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December 14, 1999     The Ortonville Independent
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December 14, 1999
 

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Editorial comment onversat i WITH THE The World Trade Organization talks in Seattle that were thought by Seattle locals to be safer and more pre- dictable than the Olympics which they turned thumbs down on several years ago turned pretty wild. But the meet- ing and the demonstrations that sur- rounded it serve as a real sorting device for farmers and farm interests. There were and are farmers on both sides of the issue. Agribusiness is almost unanimously in favor of glob- alization. That is at least in part because most of agribusiness is now global in scope and carried out by companies that hold no particular loy- alty to any national government. Farmers tend to be of several minds. Most believe, contrary to much evidence and a good deal of logic, that they are the most "efficient" producers in the world and that the world would be their oyster if the gov- ernment would just get out of the way. But then most farmers go on to put some important "ifs" with that asser- tion. American farmers will "win" at globalization if other farmers play by the same environmental rules and if they pay labor the same rate and if the rates of exchange are fair and etc. And then farmers want certain exceptions made whether they add up or not, such as that the American sheep industry cannot compete with Australia and New Zealand, or not yet anyhow and so trade barriers need to be erected for a little while. Or that the sugar industry needs to be excepted because domestic sugaris cheap and because unfair subsidies are allowed sugar producers in other countries. Some farmers are politically inclined to believe that globalization is mostly bad and that government is in agriculture for better or for worse. They will oppose trade liberalization as a matter of belief. One of these is a young French farmer who drove a bulldozer through a McDonald's in his home country before showing up in Seattle. He was irked because America's retaliation for Europe's refusal to allow hormone implanted American beef has driven up the effective price of his Roquefort (sheep) cheese in America to the point that it was wrecking his market. He stated for the press that he didn't believe one economy(American), even if it was the most dominant in the world, had any business dictating what people ate. 2 3 t I 25 26 )-7 36 I i l 45 51 52 53 59 82 65 Clues ACROSS 1. Cornmeal mush (Bdtish) 5. Musical time 10. High  what this is 14. Consumer 15. Rhizopodan 16. Margarine 17. Ghost 20. With armour plate 21. Rivers 22. Bed 23. Husk of wheat 25. Pacific island 29. Rig 33. Herb 34. Annual grass of Europe and N. Africa 35. Figure 36. Feels 38. Worn 41. Greek letter 42. Imitators 44. White aspen 45. Provencal verses 45. Victims 49. Obey 50. Arrange 51. Wigwam 54. Beat 59. Piker 62. Meat from a pig 63. Mentally quick 64. City in France 65. Stakes 66. Character of apples 67. Geographical area Chlel DOWN 1. Similar 2. Arthur __, Wimbledon champion i 3. Blackbird 31. Old 4. Formal 32. Distributes 5. Decoration 37. Reasonable 6. Hymenopteron 39, Thief 7. Made of fermented 40. East by south honey and water 43. Hoof 8. Phosphate buffer 46. Therefore solution 47, Where electrical 9. Clod engineers meet 10. Lugging 48. Forcemeats 11. Hebrew calendar 50. Not ret'l month 51. Used for insect 12. Wrap sterilization 13. Tills 52. Black 18. Break up 53. Forward 19. Sloth 54. Decoration or 23. Hillsides adornment 24. College army 55. Underside 25. Drenches 56. Porcelain flower 26. Speak 57. Pddes 27. Dicot genus 58. Harm 28. Reordered tin 60. Change by heating 29. Signals 61. Self 30. Chinese province . j9 . I l'J ' = 1 . .  +  o ,!ol, . q- -'- 9 7" "1 1151 R 1 0 l= J  z r There are a lot of reasons to oppose globalization. There are also powerful and persuasive arguments in favor of it. But it seems that the farmers, for their part, can be sorted out pretty nicely into the group that believes that "market forces" eventually solve all problems and the group that believes that once in a while market forces are the problem, by their attitude toward globalization. The ones that want to go slow on trade tend to be the same ones that answer the questions about profitabil- ity by insisting that there are other goals that are equally important, such as quality of family life, a pleasant life in the country, and low impact on the environment. The farmers that tend to see the world as an endless opportunity for profit that world trade talks could open up, also think folks should quit talking quite so much about problems and just get out there and make some money, preferably by being low cost producers. These farmers tend to think that increased trade will always benefit agriculture and that they will be the particular farmers that benefit. The other bunch is pretty sure they won't benefit and they think they are already suffering the lack of local market opportunities. It is a deep split in world view and it goes way back in agriculture, and indeed in American civilization. This split roughly describes the difference between those who came, farmed, and moved west, and those who came and stayed. After the settlement period, it describes the difference between "early adopters" of machines, hybrid seeds and chemicals, and those who were more interested in sharing work with the neighbors. Today it is the difference between the specialists (corn, or hogs, or dairy, or poultry, but never all) and the gen- eralists (diversified, organic, sustain- able, fringy, other). Interestingly enough, it is the generalists who are beginning to timidly ask the consumer what they want in the way of food. Who knows where that will lead? Sounds a lot like the profit motive to me. 1999 Ucenses Good through January 2(X)0 Game, Fish and Parks officials are reminding South Dakota resident hunters that their 1999 South Dakota licenses are valid through January Once Upon a Long Ago Who 00ares?00. by Harlan (J.R) Junior Parler P.O. Box35, B Stone City, SD 57216 The times and tribulations of Harlan (J.R.) Junior Parker. His endeavors and mis-endeavors in a small town of western Minnesota - the rest of the United States - and part of Europe. SEVENTH IN A SERIES We would dig angleworms along the creek in the City Park, which was only one block from home, and was hilly and heavily wooded, a ravine with a stream in it. We would short cut through the park on the way to school, and in the spring I would bring Mother home a bouquet of wild violets, and in the fall a handful of gooseberries. This was also a great place to play cowboys and Indians, or cops and robbers, also to shoot birds with Our BB guns and sling shots and fly kites from the hill- tops. We used to stake our kites out on top of the hill behind Schoen's on a windy day in the spring and leave them out day and night to see whose kite would stay up the longest - of course, if the wind died down, it was "one tie, all tie." We would get a free yardstick with advertising on it at the lum- ber yard, cut it lengthwise down the middle for cross pieces, get some butcher paper from the meat market and some string and glue and make our own kites. Some would make "box kites" but I never knew how, so I always made the old four corner regular ones. At about this age - from 7 to 12 - I used to spend from three to five weeks in the summer visit- ing my grandmother and Aunt Margueritte Parker at Howard Lake. Grandpa Parker passed away in 1926, so my Aunt, who was single and worked in a mer- cantile store (groceries and dry goods) as a bookkeeper and clerk, lived with Grandma in the old Parker house. At this time in my life I loved Grandma more than anyone in the world. She had the time and inclination to indulge me, and indulge me she did! She had been born in Maryland in December 1863 and was named Clara Thomas Moore. She had lost her father in the Civil War. At the end of the war, her grandmother (on her mother's side), her Uncle Headley (her mother's brother) who had been discharged from the Union Army, her mother and baby Clara, migrated to the Minnesota frontier and homesteaded on Lake Ann, near present day Howard Lake. She was raised in a log cabin and at the age of 16 was teaching in a log cabin school house. She was very intel- ligent and intensely interested in everything. She knew all the con- stellations in the heavens. There was an old carriage shed behind her house. One June 21st, she awakened me before dawn, put a ladder against the shed and helped me to climb up on the roof to watch the sun rise. That evening she helped me up again, so I could watch the sun set on the longest day of the year. What a grandparent! She taught me how to make a bow and arrow, helped me build a cage for gophers, steeped me in family history and whetted my appetite for all history. She lived a block and a half from the ceme- tery. to get a jump on hunting and fishing for the new millennium, new licenses for year 2000 are scheduled to arrive in the Pierre License Office on Dec. 15. Licensing Manager AI Jockheck said when the new licenses have Sportsmen should also note that the new licenses will again have and extended expiration date. Jockheck said the new 2000 resident licenses will be valid beginning Dec. 15, 1999, and will remain valid through January 2001. "This should help 2000. Non resident hunting licenses ...... eliminate an + confusion a " " .,,.= .,..i;a ,k ..... k ....... ,,,,-, arrived, they Will De sent, uDon y ssocIateo ,=,,. ,,,, ,-=v,l, +-,,-y ,uuu ......... '* - with end of -'ear licens- r ...... '- " %"--S;a-n" hun- li---":" - -:-- request, to license agents mrougnout - ,  -,;,,,., *,+ *tt *u * tS vtu=mn -,pirc +h +o+. h" ad a,a , Dee. 31. However, if sportsmen want ..... ''" ..... v,d00L.r .'44 " - - - " idea Rocke S ....... . .........   II o f/#]J,t/II l,..--, II00+ ;ootstool+assocks ...... '1," lll00 00'ounterStools .................. '49 's .... IIn-00 : ced. Ch. .................... ,24, .,m.mm.  III Gift For 1_1111 II Bunk Bed ' 11 _The. 11 IIL" - " " - =189 ----  t-am,ly tl | . , 'o #:/J I Purchase Che,, 00re,-er ,.--. '-".  "' E-a Tal== $234 A= ====,= Country Pine Collection m m.= = .,= liUUl:li From Electrlc D, Bedroom ROCKBS Set Ea. 9=,,. Storage $99 Hassocks on Rollers /,d/ q4=d/., M,u t e[ . s35.98 OAK QUEEN SIZE INNER- FAMOUS LANE enBTA00mT SPR,N00.A00RESS BECUNING mmm HID00BB) SOFA s499" s399 s699 DINETTE lid oak Gun SETS Cabinets S " Other Sizes S [lil CHINA CURIOS II1[ .UtyHES s159 I! s30000_Q.QL With Hutch Computer Desk s129 LANE RECUNERS 6MONTHS s24"9" ,.. ...... ++=++r-;-'+:+:++: -], ,* . FREE RNANCINGi +11 ................. TO  iIIPI Free Delivery ! nger Ftrmture Co,. Morri,, MN [ Furniture We00a00.0o, '+'M-,Cm" [ own accotmts & Carpet I Everfthng [or your Home.  "it Pays to Shop the Store Whlw bu Gel Mort!' The Independ, eeeoe JEANETTE Publisher Managing EditOr SUZETTE Editor & Advertising ROBERT Plant Manager ARLENE WlESE Office Manager KATHIE LANTIg Computer DAF SARA Ad and Pdnting RYA BILL DWYER i BOB Pressmen KRIST;NOVAK NANCY: Collater nee Tues., Dec. 14, 1999 Pub11d Evy Tueey  29 2rid: Orlomlle, kin 56278 Perio Postage Faid at Ofl0nvHl SUBSCRIPTION $25.00per year in BI Pade, Traverse and Minnesota, Grant and In South Dakota. $29.00 counties in Minnesota Dakota. All others, $33.00 per Postmaster: Send The Ortonvllle Inde Odonvllle, A FEBRUARY 1! BoStone, Lee c unties In Roberts in February .............. 25.00 Merch .................. :12.89 April .................... 20.81 Muy ..................... 15.73 June .................... 16.6S July ...................... 14.57 Februery ............. 29.00 Merch .................. 2(I.61 April .................... 24.19 Mey ...................... 21.77 Juno .................... 19.21; July ...................... 111.93 Februery .............. 331.00 Merh ................. 20.28; April .................... 27.|0 Mey ..................... 24.715 Juno ................... 22.00 July ..................... 12.2 I "PUBLISHER'S LIABILITY FORI The Publisher shall not be slight that do advertisement. The for other errors or connection with an strictly limited to advertisement in or the refund of an! advertisement. DEADLINES Chumh notes Display ads - Fdda! Correspondence - I Pictures - 5 p.m. Fddsy News - Fddsy afternoon Classified ads - Friday noon (Any ad brought in later will be claesfy.) OFRCE HOURS 1:8 a.m.-5 p.m p.m.; A Thursday: p.m.; A Fdday: 8 a.m..12 noon, 1-5 Holidays may affect office h LETTERS POUCY Letters to the editor community issues are Letter wdters should be Independent reserves the and/or condense letters for paper also reserves the publish letters that are which It might Letters should printed or typed name, address and tale Addresses and not be published. Letter writers are asked themselves to one letter Please keep letter bdef over 350 words AD ve. The Ortonvllle Independent determining what Is advertising is news is based on If an individual zatlon chm for event, be considered advertlsln newspaper, it a would cease to exist. The paper receives for single paper sales is used to ink and paper used in product. It no longer does so paper cost increases. It still cost of Ink and a small paper used. Advertising to a crops and livestock ! products to the grocer; and underwear to the tractors to the I artlcular uslness. ADS: We reserve the d any advertising without justify our decision. POMCIES News: Our goal is to as fully and accuratel staffs opinions will opinion page. Editorials: oge, whether m other sources our readers. editor are her own those of other staff members. expressed In Items from lions may own views, but are general Interest. Call 320-839-6163 320-839-3761 to place claealfled advertlsln OrtonvUte Independent. Page 4  INDEPENDENT Tuesday, Dec. Editorial comment onversat i WITH THE The World Trade Organization talks in Seattle that were thought by Seattle locals to be safer and more pre- dictable than the Olympics which they turned thumbs down on several years ago turned pretty wild. But the meet- ing and the demonstrations that sur- rounded it serve as a real sorting device for farmers and farm interests. There were and are farmers on both sides of the issue. Agribusiness is almost unanimously in favor of glob- alization. That is at least in part because most of agribusiness is now global in scope and carried out by companies that hold no particular loy- alty to any national government. Farmers tend to be of several minds. Most believe, contrary to much evidence and a good deal of logic, that they are the most "efficient" producers in the world and that the world would be their oyster if the gov- ernment would just get out of the way. But then most farmers go on to put some important "ifs" with that asser- tion. American farmers will "win" at globalization if other farmers play by the same environmental rules and if they pay labor the same rate and if the rates of exchange are fair and etc. And then farmers want certain exceptions made whether they add up or not, such as that the American sheep industry cannot compete with Australia and New Zealand, or not yet anyhow and so trade barriers need to be erected for a little while. Or that the sugar industry needs to be excepted because domestic sugaris cheap and because unfair subsidies are allowed sugar producers in other countries. Some farmers are politically inclined to believe that globalization is mostly bad and that government is in agriculture for better or for worse. They will oppose trade liberalization as a matter of belief. One of these is a young French farmer who drove a bulldozer through a McDonald's in his home country before showing up in Seattle. He was irked because America's retaliation for Europe's refusal to allow hormone implanted American beef has driven up the effective price of his Roquefort (sheep) cheese in America to the point that it was wrecking his market. He stated for the press that he didn't believe one economy(American), even if it was the most dominant in the world, had any business dictating what people ate. 2 3 t I 25 26 )-7 36 I i l 45 51 52 53 59 82 65 Clues ACROSS 1. Cornmeal mush (Bdtish) 5. Musical time 10. High  what this is 14. Consumer 15. Rhizopodan 16. Margarine 17. Ghost 20. With armour plate 21. Rivers 22. Bed 23. Husk of wheat 25. Pacific island 29. Rig 33. Herb 34. Annual grass of Europe and N. Africa 35. Figure 36. Feels 38. Worn 41. Greek letter 42. Imitators 44. White aspen 45. Provencal verses 45. Victims 49. Obey 50. Arrange 51. Wigwam 54. Beat 59. Piker 62. Meat from a pig 63. Mentally quick 64. City in France 65. Stakes 66. Character of apples 67. Geographical area Chlel DOWN 1. Similar 2. Arthur __, Wimbledon champion i 3. Blackbird 31. Old 4. Formal 32. Distributes 5. Decoration 37. Reasonable 6. Hymenopteron 39, Thief 7. Made of fermented 40. East by south honey and water 43. Hoof 8. Phosphate buffer 46. Therefore solution 47, Where electrical 9. Clod engineers meet 10. Lugging 48. Forcemeats 11. Hebrew calendar 50. Not ret'l month 51. Used for insect 12. Wrap sterilization 13. Tills 52. Black 18. Break up 53. Forward 19. Sloth 54. Decoration or 23. Hillsides adornment 24. College army 55. Underside 25. Drenches 56. Porcelain flower 26. Speak 57. Pddes 27. Dicot genus 58. Harm 28. Reordered tin 60. Change by heating 29. Signals 61. Self 30. Chinese province . j9 . I l'J ' = 1 . .  +  o ,!ol, . q- -'- 9 7" "1 1151 R 1 0 l= J  z r There are a lot of reasons to oppose globalization. There are also powerful and persuasive arguments in favor of it. But it seems that the farmers, for their part, can be sorted out pretty nicely into the group that believes that "market forces" eventually solve all problems and the group that believes that once in a while market forces are the problem, by their attitude toward globalization. The ones that want to go slow on trade tend to be the same ones that answer the questions about profitabil- ity by insisting that there are other goals that are equally important, such as quality of family life, a pleasant life in the country, and low impact on the environment. The farmers that tend to see the world as an endless opportunity for profit that world trade talks could open up, also think folks should quit talking quite so much about problems and just get out there and make some money, preferably by being low cost producers. These farmers tend to think that increased trade will always benefit agriculture and that they will be the particular farmers that benefit. The other bunch is pretty sure they won't benefit and they think they are already suffering the lack of local market opportunities. It is a deep split in world view and it goes way back in agriculture, and indeed in American civilization. This split roughly describes the difference between those who came, farmed, and moved west, and those who came and stayed. After the settlement period, it describes the difference between "early adopters" of machines, hybrid seeds and chemicals, and those who were more interested in sharing work with the neighbors. Today it is the difference between the specialists (corn, or hogs, or dairy, or poultry, but never all) and the gen- eralists (diversified, organic, sustain- able, fringy, other). Interestingly enough, it is the generalists who are beginning to timidly ask the consumer what they want in the way of food. Who knows where that will lead? Sounds a lot like the profit motive to me. 1999 Ucenses Good through January 2(X)0 Game, Fish and Parks officials are reminding South Dakota resident hunters that their 1999 South Dakota licenses are valid through January Once Upon a Long Ago Who 00ares?00. by Harlan (J.R) Junior Parler P.O. Box35, B Stone City, SD 57216 The times and tribulations of Harlan (J.R.) Junior Parker. His endeavors and mis-endeavors in a small town of western Minnesota - the rest of the United States - and part of Europe. SEVENTH IN A SERIES We would dig angleworms along the creek in the City Park, which was only one block from home, and was hilly and heavily wooded, a ravine with a stream in it. We would short cut through the park on the way to school, and in the spring I would bring Mother home a bouquet of wild violets, and in the fall a handful of gooseberries. This was also a great place to play cowboys and Indians, or cops and robbers, also to shoot birds with Our BB guns and sling shots and fly kites from the hill- tops. We used to stake our kites out on top of the hill behind Schoen's on a windy day in the spring and leave them out day and night to see whose kite would stay up the longest - of course, if the wind died down, it was "one tie, all tie." We would get a free yardstick with advertising on it at the lum- ber yard, cut it lengthwise down the middle for cross pieces, get some butcher paper from the meat market and some string and glue and make our own kites. Some would make "box kites" but I never knew how, so I always made the old four corner regular ones. At about this age - from 7 to 12 - I used to spend from three to five weeks in the summer visit- ing my grandmother and Aunt Margueritte Parker at Howard Lake. Grandpa Parker passed away in 1926, so my Aunt, who was single and worked in a mer- cantile store (groceries and dry goods) as a bookkeeper and clerk, lived with Grandma in the old Parker house. At this time in my life I loved Grandma more than anyone in the world. She had the time and inclination to indulge me, and indulge me she did! She had been born in Maryland in December 1863 and was named Clara Thomas Moore. She had lost her father in the Civil War. At the end of the war, her grandmother (on her mother's side), her Uncle Headley (her mother's brother) who had been discharged from the Union Army, her mother and baby Clara, migrated to the Minnesota frontier and homesteaded on Lake Ann, near present day Howard Lake. She was raised in a log cabin and at the age of 16 was teaching in a log cabin school house. She was very intel- ligent and intensely interested in everything. She knew all the con- stellations in the heavens. There was an old carriage shed behind her house. One June 21st, she awakened me before dawn, put a ladder against the shed and helped me to climb up on the roof to watch the sun rise. That evening she helped me up again, so I could watch the sun set on the longest day of the year. What a grandparent! She taught me how to make a bow and arrow, helped me build a cage for gophers, steeped me in family history and whetted my appetite for all history. She lived a block and a half from the ceme- tery. to get a jump on hunting and fishing for the new millennium, new licenses for year 2000 are scheduled to arrive in the Pierre License Office on Dec. 15. Licensing Manager AI Jockheck said when the new licenses have Sportsmen should also note that the new licenses will again have and extended expiration date. Jockheck said the new 2000 resident licenses will be valid beginning Dec. 15, 1999, and will remain valid through January 2001. "This should help 2000. Non resident hunting licenses ...... eliminate an + confusion a " " .,,.= .,..i;a ,k ..... k ....... ,,,,-, arrived, they Will De sent, uDon y ssocIateo ,=,,. ,,,, ,-=v,l, +-,,-y ,uuu ......... '* - with end of -'ear licens- r ...... '- " %"--S;a-n" hun- li---":" - -:-- request, to license agents mrougnout - ,  -,;,,,., *,+ *tt *u * tS vtu=mn -,pirc +h +o+. h" ad a,a , Dee. 31. However, if sportsmen want ..... ''" ..... v,d00L.r .'44 " - - - " idea Rocke S ....... . .........   II o f/#]J,t/II l,..--, II00+ ;ootstool+assocks ...... '1," lll00 00'ounterStools .................. '49 's .... IIn-00 : ced. Ch. .................... ,24, .,m.mm.  III Gift For 1_1111 II Bunk Bed ' 11 _The. 11 IIL" - " " - =189 ----  t-am,ly tl | . , 'o #:/J I Purchase Che,, 00re,-er ,.--. '-".  "' E-a Tal== $234 A= ====,= Country Pine Collection m m.= = .,= liUUl:li From Electrlc D, Bedroom ROCKBS Set Ea. 9=,,. Storage $99 Hassocks on Rollers /,d/ q4=d/., M,u t e[ . s35.98 OAK QUEEN SIZE INNER- FAMOUS LANE enBTA00mT SPR,N00.A00RESS BECUNING mmm HID00BB) SOFA s499" s399 s699 DINETTE lid oak Gun SETS Cabinets S " Other Sizes S [lil CHINA CURIOS II1[ .UtyHES s159 I! s30000_Q.QL With Hutch Computer Desk s129 LANE RECUNERS 6MONTHS s24"9" ,.. ...... ++=++r-;-'+:+:++: -], ,* . FREE RNANCINGi +11 ................. TO  iIIPI Free Delivery ! nger Ftrmture Co,. Morri,, MN [ Furniture We00a00.0o, '+'M-,Cm" [ own accotmts & Carpet I Everfthng [or your Home.  "it Pays to Shop the Store Whlw bu Gel Mort!' The Independ, eeeoe JEANETTE Publisher Managing EditOr SUZETTE Editor & Advertising ROBERT Plant Manager ARLENE WlESE Office Manager KATHIE LANTIg Computer DAF SARA Ad and Pdnting RYA BILL DWYER i BOB Pressmen KRIST;NOVAK NANCY: Collater nee Tues., Dec. 14, 1999 Pub11d Evy Tueey  29 2rid: Orlomlle, kin 56278 Perio Postage Faid at Ofl0nvHl SUBSCRIPTION $25.00per year in BI Pade, Traverse and Minnesota, Grant and In South Dakota. $29.00 counties in Minnesota Dakota. All others, $33.00 per Postmaster: Send The Ortonvllle Inde Odonvllle, A FEBRUARY 1! BoStone, Lee c unties In Roberts in February .............. 25.00 Merch .................. :12.89 April .................... 20.81 Muy ..................... 15.73 June .................... 16.6S July ...................... 14.57 Februery ............. 29.00 Merch .................. 2(I.61 April .................... 24.19 Mey ...................... 21.77 Juno .................... 19.21; July ...................... 111.93 Februery .............. 331.00 Merh ................. 20.28; April .................... 27.|0 Mey ..................... 24.715 Juno ................... 22.00 July ..................... 12.2 I "PUBLISHER'S LIABILITY FORI The Publisher shall not be slight that do advertisement. The for other errors or connection with an strictly limited to advertisement in or the refund of an! advertisement. DEADLINES Chumh notes Display ads - Fdda! Correspondence - I Pictures - 5 p.m. Fddsy News - Fddsy afternoon Classified ads - Friday noon (Any ad brought in later will be claesfy.) OFRCE HOURS 1:8 a.m.-5 p.m p.m.; A Thursday: p.m.; A Fdday: 8 a.m..12 noon, 1-5 Holidays may affect office h LETTERS POUCY Letters to the editor community issues are Letter wdters should be Independent reserves the and/or condense letters for paper also reserves the publish letters that are which It might Letters should printed or typed name, address and tale Addresses and not be published. Letter writers are asked themselves to one letter Please keep letter bdef over 350 words AD ve. The Ortonvllle Independent determining what Is advertising is news is based on If an individual zatlon chm for event, be considered advertlsln newspaper, it a would cease to exist. The paper receives for single paper sales is used to ink and paper used in product. It no longer does so paper cost increases. It still cost of Ink and a small paper used. Advertising to a crops and livestock ! products to the grocer; and underwear to the tractors to the I artlcular uslness. ADS: We reserve the d any advertising without justify our decision. POMCIES News: Our goal is to as fully and accuratel staffs opinions will opinion page. Editorials: oge, whether m other sources our readers. editor are her own those of other staff members. expressed In Items from lions may own views, but are general Interest. Call 320-839-6163 320-839-3761 to place claealfled advertlsln OrtonvUte Independent. Page 4  INDEPENDENT Tuesday, Dec.