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December 9, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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December 9, 2003
 

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need to adjust nitrogen tes for wheat var,et,es INDEPENDENT u don't need to adjust fertilizer rates for different varieties of spring wheat, according to of Minnesota nssue arises since Minnesota are interested in nitro- efficiency for both envi- and economical reasons. interest in improving the of fertilizer nitrogen raised about matching nitrogen 0 specific varieties, says George soil scientist with the of Minnesota Extension was a logical question since percentage in grain varies in modern varieties," Rehm says. Since nitrogen is a major component of protein, logic might say that some wheat varieties require more nitrogen for optimum yields than others. To find some answers, field research supported by the Minnesota Association of Wheat Growers was conducted with the cooperation of six wheat growers in 2002 and 2003. In these field trials, five rates of nitrogen were applied to three modern varieties (Knudson, Alsen and Oxen) and one traditional choice (P2375). Wheat yields in 2003 were excel- lent, Rehm says. At three of four sites, optimum yield was in the range of 100 bu. per acre. The optimum rate of fer- tilizer nitrogen was about 120 lb. per acre when wheat followed crops other than sugarbeets and soybeans. The optimum rate decreased to about 100 lb. per acre when wheat followed a soybean crop. The study also illustrated the value of nitrogen in the tops of sugarbeets, Rehm says. At this site, the wheat yield was 100 bu. per acre; but use of fertilizer nitrogen did not increase yield. "At all test sites, the optimum rate of fertilizer nitrogen was the same for all varieties. Therefore, there appears to be no need to adjust recommended rates of fertilizer N for variety," Rehm says. Hoffbeck honored with plant breeding award John Hoffbeck was present- h the NCCPB Genetic and plant Award for Industry at the Society of America was held during the Meetings of CSSA, held iunction with the American of Agronomy and Soil Society of America Nov 2-6 CO. Loren is the son of the and Myrtle Hoffbeck of Big SD, and a graduate of Big High School. earned his B.S. from South Dakota State Sity and M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Madison. Worked for four years as a breeder for USDA before joining Pioneer Hi-Bred International as a corn breeder. He held positions of station man- ager, research coordinator, research director and most recently, research fellow, while actively managing a corn breeding program during all of his nearly 37 years with Pioneer. He developed several inbred lines that were commercially highly suc- cessful; lines that brought increased stalk strength, tolerance to high plant density, and higher yield to corn grow- ers in northern United States, Canada and parts of Europe. One line was used in several hybrid pedigrees that collectively sold over 40 million units of seed. The Genetics and Plant Breeding Award for industry is administered by CSSA and is financially supported by the NCCPB. The award is presented to a crop scientist who has made sig- nificant contributions in genetics and plant breeding. R warns against rescues animals fallen through ice .DNR is warning people to not This comes after a 19-year-old the ice, contact the local authorities or lives trying to save an ani- has fallen through thin ice. upsetting to see a beloved animal in a bad situation, strenuously advise against human life in an attefnpt to animal," said DNR water rim Smalley. records indicate that over the have been a number of who have drowned in a to rescue a dog. "Sadder still after the person goes the animal gets out of the water help," said Tim Smalley, MN safety specialist man drowned after breaking through one inch thick ice on Wettles Lake in Becker County, Tuesday, the day before his 20th birthday. He was try- ing to rescue his dog that had broken through while following some deer on the ice. He fell into the water and was submerged for nearly an hour. He was recovered by a rescue diver, resusci- tated aJad then flown to a Fargo hospi- tal, where he died. The DNR recommends if you are walking your dog anywhere there might be thin ice, keep it on a leash so it can't bolt out onto the lake. If you see an animal that has fallen through DNR conservation officer who will determine if the animal can be rescued safely. Ice experts recommend at least four inches of new clear ice for activ- ities such as ice fishing, six inches for snowmobiles and eight to twelve inches of new solid ice for small to medium-sized cars and trucks. For more information about ice safety, Minnesotans may call the DNR toll free at 1-800-MINNDNR. Computer users can download ice safety information from the DNR website www.dnr.state.mn.us and click on "Danger Thin Ice". More Than Last Year .... ,850 Collected in Clinton's 2003 Combined Fund EPrArve of $3,850 was collected in Combined Fund Drive, 'as held during the month of $464 more than was collect- according to the records. Fund Drive Chairman Kaye; the annual Fund sponsored by the Clinton Civic Club, which has con- this fund drive since it's still have Fund Drive slips and have not turned may bring them to the office and they will be with this year's drive. volunteer solicitors were ierson, Leota Moberg, Merlyn Kerstein, Jane Joanne Vangsness, Marie rl, Janine Teske, Cheri Kaye, liams, Sharon Athey, Bob Josean Benson, Millie Dybdahl, Jean Rixe, Peggy Lois Torgerson, Denese and Charlotte Kashmark Providence Center. of contributions in ' drive are as follows: ............. $213.00 Red Cross ....... 161.00 .156.00 ............. 52.00 ............. 94.00 ................. 202.00 .......... 600.00 ................ 78.00 ............... 406.00 ............. 167.00 Scouts ......... 73.00 ............ 86.00 ................... 50.00 Sclerosis ......... I 18.00 J Children .......... 50.00 Army ........... 237.00 .............. 35.00 4-H Federation .... 63.00 ........ 35.00 ...... 300.00 ............... 50.00 County Foodshelf ......... 142.00 Parkinsons' . .............. 10.00 Totals ............... $3,850.00 The Clinton Women's Civic Club appreciates the volunteers who assist with this once-a-year fund drive. The checks have been sent to the various charities. i . ,i,ir i, mz,,lll,.,IoIol II i ullll f SHOP ORTONVILLE - FOR CHRISTMAS LET THE SANTA GALS HELP YOU SHOP FOR THE HOLIDAYS +'+°/(;i//': i,:, Its:!: "'1+ it I. : t :.;+ /,+.;;, + r/,/i  :! i:);i i Watch for them on the streets as they pass out candy and _ spread Christmas cheer, j a,000 IAile$ Public support for public notices at 90% Nine out of 10 Minnesota adults, or 90%, believe that cities, counties, townships and school boards should be required to publish public notices in newspapers, and 92% believe that keeping the public informed of such government activities is a worthwhile expenditure of funds. These were two of the findings from a July 2003 survey of 701 ran- domly selected adults in Minnesota conducted for the Minnesota Newspaper Foundation (MNF). Public notices, or "legals" as they are sometimes known, include minutes or summaries of meetings held by public bodies like school and county boards or city councils. These postings tell readers, for example, what a school district's budget is, whether property taxes will increase or if a neighbor is being rezoned. "Clearly, an overwhelming num- ber of people believe that public notices in newspapers hold public officials and bodies accountable for their actions," said Renee McGivern, executive director of the Minnesota Newspaper Foundation. The survey also showed that 88% of Minnesota adults read public notices in their local newspapers either regularly or sometimes and 72% of them rated the continued pub- lishing of public notices in newspa- pers as very important or important. Survey, conducted by A & A Research of Kalispell, Mont., has a margin of error of 3.9%. The Minnesota Newspaper Foundation is a non-profit organization that provides training to newspapers and education to the pub- lic about newspaper issues. They sur- vey was funded by MNF donors and the Minnesota Newspaper Association's Freedom Fund. '03 Dodge Intrepid SE s12,399+,+ 7/70 S tock 10-5 Shoppe W. Hwy. 7 • Corretl, MN 1120-596-2150 or 596-2336 Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays -+ Dec. 4-20, 2003 Many items reduced in price! PLUS... lO% OFF total purchases over $25 J- • ANTIQUES- Full line! • GIFTS for Christmas • SEWING SUPPUES - Fabric, Thread, Buttons, Zippers a/. and Other Notions Christmas Trees We have Fresh Cut (3 ft. to 9 fli) trees to choose from, (Church Trees available) Frazier Fur, - Balsam, White & Scotch Pine, Colorado Spruce Christmas Tree Hours: Mon,-Fri. 10-6 • Sat. 10-6 ° Sun 1-4 00e00e00t's Lawn Care & Landscaping 605-432-6313 N, Hwy. 15 Milbank, SD • C ur local merchants carry a large variety of gi ;a ad supplies for the holidays. Our local m,.'rc:hants can often special order for you. Remember...you help support the community when you :eep your shopping dollars at home. A MESSAGE FROM YOUR LOCAL TEAM AT \\;I''M / "Bcaue e care:" .00'00/CenBank " \\;--/ 113 NW 1st Street Ortonville, MN 56278 V Phone 320-839-6123 • 1-800-335-8920 • Fax 320-839-6127 Member 24-hour banking 1-877-569-2265 • www.cenbank.com FDIC need to adjust nitrogen tee for wheat var,et,es INDEPENDENT u don't need to adjust fertilizer rates for different varieties of spring wheat, according to of Minnesota nssue arises since Minnesota are interested in nitro- efficiency for both envi- and economical reasons. interest in improving the of fertilizer nitrogen raised about matching nitrogen 0 specific varieties, says George soil scientist with the of Minnesota Extension was a logical question since percentage in grain varies in modern varieties," Rehm says. Since nitrogen is a major component of protein, logic might say that some wheat varieties require more nitrogen for optimum yields than others. To find some answers, field research supported by the Minnesota Association of Wheat Growers was conducted with the cooperation of six wheat growers in 2002 and 2003. In these field trials, five rates of nitrogen were applied to three modern varieties (Knudson, Alsen and Oxen) and one traditional choice (P2375). Wheat yields in 2003 were excel- lent, Rehm says. At three of four sites, optimum yield was in the range of 100 bu. per acre. The optimum rate of fer- tilizer nitrogen was about 120 lb. per acre when wheat followed crops other than sugarbeets and soybeans. The optimum rate decreased to about 100 lb. per acre when wheat followed a soybean crop. The study also illustrated the value of nitrogen in the tops of sugarbeets, Rehm says. At this site, the wheat yield was 100 bu. per acre; but use of fertilizer nitrogen did not increase yield. "At all test sites, the optimum rate of fertilizer nitrogen was the same for all varieties. Therefore, there appears to be no need to adjust recommended rates of fertilizer N for variety," Rehm says. Hoffbeck honored with plant breeding award John Hoffbeck was present- h the NCCPB Genetic and plant Award for Industry at the Society of America was held during the Meetings of CSSA, held iunction with the American of Agronomy and Soil Society of America Nov 2-6 CO. Loren is the son of the and Myrtle Hoffbeck of Big SD, and a graduate of Big High School. earned his B.S. from South Dakota State Sity and M.S. and Ph. D. from the University of Madison. Worked for four years as a breeder for USDA before joining Pioneer Hi-Bred International as a corn breeder. He held positions of station man- ager, research coordinator, research director and most recently, research fellow, while actively managing a corn breeding program during all of his nearly 37 years with Pioneer. He developed several inbred lines that were commercially highly suc- cessful; lines that brought increased stalk strength, tolerance to high plant density, and higher yield to corn grow- ers in northern United States, Canada and parts of Europe. One line was used in several hybrid pedigrees that collectively sold over 40 million units of seed. The Genetics and Plant Breeding Award for industry is administered by CSSA and is financially supported by the NCCPB. The award is presented to a crop scientist who has made sig- nificant contributions in genetics and plant breeding. R warns against rescues animals fallen through ice .DNR is warning people to not This comes after a 19-year-old the ice, contact the local authorities or lives trying to save an ani- has fallen through thin ice. upsetting to see a beloved animal in a bad situation, strenuously advise against human life in an attefnpt to animal," said DNR water rim Smalley. records indicate that over the have been a number of who have drowned in a to rescue a dog. "Sadder still after the person goes the animal gets out of the water help," said Tim Smalley, MN safety specialist man drowned after breaking through one inch thick ice on Wettles Lake in Becker County, Tuesday, the day before his 20th birthday. He was try- ing to rescue his dog that had broken through while following some deer on the ice. He fell into the water and was submerged for nearly an hour. He was recovered by a rescue diver, resusci- tated aad then flown to a Fargo hospi- tal, where he died. The DNR recommends if you are walking your dog anywhere there might be thin ice, keep it on a leash so it can't bolt out onto the lake. If you see an animal that has fallen through DNR conservation officer who will determine if the animal can be rescued safely. Ice experts recommend at least four inches of new clear ice for activ- ities such as ice fishing, six inches for snowmobiles and eight to twelve inches of new solid ice for small to medium-sized cars and trucks. For more information about ice safety, Minnesotans may call the DNR toll free at 1-800-MINNDNR. Computer users can download ice safety information from the DNR website www.dnr.state.mn.us and click on "Danger Thin Ice". More Than Last Year .... ,850 Collected in Clinton's 2003 Combined Fund EPrArve of $3,850 was collected in Combined Fund Drive, 'as held during the month of $464 more than was collect- according to the records. Fund Drive Chairman Kaye; the annual Fund sponsored by the Clinton Civic Club, which has con- this fund drive since it's still have Fund Drive slips and have not turned may bring them to the office and they will be with this year's drive. volunteer solicitors were ierson, Leota Moberg, Merlyn Kerstein, Jane Joanne Vangsness, Marie rl, Janine Teske, Cheri Kaye, liams, Sharon Athey, Bob Josean Benson, Millie Dybdahl, Jean Rixe, Peggy Lois Torgerson, Denese and Charlotte Kashmark Providence Center. of contributions in ' drive are as follows: ............. $213.00 Red Cross ....... 161.00 .156.00 ............. 52.00 ............. 94.00 ................. 202.00 .......... 600.00 ................ 78.00 ............... 406.00 ............. 167.00 Scouts ......... 73.00 ............ 86.00 ................... 50.00 Sclerosis ......... I 18.00 J Children .......... 50.00 Army ........... 237.00 .............. 35.00 4-H Federation .... 63.00 ........ 35.00 ...... 300.00 ............... 50.00 County Foodshelf ......... 142.00 Parkinsons' . .............. 10.00 Totals ............... $3,850.00 The Clinton Women's Civic Club appreciates the volunteers who assist with this once-a-year fund drive. The checks have been sent to the various charities. i . ,i,ir ), m1,,lll,.,IoIol II i ill iii f" SHOP ORTONVILLE - FOR CHRISTMAS LET THE SANTA GALS HELP YOU SHOP FOR THE HOLIDAYS +'+°/(;il;/': i,:, I, :!: "'1+ it I. : t :.;+ /,+.;;, + r/,/i  :! i:);i i Watch for them on the streets as they pass out candy and spread Christmas cheer._.# pr Public support for public notices at 90% Nine out of 10 Minnesota adults, or 90%, believe that cities, counties, townships and school boards should be required to publish public notices in newspapers, and 92% believe that keeping the public informed of such government activities is a worthwhile expenditure of funds. These were two of the findings from a July 2003 survey of 701 ran- domly selected adults in Minnesota conducted for the Minnesota Newspaper Foundation (MNF). Public notices, or "legals" as they are sometimes known, include minutes or summaries of meetings held by public bodies like school and county boards or city councils. These postings tell readers, for example, what a school district's budget is, whether property taxes will increase or if a neighbor is being rezoned. "Clearly, an overwhelming num- ber of people believe that public notices in newspapers hold public officials and bodies accountable for their actions," said Renee McGivern, executive director of the Minnesota Newspaper Foundation. The survey also showed that 88% of Minnesota adults read public notices in their local newspapers either regularly or sometimes and 72% of them rated the continued pub- lishing of public notices in newspa- pers as very important or important. Survey, conducted by A & A Research of Kalispell, Mont., has a margin of error of 3.9%. The Minnesota Newspaper Foundation is a non-profit organization that provides training to newspapers and education to the pub- lic about newspaper issues. They sur- vey was funded by MNF donors and the Minnesota Newspaper Association's Freedom Fund. '03 Dodge Intrepid SE s12,399+,+ 7/70 S tock 10-5 Shoppe W. Hwy. 7 • Corretl, MN 20-596-2150 or 596-2336 Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays -+ Dec. 4-20, 2003 Many items reduced in price! PLUS... lO% OFF total purchases over $25 AL ,ANTIQUES- Full line! ,GIFTS for Christmas .SEWING SUPPUES - Fabric, Thread, Buttons, Zippers a/. and Other Notions Christmas Trees We have Fresh Cut (3 ft. to 9 fli) trees to choose from, (Church Trees available) Frazier Fur, - Balsam, White & Scotch Pine, Colorado Spruce Christmas Tree Hours: Mon,-Fri. 10-6 • Sat. 10-6 ° Sun 1-4 00e00e00t's Lawn Care & Landscaping 605-432-6313 N, Hwy. 15 Milbank, SD • C ur local merchants carry a large variety of gi ;a ad supplies for the holidays. Our local m,.'rc:hants can often special order for you. Remember...you help support the community when you :eep your shopping dollars at home. A MESSAGE FROM YOUR LOCAL TEAM AT \\;l'' / "Bc.ue e ca.:" .00'00/CenBank " \\;--/ 113 NW 1st Street Ortonville, MN 56278 V Phone 320-839-6123 • 1-800-335-8920 • Fax 320-839-6127 Member 24-hour banking 1-877-569-2265 • www.cenbank.com FDIC