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December 9, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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December 9, 2003
 

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;-2004 WRESTLING TEAM poses in front of an artillery unit on loan from the National Guard. With oe Eustice in England, assistant coach Joe Karels, second from right, directs the team this year. from page 1) in their lives, too. "Each of ;have their own photo album," Renee. "I'm hoping they his face." Indeed, with the ,s scattered about the dining the little ones eagerly pick ones that show themselves dad and the older kids pore they've received. the kids, the adjustment has One of the youngest tied for three weeks, wondering daddy couldn't tuck her in as 's did. Renee says it even the older ones at times, with things triggering their [IS. her perspective, Renee says the companionship of" another adult to talk to, the )line, and the absence friend. She says the supper hard on them all, since the always made a point to sit their evening meal. n-year-old Patrick arrives wrestling practice and the family this year's team The team poses in front of a illery unit on loan from the Guard to honor their absent says interim coach Joe his wife came up with the bile visiting Iowa to do some ical research. Upon entering in a small town, the noticed a sports poster in of the local high school in front of a canon in place. Eustice's role as a first sergeant places him in charge of his unit's work. He supervises the unit's activities as security force for the air base; coordinates correspondence between the United States and the air base; handles discipline; sees that the troops have proper housing, food, and pay; and passes orders and critical family information to the troops in his unit. It is a role that Eustice performs well; he just received a Command Sergeant Majors coin from Command Sergeant Major Lever, an award given for excellence to a soldier serving in the National Guard. "He was really honored by that," says wife Renee. "It's always nice to know you're doing a good job and to be recognized by your superiors." Eustice received a similar award once before, but not' from such a high-ranking official. Eustice expects to leave England at the end of March, but the terms of his orders state that he can be deployed up to two years. So far, his unit has not received official word. In his absence, family life continues, in a way. The Christmas tree stands in the living room, but this year features red, white, and blue ornaments. Family pictures cover the walls, in tribute to an absent parent. And the most recent family photo features Renee, the kids, and their father, whose uniformed image was superimposed into the group. For Christmas, the family plans to visit Renee's family before Christmas and then spend Christmas Day at home. They typically visit Joe's family after Christmas, and this year will be no different, except that Joe deployed unit. Renee and two of his brothers will be absent. idon . orat ,x,av tc, , I think a lot of people mclud ng VFW members tti"sl ", a'e fial,6 dt'the impact on a the flags that adorn the family when a soldier is deployed," uniforms, and donated card to help the family stay in Renee, the early struggles of 'ment exceeded bearing responsibility of the family. n she and the school district the challenge of educating elves on the legislation ning to National Guard Renee says outside help Guards aided the school in tanding its obligation. She that no federal or state exists stating what percentage employers must pay to soldiers. The school district tly has no written policy in says Renee. "The meaning of the word 'sacrifice' and how important it is to support the military are much clearer to me now." Parker (Continued from page 1) stashed beneath his radio table hidden under a" blanket. Lunch time was always a welcome diversion and made the trip somewhat tolerable, besides it was close to being over. Soon our wheels would be com- ing down and we'd be rumbling along the landing strip safely home. Landing was like getting your life back and anyone who so desired could HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 8AM-5:3OPM; Sat. 8AM-5PM MN PHONE (320) 839-2653 Christmas Gift Ce00ificatos/ ' go to the dispensary and they would pour them two free shots of whiskey. I was a teetotaler, but a jug of American whiskey was worth a small fortune in the squadron. So I accumulated my allotment in a wine bottle and hid it behind a clothes rack in the tent that I shared with five other crew members. I was especially worried about Allen South, the crew Engineer, because he liked booze, anybody's booze. One day, I discovered Allen on his cot, a bit ine- briated with my jug propped between his legs. He saluted me with the bottle and said, "Parker, join me in a drink." Allen was a short, stocky, mischie- vous young man from Centerview, Missouri. He went on to become a genuine hero. Once, severely burned in a plane crash, he escaped the fire only to rush back in and save several lives. Humble and highly decorated, he's now retired and living on a mountain top in Virginia. I sometimes call him to remind him that he's still my hero. He always says, "I'11 drink to that!" After the war, most veterans came home and didn't look back. And there was a good reason for that. They were busy finding jobs, marrying their sweethearts and raising families. And as strange as it might seem, they did it in that order. Now I hear it said that 1,500 WWII veterans are dying every- day. That's a terrible statistic for a guy my age. Fortunately many of them are beginning to put together their stories and thank goodness, because time is fleeting and future generations need to know and come to understand what a remarkable group of young men and women they were. Jim, thanks again for sending me thebook. It wsa great trip in nostal- gia ............. Best Always, Vince. Enclosed are several pictures I brought back from Italy. One is an excellent example of exploding flak over a target. The B-17 high in the p!cture has its bombay doors open. It s out of formation and could well be in deep trouble• Another picture shows me in com- bat gear showing off astride the tail of a B-17 taken just before a mission to Vienna. Temperatures of 50 degrees below zero were not uncommon at bombing altitude, so beneath our flight clothing we wore electrically heated suits. The fire pictures were taken the day President Roosevelt died - April 12, 1945. We came back from a mis- sion in terrible shape! Two inboard engines were feathered, (closed down), and the two outboard engines with their controls shot out were run- ning three-quarter power. Our pilot, Tom Clancy, an Irish kid from Syracuse, N.Y., was making a fairly decent approach and just as we settled in to touch down, one of the remain- ing engines "ran away" causing us to drift into a line of parked aircraft next to the landing strip. Five C-47 cargo ships and our B-17 bomber were destroyed in the crash and fire. Several were killed on the ground and a number of my crew members were injured - some with critical burns. To my knowledge, the crash pic- tures have never been in print. I brought the original snapshots back from Italy and just recently had them reproduced. It's always good to come back and visit my friends and relatives in Big Stone and Ortonville. Quite often my sentimental nature kicks in and I drive by the old haunts. The city park, the school house, the swimming hole, the hills where I picked May flowers and the old house I grew up in. So much has changed! But I see it as it was. And always there is a little boy in the picture, some- times with a hand full of marbles or maybe a jack knife or a switch chas- ing after his twin sister. He's always there, that little kid. He can't seem to get out of town! LOWEST MEAT PRICES IN THE AREAl Register to win one of three $100 beef bundles! cainot survive unless our • .:::::iii::?:::::%:ii::ii::i:ii.:ii::%i.][ ........... i!iiii!ili{i{i i:::::::::;::'::: 3:::?-: ..... :::!:!:i:i:!:!:!;::i:!::;::i::,. BE =RESPONSIBLE!; EXPLODING FLAK NEAR A B-17 BOMBER over a target, showing the plane's bombay doors open. Out of formation, Vince says the plane could well be in deep trouble. ONE OF FIVE C-47 PLANES DESTROYED when Vince's plane lost control on a landing and crashed into a row of parked aircraft next to the landing strip. Vince's bomber was destroyed also in the crash and fire. ROPRI:ICTIC In m0T,0n SPORTS INJURY & FAMILY WELLNESS CENTER Welcomes Dr. Jessica Graham Associate Doctor Dr. Shelly Brandenburger practices part-time and is available for acupuncture, nutritional consults or public speaking. Dr. Rod Brandenburger practices general chiropractic with a focus and special training in sports injuries and extremities problems. Dr. Graham has an special " interest in the chiropractic care of women and children. Her previous practice was focused on family care. • Chiropractic • Annie e Acupuncture • Tanya • Ergonomic Assessments • • Nutritional Counseling • Exercise Counseling • Orthopedic Products • Nutrition Products • • Pre-Employment and D.O.T. Physicals with Drug Testing • • Sports Physicals • 304 E. 4th Avenue Milbank, SD 57252 605-432-6418 (Sateflite office in New Effington, SD) Ddc. 9, 2003  INDEPENDENT Page 9 ;-2004 WRESTLING TEAM poses in front of an artillery unit on loan from the National Guard. With oe Eustice in England, assistant coach Joe Karels, second from right, directs the team this year. from page 1) in their lives, too. "Each of ;have their own photo album," Renee. "I'm hoping they his face." Indeed, with the ,s scattered about the dining the little ones eagerly pick ones that show themselves dad and the older kids pore they've received. the kids, the adjustment has One of the youngest tied for three weeks, wondering daddy couldn't tuck her in as 's did. Renee says it even the older ones at times, with things triggering their [IS. her perspective, Renee says the companionship of" another adult to talk to, the )line, and the absence friend. She says the supper hard on them all, since the always made a point to sit their evening meal. n-year-old Patrick arrives wrestling practice and the family this year's team The team poses in front of a illery unit on loan from the Guard to honor their absent says interim coach Joe his wife came up with the bile visiting Iowa to do some ical research. Upon entering in a small town, the noticed a sports poster in of the local high school in front of a canon in place. Eustice's role as a first sergeant places him in charge of his unit's work. He supervises the unit's activities as security force for the air base; coordinates correspondence between the United States and the air base; handles discipline; sees that the troops have proper housing, food, and pay; and passes orders and critical family information to the troops in his unit. It is a role that Eustice performs well; he just received a Command Sergeant Majors coin from Command Sergeant Major Lever, an award given for excellence to a soldier serving in the National Guard. "He was really honored by that," says wife Renee. "It's always nice to know you're doing a good job and to be recognized by your superiors." Eustice received a similar award once before, but not' from such a high-ranking official. Eustice expects to leave England at the end of March, but the terms of his orders state that he can be deployed up to two years. So far, his unit has not received official word. In his absence, family life continues, in a way. The Christmas tree stands in the living room, but this year features red, white, and blue ornaments. Family pictures cover the walls, in tribute to an absent parent. And the most recent family photo features Renee, the kids, and their father, whose uniformed image was superimposed into the group. For Christmas, the family plans to visit Renee's family before Christmas and then spend Christmas Day at home. They typically visit Joe's family after Christmas, and this year will be no different, except that Joe deployed unit. Renee and two of his brothers will be absent. idon . orat ,x,av tc, , I think a lot of people mclud ng VFW members tti"sl ", a'e fial,6 dt'the impact on a the flags that adorn the family when a soldier is deployed," uniforms, and donated card to help the family stay in Renee, the early struggles of 'ment exceeded bearing responsibility of the family. n she and the school district the challenge of educating elves on the legislation ning to National Guard Renee says outside help Guards aided the school in tanding its obligation. She that no federal or state exists stating what percentage employers must pay to soldiers. The school district tly has no written policy in says Renee. "The meaning of the word 'sacrifice' and how important it is to support the military are much clearer to me now." Parker (Continued from page 1) stashed beneath his radio table hidden under a" blanket. Lunch time was always a welcome diversion and made the trip somewhat tolerable, besides it was close to being over. Soon our wheels would be com- ing down and we'd be rumbling along the landing strip safely home. Landing was like getting your life back and anyone who so desired could HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 8AM-5:3OPM; Sat. 8AM-5PM MN PHONE (320) 839-2653 Christmas Gift Ce00ificatos/ ' go to the dispensary and they would pour them two free shots of whiskey. I was a teetotaler, but a jug of American whiskey was worth a small fortune in the squadron. So I accumulated my allotment in a wine bottle and hid it behind a clothes rack in the tent that I shared with five other crew members. I was especially worried about Allen South, the crew Engineer, because he liked booze, anybody's booze. One day, I discovered Allen on his cot, a bit ine- briated with my jug propped between his legs. He saluted me with the bottle and said, "Parker, join me in a drink." Allen was a short, stocky, mischie- vous young man from Centerview, Missouri. He went on to become a genuine hero. Once, severely burned in a plane crash, he escaped the fire only to rush back in and save several lives. Humble and highly decorated, he's now retired and living on a mountain top in Virginia. I sometimes call him to remind him that he's still my hero. He always says, "I'11 drink to that!" After the war, most veterans came home and didn't look back. And there was a good reason for that. They were busy finding jobs, marrying their sweethearts and raising families. And as strange as it might seem, they did it in that order. Now I hear it said that 1,500 WWII veterans are dying every- day. That's a terrible statistic for a guy my age. Fortunately many of them are beginning to put together their stories and thank goodness, because time is fleeting and future generations need to know and come to understand what a remarkable group of young men and women they were. Jim, thanks again for sending me thebook. It wsa great trip in nostal- gia ............. Best Always, Vince. Enclosed are several pictures I brought back from Italy. One is an excellent example of exploding flak over a target. The B-17 high in the p!cture has its bombay doors open. It s out of formation and could well be in deep trouble• Another picture shows me in com- bat gear showing off astride the tail of a B-17 taken just before a mission to Vienna. Temperatures of 50 degrees below zero were not uncommon at bombing altitude, so beneath our flight clothing we wore electrically heated suits. The fire pictures were taken the day President Roosevelt died - April 12, 1945. We came back from a mis- sion in terrible shape! Two inboard engines were feathered, (closed down), and the two outboard engines with their controls shot out were run- ning three-quarter power. Our pilot, Tom Clancy, an Irish kid from Syracuse, N.Y., was making a fairly decent approach and just as we settled in to touch down, one of the remain- ing engines "ran away" causing us to drift into a line of parked aircraft next to the landing strip. Five C-47 cargo ships and our B-17 bomber were destroyed in the crash and fire. Several were killed on the ground and a number of my crew members were injured - some with critical burns. To my knowledge, the crash pic- tures have never been in print. I brought the original snapshots back from Italy and just recently had them reproduced. It's always good to come back and visit my friends and relatives in Big Stone and Ortonville. Quite often my sentimental nature kicks in and I drive by the old haunts. The city park, the school house, the swimming hole, the hills where I picked May flowers and the old house I grew up in. So much has changed! But I see it as it was. And always there is a little boy in the picture, some- times with a hand full of marbles or maybe a jack knife or a switch chas- ing after his twin sister. He's always there, that little kid. He can't seem to get out of town! LOWEST MEAT PRICES IN THE AREAl Register to win one of three $100 beef bundles! cainot survive unless our • .:::::iii::?:::::%:ii::ii::i:ii.:ii::%i.][ ........... i!iiii!ili{i{i i:::::::::;::'::: 3:::?-: ..... :::!:!:i:i:!:!:!;::i:!::;::i::,. BE =RESPONSIBLE!; EXPLODING FLAK NEAR A B-17 BOMBER over a target, showing the plane's bombay doors open. Out of formation, Vince says the plane could well be in deep trouble. ONE OF FIVE C-47 PLANES DESTROYED when Vince's plane lost control on a landing and crashed into a row of parked aircraft next to the landing strip. Vince's bomber was destroyed also in the crash and fire. ROPRI:ICTIC In m0T,0n SPORTS INJURY & FAMILY WELLNESS CENTER Welcomes Dr. Jessica Graham Associate Doctor Dr. Shelly Brandenburger practices part-time and is available for acupuncture, nutritional consults or public speaking. Dr. Rod Brandenburger practices general chiropractic with a focus and special training in sports injuries and extremities problems. Dr. Graham has an special " interest in the chiropractic care of women and children. Her previous practice was focused on family care. • Chiropractic • Annie e Acupuncture • Tanya • Ergonomic Assessments • • Nutritional Counseling • Exercise Counseling • Orthopedic Products • Nutrition Products • • Pre-Employment and D.O.T. Physicals with Drug Testing • • Sports Physicals • 304 E. 4th Avenue Milbank, SD 57252 605-432-6418 (Sateflite office in New Effington, SD) Ddc. 9, 2003  INDEPENDENT Page 9