT Page 4 Tuesday, DeC. 9' Editorial comment m n u m m m m m m m n m m m m m n m m m n m m ORTONiflII£1NBEPfNDENTREADER$ i any | I New or Used I i . Bi B in n Vehicle over i I , +++. urr +,,ooo ,, m 1 coupon per purchase. Expires Dec. 20, 2003 m i We Appreciate Business , Letters to the editor To the Editor: Throw the Bums Out! The old adage concerning politicians who say "You, You" when they want your vote and "Me, Me'* after they have been elected no longer stands true for only Washington and St Paul. All of the Big Stone County Commissioners, except Bruce Swigerd, voted against the publics wishes and for a feedlot ordinance that will be very detrimental to Big Stone County. The feediot ordinance was revisited when a controversial hog operation was being planned. Planned next to a turkey operation that was already having a negative effect on neighbors, tourists, Big Stone Lake, and an area of South Dakota across the lake. Although nearly a years effort of information and facts did bring some good changes to the new feedlot ordinance it was not able to accomplish its original intention, that being to stop 6000 hogs from being added to an already big turkey operation near the lake. When the commissioners approved the ordinance and adjourned their meeting, the proponents for large feedlots were grinning from ear to ear and shaking each others hands. The neighbors of the feedlot and concerned citizens for the lake left that meeting extremely frustrated with way to protect the county's resources and its citizens. One really has to wonder how these commissioners can feel that one building with 6000 hogs is more important than the well-being of a thousand people. People who not only pay their taxes, but willingly serve their country and support its schools, churches, businesses, and its people. Feedlot operations are moving through Minnesota. Commissioners from the Carolinas to Iowa have fallen in with the hog confinement interests believing that in some way it will save their small towns. The opposite is true as in their wake large hog confinements have put small farmers out of business, damaged the environment, lowered property values, offended whole communities by their smell and made enemies of neighbors by the thousands. Now in Big Stone County, a county which is known for its natural resources and its beauty, the hog confinement industry has more rights than its citizens. Citizens for Big Stone Lake Steering Committee Cal Gunnick, Karl Henneberg, Curtis Bailey and Linda Bailey To the Editor: It's hard around this time of the year being 1,500 miles from home. It's always nice to receive a cheerful card around the holidays. Thank you, SPC Saeger US Army, Republic of Korea Man charged with felony, burglary Jesse John Schmidt, 18, of Milbank, SD, made his first court appearance Wednesday, Nov. 26, on charges of burglary in the third degree. He appeared before Judge Peter Hoff of Big Stone County. Schmidt allegedly drove a vehicle used in a burglary at the Sioux Historic Pavillion on October 16, 2003. Man charged with co-op burglary Bryan Scott Keufler, 19, of Ortonviile came before Judge Peter Hoff in Big Stone County Court Wednesday, Nov. 26. Keufler entered a plea of guilty to charges of con- sumption, one count of disorderly the validity of this pol'itical process. I would like to thank everyone conduct, and one count of burglary. Judge Hoff sentenced Keufler to 30 But, determined to continue ?  toe,find+ a, from+Ortorwille for the greelingrcards. .... +daysja.+,. for each offense, to be served ......... c0ndui-rentl')/? + Fins + tttalllng $1,070 T t"--'--q -- r Z , +, + ,+ i-" l 4 ) its l 17 !o Z6 33 16 tO 14 5O 51 58 t6 2 3 ' ---jill-- )7 18 39 )i i62 I [ .-.- --  .... Clues ACROSS Clues DOWN 1. Small lake 1. A wild goat 5. Albert __, French 2. Phil _, former CIA philosopher 3. Monetary unit of Iran 10. Australian aborigine 4. A knot, knob or (slang) swelling 14. Premium or discount 5. Shuts 41. on bills of exchange 6. Opened 42. from other countries 7. Floor or table 45. 15. A woody climbing coverings 46. plant 8. Univ. of New 47. 16. A very wise person Hampshire (abbr.) 49. 17. Escape from town 9. So (Scottish) 50. 20. Lets go 10. Filipinos, for example 51. 21. Kind of chair 11. Used for healing or 52. 22. A place to sleep soothing 23. Farm building 12. A way to look 25. Artiodactyls 13. Dried leaves of the 29. "Death of a" hemp plant 33. Lower in esteem 18. Legends 34. Elder Gershwin 19. This place 35. Company's first offer 23. Exposes to sell stock to the 24. Expression of sorrow 56. public or pity 36. Huron and Erie 25. California (abbr.) 57. 37. Poem of six six-line 26. Manila hemp 59. stanzas and a triplet 27. Manufacturer 40. Decorate with frosting 28. Compass point 60. 41. Netherlands river 29. Plant fiber used for 43.Feel deep affection for making rope 44. Goodbye ,  ,,.. aS+ +,1, 47. Hurts (slang) ; ,'v: +i. )+i, 48. Friend (slang) ,  ai- .i, .i,i, 49. South Sea arrowroot i- -  ,__o , 50. Feet or measures (poetry) mmmm+. 53. Remove oil . 58. Overreact (slang) i-- o ,--  61. Sports aficionados ;--;- 62. Throw with great effort ;--;- , . 63. Afrikaans m [] 64. Affirmatives ', +,- m 65, Did not compare r - =-+- +,. 66. Spheres , o ,i, ,i,i,: : ,2_ .,oi.+,io !m!im !l| 30. Inferior in importance 31. Aside 32. Smelling organs 38. __ Karsavina, Nijinski's partner 39. Potato state, abbr. Became acquainted Brew A way to impdnt A homeless child Breathed deeply Annoy Not definite (slang) Wings (archaic) Tropical Asian starlings 53. Woody herb with showy yellow flowers and flattish pods 54. Within, prefix 55. Hebrew calendar month Thick piece of something Soft-finned fishes Frictional horse- power, abbr. Extensively culti- vated in China and Japan and India iv a I .,. r i,,, ,,i =, i llmll IW Y' dl y,-1 r;-, T were waived. Judge Hoff also placed Keufler on probation for a period of five years, prohibited the use/posses- sion of alcohol or drugs, and ordered a psychological evaluation. The charges against Keufler stem from a July 7 burglary involving the Country Partners Coop station in Beardsley. @,.+003 Aothelter Posl-Bultetin Co, L.LC. Ed Fischer Syndicste flsc her pos Cbu Iletiu+com Ross wins $100 on instant millionaire Robert Ross of Ortonville was one of Minnesota's 34 at-home players on a recent episode of Powerball Instant Millionaire. Ross won $100 on the show that aired on Nov. 29. Minnesota's TV contestant, Nancy Hartner of Robbinsdale, won $ 1,100 on the show. The bonus round contes- tant, Pete Reid of Oregon, won $5,000 on the show. Powerball Instant Millionaire is taped at The Venetian® in Las Vegas and is hosted by Todd Newton, who is well known to audiences for his work on E! Entertainment Television and on the Game Show Network. The show is broadcast Saturdays at 5:30 p.m. in the Twin Cities on KSTC-TV Channel 45 and Saturdays at 5 p.m. on KTTC-TV Channel 10 in Rochester. The show also airs on Sundays at 11:30 p.m. on WDIO-TV Channel 10 in Duluth. For a chance to be an at-home player or to appear on Powerball Instant Millionaire, players scratch the red Powerball® on the bottom of the Venetian Nights Scratch ticket. If the word 'ENTRY,' appears, the play- er simply mails the entry stub to the Lottery according to the instructions on the ticket. The Lottery conducts a drawing every week to select one TV contes- tant and their at-home players. At home players win either $100, $500 or $10,000. For more information about Powerball Instant Millionaire, visit the Lottery's Web site at www.mnlot- tery.com. Christmas at the Museum Come and join us for Christmas at the Museum on Sunday, Dec. 14th, at the intersections of Highways 12 and 7 at Hilltop in Ortonville. You will have an opportunity to see local tal- ents displayed. We will have a table for children to decorate a Christmas package, and then begin to fill it with gifts for their mothers and fathers. They will also be decorating cookies, How to make lefse will be demonstrated+with addi- tional lefse for sale. Locally made honey, bird houses, bird feeders, quilts, rosemaled items, and other crafts will be for sale. Demonstrations on how to use the spinning wheel, and how to carve a canoe paddle will also take place. Hand made woolen items will be for sale. Our gift shop will be open with books, cards, and other items for sale. During the afternoon, various musical entertainment will enhance the atmosphere. Sleigh rides on the new fallen snow will be enjoyed as you view the recently improved grounds. There are many new and interesting things for you to see at our museum. So come and see the many changes that have recently been made. The smell of hot appPe cider will beqn the air ataff coffee and goodies + will be served foFa free wilFdonation. Come and see the MINNESOTA, EATS OUT book, with notations about Ortonville mentioned twice in its printing. See the history book containing information about the newly re-dis- covered MINNESOTA/DAKOTA boundary marker. Come and spend an enjoyable afternoon with us here at YOUR COUNTY MUSEUM. National Guardsman presents flag, tells students of life in Iraq County(C°urteSYReview,°f Grant CODY McMAHON RECEIVES FLAG on behalf of James Knoll Elementary as his grandfather Sergeant Darrel Gullickson and principal Joel Statte|man look on; the flag flew in Kuwait and Iraq on August 24. enroll Gullickson's grandchildren: Cody McMahon in Ortonviile, Aiyssa and Tanner Robertson in Milbank, and J.C., Zachary, and Jessie Zempler in Wilmot. Gullickson prepared a slide show of photographs showing the camp area where he and his unit, the 740th Transportation Company out of Milbank and Brookings, are stationed. "It's easi- er to talk about a picture," explains Gullickson. He focused his presentation on the company's living conditions. Gullickson's slides showed stu- dents diverse slices of life in Iraq, everything from transport vehicles to a booth that sells subway sandwiches. Pictures of a 30,000-gallon water It all started when Cody McMahon of Ortonville wanted to bring his grand- pa Sargeant Darrel Gullickson of Milbank to show-and-tell. What start- ed as a child's simple wish turned into visits and presentations to four area schools. Gullickson, a National Guard offi- cer on leave from Iraq, ended up shar- ing his story with four area schools over a two-day period. He visited Wilmot, SD, and Big Stone City, SD, schools on Nov. 25th and Koch (Milbank) and Ortonville schools on Nov. 26th. "My grandchildren wanted me to come to school," Gullickson explains. Three of the four schools he visited bladder used for showers and fire- fighting and huge generators used for the camp's power supply illustrate the self-contained resources of the post. Photographs of satellite television dishes and a state-of-the-art internet facility let the children know that the soldiers are still linked to U.S. culture and loved ones. Gullickson says he received a lot of questions about weapons from the kids. "I tried to stay away from that as much as I could," he explains. The students still wanted to know about various types of weapons and what weapon Gullickson has, he says. Snakes and bugs occupied some of the young listeners, too, according to Gullickson. Gullickson relates that sticky flies, continually looking for moisture on humans and animals, have been the worst, and that scorpi- ons are starting to surface now as the weather cools. Gullickson says temperatures at night get down to the mid-40s. Tents with heat and air-conditioning keep the troops comfortable inside, though. Gullickson considers his presenta- tion in Ortonville particularly impor- tant and enjoyable. Two of the stu- dents attending the assembly have a father who is now on duty; Joe Eustice, an Ortonville sixth-grade teacher and high school wrestling coach, is stationed in England. Gullickson concluded his visit with a presentation of a flag flown in Kuwait and Iraq on Aug. 24, 2003. The flag Gullickson presented to the Ortonville Elementary School will be on display and flown on special occa- sions, according to Principal Joel Stattelman. Guilickson wants students to come away with "some idea of what we're doing and how we live." He com- ments, "I hope they have some under- standing of the Guard...and how we're protecting their freedom." Gullickson's unit is scheduled to be on duty for one year, through April 19, 2004. He says his unit has not received its orders yet, however, so that date has not been confirmed. Gullickson has been asked to return for a whole-school assembly when his tour of duty ends. The Ortonvilli IndeF (U.S.P.S. 412-460) JAMES°D °. Publisher / Managing SUZE'n'E Editor and Advertising ARLENE WIESE Office Manager KATHIE LANTIS Computer and Comeposition EMILEE Compositor / Rece BILL DWYER Pressman BOB SHEROD Pressman BETH FULLER Advertising/Print Sale6 TIM GRONFELD Camera Department NANCY SCOBLIC Collater PHIL BLAKE Layout KRIS GOEHRING Reporter / Photo( Tues., Dec. 9, 2003 Vol. 85;1 Continuing the ORTONVILLE Published Ever Ortonville+ MN 56278 Periodicals Postage Paid at SUBSCRIPTION $30.00 per year in Big Parle, Traverse and Swift Minnesota, Grant and in South Dakota. $34.00 counties All others, $38.00 per year. Postmaster: Send address The Ortonville Independent, Ortonville, Minnesota 56278. NEW SUBSCRIPTION RATE SCHEDULE ° A FEBRUARY 1ST DUE Big Stone, Lac qui Parle, Swift Counties in Grant and Roberts in South February .......... 3000 August .... March ............... 2750 Apdl ............. 25 00 May ................... 2250 June ............... 2000 July .................. 1750 Januar ALL OTHERS IN MINN. February ........ 34.00 March ................ 31 24 Apnl ............ 28.40 May .............. 2556 June .................. 2272 July ............... 19 88 January ...... ALL AND SO. DAK. February ........... 3800 March .............. 3487 September. Apnl .................. 31 70 October .... May ............ 2853 June ............ 2536 Decernbet July .............. 22 19 "PUBLISHerS LIABIMTY The Publisher shall not changes or typographical not lessen the value of an The Publisher's liability for omissions in connection tisement is strictly limited to pu the advertisement in any issue or the refund of an, the advertisement. DEADLINES Church notes - Saturday mail Display ads - Friday mail .. Correspondence - Monday mail Pictures - 5 p.m. Friday News - Friday afternoon Classified ads - Friday noon (Any ad brought in later will to classify.) OFFICE HOURS A Monday: 8 AM-5 PM A Tuesday: 8 AM-5 PM A Wednesday: 8 AM-12 NOON; A Thursday: 8 AM-12 NOON; A Friday: 8 AM-5 PM t Holidays may affect office LETTERS POLICY Letters to the editor munity issues are writers should be Independent reserves the and/or condense letters for isaper also reserves the right h letters that it might be held legally liable. Letters should contain printed or typed name, address and telephone . Addresses and telephone not be published. Letter writers are asked to selves to one letter keep letter brief, words, and to the point. AD vs. NEWS The Ortonvilte IndE determining what is is news is based on one sire If an individual business zation charges for for an item or for a service, sidered advertising. In other you charge, we charge." Advertising is the life-bloOd paper. Without it a cease to exist. The receives for subscription paper sales is used to pay paper used in producing no longer does so increases. It still covers the and a small portion of the Advertising to a news crops and livestoc products to the grocer; and underwear to the and plows and tractors to the dealer. Without any of those particular business would not hess. ADS: We reserve the right advertising without obli our decision. POLICIES: News: Our goal is to report t fully and accurately as staff's opinions will opinion page. Editorials: Opinions page, whether locally row other sources is late thinking and readers. Opinions tor are her own and not of other staff members expressed in items from tions may be contradictory own views, but are eral interest. Phone 320-839-6163 839-3761 to place sifted advertising Ortonville Inde mail @ ortonvilleinde 00INDEPENDENT Page 4 Tuesday, DeC. 9'