Newspaper Archive of
The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
Lyft
December 29, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
PAGE 7     (7 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 7     (7 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
December 29, 1921
 

Newspaper Archive of The Ortonville Independent produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




DECEMBER 29. 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE T 00tHgs And Sheep F A RM E R PA G E Higher For Week x ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF THE , FARMERS AND FARMERS&apos; ORGANIZATIONS. GROWERS CONTRACTS U. S. Grain Growers Deals of National Drive. time, Minnesota has set by she farmers' marketing corporation work, it was an- Week. farms aggregating are in a single by E. R. Voss, county, t o L the U. S. Grain Growers record also was set county when the grain ilney farms, including 12 ,200 acres, was pledged thru the national selling membership in the U. S. has passed the 500 announced this week. elevators are now the national corpora'- were signed last week at Lancaster. Bronson Kittson county and at county. The total of the national agency mark, and 819 have contracted grain thru it. this week that far- members before will have the right m naming directors for in determining future company. These direc- at the first nation- to be held at Chicago 1922. IN WORK ANNOUNCED and district awards girls' extension work in home economics were week from the office University Farm, club work in Minneso- of Winona is the state club member. In I Raised My Poul- "I am very much year's result. My shows a total and a total cost of a net profit for the of the single class is Verne old boy of Faribault, I-Ie raised 107 bushels which were good for total value of his c6rn his total costs $25.25 Profit of $118.19. The of the five acre corn Aughenbaugh, aged Waseca county, average yield of 85 acre. He places the acre at $35 and his ton at $27.62, leaving 8an acre. garden club of the club of Cyrus, Pope stimated value of its and its estimat- Representatives to the Minnesota Crop .Kron and Lloyd Second chum- the state were awarded Garden club with and Violet Kauf.man to the state crop Winners by districts all the free trip to the Were: Northern--Tony North Central-- of Glyndon. South- Weeks of Winona. Keller of best clubs in the and their represen- big state crop show club of Harold Olson. North club, John EricksorL Prairie club. South Central-- club, Alleen McDon- champion gardene winners will be an. BOOK ,E AT U FARM desire forms for tak- a statement for the expenses, should Extension Divis- book, which may be Book Store, St. Paul, at 25e a to William L. Cavert, demonstrator with extension division. In Says, it may be obtain- from bankers who atrons as an adver- Bureau units or other desire 50 copies or supply direct from rates and with front cover. a fian will drop into a What's on, and then his time observing BREEDING DUCKS SHOULD BE THE PICK OF THE FLOCK Ducks are usually mated in flocks of about 30 females with 5 or 6 males, as the drakes do not fight one another. The number of males may be reduced to 1 for every 7 females about the first of March, and again changed a month later to 1 male for 8 to 10 fe- males. Active, healthy females of nedium size should be used for breeding; that is, weighing about 8 pounds when ma- ture. Only mature birds should be used as breeders. Select ducks with short necks, medium long bodies, flat backs, and of good depth to the keel bones. Watery eyes usually are a sign of weakness in ducks. The drake is coarser and more masculine in appearance than the duck, and has a distinct curl in his tail feathers. Ducks should be sohl, usually, after they are 2 years old, although the best breeders or layers may be kept over their third year, say poultry special- ists in the U. S. Department of Ag- riculture. / In handling ducks picked them up by their necks, as their legs are very easily broken. Ducks lay their eggs early in the morning, and should be confined to the house or pen until 9:30 or 10 o'clock in the morning. If al- lowed to roam early in the morning they may lay in a pond or stream and the eggs may be lost. HENS NEED PROTEIN FROM ANIMAL SOURCES Thoes who have'not learned by ex- 3erience are apt to conclude, using the :'pigs is pigs" reasoning, that protein is protein whether it grows inside a hide or upon a plant. But not all pro- teins are alike and they do not pro- duce like results when taken into the hen's body. In a general way, animal proteins and vegetable proteins are alike in that both are nitrogenous, but when the hen begins to make therein" - to eggs she finds there are important differences than can not be overcome. But she must have animal proteins in some amount, no matter how nuch of lhe other kind is available. High- vegetable-protein feeds can replace some of the meat feed to advantage, but not more than one-fourth to one- half of it. Tests made by the United States Depaiment of Agriculture show that of the high vegetable-protein feeds cottonseed meal is the best for egg production. Peanutmeal comes next, followed by soy-bean meal and velvet- bean meal. In making up a mash not more than one-tenth of it should be cottonseed meal, as the use of more cuts down the egg yield materially and may affect the quality of the eggs, producing spots and blotches on the yolks which make them look bad. Other vegetable-protein feeds that may be .used to advantage are gluten and linseed meal. GOOD KITCHEN LIGHT MAKES WORK GO BETTER Are sink, stove, worktable, and other important parts of your kitchen well lighted ? Every kitchen needs good artificial lighting as well as plenty of daylight and sun during some part of the day. Dark, gloomy kitchens may often be transformed in- to cheerful workrooms by cutting an additional window or Wen by paint- ing walls and woodwork a color that reflects .rather than absorbs light. Reflectors behind wall lamps and lights help in throwing light where it is most needed, the United States De- partment of Agriculture finds. "That woman has a blot of paint on the end of her nose." "Well ?" "Shall we tell her about it?" "Better not. It may be the latest style." MliKIE SAYS At'rg w I-ffit.urt., ew J N Uneven Advances Scored During Past Week--Lambs Up To $10.35--Top Hogs $7.25--Veals off $1.50. So. St. Paul., Minn, Dec. 24, 1921--: Hogs and sheep have scored uneven advances during the past week under de influence of light receipts and a fairly healthy shipping demand. Bulk of good butcher hogs today, $7.00, choice light sorts $7.25, heavy pack- ers $5.75 to $6.00, being 25c to 50c higher than a week ago. Lmbs an(] yearling wethers are closing 50c to 75c higher, sheep strong to 50c up. Good and choice fat lambs $9.75 to $10.35, fat ewes $3.50 to $4150, yearling weth- ers $7.50 to $9.60. Altho cattle receipts have been light demand has been even lighter due largely to an increased consumption of poultry which is usual during the wivter holiday season and this has sharply lessened the demand for drezs- ed beef, which has been reflected in the live markets, most beef seers and butcher she stock showing losses of 25c (luring the past week. A few fed yearlings sold at the close from $(;.50 to $.00, with bulk of beef steers go- ing at $4.75 to $6.00, very few higher. Butcher cows and heifers sold at the finish largely from $3.00 to $4.75, with a very few of the better offer- ings going at $5.00 to $5.50 or some- what higher. Canners and cutters have shown some strength due large- ly to demand from the country from some thin cows for feeding purposes and these are mostly 25c higher than last week, bulk, bolk selling at $2.00 to $2.75, a few cotters $3.00. Bologna bulls closed at $2.50 to $3.25. Veal calf prices established a new low mark for the year on Thursday when bulk of best lights at $6.00. The market rallied 50c on Friday but is still $1.50 below a week ago. Better grades of stockers and feeders have held up well this week, closing steady to 25c low- er, with common and medium grades 25c to 50c lower. Bulk of sales at the close ranged from $4.00 to $5.00, with some few good to choice grades $5.25 to $5.50, strictly choice being quotable up to around $6.00. A western evangelist makes a prac- tice of painting Bible and religious quotations on fences and rocks along the public highways. One one big flat rock he painted these words: "What will you do when you die ?" An advertising gazabo came along and painted underneath that question: "Use Delta Oil. Good for burns." FEED COST OF PRODUCING EGGS VARIES WITH BREED Careful poultrymen like to know what iV costs them to produce a dozen eggs, but it is not possible for anyone to tell them. With certain informa- tion obtained througl,, experimental feeding to start wi',h, 'they must fig- ure it out for themselves. Since the feed constitutes the principal cost, it is possible to get some idea of the real cost if the auount of grain used in making a dozen eggs is known. The United States Department of Ag- riculture has kept records that show about what mnounts are used by gen- eral-purpose fowls and Leghorns, and by using the local price for grain in connection with these figures the feed cost of a dczen eggs can be ob- tainc(t with fair accuracy. The grain consumed to produce a dozen eggs will vary a great deal, de- pending upon the skill of the poultry- man, but it is assumed that he knows how to feed economically. The gen- eral-purpose fowls and Leghorns used in this feeding work were kep.t on the test while pullets and yearlings. As pullets the general-purpose fowls pro- duced 130.5 eggs a year and 88.1 as yearlings. The Leghm'ns produced an average of 138.7 eggs a; pullets and 124.9 as yearlings. The general-pro'pose pullets ate in a year an average of 6.7 pounds of feed per dozen eggs producl, and the yearlings ate 9.6 pounds. The Leghorn pullets ate 4.8 pounds and the yearlings 5.5 pounds. The gener- al-purpose pullets ate 1.9 pounds more feed in producing a dozen eggs than the Leghorn pullets, and the dif- ference increases very rapidly with the age of the stock, the general-pur- pose yearlings consuming 4.1 pounds more feed per dozen eggs than the Leghorn yearlings; therefore the Leghorn yearlings produced eggs up- on much less feed than the general- purpose breeds. The value of the, general-purpose breeds for market, or for hatching and breeding, makes them usually he most desirable breeds for the gen- eral farmer and the backyard poultry raiser, while the Leghorns are especi- ally adapted for the commercial egg farms, say the poultrymen of the de- partment. "I am so sorry I did not hear your lecture," gushed Miss Vedado to the visiting scientist. "You spoke on sun spots, did yo unot?" The scientist admitted that he had spoken on solar chemistry, including sun spots. "1 would have been so interested,' continued Miss Vedado. "I have been a martyr to freckles all my life." Grain Raisers Urged IT Professional and * To Back Price Probe[ z Business Directory [ C.E. SIGLOH , FLECTRIC Farmers National Marketing Cor-[ [:nr ]:vnnrt s,iv,,' poration Charges Deliberate I l||l /IHYll ;;;i-,- "Market Smashing." [ a.*si. RF1)AIRING l Phone 284-L  County farm bureaus in Minnesota! ! Ortonvme, ....... ,nnn were urged by C.H. Gustafson,[@- pre'sident of the U. S. Grain Growex,] In, to join farmers thruout the[ JOE BAYER & SON United States in a demand for a fed-] Of the Ortonville Tailorin Co eral mvestgatmn of alleged smash-| All kinds of cleanin and ressin ifig" of wheat prices below the true] neatly dogne P " g va " . . " " l:::'i)? ghraanfarmers in Sweden ] Ort Slts Made to Order. , -- , I onvll e, Minn. nave asKe(t an moargo agams a l flood of "cheap American wheat," Mr.[ Gustafson asserts that claims of "not ELECTRIC SHOE export, demand" are no excuse fort H p present low prices of wheat on home I " -' markets. I He bases his charge on official fig-! ures compiled by the U. S. Dept. of Commerce, issued November 28, show- iog the average domestic exports for 19t0-1914 to be 60,588,884 bushels. In 1920, thi:. figure increased to 166,348,- s14 bnshels, and in 1921 it has reach- ed 255Y.06.737 bushels, he says. Mr. Gustafson proposes to bring about an investigation of this situa- tion by the Federal Trade commission by bringing pressure on Congressmen to enact Senate Resolution No. 133. "Every farmer who grows grain, he says, ".hould write to his congress- man urging early action on this meas- ure. It will reveal the real reasons for the present depression." WILL PAY BIG TO MARKET EGGS RIGHT If the market eggs of Minnesota were graded and quality maintained on the way to market, the value would be increased at least five cents a doz- en, accordin to poultry specialists of University Farm . This would put a large additional sum in the pockets of producers, while greatly increasing the reputation of Minnesota eggs in the markets of the nation. i Wells Drilled ,oL%Te00a0000002o::tt %n " and smallest cost to you. See [] me first. 1 j. A. SMITH | A Hen Doesn't Stop Scratching When Worms Are Scarce Then Why Stop Advertising When Business Is Shoes repai-red neatly and prompt- ly. Our Work Guaranteed. GUS. E. ANDERSON, Prop; JOHN SPANYERS Light Hauling of all Kinds Express and Bagg'ge Telephone 287 Ortonville, Minn. PAUL DIRNBAUER Brick Layer and Plasterer Stone Mason and All Kinds of Cement Work. Ortonville, Min. R.F.D. PETERSON & SON Dray Line Big Stone Lake Ice Phone 38 Ortonville, Miw. Kodak DEVELOPING PRINTING ENLARGING Prompt, Quality Service, Moderate Prices. I HE REED STUDIO Ortonville Minn. DR. R. D. RIFENBARK OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN One block uphill from Gunderson's *rug Store Vapor-Sulphur Cabinet Treatments (For rheumatism, neuritis, etc.) F. L. BROWN THE JEWELER Ortonville, Minnesot FOR TRUCK SERVICE and any kind of light and heavy draying Hausauer Bros. PHONE 268 All Orders Given Prompt Attention A. B. KAERCHER Attorney at Law Odd Fellows Building Ortonville, Minn. DR. F. W. DUNN, CHIROPRACTOR D. D. WHITE, D. C., PH. C. Spinogrepher 12-13-14-15-16 Shumaker Bldg. Ortonv/lle, Minn. Col. Wm. Wellendorf AUCTIONEER 30 years' experience. No praeti mg on your property. Call m write me early and get in on in early date. Ortonvill Minnesota J. A. JOHNSON PIANO TUNING AND REPAIRING PHONES--Residence . 194 Furniture Store - AIl Work Guaranteed Ortonville, Minnesota. It-- t WILL FINCH Experienced Painter Phone 255-L All Work Guaranteed Dull ELMER SALSBURY aTHE WELL DIGGER" Fifteen Years' Experienm Ortonville, Minn. R, F. D. 2 We will pay the following prices for }unk: Old Iron, $6.00 to $10.00 per ton Copper and heavy Brass,4e to 8c per pound. Old Rags, cent per pound. Old Rubbers and Tires,  cent to I cent per pound. Pipe Fittings, Brass Goods, Belting and Hose cerHed in stock. Acetylene Welding, The Ortonville Foundry W. F. MULLICA. Prop. Pheae o DECEMBER 29. 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE T 00tHgs And Sheep F A RM E R PA G E Higher For Week x ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF THE , FARMERS AND FARMERS' ORGANIZATIONS. GROWERS CONTRACTS U. S. Grain Growers Deals of National Drive. time, Minnesota has set by she farmers' marketing corporation work, it was an- Week. farms aggregating are in a single by E. R. Voss, county, t o L the U. S. Grain Growers record also was set county when the grain ilney farms, including 12 ,200 acres, was pledged thru the national selling membership in the U. S. has passed the 500 announced this week. elevators are now the national corpora'- were signed last week at Lancaster. Bronson Kittson county and at county. The total of the national agency mark, and 819 have contracted grain thru it. this week that far- members before will have the right m naming directors for in determining future company. These direc- at the first nation- to be held at Chicago 1922. IN WORK ANNOUNCED and district awards girls' extension work in home economics were week from the office University Farm, club work in Minneso- of Winona is the state club member. In I Raised My Poul- "I am very much year's result. My shows a total and a total cost of a net profit for the of the single class is Verne old boy of Faribault, I-Ie raised 107 bushels which were good for total value of his c6rn his total costs $25.25 Profit of $118.19. The of the five acre corn Aughenbaugh, aged Waseca county, average yield of 85 acre. He places the acre at $35 and his ton at $27.62, leaving 8an acre. garden club of the club of Cyrus, Pope stimated value of its and its estimat- Representatives to the Minnesota Crop .Kron and Lloyd Second chum- the state were awarded Garden club with and Violet Kauf.man to the state crop Winners by districts all the free trip to the Were: Northern--Tony North Central-- of Glyndon. South- Weeks of Winona. Keller of best clubs in the and their represen- big state crop show club of Harold Olson. North club, John EricksorL Prairie club. South Central-- club, Alleen McDon- champion gardene winners will be an. BOOK ,E AT U FARM desire forms for tak- a statement for the expenses, should Extension Divis- book, which may be Book Store, St. Paul, at 25e a to William L. Cavert, demonstrator with extension division. In Says, it may be obtain- from bankers who atrons as an adver- Bureau units or other desire 50 copies or supply direct from rates and with front cover. a fian will drop into a What's on, and then his time observing BREEDING DUCKS SHOULD BE THE PICK OF THE FLOCK Ducks are usually mated in flocks of about 30 females with 5 or 6 males, as the drakes do not fight one another. The number of males may be reduced to 1 for every 7 females about the first of March, and again changed a month later to 1 male for 8 to 10 fe- males. Active, healthy females of nedium size should be used for breeding; that is, weighing about 8 pounds when ma- ture. Only mature birds should be used as breeders. Select ducks with short necks, medium long bodies, flat backs, and of good depth to the keel bones. Watery eyes usually are a sign of weakness in ducks. The drake is coarser and more masculine in appearance than the duck, and has a distinct curl in his tail feathers. Ducks should be sohl, usually, after they are 2 years old, although the best breeders or layers may be kept over their third year, say poultry special- ists in the U. S. Department of Ag- riculture. / In handling ducks picked them up by their necks, as their legs are very easily broken. Ducks lay their eggs early in the morning, and should be confined to the house or pen until 9:30 or 10 o'clock in the morning. If al- lowed to roam early in the morning they may lay in a pond or stream and the eggs may be lost. HENS NEED PROTEIN FROM ANIMAL SOURCES Thoes who have'not learned by ex- 3erience are apt to conclude, using the :'pigs is pigs" reasoning, that protein is protein whether it grows inside a hide or upon a plant. But not all pro- teins are alike and they do not pro- duce like results when taken into the hen's body. In a general way, animal proteins and vegetable proteins are alike in that both are nitrogenous, but when the hen begins to make therein" - to eggs she finds there are important differences than can not be overcome. But she must have animal proteins in some amount, no matter how nuch of lhe other kind is available. High- vegetable-protein feeds can replace some of the meat feed to advantage, but not more than one-fourth to one- half of it. Tests made by the United States Depaiment of Agriculture show that of the high vegetable-protein feeds cottonseed meal is the best for egg production. Peanutmeal comes next, followed by soy-bean meal and velvet- bean meal. In making up a mash not more than one-tenth of it should be cottonseed meal, as the use of more cuts down the egg yield materially and may affect the quality of the eggs, producing spots and blotches on the yolks which make them look bad. Other vegetable-protein feeds that may be .used to advantage are gluten and linseed meal. GOOD KITCHEN LIGHT MAKES WORK GO BETTER Are sink, stove, worktable, and other important parts of your kitchen well lighted ? Every kitchen needs good artificial lighting as well as plenty of daylight and sun during some part of the day. Dark, gloomy kitchens may often be transformed in- to cheerful workrooms by cutting an additional window or Wen by paint- ing walls and woodwork a color that reflects .rather than absorbs light. Reflectors behind wall lamps and lights help in throwing light where it is most needed, the United States De- partment of Agriculture finds. "That woman has a blot of paint on the end of her nose." "Well ?" "Shall we tell her about it?" "Better not. It may be the latest style." MliKIE SAYS At'rg w I-ffit.urt., ew J N Uneven Advances Scored During Past Week--Lambs Up To $10.35--Top Hogs $7.25--Veals off $1.50. So. St. Paul., Minn, Dec. 24, 1921--: Hogs and sheep have scored uneven advances during the past week under de influence of light receipts and a fairly healthy shipping demand. Bulk of good butcher hogs today, $7.00, choice light sorts $7.25, heavy pack- ers $5.75 to $6.00, being 25c to 50c higher than a week ago. Lmbs an(] yearling wethers are closing 50c to 75c higher, sheep strong to 50c up. Good and choice fat lambs $9.75 to $10.35, fat ewes $3.50 to $4150, yearling weth- ers $7.50 to $9.60. Altho cattle receipts have been light demand has been even lighter due largely to an increased consumption of poultry which is usual during the wivter holiday season and this has sharply lessened the demand for drezs- ed beef, which has been reflected in the live markets, most beef seers and butcher she stock showing losses of 25c (luring the past week. A few fed yearlings sold at the close from $(;.50 to $.00, with bulk of beef steers go- ing at $4.75 to $6.00, very few higher. Butcher cows and heifers sold at the finish largely from $3.00 to $4.75, with a very few of the better offer- ings going at $5.00 to $5.50 or some- what higher. Canners and cutters have shown some strength due large- ly to demand from the country from some thin cows for feeding purposes and these are mostly 25c higher than last week, bulk, bolk selling at $2.00 to $2.75, a few cotters $3.00. Bologna bulls closed at $2.50 to $3.25. Veal calf prices established a new low mark for the year on Thursday when bulk of best lights at $6.00. The market rallied 50c on Friday but is still $1.50 below a week ago. Better grades of stockers and feeders have held up well this week, closing steady to 25c low- er, with common and medium grades 25c to 50c lower. Bulk of sales at the close ranged from $4.00 to $5.00, with some few good to choice grades $5.25 to $5.50, strictly choice being quotable up to around $6.00. A western evangelist makes a prac- tice of painting Bible and religious quotations on fences and rocks along the public highways. One one big flat rock he painted these words: "What will you do when you die ?" An advertising gazabo came along and painted underneath that question: "Use Delta Oil. Good for burns." FEED COST OF PRODUCING EGGS VARIES WITH BREED Careful poultrymen like to know what iV costs them to produce a dozen eggs, but it is not possible for anyone to tell them. With certain informa- tion obtained througl,, experimental feeding to start wi',h, 'they must fig- ure it out for themselves. Since the feed constitutes the principal cost, it is possible to get some idea of the real cost if the auount of grain used in making a dozen eggs is known. The United States Department of Ag- riculture has kept records that show about what mnounts are used by gen- eral-purpose fowls and Leghorns, and by using the local price for grain in connection with these figures the feed cost of a dczen eggs can be ob- tainc(t with fair accuracy. The grain consumed to produce a dozen eggs will vary a great deal, de- pending upon the skill of the poultry- man, but it is assumed that he knows how to feed economically. The gen- eral-purpose fowls and Leghorns used in this feeding work were kep.t on the test while pullets and yearlings. As pullets the general-purpose fowls pro- duced 130.5 eggs a year and 88.1 as yearlings. The Leghm'ns produced an average of 138.7 eggs a; pullets and 124.9 as yearlings. The general-pro'pose pullets ate in a year an average of 6.7 pounds of feed per dozen eggs producl, and the yearlings ate 9.6 pounds. The Leghorn pullets ate 4.8 pounds and the yearlings 5.5 pounds. The gener- al-purpose pullets ate 1.9 pounds more feed in producing a dozen eggs than the Leghorn pullets, and the dif- ference increases very rapidly with the age of the stock, the general-pur- pose yearlings consuming 4.1 pounds more feed per dozen eggs than the Leghorn yearlings; therefore the Leghorn yearlings produced eggs up- on much less feed than the general- purpose breeds. The value of the, general-purpose breeds for market, or for hatching and breeding, makes them usually he most desirable breeds for the gen- eral farmer and the backyard poultry raiser, while the Leghorns are especi- ally adapted for the commercial egg farms, say the poultrymen of the de- partment. "I am so sorry I did not hear your lecture," gushed Miss Vedado to the visiting scientist. "You spoke on sun spots, did yo unot?" The scientist admitted that he had spoken on solar chemistry, including sun spots. "1 would have been so interested,' continued Miss Vedado. "I have been a martyr to freckles all my life." Grain Raisers Urged IT Professional and * To Back Price Probe[ z Business Directory [ C.E. SIGLOH , FLECTRIC Farmers National Marketing Cor-[ [:nr ]:vnnrt s,iv,,' poration Charges Deliberate I l||l /IHYll ;;;i-,- "Market Smashing." [ a.*si. RF1)AIRING l Phone 284-L  County farm bureaus in Minnesota! ! Ortonvme, ....... ,nnn were urged by C.H. Gustafson,[@- pre'sident of the U. S. Grain Growex,] In, to join farmers thruout the[ JOE BAYER & SON United States in a demand for a fed-] Of the Ortonville Tailorin Co eral mvestgatmn of alleged smash-| All kinds of cleanin and ressin ifig" of wheat prices below the true] neatly dogne P " g va " . . " " l:::'i)? ghraanfarmers in Sweden ] Ort Slts Made to Order. , -- , I onvll e, Minn. nave asKe(t an moargo agams a l flood of "cheap American wheat," Mr.[ Gustafson asserts that claims of "not ELECTRIC SHOE export, demand" are no excuse fort H p present low prices of wheat on home I " -' markets. I He bases his charge on official fig-! ures compiled by the U. S. Dept. of Commerce, issued November 28, show- iog the average domestic exports for 19t0-1914 to be 60,588,884 bushels. In 1920, thi:. figure increased to 166,348,- s14 bnshels, and in 1921 it has reach- ed 255Y.06.737 bushels, he says. Mr. Gustafson proposes to bring about an investigation of this situa- tion by the Federal Trade commission by bringing pressure on Congressmen to enact Senate Resolution No. 133. "Every farmer who grows grain, he says, ".hould write to his congress- man urging early action on this meas- ure. It will reveal the real reasons for the present depression." WILL PAY BIG TO MARKET EGGS RIGHT If the market eggs of Minnesota were graded and quality maintained on the way to market, the value would be increased at least five cents a doz- en, accordin to poultry specialists of University Farm . This would put a large additional sum in the pockets of producers, while greatly increasing the reputation of Minnesota eggs in the markets of the nation. i Wells Drilled ,oL%Te00a0000002o::tt %n " and smallest cost to you. See [] me first. 1 j. A. SMITH | A Hen Doesn't Stop Scratching When Worms Are Scarce Then Why Stop Advertising When Business Is Shoes repai-red neatly and prompt- ly. Our Work Guaranteed. GUS. E. ANDERSON, Prop; JOHN SPANYERS Light Hauling of all Kinds Express and Bagg'ge Telephone 287 Ortonville, Minn. PAUL DIRNBAUER Brick Layer and Plasterer Stone Mason and All Kinds of Cement Work. Ortonville, Min. R.F.D. PETERSON & SON Dray Line Big Stone Lake Ice Phone 38 Ortonville, Miw. Kodak DEVELOPING PRINTING ENLARGING Prompt, Quality Service, Moderate Prices. I HE REED STUDIO Ortonville Minn. DR. R. D. RIFENBARK OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN One block uphill from Gunderson's *rug Store Vapor-Sulphur Cabinet Treatments (For rheumatism, neuritis, etc.) F. L. BROWN THE JEWELER Ortonville, Minnesot FOR TRUCK SERVICE and any kind of light and heavy draying Hausauer Bros. PHONE 268 All Orders Given Prompt Attention A. B. KAERCHER Attorney at Law Odd Fellows Building Ortonville, Minn. DR. F. W. DUNN, CHIROPRACTOR D. D. WHITE, D. C., PH. C. Spinogrepher 12-13-14-15-16 Shumaker Bldg. Ortonv/lle, Minn. Col. Wm. Wellendorf AUCTIONEER 30 years' experience. No praeti mg on your property. Call m write me early and get in on in early date. Ortonvill Minnesota J. A. JOHNSON PIANO TUNING AND REPAIRING PHONES--Residence . 194 Furniture Store - AIl Work Guaranteed Ortonville, Minnesota. It-- t WILL FINCH Experienced Painter Phone 255-L All Work Guaranteed Dull ELMER SALSBURY aTHE WELL DIGGER" Fifteen Years' Experienm Ortonville, Minn. R, F. D. 2 We will pay the following prices for }unk: Old Iron, $6.00 to $10.00 per ton Copper and heavy Brass,4e to 8c per pound. Old Rags, cent per pound. Old Rubbers and Tires,  cent to I cent per pound. Pipe Fittings, Brass Goods, Belting and Hose cerHed in stock. Acetylene Welding, The Ortonville Foundry W. F. MULLICA. Prop. Pheae o DECEMBER .1921 THE ORTONVlLLE INDEPENDENT PAGE FARMERS PAGE ESpE('IALLY TO THE A('TI''ITIES OF THE [ AItMERS t, ND FARMERS' ORGANIZATIONS. I GROWERS Deals a rnarkstng corporation work, it was aggatug are covered in a ingle by B. Voss, the U. coty, pledged 5OO this week. rs al  now the national corpora'- wer signed last week at Lancaster. a Kittson county county. national 32,OOO mark. ght naming diluters for g futu COmpany. Chicago distTiet awards girls' extension work i of Winona is the slate of . net profit for the class is old boy of Farlbault, , raised 107 bushels which we good for totl value of his eSr ; fit o $118.19. th6 five  eo Aughenbangh, aged Waea county, average yleld of 85 He places at $27.62, leaving )a gaxden e]ub of the club of Cyrua, POp* p Lloyd Second eh- Oardeu nd WinonL Keller of in the their presen- p show lub of [arold Olson. North , Joh Erksoa . Prairie c]ul Soth Central-- Club, champion gardeue T BOOK desire o for tak- td expenses, t book, which may be DUCKS SHOULD BE THE PICK OF THE L Ducks a usually mated in ks of the drakes do not fight he number of males may be reduced 1 or every Lgain changed a Active, healthy female of edlum be used for breading; that is, weighing about 8 p ture. OnIy mature birds should be used as breeder. Select ducks wit}, short neck, medi long bodie, flat backs, and of good depth to the keel bon. Watery eyes uuliy are a sign of weakness in ducls drake is coarser and more in ap;earance than the du(k, a,l had a diatinct curl in his tail feathe,s. Ducks should be sohi, usual.,, er they are 2 years old, although the be beders Ol. layers nay be kept over year, say poultry specI U. S. Department of }g- # In handling ducks pickl them up easily broken. Ducks early in the morning, and confined to the heue or pen until 9:3O in the moing. to m early in the moing they may lay in a pond or steam a,nl the eggs may be )usa. NEED PROTEIN FROM ANIMAL oerlence are apt to conclude, using the "pigs ts pigs" reasoning, that protein is protein whether it grows inslde a !dde or upon a plant. hey do hen's body. In a general way, animal proteins and vegetable proteins a alike in that both a nitrogenous, but proteins in the other ku4 is available. High- vegetable-ptein feeds can replace Tests made by the united of the high vegetable protein feeds cottonseed meal is the best for egg prluctio Peanutmeal comes next, followed hy soy-bean meal nd velvet. In making up a mh not meal, as the cuts down the egg yle)d materlally and may afft the quality of the eggs. prtucing spots ad bloeh on the yolks which make them look bad. Other vegetable-preach, feds that may be ud to advantage are gluten and linseed mea, KITCHEN LIGHT Are sink, stove, worktable, and other Important parm of your kitch well Hghted? Every kiteh good artificial lighting wel] asl plenty of daylight and sun dundas: some part of the day. Dark, gImy kitchen may often he tnsfocd in- I to cheerful workroa by cutting an i addltonl window or Wen by palnt-i ins wal reflt rather than absorbs light behind wtdl lamps an Iiffhts help in throwing light where II is most eeOed, the United partmcnt of Arcult finds. '*That woman has a blot of pnl on the end of her no." '%Veil ?" al) we tell her about it?" "Better not. it y be the laiesl style" MIgKIE SAY;" '14ZZ 3 AL4C/M; fm banke who as  adve )pies ta ll drop into a on, and  time i i So. St l)aul., Minn, Dee. 24, 1921--: Hogs d shp have t scored uneven advances during the past week umler ight receipts and a fairly healthy shipping demand. Bulk of od butcher hogs today, $7.OO, choice light sorta $726, beay pack era $5.75 to $.00, belng 25e to V0 higher than a reek ago. Lambs and -earlig wethers are cloing 5oc to 75c higher, heep strong to 50c up. Good and eboleu fat ]amb $9.7b to $10.35, l'at ewes $.50 o $)5O, "ear ng we h- H_ t 1 O1 i FEED COST OF PRODUCING I[1  IT _ / 0aS Aria 5neep E. WR, w,.. "BEE" brain lalsers urgea Hher For Weekl .............. , ................. ', Ta R.ob Pr;o. P,K. [ what i costs them f produ a donJ  u gax, xtuo r Aa a . , . p .[egg burials no*possible for anyone[ neven v n*.aum--.rl.g--as to te th  larmers' Natlmal Marketiug Cot Week--Lamh Up To $10.fTop I ran. ,lh certain lnforma- potation Charges Del hera e Hogs $7.2--Veais off $1.50. finn obtained throog experimentalj ,,!lark e Smash rig.,, -- feeding to start with, they mut fig-] -- Ul.e it ou for thezalves. Since the County larm buaus in e cons le p'ln pa e . , e tu e tl 1 ci t ere u)ged by C It {iustafsnn , . e e den of he [ueIdent of the U. S. Grain Glowel ,s s, o e sum , .. tealPcot if theg ount of grain u ed 11 c, o JOin farmers thr, n m ng a dozen eggs IS known] . . mlltett States in a demand f rhe United States Dolnrtment of At- eral nvestlgatlon of alleged lieulture has kept x*rds that sho, about what amonnts a used by gen- elal-l,up*se fob.is and Imghorns, and l)eclaring I)y using the local price for grain a sked an mhargo against a connection .ith these figus the flood of "cheap Ameliean wheat," Mr fi cost of a dozen eggs can be ob- tained with fair aeeaey. The grain consumed t produce a Altho cattle receipts have been light dozetl eggs will vary a g "ca ea, de- mand has been even lighter dne[pending upon th e skil of the pou ry Il'gely] to an l,zcreal consumption, man but it is assumed that he knows o pou try which s usual durng tbe[ how to feed economically. The g- xvmtor hell(lay eeason and this hastt elaI.purpe:; e foz]s anfl LeKhorns user harply lessened the demand for dl.CS [ n  s ec ng work ve e ke I  on th cd beef which has been refltl inte t /'l 1 t n arm % ................................... d .......... P .......... dose fo*s p'o. buteler she stock showng loses oi du(e d 130.5 egffs a yelr and 88.1 as oe<yrm[.thepastweek. Afewfedl earing  [ e Lethe s p duee yearhngs :.old at the close from $6.50 au nerage of 1387 eggs a pullets to SgO0 with l)ulk of beef steers gu  an 24,9 as year ngs ing at $4.75 to Sa,00, very few hig'her I Tbe generdlpzlpose pullets ate in Butcher cows and hei er so d at] a year a a "e'age of ,,7 pounds of the finish largely from $flO0 to $4+75, fel per dozen egg produl d with a very few of the bettr offer-(the yearlings ate 9.6 p,,unds. The ings going at $5,00 to $5.50 or me ] Leghorn put]eta ate 4,8 poullds and what higher, Canners nnd cutters]tile yearlblgs 5.5 pounds. The goner- have shown some stzength due large- al.purposc pullets ate L0 pound ly to demand from the country froml mo feed in produein a dozen eggs some thin eow than the Leghorn pullets, and the dif these a mostly 25e higher than Iast week, bulk, boll{ selling to $2.75, a few cotters $3.OO. Bologna bulls closed at $2.5O to $3,25. Veal alf pri establlshed a new low mark for the year on Thursday when bulk of best Iight at $6.O0. hut is still $1.50 below a week ago. Better grades of stokers and feede have held up well tis week, elosing steady to 25e Io'- or, wlth oommon and medium grad 25e to S0e lower. Bulk of sales at the close ranged fm $4.OO to $5.O0, few good to choice grades $5.25 to $5.5O, stdctly choice being quotable up to aund $6,0O. A wtern euanRelist make a tce of pah,tig Bible and m]i#ous xuotath,ns on fends and reeks alung the public highways. One one big flat reek he painted "What wlll you do when ynu die?" An adveisiug gazaho came along d plated uderneath that question: "Use Delta Oil, Goud for hu,a," very rapidly with the age of the stock, the general-pur- pese yrlings eonsumlng 4.1 poun per dozen eggs than the Legho yearlings; therefore the Leho yearlings produ'd eggs up- on much less feed than the genera1 purpose beds. The value of the, general-purr*se beds for market, or for hatching and breeding, makes the usually he most desirable h,eds for the raiser, while the Lehon, s are espi- farm, ay the poultrymen of the partment. "I am eo rry leetum," gushed Mis Vedado isitng entist. "You spuke su spots, did yo unot?" The scleatst sp*ken ell solar chemistry, including sun spots. "I would have been o intosted," Miss Vedado, "I have been freckles all my lfe." lie I,ase his charge on omeiaI fl urns ten,piled by tile U S, Dept nt Cnmmerre, issned November 28, show- leg the avee domestic exports fez 10]0-1911 tn 1920, tbis figro increased to 10,3S,- l bnshel, aTLd i,, 1921 it ed  0C,T:7 busheJa, he says, Mr Gutafson proposes o brin about un nvesgation ef this sltua ton b Relutloe No. 133. "ory farmer who gows grain he says, "houhl te to his con,s: man urging early action on ure. It will reveal the for the plant depmssun." If the market eggs of  grarl and qli y on the way Io mket, t e ' be iueased at least fl,  ( en, aecordlng to poultry specialists el Unlversity Farm. This would put s large additloual sum n the pkets e producers, while greatly ineaslng the of Minnesota eggs in the of the nation. Wells Drilled I am ppared to put down your well in the d stablest cost to you. See me first. J. A. SMITH I.L 8, Oonvillo Phone 10-F-If A Hen Doesn't Stop Scratching When Worms Are Scarce Then Why Stop Advertising When Business Is Dull Professional and Business Directory C. E. SIGLOH m IEPAIRING Phone 284-L Or t oaviZle, Min JOE BAYER & SON the Ortontille Tailoring Cm of cleaning and pressin neatly done. Sut Made to Order, Ortonville, Minn ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP Shoe u*raired neat]y and pnpt. ly. Work Guaranteed. GUS. g. ANDERSON, Propx JOHN SPA*YERS Light Hauling of all Kinda Express and Baggoge Telephone 287 Ortonville, Minn PAUL DIRNBAUER Brlok Layer d Plaat Ste Man and All Kind of Cement Work* Ortonvllle* Mien, R* F. D PETERSON & SON Dra Big Sone Lake le Phone 38 Ortonvil M n K dk DE ..... INO 0 PRINTING ENLARGINO Prompt, Quality Service. Moderat Pri THE REED STUDIO OrtonviDe Mml DR. R. D. RIFENBARK OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN Sto (For rheatsm, nriti, e F. L. BROWN THE J EWEL FR Or to.tills* Minuet  FOR TRUCK SERVICE and y kind o light d Imav draing Hausauer Bros. PHONE 268 All Orders Given Prompt Attatiot A. B. KAERCHER Attorney t Lw Odd Fellow* Building Ortonville, Mill. DR. F. W. DUNN. CIROPRAOR D. D. WHITE, D, , pH. C, Sptaograph 12-I14.1-16 Shttmaker Bld. Ortontlle, Minm CoL Win. Wellendorf A UCIONER on yot prty, td rlt*ttmearly dgtl mr aat Ortvilb, tt J. A. JOHNSON PIANO TUNING AND REPAIRIO All Week Ouamttdd Ot mtvillt. Mt. WILL FINCH Et perttwd Phtt .dl Work ELMER SALSBURY lgE WELL DlltO]t Fift Year' l,ri Otonvllle, Mia R.F.D. | We will Ity th l*rleea for kt 01d lro rK00 t $10,00 it ta Copper and heavy Bra4toSe per pemd. Old Itaga eet per und. OM Ruhber d   t to 1 cent per eund. PIpe Fittings. Eras* Ooode. Belting and Hem rded t stock. Aetylene Welding. The Ortonvine Foundry W, F. MLLIC& M P DECEMBER 29. 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE T 00tHgs And Sheep F A RM E R PA G E Higher For Week x ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF THE , FARMERS AND FARMERS' ORGANIZATIONS. GROWERS CONTRACTS U. S. Grain Growers Deals of National Drive. time, Minnesota has set by she farmers' marketing corporation work, it was an- Week. farms aggregating are in a single by E. R. Voss, county, t o L the U. S. Grain Growers record also was set county when the grain ilney farms, including 12 ,200 acres, was pledged thru the national selling membership in the U. S. has passed the 500 announced this week. elevators are now the national corpora'- were signed last week at Lancaster. Bronson Kittson county and at county. The total of the national agency mark, and 819 have contracted grain thru it. this week that far- members before will have the right m naming directors for in determining future company. These direc- at the first nation- to be held at Chicago 1922. IN WORK ANNOUNCED and district awards girls' extension work in home economics were week from the office University Farm, club work in Minneso- of Winona is the state club member. In I Raised My Poul- "I am very much year's result. My shows a total and a total cost of a net profit for the of the single class is Verne old boy of Faribault, I-Ie raised 107 bushels which were good for total value of his c6rn his total costs $25.25 Profit of $118.19. The of the five acre corn Aughenbaugh, aged Waseca county, average yield of 85 acre. He places the acre at $35 and his ton at $27.62, leaving 8an acre. garden club of the club of Cyrus, Pope stimated value of its and its estimat- Representatives to the Minnesota Crop .Kron and Lloyd Second chum- the state were awarded Garden club with and Violet Kauf.man to the state crop Winners by districts all the free trip to the Were: Northern--Tony North Central-- of Glyndon. South- Weeks of Winona. Keller of best clubs in the and their represen- big state crop show club of Harold Olson. North club, John EricksorL Prairie club. South Central-- club, Alleen McDon- champion gardene winners will be an. BOOK ,E AT U FARM desire forms for tak- a statement for the expenses, should Extension Divis- book, which may be Book Store, St. Paul, at 25e a to William L. Cavert, demonstrator with extension division. In Says, it may be obtain- from bankers who atrons as an adver- Bureau units or other desire 50 copies or supply direct from rates and with front cover. a fian will drop into a What's on, and then his time observing BREEDING DUCKS SHOULD BE THE PICK OF THE FLOCK Ducks are usually mated in flocks of about 30 females with 5 or 6 males, as the drakes do not fight one another. The number of males may be reduced to 1 for every 7 females about the first of March, and again changed a month later to 1 male for 8 to 10 fe- males. Active, healthy females of nedium size should be used for breeding; that is, weighing about 8 pounds when ma- ture. Only mature birds should be used as breeders. Select ducks with short necks, medium long bodies, flat backs, and of good depth to the keel bones. Watery eyes usually are a sign of weakness in ducks. The drake is coarser and more masculine in appearance than the duck, and has a distinct curl in his tail feathers. Ducks should be sohl, usually, after they are 2 years old, although the best breeders or layers may be kept over their third year, say poultry special- ists in the U. S. Department of Ag- riculture. / In handling ducks picked them up by their necks, as their legs are very easily broken. Ducks lay their eggs early in the morning, and should be confined to the house or pen until 9:30 or 10 o'clock in the morning. If al- lowed to roam early in the morning they may lay in a pond or stream and the eggs may be lost. HENS NEED PROTEIN FROM ANIMAL SOURCES Thoes who have'not learned by ex- 3erience are apt to conclude, using the :'pigs is pigs" reasoning, that protein is protein whether it grows inside a hide or upon a plant. But not all pro- teins are alike and they do not pro- duce like results when taken into the hen's body. In a general way, animal proteins and vegetable proteins are alike in that both are nitrogenous, but when the hen begins to make therein" - to eggs she finds there are important differences than can not be overcome. But she must have animal proteins in some amount, no matter how nuch of lhe other kind is available. High- vegetable-protein feeds can replace some of the meat feed to advantage, but not more than one-fourth to one- half of it. Tests made by the United States Depaiment of Agriculture show that of the high vegetable-protein feeds cottonseed meal is the best for egg production. Peanutmeal comes next, followed by soy-bean meal and velvet- bean meal. In making up a mash not more than one-tenth of it should be cottonseed meal, as the use of more cuts down the egg yield materially and may affect the quality of the eggs, producing spots and blotches on the yolks which make them look bad. Other vegetable-protein feeds that may be .used to advantage are gluten and linseed meal. GOOD KITCHEN LIGHT MAKES WORK GO BETTER Are sink, stove, worktable, and other important parts of your kitchen well lighted ? Every kitchen needs good artificial lighting as well as plenty of daylight and sun during some part of the day. Dark, gloomy kitchens may often be transformed in- to cheerful workrooms by cutting an additional window or Wen by paint- ing walls and woodwork a color that reflects .rather than absorbs light. Reflectors behind wall lamps and lights help in throwing light where it is most needed, the United States De- partment of Agriculture finds. "That woman has a blot of paint on the end of her nose." "Well ?" "Shall we tell her about it?" "Better not. It may be the latest style." MliKIE SAYS At'rg w I-ffit.urt., ew J N Uneven Advances Scored During Past Week--Lambs Up To $10.35--Top Hogs $7.25--Veals off $1.50. So. St. Paul., Minn, Dec. 24, 1921--: Hogs and sheep have scored uneven advances during the past week under de influence of light receipts and a fairly healthy shipping demand. Bulk of good butcher hogs today, $7.00, choice light sorts $7.25, heavy pack- ers $5.75 to $6.00, being 25c to 50c higher than a week ago. Lmbs an(] yearling wethers are closing 50c to 75c higher, sheep strong to 50c up. Good and choice fat lambs $9.75 to $10.35, fat ewes $3.50 to $4150, yearling weth- ers $7.50 to $9.60. Altho cattle receipts have been light demand has been even lighter due largely to an increased consumption of poultry which is usual during the wivter holiday season and this has sharply lessened the demand for drezs- ed beef, which has been reflected in the live markets, most beef seers and butcher she stock showing losses of 25c (luring the past week. A few fed yearlings sold at the close from $(;.50 to $.00, with bulk of beef steers go- ing at $4.75 to $6.00, very few higher. Butcher cows and heifers sold at the finish largely from $3.00 to $4.75, with a very few of the better offer- ings going at $5.00 to $5.50 or some- what higher. Canners and cutters have shown some strength due large- ly to demand from the country from some thin cows for feeding purposes and these are mostly 25c higher than last week, bulk, bolk selling at $2.00 to $2.75, a few cotters $3.00. Bologna bulls closed at $2.50 to $3.25. Veal calf prices established a new low mark for the year on Thursday when bulk of best lights at $6.00. The market rallied 50c on Friday but is still $1.50 below a week ago. Better grades of stockers and feeders have held up well this week, closing steady to 25c low- er, with common and medium grades 25c to 50c lower. Bulk of sales at the close ranged from $4.00 to $5.00, with some few good to choice grades $5.25 to $5.50, strictly choice being quotable up to around $6.00. A western evangelist makes a prac- tice of painting Bible and religious quotations on fences and rocks along the public highways. One one big flat rock he painted these words: "What will you do when you die ?" An advertising gazabo came along and painted underneath that question: "Use Delta Oil. Good for burns." FEED COST OF PRODUCING EGGS VARIES WITH BREED Careful poultrymen like to know what iV costs them to produce a dozen eggs, but it is not possible for anyone to tell them. With certain informa- tion obtained througl,, experimental feeding to start wi',h, 'they must fig- ure it out for themselves. Since the feed constitutes the principal cost, it is possible to get some idea of the real cost if the auount of grain used in making a dozen eggs is known. The United States Department of Ag- riculture has kept records that show about what mnounts are used by gen- eral-purpose fowls and Leghorns, and by using the local price for grain in connection with these figures the feed cost of a dczen eggs can be ob- tainc(t with fair accuracy. The grain consumed to produce a dozen eggs will vary a great deal, de- pending upon the skill of the poultry- man, but it is assumed that he knows how to feed economically. The gen- eral-purpose fowls and Leghorns used in this feeding work were kep.t on the test while pullets and yearlings. As pullets the general-purpose fowls pro- duced 130.5 eggs a year and 88.1 as yearlings. The Leghm'ns produced an average of 138.7 eggs a; pullets and 124.9 as yearlings. The general-pro'pose pullets ate in a year an average of 6.7 pounds of feed per dozen eggs producl, and the yearlings ate 9.6 pounds. The Leghorn pullets ate 4.8 pounds and the yearlings 5.5 pounds. The gener- al-purpose pullets ate 1.9 pounds more feed in producing a dozen eggs than the Leghorn pullets, and the dif- ference increases very rapidly with the age of the stock, the general-pur- pose yearlings consuming 4.1 pounds more feed per dozen eggs than the Leghorn yearlings; therefore the Leghorn yearlings produced eggs up- on much less feed than the general- purpose breeds. The value of the, general-purpose breeds for market, or for hatching and breeding, makes them usually he most desirable breeds for the gen- eral farmer and the backyard poultry raiser, while the Leghorns are especi- ally adapted for the commercial egg farms, say the poultrymen of the de- partment. "I am so sorry I did not hear your lecture," gushed Miss Vedado to the visiting scientist. "You spoke on sun spots, did yo unot?" The scientist admitted that he had spoken on solar chemistry, including sun spots. "1 would have been so interested,' continued Miss Vedado. "I have been a martyr to freckles all my life." Grain Raisers Urged IT Professional and * To Back Price Probe[ z Business Directory [ C.E. SIGLOH , FLECTRIC Farmers National Marketing Cor-[ [:nr ]:vnnrt s,iv,,' poration Charges Deliberate I l||l /IHYll ;;;i-,- "Market Smashing." [ a.*si. RF1)AIRING l Phone 284-L  County farm bureaus in Minnesota! ! Ortonvme, ....... ,nnn were urged by C.H. Gustafson,[@- pre'sident of the U. S. Grain Growex,] In, to join farmers thruout the[ JOE BAYER & SON United States in a demand for a fed-] Of the Ortonville Tailorin Co eral mvestgatmn of alleged smash-| All kinds of cleanin and ressin ifig" of wheat prices below the true] neatly dogne P " g va " . . " " l:::'i)? ghraanfarmers in Sweden ] Ort Slts Made to Order. , -- , I onvll e, Minn. nave asKe(t an moargo agams a l flood of "cheap American wheat," Mr.[ Gustafson asserts that claims of "not ELECTRIC SHOE export, demand" are no excuse fort H p present low prices of wheat on home I " -' markets. I He bases his charge on official fig-! ures compiled by the U. S. Dept. of Commerce, issued November 28, show- iog the average domestic exports for 19t0-1914 to be 60,588,884 bushels. In 1920, thi:. figure increased to 166,348,- s14 bnshels, and in 1921 it has reach- ed 255Y.06.737 bushels, he says. Mr. Gustafson proposes to bring about an investigation of this situa- tion by the Federal Trade commission by bringing pressure on Congressmen to enact Senate Resolution No. 133. "Every farmer who grows grain, he says, ".hould write to his congress- man urging early action on this meas- ure. It will reveal the real reasons for the present depression." WILL PAY BIG TO MARKET EGGS RIGHT If the market eggs of Minnesota were graded and quality maintained on the way to market, the value would be increased at least five cents a doz- en, accordin to poultry specialists of University Farm . This would put a large additional sum in the pockets of producers, while greatly increasing the reputation of Minnesota eggs in the markets of the nation. i Wells Drilled ,oL%Te00a0000002o::tt %n " and smallest cost to you. See [] me first. 1 j. A. SMITH | A Hen Doesn't Stop Scratching When Worms Are Scarce Then Why Stop Advertising When Business Is Shoes repai-red neatly and prompt- ly. Our Work Guaranteed. GUS. E. ANDERSON, Prop; JOHN SPANYERS Light Hauling of all Kinds Express and Bagg'ge Telephone 287 Ortonville, Minn. PAUL DIRNBAUER Brick Layer and Plasterer Stone Mason and All Kinds of Cement Work. Ortonville, Min. R.F.D. PETERSON & SON Dray Line Big Stone Lake Ice Phone 38 Ortonville, Miw. Kodak DEVELOPING PRINTING ENLARGING Prompt, Quality Service, Moderate Prices. I HE REED STUDIO Ortonville Minn. DR. R. D. RIFENBARK OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN One block uphill from Gunderson's *rug Store Vapor-Sulphur Cabinet Treatments (For rheumatism, neuritis, etc.) F. L. BROWN THE JEWELER Ortonville, Minnesot FOR TRUCK SERVICE and any kind of light and heavy draying Hausauer Bros. PHONE 268 All Orders Given Prompt Attention A. B. KAERCHER Attorney at Law Odd Fellows Building Ortonville, Minn. DR. F. W. DUNN, CHIROPRACTOR D. D. WHITE, D. C., PH. C. Spinogrepher 12-13-14-15-16 Shumaker Bldg. Ortonv/lle, Minn. Col. Wm. Wellendorf AUCTIONEER 30 years' experience. No praeti mg on your property. Call m write me early and get in on in early date. Ortonvill Minnesota J. A. JOHNSON PIANO TUNING AND REPAIRING PHONES--Residence . 194 Furniture Store - AIl Work Guaranteed Ortonville, Minnesota. It-- t WILL FINCH Experienced Painter Phone 255-L All Work Guaranteed Dull ELMER SALSBURY aTHE WELL DIGGER" Fifteen Years' Experienm Ortonville, Minn. R, F. D. 2 We will pay the following prices for }unk: Old Iron, $6.00 to $10.00 per ton Copper and heavy Brass,4e to 8c per pound. Old Rags, cent per pound. Old Rubbers and Tires,  cent to I cent per pound. Pipe Fittings, Brass Goods, Belting and Hose cerHed in stock. Acetylene Welding, The Ortonville Foundry W. F. MULLICA. Prop. Pheae o