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Ortonville, Minnesota
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December 29, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
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December 29, 1921
 

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THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT r- ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29, 1921 NUMBER 34 SERVICE TO BE GIVEN AT CLINTON Pauli--Big Stone Choir Direction of Rev. Moe Is Fine Organi- Say Critics. St. Pauli-Big Stone Choir of will give a song service at Stone Lutheran Church at on New Year&apos;s Day at eight P.' m., to which all are in- the able direction of Rev. the choir has developed in- organization of high rank. The are Clara Martinson and e Steen. Program as announced B as follows: Gud, al Jorden ........ Rhode stille Nat .............. Forseth ght of Bethleham ................ Abt Fideles (Choral} .............. Anon dine Veie (Choral)....Hassler mine Oine ...... Wennerberg is He ............................ Gounod Rost .................................. Dahle from " Messiah" ......Handel ( Intem.ission ) ...................................... Gounod aros Fodt .................... Flugel Glory of the Lord from ................................ Handel is Born a Blessed Child ...................................... Anon Lacier Herren Raade .............................. Neumark lov Herren .......... Wennerberg Day is Over .................. Borg are Telling ........ Hayden are Telling .......... Haydn Wedding Anniversary. 27th, of this year, marked (Ruby) wedding an- of Mr. and Mrs. Hayden this city, who were married 27th, 1876 at Plainview, and Mrs. French moved to Or- in the spring of 1878. special celebration was held in of this event, the big time be- for their Golden Wedding be enjoyed in the short of five years from this time. Him One Better. Independent cam'led a to the effect that John Lar- Stone township, tlad the Canning company beat on hogs, in that he marketed May 20, averaging 294 ' Robert Dew, oll the canning farm, drdpped in to say that Would have to raise bet{or he had just butchered two with an aggregate weight of Zwiener Says "Hello." is in receipt of a week from H. L. Zwiener, now living at 2216 13th St., California, enclosing Order for another year's sub- In the letter Mr. Zwiener they have no desire to re. a cold climate as they are so with the Golden State. Tax Conference Meet January 18-19 annual-'-meeting 0f the I Tax Conference will be I olis on January 18 and 1 Conference was organ- I and neets annual-I of discussing state I oUnty is entitled to five dele- The county auditor and the of the copnty board of each exofficio delegates, the orb- named by the county interested citizen, how- atten.d the conference and in its discussions. Auditor A. V. Randall is in of a letter from Roy G. Blake- he University of Minnesota, of the conference, asking Selection of delegates be brot attention of the county board meeting. In order that interests of the state fully represented at the con- the president suggests that more of the delegates to be theboard be selected from community of the county. gram this year will be very to a consideration of tax burdens now being business and property and for some measure business conditions restored to normalcy. Gover- and other prominent speak- address the conference. Mrs. F. W. Dun will reach Monday on their return wedding trip to California. leased the Phillip Miller they will occupy until s return from the coast in "Sawing a Woman in Half" at Orpheum Friday night's program at the Or- pheum theatre hre promises to be a real treat when the "Sawing of a Woman in Half" will be presented. This act, it is said, is one that is cer- tain to please and will call for the closest attention. Leading magazines of the country have devoted space in the writing up of this, act and Manager Gowan es- pecially recommends it as being out of the ordinary and one that will be well worth seeing. Other numbers on the bill include, the featuring of a musical and mind- reading dog, by Foster and PeggT; entertainaent by the Carmen Sisters, Banjo experts; and presentation of "The Si!vertone" by Gene Metcalf. The program Friday night will mark the closing of vaudeville per- formances here for a period of a few weeks, according to Mr. Gowan. Re- booking is expected to be made later in the season. New Year's Dance to Be Given by American Legio Bill Dougherty's Jazz Hounds, will furnish music for lovers of dance, at a big New Year's Ball to be given by the Ortonville American Legion on the evening of January 2. The enter- tainment committee have been busy the past week making elaborate prep- arations for the event and assure ev- eryone who comes a real big time. Favors in harmony with the season will be provided for all. This event will be held in the Odd. Fellows Hall in Ortonville, and price of admission has been set at $1.25 per couple. :00TAX ON EXPRESS TAKEN OFF BY GOV'T Tax Amounting to $17,500,- 000, in 1920, Eliminated by 1921 Revenue Act. The public will save approximately $1,500,000 a month as a result of the elimination of war tax on express shipments, according to George C. Taylor, president of the American Railway Express company. An an- nouncement to this effect was made today by R. F. Walker, the local ex- press agent. The "Revenue Act of 1921" elimin- ates the war tax of one cent on every twenty cents and fractions thereof in transportation charges on all express shipments. This tax during the year of 1920 amounted to $17,502,918. The average transportation charge for each express shipment was approxi- mately $1,50 and the average war tax for each shipment was eight cents. The elimination of the tax, there- fore, Mr .Taylor states, will virtually amount to a decrease in rates of a little over five per cent. Mr. Taylor believes that this should have a ten- dency to stimulate business and there- by accelerate the rapidly improving conditions throughout the entire country. "The American Railway Express company handles approximately one million shipments a day or nearly four hundred million shiiments a year," Mr. Taylor goes on to say. "The elimination of the tax will re- lieve the American Railway Express company of an immense amount of la- bor which has been involved in calcu- lating, entering on way bills and col- lection of tax, not to mentiop the ex- pense of checking and accounting en- tailed. "The treasury department has re- quested express carriers to advise all claimants who have claims pending, for overcharges, or who file such claims after December 31, 1921, that claims for refund 'of tax should be filed seperately on treasury depart- ment form No. 46, with the commis. sioner of internal revenue within four years from the time the tax was paid, claim being barred by statute of limitations if received after such time." Mr. Walker pointed out that as the revenue act becomes effective January 1, 1922, the tax on all shipments "pre- paid" on or before Deember 31, 1921, will be collected. On shipments for- warded "collect" and arriving on or after January 1, 1921, the tax will not be assessed. These provisions also apply to all freight shipments, and the war tax of three per cent will be eliminated. The elimination of the tax of eight per cent on tickets and sleeping car berths will make a substantial re- duction. Mrs. Katherine Spanyers received a letter from her son George from the Philippines stating he was employed on a merchant marine and that they were there for a few NOTED EVANGELIST TO HOLD SERIES OF MEETINGS HERE REVEREND E. V. DAY The Methodist Episcopal church of this city announce that the services of Reverend E. W. Day have been pro- cured to hold special two weeks' ser- vice here to begin next Sunday even- ing. Mr. Day comes highly recommended as an evangelist, with a wondelfful record back of him as a conductor of Union Tabernacle meetings. A grad- uate of Denver University, Iowa Wes- lyan College, and a post graduate of Boston University, where he gained an extensive theological education, and with eleven years of active work in the ministry, Mr. Day has a broad field of experience from, which to choose his themes ahd impart,good. things to his hearers. Speaking of Mr. Day, Rev. G. I Haggans of the local Methodist church says: "Not only is this evangelist a big man in his calling, but he is an all around fine fellow, well liked by all who have known him. While in col- liege he was a crack athlete, having played on the Denver University foot- ball team where he won the position of full-back on the 'All Rocky Moun- tain Eleven.' He also has coached athletics in three high schools and the Iowa Wesleyan College. "Rev. Day come with great mes- sages in sermon anyonE, and you cannot afford to miss these soul up- lifting services. He is a great singer with 2 years experience as baritone soloist for the Boston Apollo Club and has done great work as a lecturer and singer upon chautauqua and ly- ceum platfolms." These services will be held each evening, with spirited singing by a big chorus choir." Beardsley and Clinton Win Declamation Honor The sub-district Declamatory Con- test was held in the Clinton Opera House last Wednesday night. While the contest was not as elosa as the local one held at Clinton a s,. time ':ago. tthere were many good speakers and the judges decided as follows: Boys' DivisionGeorge Smith of Beardsley, lst; Alfred Hjartas of Bel- lingham, 2rid; Howard Wegfler, 3rd. Girls' Division--Irma Johnson of Clinton, lst; Vivian Vaughan of Cor- roll, 2nd; Elian Blocker, Bellingham, 3rd. The winners will take part in the District Contest which will be held some time in January. The judges were Miss T. Snyder, Big Stone City, S. D., Mrs. C. C. Olson and Rev. P. Bockoven of this city. Biddinger-Hallock. The marriage of Miss Gladys Hal- lock, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wal- ter Halleck of Pleasant Valley, to Mr. William Joseph Biddingr of Glendive, Montana, occurred on Sat- urday, December 24, at Glendive. The bride is well known in Orton- viJ!e and vicinity. She graduated from the local high school in 1919 and has been teaching in Montana since that time. The groom is a prosper- ous young rancher living near Glen- dive. The smple marriage ceremony was performed in the presence of only im- mediate relatives, after which the hap- py young couple left for Fargo, N. D., to visit with relatives of Mr. Bid- dinger. They arrived at Ortonville Thursday night from Fargo to spend a week with the bride's parents, after which they will return to Montana to make their home. Mrs. Biddinger has a host of friends here who wish her great happiness. Earl Stanton Goes Into Business Earl Stanton of Clinton has pur- chased the Clinto nProduce Company's business at that place from William Markel. Mr. Stanton is well known thruout the central part of the coun- ty, and especially around Clinton. Mr. Markel has moved his family to Mil- bank. Nick Fink motored to Appleton Wednesday. Mrs. J. R. Cain is visiting at the home of her motller at Alexandria for a few days. Miss Garnet Johnson, daughter of Mrs. M. M. Johnson, gave a dinner dance Tuesday evening at which twen- ty guests were invited. A three course dinner was served. The young folks had a most enjoyable evening. Charles Leet Found Ill in Hut; Dies Charles Leet, one of the Big Stem County's pioneer settlers, died at Evangelical hospital here Sunday mor- :.ing a*. 1:30 o'clock a. m. Mr. Leer, who has for yeal been a familiar character around the lake, in his capacity as a fisherman, has been suf- fering for several years from blind- hess, and a short time ago had a stroke of paralysis, but was apparent- ly recovering. Saturday morning, Gust Young, who lives in the Ferris house, near where Mr. Leet had a shack, and who had been looking af- ter him, noticed that there was no smoke coming from his hut, and not being able to arouse him by pounding on the dogr, called upon a neighbor, Mr. Carlson. Breaking down the door they found the old gentleman uncon- scious. Upon reporting their discov- ery to local authorities, the stricken man was removed to the hospital on a stretcher, but on account of his age, and seriousness of his condition, medi- cal assistance was of no avail and he died Christmas morning. The deceased man came to Big Stone county when he was 21 years old, with his father, g. T. Leet, who homesteaded the piece of land'known as the Pat Clark farm east of town, in 1874, and was 68 years old. He also homesteaded a piece of land near his father's farm. While a young man, he was married, but his wife died sbortly after their marriage, and there are no children surviving him. He had two brothers, one of whom died and it is not reliably known as to whether the other is living. It is re- ported that no word has been received from his for over 30 years. Burial services )vere held by Rev. Haggans, in the Johnson Undertaking Parlors here Tuesday at 3:00 o'clock p. m. Interment was made in Mound Cemetery. Mrs. M. P. Williams of Montevideo is visiting her sister Miss Ida Pome- roy here for a few days. Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Schoen enter- tained a number of friends at a bridge party Monday evening. Delicious re- freshmehts were served. Mrs. R. Mountford and daughter Miss Marie Mountford will leave for Chicago and Milwaukee in the morn- ing for several day's stay. Word has been received here of the death of R. E. Denfeld of Duluth. Mr. Denfeld was superintendent of the city schools of that place for over 31 years Masons of this city will remembel him as being past grand naster of he Masonic lodge in Minnesota. Mr. Den- feld spoke at the Masonic picnic held at Foster last summer. Medical Men to Meet on Big Stone Lake in July The West Central Minnesota Medi- cal Society held a meeting in the Com- mercial Club rooms' at Morris last Wednesday afternoon, and discussed problems pertinent to their profes- sion. Officers elected for the ensuing year are, Dr. C. R. Christenson, Chair- man, Dr. E. T. Fitzgerald, vice-chair- man, and Dr. Amos Leuty, secretary, all of Morris. Dr. C. F. Ewing of Wheaten was elected delegate to the State convention and Drs. C. E. Caine of Morris, M. Ramson, Donnelly, Dr. Linde and Dr. Opheim of Starbuck, censors. It was decided that the next meet- ing of the society be hold somewhere on Big Stone Lake. The Ortonville doctors were unable to attend, but axe making efforts to have Ortonville chosen as the meeting place. Parktown Minstrels at Pleasant Valley Church The Young People's Society of the Pleasant Valley Methodist Church will give a minstrel show at their church on Friday evening of this week December 30. The Parktown Min- strels will entertain for the first 45 minutes, their performance to be im- mediately followed by a half hour of music ad speaking specialties, includ- ing a Yiddish monologue, Saxaphone and clairnet duet, selection by a male quartet and song solos. The Park- town Minstrels are understood to be in a class by themselves when it corrms to rrraking mirth, and the Mnging alone it is said, is well worth the mon- ey asked for the admission, which is set at only 15 and 25 cents. DANCERS ROUTED BY DEVIL AT LAKE MARION Devil Appears at Alleged Rough Dance; L e t t e r Gives Light on Subject. Like the famous Montevideo Mule, the subject of the "Devil at the Dance," is being commented upon of late by many newspapers thruout the state. It seems that at a dance at Lake Marion, near Hutchinson, late this fall, a regulation, dyed in the woot devil, made his appearance, apparen- ly coming either down from the ceil- mg or up thru the floor, the stories conflicting no doubt on account of the troubled state of mind most of the dances experienced at the sight. At any rate, from news items and stories heard on the subject, some kind of a devil must have appeared, as evi- denced by a letter published in the Battle Lake Review, signed by A, L. Richardson of Hutchinson, Minn. In- terested, and skeptical, Mrs. C. L. Bartlett, of Bertha, Minnesota, wrote to Mr. Richardson and received the following reply: "Huchinson, Minn., Nov. 16, 1921. "Mrs. C. L. Bartlett, "Bertha, Minn ....... "Dear Madam: "Your inquiry about the Hutchin- son 'devil' came to hand and I will- ingly tell all I-know about it. Of course much that we hear about it is not dependable at all. What is fact is about as follows: "Lake Marion, nine miles from here, is a pretty resort and a pavilion has been built there by the hotel for dan- cing. On Sunday for some time. back dances have been held and a class of people for many miles around who at- tended Sunday affairs have attended. It has been said that these dances are rough and that some of the dancers of both sexes got drunk; that the rooms of the hotel are all engaged in advance, and that the cottages are broken into the the rooms occupied by the revelers. "On Sunday night, October 30, last a dance was in progress there and it is generally agreed that there were 190 dancers on the floor, when the devil came and was in their midst. (Continued on Page 8) Shannon.Swank. On Tuesday, December 27th, Miss Hazel Swank and Mr. Merlin Shan- non, both of Clinton, were united in marriage by Rev. G. L. Haggans at the M. E. Parsonage in this city, leaving on Wednesday for Belling- ham, where they will make their fu- ture home. Both Mr. and Mrs. Shannon have resided at Clinton for several years where they made many friends who wish them every happiness. Mr. and Mrs. B. C. Trevett. of St. Paul, are visiting for a few days at the home of Mrs. Trevett's sister, Mm. E. W. Newell. The Trevetts were former residents of this city. Mrs. Frank Van ram is in the lo- cal hospital for medical attention, CHRISTMAS DAY FIRE DESTROYS CODERRE SHOP Hoffman Family Driven to Street by Flames; Build- ing and Contents Nearly. Total Loss. Endangering the lives of the Hog- man family who lived upstairs, and g'iving the owners of adjoining frame buildings a bad scare, fire nearly des- troyed the building occupied by the Coderre Barber shop, Christmas more ninE, Mr. Coderre's equipment being damaged by heat and smoke to the extent of a total loss. The Hoffman girls were luckily awakened by the smell of smoke about 1:30 a. m., and discovered that the building was on fire. The alarm was promptly turned in, and after a stub- born fight, the fire was distinguished. On account of the arrangement and sit- uation of the building in the block, trouble was encountered in locating the heart of the fire. By cutting holes thru the south side of the structure, however, it was discovered to be in the basement and with the use of the chemical apparatus and floods of wa- ter from the hose lines, the upper part of the building and the walls were saved. The Hoffman girls took refuge with the Beard family in their apartments on the opposite side of the street, bad- ly frightened and chilled, but none the worse for their experience. Mr. Hog- man removed his household goods to the old Borglin residence. The building destroyed is owned by Carlson & Hasslen of this city, and both the building and Mr. Coderre's equipment were only partly covered by insurance. Poultry vs. Grain. When H. A. Van Hout of Big Stone City finished his marketing on Satur- day he possessed the sum of $42.90. There is nothing particularly striking or interesting about that-,-but when it was learned how the sum was ob- tained it puts a touch of life to it. Sixty bushels of barley that he mar- keted brought but $16.20 while thirty chickens netted him $26.70. Now isn't that a sufficient reason for the far- mers to raise a "squawk." Twelve turkeys recently sold b'y Ca. E. HQlmquist, north of town, brought $47.15. Time Extended In Gift Corn Drive To Jan. 4th Reports from elevators designated to receive shelled corn for the relief of starving Armenians in the Near- East, would indicate that not enough corn was received during Gift Corn Week to fill the quota allotted to Big Stone county, which was two carloads. In order that all may have ample opportunity of giving to this relief, those in charge have decided not to load the corn for shipment until Janu- ary 4, which is Wednesday of neXt week. All those, therefore, who over looked this matter, should take their gift in at once. Knute Jacobsen Passes Away on Saturday Knute Jacobsen, who has been en- gaged with his brother, J. A. Jacob- son in operating the Minnehah'a BiN liard Parlors here, died at Evangelical hospital on last Saturday morning, December 24, at 2:00 o'clock after an illness of only one week. Suddenly stricken with severe ob- struction of the bowels, he was re- moved to te hospital, where an oper- ation was pformed as a last resort in the hope of saving his life, but im spite of any help that could be given him, he could not recover, and death came to relieve his sufferings. Mr. Jacobsen who was a single man, was born November 30, 1876, at Granite Falls, was 45 years old and came from one of the best known faro- families in that section of the state, his father, John Jacobsen, haying set- tied on a farm in Renville county over 50 years ago. He came to Ortenlle in 1919 af- ter havin dislosed of his interests at Granite Falls, and has been success- fully engaged in business here with his brother. Relatives surviving him are a broth- er, J. A. Jacobsen, and a sister Mat- tie Jacobsen, both" of Ortonville, and two sisters, Laura Jacobsen of Gran- ite Falls, and Mrs. A. IC Agre of Gronvick, Minnesota. Funeral services were held Tuesda afternoon this week at 1:30 o'clock, at the United Lutheran church, Granite Falls, and interment made at that place. More DeLaval's for Dairymer Alvah Matthews reports the arrivaI of another shipment of five DeLaval Crean Separators. It is apparent thaf the farmers are waking up to the fac that a good dairyman is seldom hard up for cash and are milking more COWS THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT r- ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29, 1921 NUMBER 34 SERVICE TO BE GIVEN AT CLINTON Pauli--Big Stone Choir Direction of Rev. Moe Is Fine Organi- Say Critics. St. Pauli-Big Stone Choir of will give a song service at Stone Lutheran Church at on New Year's Day at eight P.' m., to which all are in- the able direction of Rev. the choir has developed in- organization of high rank. The are Clara Martinson and e Steen. Program as announced B as follows: Gud, al Jorden ........ Rhode stille Nat .............. Forseth ght of Bethleham ................ Abt Fideles (Choral} .............. Anon dine Veie (Choral)....Hassler mine Oine ...... Wennerberg is He ............................ Gounod Rost .................................. Dahle from " Messiah" ......Handel ( Intem.ission ) ...................................... Gounod aros Fodt .................... Flugel Glory of the Lord from ................................ Handel is Born a Blessed Child ...................................... Anon Lacier Herren Raade .............................. Neumark lov Herren .......... Wennerberg Day is Over .................. Borg are Telling ........ Hayden are Telling .......... Haydn Wedding Anniversary. 27th, of this year, marked (Ruby) wedding an- of Mr. and Mrs. Hayden this city, who were married 27th, 1876 at Plainview, and Mrs. French moved to Or- in the spring of 1878. special celebration was held in of this event, the big time be- for their Golden Wedding be enjoyed in the short of five years from this time. Him One Better. Independent cam'led a to the effect that John Lar- Stone township, tlad the Canning company beat on hogs, in that he marketed May 20, averaging 294 ' Robert Dew, oll the canning farm, drdpped in to say that Would have to raise bet{or he had just butchered two with an aggregate weight of Zwiener Says "Hello." is in receipt of a week from H. L. Zwiener, now living at 2216 13th St., California, enclosing Order for another year's sub- In the letter Mr. Zwiener they have no desire to re. a cold climate as they are so with the Golden State. Tax Conference Meet January 18-19 annual-'-meeting 0f the I Tax Conference will be I olis on January 18 and 1 Conference was organ- I and neets annual-I of discussing state I oUnty is entitled to five dele- The county auditor and the of the copnty board of each exofficio delegates, the orb- named by the county interested citizen, how- atten.d the conference and in its discussions. Auditor A. V. Randall is in of a letter from Roy G. Blake- he University of Minnesota, of the conference, asking Selection of delegates be brot attention of the county board meeting. In order that interests of the state fully represented at the con- the president suggests that more of the delegates to be theboard be selected from community of the county. gram this year will be very to a consideration of tax burdens now being business and property and for some measure business conditions restored to normalcy. Gover- and other prominent speak- address the conference. Mrs. F. W. Dun will reach Monday on their return wedding trip to California. leased the Phillip Miller they will occupy until s return from the coast in "Sawing a Woman in Half" at Orpheum Friday night's program at the Or- pheum theatre hre promises to be a real treat when the "Sawing of a Woman in Half" will be presented. This act, it is said, is one that is cer- tain to please and will call for the closest attention. Leading magazines of the country have devoted space in the writing up of this, act and Manager Gowan es- pecially recommends it as being out of the ordinary and one that will be well worth seeing. Other numbers on the bill include, the featuring of a musical and mind- reading dog, by Foster and PeggT; entertainaent by the Carmen Sisters, Banjo experts; and presentation of "The Si!vertone" by Gene Metcalf. The program Friday night will mark the closing of vaudeville per- formances here for a period of a few weeks, according to Mr. Gowan. Re- booking is expected to be made later in the season. New Year's Dance to Be Given by American Legio Bill Dougherty's Jazz Hounds, will furnish music for lovers of dance, at a big New Year's Ball to be given by the Ortonville American Legion on the evening of January 2. The enter- tainment committee have been busy the past week making elaborate prep- arations for the event and assure ev- eryone who comes a real big time. Favors in harmony with the season will be provided for all. This event will be held in the Odd. Fellows Hall in Ortonville, and price of admission has been set at $1.25 per couple. :00TAX ON EXPRESS TAKEN OFF BY GOV'T Tax Amounting to $17,500,- 000, in 1920, Eliminated by 1921 Revenue Act. The public will save approximately $1,500,000 a month as a result of the elimination of war tax on express shipments, according to George C. Taylor, president of the American Railway Express company. An an- nouncement to this effect was made today by R. F. Walker, the local ex- press agent. The "Revenue Act of 1921" elimin- ates the war tax of one cent on every twenty cents and fractions thereof in transportation charges on all express shipments. This tax during the year of 1920 amounted to $17,502,918. The average transportation charge for each express shipment was approxi- mately $1,50 and the average war tax for each shipment was eight cents. The elimination of the tax, there- fore, Mr .Taylor states, will virtually amount to a decrease in rates of a little over five per cent. Mr. Taylor believes that this should have a ten- dency to stimulate business and there- by accelerate the rapidly improving conditions throughout the entire country. "The American Railway Express company handles approximately one million shipments a day or nearly four hundred million shiiments a year," Mr. Taylor goes on to say. "The elimination of the tax will re- lieve the American Railway Express company of an immense amount of la- bor which has been involved in calcu- lating, entering on way bills and col- lection of tax, not to mentiop the ex- pense of checking and accounting en- tailed. "The treasury department has re- quested express carriers to advise all claimants who have claims pending, for overcharges, or who file such claims after December 31, 1921, that claims for refund 'of tax should be filed seperately on treasury depart- ment form No. 46, with the commis. sioner of internal revenue within four years from the time the tax was paid, claim being barred by statute of limitations if received after such time." Mr. Walker pointed out that as the revenue act becomes effective January 1, 1922, the tax on all shipments "pre- paid" on or before Deember 31, 1921, will be collected. On shipments for- warded "collect" and arriving on or after January 1, 1921, the tax will not be assessed. These provisions also apply to all freight shipments, and the war tax of three per cent will be eliminated. The elimination of the tax of eight per cent on tickets and sleeping car berths will make a substantial re- duction. Mrs. Katherine Spanyers received a letter from her son George from the Philippines stating he was employed on a merchant marine and that they were there for a few NOTED EVANGELIST TO HOLD SERIES OF MEETINGS HERE REVEREND E. V. DAY The Methodist Episcopal church of this city announce that the services of Reverend E. W. Day have been pro- cured to hold special two weeks' ser- vice here to begin next Sunday even- ing. Mr. Day comes highly recommended as an evangelist, with a wondelfful record back of him as a conductor of Union Tabernacle meetings. A grad- uate of Denver University, Iowa Wes- lyan College, and a post graduate of Boston University, where he gained an extensive theological education, and with eleven years of active work in the ministry, Mr. Day has a broad field of experience from, which to choose his themes ahd impart,good. things to his hearers. Speaking of Mr. Day, Rev. G. I Haggans of the local Methodist church says: "Not only is this evangelist a big man in his calling, but he is an all around fine fellow, well liked by all who have known him. While in col- liege he was a crack athlete, having played on the Denver University foot- ball team where he won the position of full-back on the 'All Rocky Moun- tain Eleven.' He also has coached athletics in three high schools and the Iowa Wesleyan College. "Rev. Day come with great mes- sages in sermon anyonE, and you cannot afford to miss these soul up- lifting services. He is a great singer with 2 years experience as baritone soloist for the Boston Apollo Club and has done great work as a lecturer and singer upon chautauqua and ly- ceum platfolms." These services will be held each evening, with spirited singing by a big chorus choir." Beardsley and Clinton Win Declamation Honor The sub-district Declamatory Con- test was held in the Clinton Opera House last Wednesday night. While the contest was not as elosa as the local one held at Clinton a s,. time ':ago. tthere were many good speakers and the judges decided as follows: Boys' DivisionGeorge Smith of Beardsley, lst; Alfred Hjartas of Bel- lingham, 2rid; Howard Wegfler, 3rd. Girls' Division--Irma Johnson of Clinton, lst; Vivian Vaughan of Cor- roll, 2nd; Elian Blocker, Bellingham, 3rd. The winners will take part in the District Contest which will be held some time in January. The judges were Miss T. Snyder, Big Stone City, S. D., Mrs. C. C. Olson and Rev. P. Bockoven of this city. Biddinger-Hallock. The marriage of Miss Gladys Hal- lock, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wal- ter Halleck of Pleasant Valley, to Mr. William Joseph Biddingr of Glendive, Montana, occurred on Sat- urday, December 24, at Glendive. The bride is well known in Orton- viJ!e and vicinity. She graduated from the local high school in 1919 and has been teaching in Montana since that time. The groom is a prosper- ous young rancher living near Glen- dive. The smple marriage ceremony was performed in the presence of only im- mediate relatives, after which the hap- py young couple left for Fargo, N. D., to visit with relatives of Mr. Bid- dinger. They arrived at Ortonville Thursday night from Fargo to spend a week with the bride's parents, after which they will return to Montana to make their home. Mrs. Biddinger has a host of friends here who wish her great happiness. Earl Stanton Goes Into Business Earl Stanton of Clinton has pur- chased the Clinto nProduce Company's business at that place from William Markel. Mr. Stanton is well known thruout the central part of the coun- ty, and especially around Clinton. Mr. Markel has moved his family to Mil- bank. Nick Fink motored to Appleton Wednesday. Mrs. J. R. Cain is visiting at the home of her motller at Alexandria for a few days. Miss Garnet Johnson, daughter of Mrs. M. M. Johnson, gave a dinner dance Tuesday evening at which twen- ty guests were invited. A three course dinner was served. The young folks had a most enjoyable evening. Charles Leet Found Ill in Hut; Dies Charles Leet, one of the Big Stem County's pioneer settlers, died at Evangelical hospital here Sunday mor- :.ing a*. 1:30 o'clock a. m. Mr. Leer, who has for yeal been a familiar character around the lake, in his capacity as a fisherman, has been suf- fering for several years from blind- hess, and a short time ago had a stroke of paralysis, but was apparent- ly recovering. Saturday morning, Gust Young, who lives in the Ferris house, near where Mr. Leet had a shack, and who had been looking af- ter him, noticed that there was no smoke coming from his hut, and not being able to arouse him by pounding on the dogr, called upon a neighbor, Mr. Carlson. Breaking down the door they found the old gentleman uncon- scious. Upon reporting their discov- ery to local authorities, the stricken man was removed to the hospital on a stretcher, but on account of his age, and seriousness of his condition, medi- cal assistance was of no avail and he died Christmas morning. The deceased man came to Big Stone county when he was 21 years old, with his father, g. T. Leet, who homesteaded the piece of land'known as the Pat Clark farm east of town, in 1874, and was 68 years old. He also homesteaded a piece of land near his father's farm. While a young man, he was married, but his wife died sbortly after their marriage, and there are no children surviving him. He had two brothers, one of whom died and it is not reliably known as to whether the other is living. It is re- ported that no word has been received from his for over 30 years. Burial services )vere held by Rev. Haggans, in the Johnson Undertaking Parlors here Tuesday at 3:00 o'clock p. m. Interment was made in Mound Cemetery. Mrs. M. P. Williams of Montevideo is visiting her sister Miss Ida Pome- roy here for a few days. Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Schoen enter- tained a number of friends at a bridge party Monday evening. Delicious re- freshmehts were served. Mrs. R. Mountford and daughter Miss Marie Mountford will leave for Chicago and Milwaukee in the morn- ing for several day's stay. Word has been received here of the death of R. E. Denfeld of Duluth. Mr. Denfeld was superintendent of the city schools of that place for over 31 years Masons of this city will remembel him as being past grand naster of he Masonic lodge in Minnesota. Mr. Den- feld spoke at the Masonic picnic held at Foster last summer. Medical Men to Meet on Big Stone Lake in July The West Central Minnesota Medi- cal Society held a meeting in the Com- mercial Club rooms' at Morris last Wednesday afternoon, and discussed problems pertinent to their profes- sion. Officers elected for the ensuing year are, Dr. C. R. Christenson, Chair- man, Dr. E. T. Fitzgerald, vice-chair- man, and Dr. Amos Leuty, secretary, all of Morris. Dr. C. F. Ewing of Wheaten was elected delegate to the State convention and Drs. C. E. Caine of Morris, M. Ramson, Donnelly, Dr. Linde and Dr. Opheim of Starbuck, censors. It was decided that the next meet- ing of the society be hold somewhere on Big Stone Lake. The Ortonville doctors were unable to attend, but axe making efforts to have Ortonville chosen as the meeting place. Parktown Minstrels at Pleasant Valley Church The Young People's Society of the Pleasant Valley Methodist Church will give a minstrel show at their church on Friday evening of this week December 30. The Parktown Min- strels will entertain for the first 45 minutes, their performance to be im- mediately followed by a half hour of music ad speaking specialties, includ- ing a Yiddish monologue, Saxaphone and clairnet duet, selection by a male quartet and song solos. The Park- town Minstrels are understood to be in a class by themselves when it corrms to rrraking mirth, and the Mnging alone it is said, is well worth the mon- ey asked for the admission, which is set at only 15 and 25 cents. DANCERS ROUTED BY DEVIL AT LAKE MARION Devil Appears at Alleged Rough Dance; L e t t e r Gives Light on Subject. Like the famous Montevideo Mule, the subject of the "Devil at the Dance," is being commented upon of late by many newspapers thruout the state. It seems that at a dance at Lake Marion, near Hutchinson, late this fall, a regulation, dyed in the woot devil, made his appearance, apparen- ly coming either down from the ceil- mg or up thru the floor, the stories conflicting no doubt on account of the troubled state of mind most of the dances experienced at the sight. At any rate, from news items and stories heard on the subject, some kind of a devil must have appeared, as evi- denced by a letter published in the Battle Lake Review, signed by A, L. Richardson of Hutchinson, Minn. In- terested, and skeptical, Mrs. C. L. Bartlett, of Bertha, Minnesota, wrote to Mr. Richardson and received the following reply: "Huchinson, Minn., Nov. 16, 1921. "Mrs. C. L. Bartlett, "Bertha, Minn ....... "Dear Madam: "Your inquiry about the Hutchin- son 'devil' came to hand and I will- ingly tell all I-know about it. Of course much that we hear about it is not dependable at all. What is fact is about as follows: "Lake Marion, nine miles from here, is a pretty resort and a pavilion has been built there by the hotel for dan- cing. On Sunday for some time. back dances have been held and a class of people for many miles around who at- tended Sunday affairs have attended. It has been said that these dances are rough and that some of the dancers of both sexes got drunk; that the rooms of the hotel are all engaged in advance, and that the cottages are broken into the the rooms occupied by the revelers. "On Sunday night, October 30, last a dance was in progress there and it is generally agreed that there were 190 dancers on the floor, when the devil came and was in their midst. (Continued on Page 8) Shannon.Swank. On Tuesday, December 27th, Miss Hazel Swank and Mr. Merlin Shan- non, both of Clinton, were united in marriage by Rev. G. L. Haggans at the M. E. Parsonage in this city, leaving on Wednesday for Belling- ham, where they will make their fu- ture home. Both Mr. and Mrs. Shannon have resided at Clinton for several years where they made many friends who wish them every happiness. Mr. and Mrs. B. C. Trevett. of St. Paul, are visiting for a few days at the home of Mrs. Trevett's sister, Mm. E. W. Newell. The Trevetts were former residents of this city. Mrs. Frank Van ram is in the lo- cal hospital for medical attention, CHRISTMAS DAY FIRE DESTROYS CODERRE SHOP Hoffman Family Driven to Street by Flames; Build- ing and Contents Nearly. Total Loss. Endangering the lives of the Hog- man family who lived upstairs, and g'iving the owners of adjoining frame buildings a bad scare, fire nearly des- troyed the building occupied by the Coderre Barber shop, Christmas more ninE, Mr. Coderre's equipment being damaged by heat and smoke to the extent of a total loss. The Hoffman girls were luckily awakened by the smell of smoke about 1:30 a. m., and discovered that the building was on fire. The alarm was promptly turned in, and after a stub- born fight, the fire was distinguished. On account of the arrangement and sit- uation of the building in the block, trouble was encountered in locating the heart of the fire. By cutting holes thru the south side of the structure, however, it was discovered to be in the basement and with the use of the chemical apparatus and floods of wa- ter from the hose lines, the upper part of the building and the walls were saved. The Hoffman girls took refuge with the Beard family in their apartments on the opposite side of the street, bad- ly frightened and chilled, but none the worse for their experience. Mr. Hog- man removed his household goods to the old Borglin residence. The building destroyed is owned by Carlson & Hasslen of this city, and both the building and Mr. Coderre's equipment were only partly covered by insurance. Poultry vs. Grain. When H. A. Van Hout of Big Stone City finished his marketing on Satur- day he possessed the sum of $42.90. There is nothing particularly striking or interesting about that-,-but when it was learned how the sum was ob- tained it puts a touch of life to it. Sixty bushels of barley that he mar- keted brought but $16.20 while thirty chickens netted him $26.70. Now isn't that a sufficient reason for the far- mers to raise a "squawk." Twelve turkeys recently sold b'y Ca. E. HQlmquist, north of town, brought $47.15. Time Extended In Gift Corn Drive To Jan. 4th Reports from elevators designated to receive shelled corn for the relief of starving Armenians in the Near- East, would indicate that not enough corn was received during Gift Corn Week to fill the quota allotted to Big Stone county, which was two carloads. In order that all may have ample opportunity of giving to this relief, those in charge have decided not to load the corn for shipment until Janu- ary 4, which is Wednesday of neXt week. All those, therefore, who over looked this matter, should take their gift in at once. Knute Jacobsen Passes Away on Saturday Knute Jacobsen, who has been en- gaged with his brother, J. A. Jacob- son in operating the Minnehah'a BiN liard Parlors here, died at Evangelical hospital on last Saturday morning, December 24, at 2:00 o'clock after an illness of only one week. Suddenly stricken with severe ob- struction of the bowels, he was re- moved to te hospital, where an oper- ation was pformed as a last resort in the hope of saving his life, but im spite of any help that could be given him, he could not recover, and death came to relieve his sufferings. Mr. Jacobsen who was a single man, was born November 30, 1876, at Granite Falls, was 45 years old and came from one of the best known faro- families in that section of the state, his father, John Jacobsen, haying set- tied on a farm in Renville county over 50 years ago. He came to Ortenlle in 1919 af- ter havin dislosed of his interests at Granite Falls, and has been success- fully engaged in business here with his brother. Relatives surviving him are a broth- er, J. A. Jacobsen, and a sister Mat- tie Jacobsen, both" of Ortonville, and two sisters, Laura Jacobsen of Gran- ite Falls, and Mrs. A. IC Agre of Gronvick, Minnesota. Funeral services were held Tuesda afternoon this week at 1:30 o'clock, at the United Lutheran church, Granite Falls, and interment made at that place. More DeLaval's for Dairymer Alvah Matthews reports the arrivaI of another shipment of five DeLaval Crean Separators. It is apparent thaf the farmers are waking up to the fac that a good dairyman is seldom hard up for cash and are milking more COWS THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT ORTONVlLLE. MINN THURSDAY, DECEMBER 2 1921 NUMB]Rdt SERVICE TO BE GIVEN AT CLINTON Stone Choh" Direction of Rev. bl. Nee Is Fine Organi- r Critics. St. Paui Big Stone Choir of ill give a serdce at Church at )aa egh : P. m. to which all are in- the of Rev, igh rank "Sawing a Woman in NOTED EVANGELIST TO HOLD Half" at Orpheum Friday night's pheum theatre real treat when the "Sawhlg of a Woman in Half" Will be psanted, This act, it is said, lain to please and will closest attention, Leading magazines of the country have devoted spe in the writing np f thi, act and Manager Gowan es eclall recommends it as being out of the o[dinary and one that will well worth sing. Other numbers on the bill include, he featuring of a musical and mind- reading dog, by Foster SERIES OF MEETINGS experts; and pntation Program as Sil vertone" by Gene a fallows: The program Friday night of Gud, al Jorden peried of a few wks, eording to Mr Gowan. Re booking is expired to be made later FIdeles (Chol) ....... Ann ( Chomll Hassler New Year's Dance to Be Given by American Legion (Inteission) Bill Dougherty's Jazz Hounds, will msie for lovers of dance, at a big New Year's BaH to be given by from Ameffe Legion on the evening of January 2. The enter- have bn busy ann1 a Blessed Child the past week making elaborate pp a and ass a Lad er Ith  a a Jg will be provided for all, This event Odd Fellows Hall n Ortonville, and price of has been set at $I.25 per couple. IAR ?( ON d a, iRoh. =dH*oo EXPRESS TAKEN this city, ev Mrs. Fneh moved to In the spring f this ent, llehtg Hi m One Betty." eek's 1 ependent can t6 to the e feet that Johr 131g StOne township, had the e Canning company beat on in that hem May 20, averaging 294 in to say timt Would have to raise better I SWisher Says "Hello." is ia receipt of a ,w Ibdng at 2216 13th order for another letter Mr. a enid ellmate as they a Meet January T Confen ears a OLnty is entitled to five deIe- 1+ catty amiitor of the oapnty board of eact emio detegat, the ath. ,ty i haw- i ' attend AxxdRor A. he ,y G. Blake- University of Minnesota, of the county board OFF BY Amounting to $17,500,, 000, in 1920, Eliminated by 1921 Revenue Act. The publle will sa app:timately Sift00,000 a month s a result of the elimition of war tax on expose ship.dents, according to George C. Tayl, president of the AmeHn Railway Expos epany. An nouncent to this effect .as n today by R+ F* Wal'gr+ the local The "Re.hue n ery twenty c#nt and fractio thereof in transportation charges on all expose shipts. This tax during the year $17,fi02,918. The trsportaton charge for eh ps shipment was approxi- mately $1,50 d the avenge w tax for ch shipment w eight The elimination of the tax, fore, Mr .Taylor states, will virtually in rates of a Mr. Taylor this ahould dene by aelerate the pldty improving eondRionm thmughout the enre eount/. "The Amerle Railway Expos comply handles appximately one mitllm shlpmenL a day or nearly fo ] and  million hJnents a year/' Mr. Taylor gs  to y. "The elimition of the t Uev the American Railway Expose toting, entering on way bills wd eol- leion of tax, not to menUo the - pease of checking d ountlng en- "Th e treasury have claims pending, for oveharges, or who file such cLaims after December RI, 1921, that for refund +of tax should be filed perately on tasury depart- ment fo No. 46, with the of internal revenue suggests ' the hoard be selted f be ry buslne and property and business restored to noalcy. d other pminent epeak- con ferenee. , Id Irs. F. W, Dunn will h Menday on their they will the REyFAEND E. V. DAY The Methodist EpiscopaI ehah oflhlg man in his calling, but he is an this city anneunce that the services af all around fine fellow, well liked by Reverend E. W. Day have bn p- all who have known hm. While in eel- cured to hold spial two weeks' set- legs he was a craek athlete haunt Mr. Day eom highly eommended of full-back on the 'All Rocky Moun- vice he to begin next Sunday even+ played on the Denver University foot. inS ball team where he won the position as aa evangelist, with a wonderful od bk of him as a eonductur o A grad. Iowa Wesleyan Cnlleg. "Rev, Day ome with great mes- lyon College, and a post graduate of sages in seon andS.song, and you 8oson University, whe he g/ned an nnot afford to adss tbe tq up- extensive thlugil edition, d lifting sez/ ne is a gat sing with eleven years of ti work Jn th 2 years experien  baritone the mlnls, Mr Day h a broad soloist for the Boston Apollo Club field of experience fro which to and has dens great work as a It r choose ls themes ad impart.gd d singer upon chautauqua ad ly- things to his hearem Speaking of Mr. Day, Ray, G.  The is will Ha+g'ans of the ioeal Methodist ehvrd evening, vth s#rited singing hy a says: "Not nnIy le this evangelist big ehos choir." Beardsley and Clinton I Charles Lest Found Ill Win Declama__tion Honorl I in Hut; Die__s Christmas e auhis ri D atrv Con- Charles Leer, one of the Big Stone test was held in the CItnton" Ope County's pioneer settlers, died at House last wedneslay night. E ,gelil hogiLl hel Sunday mot- While the e0nteat was not Im  u:g at 1:30 oelock  m. Mr. Leer, as the Ial one held at Ctinn a sn t who has for yea been a filiar t me ago the we  y e.d ebaracter aund the lake in his , n g . , speakers anti the udges dided capably as a fishean, hss been suf- follows: feting for several yea Boys' Divsioneorge Smith n, and a shnr ti ago Beardsley, let; Alfred Hjart of B stroke of paralysis, but w appent- ]!agham, cl; Howard Weber, 3rd. ly lecoring. Satulay moing, Girls* Divleioa--Ia Johnn o Gust Yog, who li in the gerrls Clinton, ls; VIvl Vaughan of Cot- hoe. near where Mr. Lt had a 11, 2nd i Eii Blocker, Bellingham shack, and who had been Iooldng af- r ter him, noticed that the 8The winners will take part in the ;, d Contest which will being in Janry. The judge on the door, ipon a neighbor, L ; nyder, I Mr. Carson. S. D., Mrs. C. C. Ol  Ihey found the old Bkoven of this city. ; iou& Upon porting their discov- i ery to local authorities, the Biddinger Hank ,n was mod to the heap ta on a . " strcher but on uat of his age The marnage of Miss Gla6y Hal. ., . ,. , leek. daughter of Mr. d M. Wal and seriousness of his nd]tl, medi- c I t  was ef no a I an he ter Hallk of Pleant Valley, to , oasis an , vm tried Ch*tras me g Mr. WiHi Joseph Biddinger ef rain. The ded man came to Big Glendive, Montana, ued on at- that time. The groom Is a proepe homesteaded urda December 24 at Gle "ve Stone county when he was 21 years le and vieinit + homesteaded the pieef land'kno v y She gredted as the Pat Clark f& et of to in fm the local high heo] in 1919 and 184 and  68 e Id ' h n I hi g in Montana sin , w y n While a young m, n young cher living negr Gten- he w rrled, but his wife died dive: The smpte marriage mor hortly after their marrlag, and suivlng him. perfoed in the pr asen of only tm- mediate ]atives, after which the hap- wo brothe, one of whom py young tlple left for Fargo, N. it is not liably M D., to visit with g. It is dinger, They arrived at Pe trmt no word t Thursday night from Fargo to spend fm his for over 80 year. Burial servers were held by Ray, parents, after Haggane, which the hom Mrs. p. m. Interment was her great happiness. Cetery. if received after Earl Slanton Goes Into Busin Mrs. M. P. Willies of Monte,ride( Earl Jtanten of Clinton 1as is sting her sister Mis Ida Pme. Mr. here for a few days. at that ple from 1, 1922, Mr. Stanton ie well Mr. and Mr M M. paid" on or before Dmher 31, 1921 central will be enlisted. On shipment fo ty, and espee a y around C nton Mr party Mnnday eveing. Delirious Markel has med his family to Mil- frehments we served. hk after January 1, 1921, be assessed. M. IL Mntfnrd and daughter These provisions 2sn apply ta Nick Fk motored to Appleton Miss Marie Mountford will leave for Wednesday. Chicago and Mitwauk in the mo+ ins for ral day's stay of the tx nf eight per bits. J. R. Cain is vislttng at the hnme cent on tlekte and slping ear of her motier at Alexandria for berths vll make a substantial - days Mss Garnet Johnson, daughter ot Mrs. K&therine Spanyers reeelved . M. Johnson, gave a dinne this day will at which twea- hm as being p Masonic Indge they dinner was seed The young plcne held Medical Men in Meet on CHRISTMAS IAV Big Stone Lake in July uo., uax e Weseu=--al+n ..... +d+l FIRE DESTROYS m[ Society held a meeting in the Com- ............................ ] CODERRE SHOP Wednesday aften, and die.rased] ems e inen o ei  as. r i+ I om eltt t fot r sg Hoffman Family Driven to yea r a, Dr. C. R. Chi.istenson ' Chair. Street by Flames; Build- man, Dr- - T- Fitzgerald, vi-ehair-I ing and Contents NeariZ man, and Dr. Amo Leery, eretarY,I Total Loss. of Morris. Dr. C. F, Ewing of I eiegate to of Morris, M. Ramson, Donaelly, Dr. Opheim of Starbuck, It was deeide that the next meet ins of the siety be hold on Big Stone Lake. ,but making effor to have the mting pla Parktown Minstrels at Pleasant Valley Church The Young People's Society Valley Methodist wi[I give a minstl show at their; church on Friday evening of this wk 3O. The parktown Min for the flt 4 minutes, their p music d speaking speclates, inehid ins a iddish monologue, Saxapont leetisn by a mal quartet and song solos. The Park to Minstl ds an und t d to b in a class by :hems Ires ter it eo to kilm mirth, and the gingln$ alone it is said, ey sked for the admission, which i set at only 15 and 25 cents DANCERS ROUTED BY DEVIL AT LAKE Devil Appears at Alleged Rough Dance; Letter Give Light on Subject. Like the famous Montevideo Mule, tha subjt of the ',Del at the Dance/' is being mmented upon el late by many newspapers tl  state It ms that at a dan e at Marion, ne nutehinn, late fall, a regulation, dyed in the devil, made his ly coming ins or up thm the floor, the storie cnnflictin 8 of mind experlend at the igha At fm news ite and stole hoard on the subjt, devil must have appeared,  evi- denced by & totter published in th Battle L k Review, signed by A. L Rlcharda n of utchlnson, Minn. In. tereste, and skeptieaI, Mrs, C. L Bartlett, of Bertha, esota, wU to Mr. PAchard and foIIowlng ply: "Hhinson, Minn,, Nov. 16, "aertha, Minn to ing]y tell all I know about it, Of ue much that we hear about it is not dependable at all. What is fact is about as follows: "Lak e Marion , nine miles f here, is a pretty resor and a pavilion has t eing. On Sd! m of people for y tended Sday ugh and that some of the sexes got drmk; advt., and that the cottages a bken into the the ros cupied by tl mlers. "On Sunday night, October 30, ]t is generally a4greed leo dancers en the floor, when the devil came and w in their midst. (Continued an Page 8) Shann.Swlak. On Toe.day, December 27th, Miss [tal SWarLk and Mr. Merlin Shan ann, both of Clinton, we ltad in marz4age b Ray. G. L Haggans at he M. E. Parsonage in thi city, leaving on Wednesday for Belling- ham, whe tu home. Both Mr. and M. Shannon have at Clinton for seve] ?ear whe they made many wish them every happiness. Mr. and Mrs. B C. Tvett, of St Panl, a visiting for n few days a ', M E. W. NewelL The Tevetts foer residents i M. Fk Van ram is in the lo- Endangering the lives of the Hoff- n family who lived upstairs and giving the owners of adjoining frame buildings a had sea, fi nearly d troyed the building upied by the Codar Barber shop, Chrstm m nJng, Mr. Clee's eqtdpment being damuged by heat and smoke tn the The Hoffman #rls were luelz awakened by the smell of moke abot 1:30 a. m., d discnved that th building was on fi. The al wu promptly tued in, and after a stub- horn fight, the fi was dlstingahed. n aount of the argement and sit. in the bleak. was enuntered i loeang he heart of the fi. By cutting hote thru the south side of the stetme, owever, It was diovered to be in the and vth the e of the chemical appamt and floods of wa- , the upper buitding and the wall* m aved. "le Hoffman girls took fuge with y in their apartments n the opposite side of the atieet bad- ly frightened a.d chilled, but none the ,r their experience Mr. Hnff- oved his hoeh goods to aorgiin resident. The building destyed is oed by Hslen of this city, and beth the bilding and Mr. Coder'a equipment  only partly vered by Poultry vs. Grai.. When R. A. Van Hout of Big Stone City finished hta mketing on Satu day he poleaxed the s of $42.9. Lg partleully stking or itesting about that--but when sm was el it puts a toh of life o it. Sixty bushels of barley that he m keted bught but $16.20 while thirty $26.7O. New i Twelve turkeys eently sold by G. E 14mquist, north of to, bught $47.1fi. Time Extended In Gift Corn Drive To Jan. 4th Reports from elevato deMgemtl of etaring Aenis ia the N Et, uld indicts that ant ough ived dunng Gift Corn g Stone county, which was two clds. In order that all may have pI opportunity of giving to this ]ief. it hose in charge ha decided not to ry 4, which is Wednesday 6{' k. All ttoe, therefore, who o , should take their glft ta at one, Away on Saturday Ennt Jolmor who has been aged with his brother, J K. Saeob- n in operating the hmehaha Bil- liard Par[o he, died at Engelieal hpltal on last Satllrday morning, Dr 24, at 2:OO o'clock  tllns of only o k. Su0denly stridgen with aere ob- o the b#wels+ e w re- move<'t to t9 hostat, where  oper+ ttnn w porme  a last rt in the hope of saving kis lif, hut ht spite af y help that could be gin Ifim, he eoukl not recover. Bad dth Mr, Jbson who was a Jmge ,187, at OravRe ldls+ wa 4 ytra aid d that sofinn of the state, his father, John Jacobsen, Iviug set- 60 y ago. He came to Ortenv..lle in 1919 af- ter having dished of his Integers at Grardte Falls, and lu ben .s fully engaged in busine here wtt his hther. Reatv suturing him ere a broth- er, J. A Jacobin, and a sister Mat tht Jacobsen, both of Ortville, and two .deters, Iura Jacobean of G- its Falls, and M. A. K. Agre of Gn.Aek, Minnesot Funel servi we hd Tasdar the United Lutheran shush, Granite Falls, (1 interment made at that pta. Mare DeLavai' s for DtitTmm Alvan Matthews 1. the atrial: of anothe ship--at of five De|val for h ad THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT r- ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29, 1921 NUMBER 34 SERVICE TO BE GIVEN AT CLINTON Pauli--Big Stone Choir Direction of Rev. Moe Is Fine Organi- Say Critics. St. Pauli-Big Stone Choir of will give a song service at Stone Lutheran Church at on New Year's Day at eight P.' m., to which all are in- the able direction of Rev. the choir has developed in- organization of high rank. The are Clara Martinson and e Steen. Program as announced B as follows: Gud, al Jorden ........ Rhode stille Nat .............. Forseth ght of Bethleham ................ Abt Fideles (Choral} .............. Anon dine Veie (Choral)....Hassler mine Oine ...... Wennerberg is He ............................ Gounod Rost .................................. Dahle from " Messiah" ......Handel ( Intem.ission ) ...................................... Gounod aros Fodt .................... Flugel Glory of the Lord from ................................ Handel is Born a Blessed Child ...................................... Anon Lacier Herren Raade .............................. Neumark lov Herren .......... Wennerberg Day is Over .................. Borg are Telling ........ Hayden are Telling .......... Haydn Wedding Anniversary. 27th, of this year, marked (Ruby) wedding an- of Mr. and Mrs. Hayden this city, who were married 27th, 1876 at Plainview, and Mrs. French moved to Or- in the spring of 1878. special celebration was held in of this event, the big time be- for their Golden Wedding be enjoyed in the short of five years from this time. Him One Better. Independent cam'led a to the effect that John Lar- Stone township, tlad the Canning company beat on hogs, in that he marketed May 20, averaging 294 ' Robert Dew, oll the canning farm, drdpped in to say that Would have to raise bet{or he had just butchered two with an aggregate weight of Zwiener Says "Hello." is in receipt of a week from H. L. Zwiener, now living at 2216 13th St., California, enclosing Order for another year's sub- In the letter Mr. Zwiener they have no desire to re. a cold climate as they are so with the Golden State. Tax Conference Meet January 18-19 annual-'-meeting 0f the I Tax Conference will be I olis on January 18 and 1 Conference was organ- I and neets annual-I of discussing state I oUnty is entitled to five dele- The county auditor and the of the copnty board of each exofficio delegates, the orb- named by the county interested citizen, how- atten.d the conference and in its discussions. Auditor A. V. Randall is in of a letter from Roy G. Blake- he University of Minnesota, of the conference, asking Selection of delegates be brot attention of the county board meeting. In order that interests of the state fully represented at the con- the president suggests that more of the delegates to be theboard be selected from community of the county. gram this year will be very to a consideration of tax burdens now being business and property and for some measure business conditions restored to normalcy. Gover- and other prominent speak- address the conference. Mrs. F. W. Dun will reach Monday on their return wedding trip to California. leased the Phillip Miller they will occupy until s return from the coast in "Sawing a Woman in Half" at Orpheum Friday night's program at the Or- pheum theatre hre promises to be a real treat when the "Sawing of a Woman in Half" will be presented. This act, it is said, is one that is cer- tain to please and will call for the closest attention. Leading magazines of the country have devoted space in the writing up of this, act and Manager Gowan es- pecially recommends it as being out of the ordinary and one that will be well worth seeing. Other numbers on the bill include, the featuring of a musical and mind- reading dog, by Foster and PeggT; entertainaent by the Carmen Sisters, Banjo experts; and presentation of "The Si!vertone" by Gene Metcalf. The program Friday night will mark the closing of vaudeville per- formances here for a period of a few weeks, according to Mr. Gowan. Re- booking is expected to be made later in the season. New Year's Dance to Be Given by American Legio Bill Dougherty's Jazz Hounds, will furnish music for lovers of dance, at a big New Year's Ball to be given by the Ortonville American Legion on the evening of January 2. The enter- tainment committee have been busy the past week making elaborate prep- arations for the event and assure ev- eryone who comes a real big time. Favors in harmony with the season will be provided for all. This event will be held in the Odd. Fellows Hall in Ortonville, and price of admission has been set at $1.25 per couple. :00TAX ON EXPRESS TAKEN OFF BY GOV'T Tax Amounting to $17,500,- 000, in 1920, Eliminated by 1921 Revenue Act. The public will save approximately $1,500,000 a month as a result of the elimination of war tax on express shipments, according to George C. Taylor, president of the American Railway Express company. An an- nouncement to this effect was made today by R. F. Walker, the local ex- press agent. The "Revenue Act of 1921" elimin- ates the war tax of one cent on every twenty cents and fractions thereof in transportation charges on all express shipments. This tax during the year of 1920 amounted to $17,502,918. The average transportation charge for each express shipment was approxi- mately $1,50 and the average war tax for each shipment was eight cents. The elimination of the tax, there- fore, Mr .Taylor states, will virtually amount to a decrease in rates of a little over five per cent. Mr. Taylor believes that this should have a ten- dency to stimulate business and there- by accelerate the rapidly improving conditions throughout the entire country. "The American Railway Express company handles approximately one million shipments a day or nearly four hundred million shiiments a year," Mr. Taylor goes on to say. "The elimination of the tax will re- lieve the American Railway Express company of an immense amount of la- bor which has been involved in calcu- lating, entering on way bills and col- lection of tax, not to mentiop the ex- pense of checking and accounting en- tailed. "The treasury department has re- quested express carriers to advise all claimants who have claims pending, for overcharges, or who file such claims after December 31, 1921, that claims for refund 'of tax should be filed seperately on treasury depart- ment form No. 46, with the commis. sioner of internal revenue within four years from the time the tax was paid, claim being barred by statute of limitations if received after such time." Mr. Walker pointed out that as the revenue act becomes effective January 1, 1922, the tax on all shipments "pre- paid" on or before Deember 31, 1921, will be collected. On shipments for- warded "collect" and arriving on or after January 1, 1921, the tax will not be assessed. These provisions also apply to all freight shipments, and the war tax of three per cent will be eliminated. The elimination of the tax of eight per cent on tickets and sleeping car berths will make a substantial re- duction. Mrs. Katherine Spanyers received a letter from her son George from the Philippines stating he was employed on a merchant marine and that they were there for a few NOTED EVANGELIST TO HOLD SERIES OF MEETINGS HERE REVEREND E. V. DAY The Methodist Episcopal church of this city announce that the services of Reverend E. W. Day have been pro- cured to hold special two weeks' ser- vice here to begin next Sunday even- ing. Mr. Day comes highly recommended as an evangelist, with a wondelfful record back of him as a conductor of Union Tabernacle meetings. A grad- uate of Denver University, Iowa Wes- lyan College, and a post graduate of Boston University, where he gained an extensive theological education, and with eleven years of active work in the ministry, Mr. Day has a broad field of experience from, which to choose his themes ahd impart,good. things to his hearers. Speaking of Mr. Day, Rev. G. I Haggans of the local Methodist church says: "Not only is this evangelist a big man in his calling, but he is an all around fine fellow, well liked by all who have known him. While in col- liege he was a crack athlete, having played on the Denver University foot- ball team where he won the position of full-back on the 'All Rocky Moun- tain Eleven.' He also has coached athletics in three high schools and the Iowa Wesleyan College. "Rev. Day come with great mes- sages in sermon anyonE, and you cannot afford to miss these soul up- lifting services. He is a great singer with 2 years experience as baritone soloist for the Boston Apollo Club and has done great work as a lecturer and singer upon chautauqua and ly- ceum platfolms." These services will be held each evening, with spirited singing by a big chorus choir." Beardsley and Clinton Win Declamation Honor The sub-district Declamatory Con- test was held in the Clinton Opera House last Wednesday night. While the contest was not as elosa as the local one held at Clinton a s,. time ':ago. tthere were many good speakers and the judges decided as follows: Boys' DivisionGeorge Smith of Beardsley, lst; Alfred Hjartas of Bel- lingham, 2rid; Howard Wegfler, 3rd. Girls' Division--Irma Johnson of Clinton, lst; Vivian Vaughan of Cor- roll, 2nd; Elian Blocker, Bellingham, 3rd. The winners will take part in the District Contest which will be held some time in January. The judges were Miss T. Snyder, Big Stone City, S. D., Mrs. C. C. Olson and Rev. P. Bockoven of this city. Biddinger-Hallock. The marriage of Miss Gladys Hal- lock, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wal- ter Halleck of Pleasant Valley, to Mr. William Joseph Biddingr of Glendive, Montana, occurred on Sat- urday, December 24, at Glendive. The bride is well known in Orton- viJ!e and vicinity. She graduated from the local high school in 1919 and has been teaching in Montana since that time. The groom is a prosper- ous young rancher living near Glen- dive. The smple marriage ceremony was performed in the presence of only im- mediate relatives, after which the hap- py young couple left for Fargo, N. D., to visit with relatives of Mr. Bid- dinger. They arrived at Ortonville Thursday night from Fargo to spend a week with the bride's parents, after which they will return to Montana to make their home. Mrs. Biddinger has a host of friends here who wish her great happiness. Earl Stanton Goes Into Business Earl Stanton of Clinton has pur- chased the Clinto nProduce Company's business at that place from William Markel. Mr. Stanton is well known thruout the central part of the coun- ty, and especially around Clinton. Mr. Markel has moved his family to Mil- bank. Nick Fink motored to Appleton Wednesday. Mrs. J. R. Cain is visiting at the home of her motller at Alexandria for a few days. Miss Garnet Johnson, daughter of Mrs. M. M. Johnson, gave a dinner dance Tuesday evening at which twen- ty guests were invited. A three course dinner was served. The young folks had a most enjoyable evening. Charles Leet Found Ill in Hut; Dies Charles Leet, one of the Big Stem County's pioneer settlers, died at Evangelical hospital here Sunday mor- :.ing a*. 1:30 o'clock a. m. Mr. Leer, who has for yeal been a familiar character around the lake, in his capacity as a fisherman, has been suf- fering for several years from blind- hess, and a short time ago had a stroke of paralysis, but was apparent- ly recovering. Saturday morning, Gust Young, who lives in the Ferris house, near where Mr. Leet had a shack, and who had been looking af- ter him, noticed that there was no smoke coming from his hut, and not being able to arouse him by pounding on the dogr, called upon a neighbor, Mr. Carlson. Breaking down the door they found the old gentleman uncon- scious. Upon reporting their discov- ery to local authorities, the stricken man was removed to the hospital on a stretcher, but on account of his age, and seriousness of his condition, medi- cal assistance was of no avail and he died Christmas morning. The deceased man came to Big Stone county when he was 21 years old, with his father, g. T. Leet, who homesteaded the piece of land'known as the Pat Clark farm east of town, in 1874, and was 68 years old. He also homesteaded a piece of land near his father's farm. While a young man, he was married, but his wife died sbortly after their marriage, and there are no children surviving him. He had two brothers, one of whom died and it is not reliably known as to whether the other is living. It is re- ported that no word has been received from his for over 30 years. Burial services )vere held by Rev. Haggans, in the Johnson Undertaking Parlors here Tuesday at 3:00 o'clock p. m. Interment was made in Mound Cemetery. Mrs. M. P. Williams of Montevideo is visiting her sister Miss Ida Pome- roy here for a few days. Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Schoen enter- tained a number of friends at a bridge party Monday evening. Delicious re- freshmehts were served. Mrs. R. Mountford and daughter Miss Marie Mountford will leave for Chicago and Milwaukee in the morn- ing for several day's stay. Word has been received here of the death of R. E. Denfeld of Duluth. Mr. Denfeld was superintendent of the city schools of that place for over 31 years Masons of this city will remembel him as being past grand naster of he Masonic lodge in Minnesota. Mr. Den- feld spoke at the Masonic picnic held at Foster last summer. Medical Men to Meet on Big Stone Lake in July The West Central Minnesota Medi- cal Society held a meeting in the Com- mercial Club rooms' at Morris last Wednesday afternoon, and discussed problems pertinent to their profes- sion. Officers elected for the ensuing year are, Dr. C. R. Christenson, Chair- man, Dr. E. T. Fitzgerald, vice-chair- man, and Dr. Amos Leuty, secretary, all of Morris. Dr. C. F. Ewing of Wheaten was elected delegate to the State convention and Drs. C. E. Caine of Morris, M. Ramson, Donnelly, Dr. Linde and Dr. Opheim of Starbuck, censors. It was decided that the next meet- ing of the society be hold somewhere on Big Stone Lake. The Ortonville doctors were unable to attend, but axe making efforts to have Ortonville chosen as the meeting place. Parktown Minstrels at Pleasant Valley Church The Young People's Society of the Pleasant Valley Methodist Church will give a minstrel show at their church on Friday evening of this week December 30. The Parktown Min- strels will entertain for the first 45 minutes, their performance to be im- mediately followed by a half hour of music ad speaking specialties, includ- ing a Yiddish monologue, Saxaphone and clairnet duet, selection by a male quartet and song solos. The Park- town Minstrels are understood to be in a class by themselves when it corrms to rrraking mirth, and the Mnging alone it is said, is well worth the mon- ey asked for the admission, which is set at only 15 and 25 cents. DANCERS ROUTED BY DEVIL AT LAKE MARION Devil Appears at Alleged Rough Dance; L e t t e r Gives Light on Subject. Like the famous Montevideo Mule, the subject of the "Devil at the Dance," is being commented upon of late by many newspapers thruout the state. It seems that at a dance at Lake Marion, near Hutchinson, late this fall, a regulation, dyed in the woot devil, made his appearance, apparen- ly coming either down from the ceil- mg or up thru the floor, the stories conflicting no doubt on account of the troubled state of mind most of the dances experienced at the sight. At any rate, from news items and stories heard on the subject, some kind of a devil must have appeared, as evi- denced by a letter published in the Battle Lake Review, signed by A, L. Richardson of Hutchinson, Minn. In- terested, and skeptical, Mrs. C. L. Bartlett, of Bertha, Minnesota, wrote to Mr. Richardson and received the following reply: "Huchinson, Minn., Nov. 16, 1921. "Mrs. C. L. Bartlett, "Bertha, Minn ....... "Dear Madam: "Your inquiry about the Hutchin- son 'devil' came to hand and I will- ingly tell all I-know about it. Of course much that we hear about it is not dependable at all. What is fact is about as follows: "Lake Marion, nine miles from here, is a pretty resort and a pavilion has been built there by the hotel for dan- cing. On Sunday for some time. back dances have been held and a class of people for many miles around who at- tended Sunday affairs have attended. It has been said that these dances are rough and that some of the dancers of both sexes got drunk; that the rooms of the hotel are all engaged in advance, and that the cottages are broken into the the rooms occupied by the revelers. "On Sunday night, October 30, last a dance was in progress there and it is generally agreed that there were 190 dancers on the floor, when the devil came and was in their midst. (Continued on Page 8) Shannon.Swank. On Tuesday, December 27th, Miss Hazel Swank and Mr. Merlin Shan- non, both of Clinton, were united in marriage by Rev. G. L. Haggans at the M. E. Parsonage in this city, leaving on Wednesday for Belling- ham, where they will make their fu- ture home. Both Mr. and Mrs. Shannon have resided at Clinton for several years where they made many friends who wish them every happiness. Mr. and Mrs. B. C. Trevett. of St. Paul, are visiting for a few days at the home of Mrs. Trevett's sister, Mm. E. W. Newell. The Trevetts were former residents of this city. Mrs. Frank Van ram is in the lo- cal hospital for medical attention, CHRISTMAS DAY FIRE DESTROYS CODERRE SHOP Hoffman Family Driven to Street by Flames; Build- ing and Contents Nearly. Total Loss. Endangering the lives of the Hog- man family who lived upstairs, and g'iving the owners of adjoining frame buildings a bad scare, fire nearly des- troyed the building occupied by the Coderre Barber shop, Christmas more ninE, Mr. Coderre's equipment being damaged by heat and smoke to the extent of a total loss. The Hoffman girls were luckily awakened by the smell of smoke about 1:30 a. m., and discovered that the building was on fire. The alarm was promptly turned in, and after a stub- born fight, the fire was distinguished. On account of the arrangement and sit- uation of the building in the block, trouble was encountered in locating the heart of the fire. By cutting holes thru the south side of the structure, however, it was discovered to be in the basement and with the use of the chemical apparatus and floods of wa- ter from the hose lines, the upper part of the building and the walls were saved. The Hoffman girls took refuge with the Beard family in their apartments on the opposite side of the street, bad- ly frightened and chilled, but none the worse for their experience. Mr. Hog- man removed his household goods to the old Borglin residence. The building destroyed is owned by Carlson & Hasslen of this city, and both the building and Mr. Coderre's equipment were only partly covered by insurance. Poultry vs. Grain. When H. A. Van Hout of Big Stone City finished his marketing on Satur- day he possessed the sum of $42.90. There is nothing particularly striking or interesting about that-,-but when it was learned how the sum was ob- tained it puts a touch of life to it. Sixty bushels of barley that he mar- keted brought but $16.20 while thirty chickens netted him $26.70. Now isn't that a sufficient reason for the far- mers to raise a "squawk." Twelve turkeys recently sold b'y Ca. E. HQlmquist, north of town, brought $47.15. Time Extended In Gift Corn Drive To Jan. 4th Reports from elevators designated to receive shelled corn for the relief of starving Armenians in the Near- East, would indicate that not enough corn was received during Gift Corn Week to fill the quota allotted to Big Stone county, which was two carloads. In order that all may have ample opportunity of giving to this relief, those in charge have decided not to load the corn for shipment until Janu- ary 4, which is Wednesday of neXt week. All those, therefore, who over looked this matter, should take their gift in at once. Knute Jacobsen Passes Away on Saturday Knute Jacobsen, who has been en- gaged with his brother, J. A. Jacob- son in operating the Minnehah'a BiN liard Parlors here, died at Evangelical hospital on last Saturday morning, December 24, at 2:00 o'clock after an illness of only one week. Suddenly stricken with severe ob- struction of the bowels, he was re- moved to te hospital, where an oper- ation was pformed as a last resort in the hope of saving his life, but im spite of any help that could be given him, he could not recover, and death came to relieve his sufferings. Mr. Jacobsen who was a single man, was born November 30, 1876, at Granite Falls, was 45 years old and came from one of the best known faro- families in that section of the state, his father, John Jacobsen, haying set- tied on a farm in Renville county over 50 years ago. He came to Ortenlle in 1919 af- ter havin dislosed of his interests at Granite Falls, and has been success- fully engaged in business here with his brother. Relatives surviving him are a broth- er, J. A. Jacobsen, and a sister Mat- tie Jacobsen, both" of Ortonville, and two sisters, Laura Jacobsen of Gran- ite Falls, and Mrs. A. IC Agre of Gronvick, Minnesota. Funeral services were held Tuesda afternoon this week at 1:30 o'clock, at the United Lutheran church, Granite Falls, and interment made at that place. More DeLaval's for Dairymer Alvah Matthews reports the arrivaI of another shipment of five DeLaval Crean Separators. It is apparent thaf the farmers are waking up to the fac that a good dairyman is seldom hard up for cash and are milking more COWS