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Ortonville, Minnesota
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December 29, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
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December 29, 1921
 

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PAGE 8 HONORS GIVEN OUT AT STATE CROP SHOW Martin Cunty Man Takes Champion- ship Corn Sweepstakes--ltasca Wins on Potatoes (By Farm Bureau News Service) Ahnrst evezy sort of farm product raised in the state, from tobacco to a "'vest pocket" squash, was on exhibi- tion in the Minnesota Crop Show in lYiinneapolis last week. The combined efforts of the State :Horticultural society, the Crop Im- provement association, and the Potato Growers association made the show the largest and best winter crop ex- position ever held here, according to R. S. Mackintosh, general secretary. Iiere are the results of the judging of staple farm products exhibited at show: t:hotatoes, county exhibits--First, Itasca; Second, Kittson, Tird, Koo- chicbing; Fourth, Crow Wing. Oats Sweepstakes, Arthur Norum,, Iall0ck, KiLtson county. I Wheat--Sweepstakes, Henry Holt,l Cokato, Wright county. / Corn--Best single ear, L. E. Zim- J merman, Tracy, Lyon county. C. L. Blanchar, Sherburn, Martin I county, took first place for ten ears l of white corn, grand championship ,I sweepstakes for ten ears, and grand championship sweepstakes for 50 ears. Best ten ears, Minnesota No. 13, C. E. Lehman, Doyle, LeSueur county. Grand sweepstakes, ten ears of yel- low corn, Lewis Scott, Failvaont, Mar- tin county. Southern section -- Yellow corn championship, Thomas Hoskins, North Redwood, Redwood county; White corn championship, Peterson Brothers, New lichland, Waseca county; Sweep- stikes, Peterson Brothers; best 50 ears, L, E. Zimmerman, Tracy. Central section--YelloW champion- shil, A. A. Chapman, Olivia, Renville county; White championship, James Hunter, Appleton, Swift county; Sweepstakes, Chapman; best 50 ears, Villiam Byrne, Farmington, Dakota ounty. Northern section--Champion dent, :l. H. Nixen, Nevis, Hubbard county; dlampion flint, Harry Ophus, Erskine, Polk county; sweepstakes, Nixen; best 0 ears, D. A. Coleman, Aitkin, Aitkin ,county. Professional corn sweepstakes-- outhern section, C. L. Blanchar; entral, John Henderson, Cokato, "Wright; northern, C. C. Williams, De- roit, Becket county. Champion popcorn--C. E. Lehman, Doyle. Champion sweet corneL. A. Wet- lhal, St. Hilaire, Penuington. There were more than 1,200 grain exhibits and scores of entries of gar- den products and flowers, while ten ounties took part in the fruit show. Boys' and girls' clubs showed the best junior potato exhibit ever seen at a state show, stemming to A. G. Tolvas/ secretary of the Potato Growers asso- ciation. TUBERCULOSIS LOVES THE GOLDEN AGE OF MAN "Tubercuesis loves the golden age of man," states Dr. Harvey W. Wiley in Good Housekeeping magazine. In the saae article Dr. Wiley gives some in- .cresting figures to show the ages at h(ch tubcrcu!o3is exerts the greatest :nuence. He says: "The most hreatening of all diseases is tuber- u!os! It first begins to be threaten- :n' as the victim approaches the age f puberty. It cor.tinues with increas- ng fury after tv,e,aty, and only begins =o vAmte its; ravages at forty." Dr. Wiley combined the reports of Aze .,moalty lecolds of the Bureau of Census for five years from 1914- .tb reclusive. From the figures given ,m has shown the l'ic of tuberculosis wilts the wtrious ages and a what ges, males or females were the most lcquent victims. With a group of in- fants and children under the age of five, 18,137 boys and 15,572 girls died ok" tubercu!osis. The particular form of tuberculosis in boys and girls, an(t especially in i:d'ants is not that of the lung, but of the lining of the mem- brane of the brain. A large perceltage of the coral deaths in these children under five was due to tuberculosis meningitis. Passing to the group of children be- tween five anti ten, we find that 4,625 boys and 4.634 girls died of tubercu- to:ds. Boys and girls bdtween the ages of five and ten are equally af- fected with tuberculosis. When we come to the group between ten and fifteen there is an amazing difference During these as, 3,945 boys and 7,115 girls died of tuberculosis. In the group between fifteen and twenty the data show that 15,002 boys and 22,428 girls died of tuberculosis. The golden age of tuberculosis is be- rceen the ages of twenty to thirty- nine inclusive. This group was divided into four sections: from twenty to twenty-four inclusive; from twenty- five to twenty-nine inclusive; from thirty to thirty-four inclusive; from thirty-five to thirty-nine inclusive. In the first group of five years data show that 31,533 young men and 34,- "50 young women died of consumption in all foms. In the group from twen- ty-five to twenty-nine years 35,654 men and 32,532 women died of tuber- cuosis. The men have now forged rapidly aimad in the number of deaths. In the next group, from thirty to thirty- four, the deaths of men were 35,013 and of women 25,740. Here we find a most remarkable difference, men being far more sbsceptible than women to the ravages of the disease. From thir- ty-five to thirty-nine, inclusive, the dif- ference becomes even greater. During this period 34,342 men died of tuber- culosis and only 21,281 women. We see therefore, that the peaks of the dis- ease arrive at different ages. Among women, the greatest fatality occurs during the ages of fifteen to twenty- five. A,mong men, the greatest fatali- ties occur during the ages from thirty to forty. DANCERS ROUTED BY DEVIL AT MARION (Continued From Page i) Govel'aor Cox Of Massachusetts sug- gests that at reeuring intervals great wars break out because new genera- lions have forgotten the evils of the conflicts fought by their fathers, and recommends that children be taught at school the evils of war and the bless- ings of peace, an dthe governors of all e states with one aclaim say Amen. Is it not strange that some of these great men did not think of these things in time to avert the World War ? The doctrine of peace has been preached ever since the "Sermon on the Mount." Now after the dreadful alamity has occurred and millions of human beings are starving to death and the whole world is on the verge of bankruptcy it commences to dawn up- on men that after all Christ's teaci- ings are right and should have been followed and taught to the children of each succeeding generation. God grant that this may be done. That the ex- ample set by the Son of God y be held up to men as true heroism and patriotism, instead of the images of warriors. I  WANT ADS I FOR SALE--White pop corn that is sure to pop, at 10c per pound. Write or phone Glen Piper, Clinton, Min- nesota. 34-2p LOSTBox containing blue petticoat: Between 0rtonville and Milbank. Finder return to Independent for re- ward. 34-1-p FOR SALE--One bull; two cows, to freshen soon. Wanton Green, Clin, ton, Minn. 32-2 FOR SALE--Some full blooded Fer-- ris White Leghorn Roosters. 260 t 300 egg strain, at $2.50 each is taken soon, while they last. F.A. Struck, Clinton, Minnesota. 32-3 W A N T E D--Ladies' and Gents' clothes to clean and press. City Tailor Shop. A. W. Young, pro- prietor. * 12-tf HEMSTITCHINCr--Will do hemstitch- ing at 10c per yard. Mrs. A. L. Waddans. , 27-tf-c i FOR SALE--100 bushels of home grown clover seed at the New Pro- duce. C. C. Steen, Clinton 3-3 FOR SALE--Ladies and Gents' Tail- ored Suits for sale at the City Tail- 12-tf Some claim that he came thru the floor, other that he came down from the roof. He was the regular fellow they say, horns and hoofs and tail. The lights flared, the musical instru- ments flew from the hands of the play- ers and were splintered. Lurid lights filled the place and the devil danced among them. Women and girls scream- ed and some fainted. One or more are still confined in bed with hysteria. They all fled terror-stricvken fromthe place. Some hid in the woods all night, others found shelter at farm houses. Twenty-six cars were left standing by the pavilion until day- light came and the party rallied and kept their courage up by keeping close together and got the cars away. "Many and varied stories are told about the details, but the above is generally told by all. If it was a hoax, it was cleverly done and the proprietor las offered $1,)0 for an explanation of i{. His place, hotel and all is deserted and abandoned. He nor his family dare remain there. "If it was the real devil, he has hurt his own business, for dancing among that class has ceased. It has been a real sensation, and I suppose has been widely advertised. The hardest peo- ple to convince that it was a hoax are those who were there. "Y)urs very sincerely, "A. L. Richardson." COMMUNITY. We build our houses unalike, and so we build our lives, And yet our common brotherhood each difference survives. For man is, after all, a man, beneath the thatch or dome, And ev'ry house, though great or small, is after all a home. For, if that house is not a home, is but a place to dwell, Then high or low, or rich or poor, your house is but a shell; And you yourself, however great the eminence you plan, Must still remain beneath it all the brother and the man. For so we build communities, with houses great and small, And so we make the nation of the in- dividual. But, if you live your life alone, no fellowship to give, Then you are dead and turned to dust, however live. THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT I Cleaning Off the Slate .====..==%===,,%p====.=====.y.%======%,,=y====.%,==%,===,,=======. _ ._ - . .% Preventative Dentistry for Infants. Preventative dentistry should be practiced upon first appearance of the deciduous or baby teeth and continued thruout life. With a soft napkin on the finger, moistened in fresh or salt water, the infant's teeth and gums should be carefully cleansed several times daily. This, while of benefit to the teeth and gums, also accutoms the child to dental manipulations, and if continued will establish the dental toilet as a routine part of the person- al hygiene of youth. As soon as the child has erupted the baby molars, the defitist should be visited for a there inspection of the teeth. At this time painless methods of treatment maybe sufficient to prevent or arrest tooth decay. A psychic factor not to be slighted is that the dentist should not be mentioned in the presence of the child as one to be visited with dread. Experience dealing with the pain and discomforts Of the dental chair should not be related in the hearing of the little patient. This has a definite plaus- ible relation to preventative dentistry, for dental operations involving pain may be escaped if skillful dental at- tention is prc, mptly and regularly ad- ministered during and after infancy, EGG PRODUCTION INCREASED BY USE OF ANIMAL FEED Meat scrap or same other animal feed high in protein is the one essen- tial constituent of the mash which can nJt well be omitted. The United States Department of Agriculture found that a pen of pullets, on free range, which did not get meat scrap or any other animal-protein feed laid only 90 eggs each in a year, compar- ed with yields of from 125 to 150 eggs from pens fed rations containing meat scrap. The eggs from the pen where no meat scrap was fed cost 2.2 cents more a dozen for feed than when the meat scrap was included in the ra- tion. Fish meal or fish scrap can be used to replace the meat scrap and compares favorably with a good grade of meat scrap containing the same per cent of protein. Skim. milk or buttermilk, either sweet or sour, is excellent for replac- ing part or all of the meat scrap. The milk may be used in mixing the mash if a moist mash is fed, or it can be kept before the fowls as a drink. If clabbered and fed thick or like cheese, hens will eat enough of it to replace all of the meat scrap needed. A little bone meal makes an excellent addition to the mash or it can be used to replace a part of the meat scrap. Green cut bone, if fresh and sweet, will also take the place of meat scrap if fed at the rate of one-third to one- half ounce daily per hen. MASCULINE STRATEGY. "Henry," announced the young mother, "I have decided on a name for baby. We will call her Florence." Husband was lost in thought for a moment or two. He did not like the name Florence, but if he opposed his wife she would insist o having her own way. "Good." he said. "My first sweet- heart was named Florence, and she will take it as a compliment." "We will call her Margaret, after my mother," was the instant reply. A Chicago woman shopping in the loop was heard to ask a clerk: "Have you a pair of shoes suitable for this boy ?" "Yes, certainly," was the reply. "French kid, perhaps ?" "No, indeed," was the response. "He is my own son, horn right here in Chi- cago." Roland Reed, of Denver, Colorado, arrived Wednesday for a visit with his sister, Mrs. O. I. Chamberlain. Miss Lou Starff of Princeton has been employed as Clerk in the dry oods department of the Pioneer Store. The milk clarifier purchased by the Rolen dairy is on display at the AI- vah Matthews Implement store this week. Ideal of Health. The creation of an ideal of health is the only effective way in which to interest children in their own health habits . Instead of talking to the lit- tle ones about the bad cold that will result from some indiscretion, or the pain that will result from overeating or the wrong kinds of food, we must give the message of building a strong and eautiful body. We must build in HOW TO MAKE BOILED STARCH I THAT WONT STICK TO IRONS Clothes are starched to stiffen them, to give them the gloss of new material, and to make them keep clean longer. The following is a good general recipe for making cooked starch, recommended by the United States Department of Agriculture: 1 to 4 tablespoons starch, according to stiffness desired. I cup (1-2 pint) cold water. 1-2 teaspoon borax. 1-2 teaspoon paraffin or white fat. 1 quart boiling water Make a paste of the starcl and the cold water; add the borax, the paraf- fin or fat, and the boiling water. Boil the mixture, stirring it thoroughly, until it is clear, or for about 20 min- utes. Remove any scum that forms and strain the starch while hot. The borax may be omitted, but it helps whiten the clothes and it, as well as the paraffin or the fat, makes the starch smoother in ironing. Alum is sometime added (from 1 teaspoor, to 1 tablespoon to 1 quart of water) and is useful in making the starch penetrate the fiber. It apparently thins the paste but does not decrease its stiffening property. It is impossible'to give definite di- rection, s for amounts of cooked starch o be used, because all depends upon the fabric and the degree of stiffness desired. However, if the 4 table- spoons of starch have been used to the quart of water, a cup of this may be diluted with about 3 quarts of water for starching such articles as petticoats and gingham dresses. Gar- ments should be starched wrong side out and left so until they are sprin- kled. For white clothes the starch should be as hot as the hands can stand, because it penetrates better, and thin enough not to leave a glazed surface when ironed. If many clothes are to be starched it is wise to keep a part of the cook- he children's minds a picture of the ed starch hot and add it to the used mystery and wonder of the body, starch as the latter becomes too cool showing the effect on its workings of and thin. The garments that are to uch processes as sleep, exercises and be stiffest should be starched first. he habits of diet.--Sally Lucas Jean, After thorough squeezing and dip- Public Health Nurse. ping the surplus starch should be . wrung out and the garments either MOTOR CAR NOW rubbed or patted. Garments wrung RADIO-EQUIPPED very dry before starching will be _ . stiffer then wetter ones. Stiff-bosom- It does not require an ultra-imagin- ed shirts should ,nat be atarched too ative person to realide the possibilities far down nor.. pleaed,bosoms, t, stiff, of police cars, fire engines, or emer- else they will hmh sp m,,)-, look gency cars with a simple wireless up- clumsy, and feel uncomfortable. If paratus which will transmit instantly messages from headquarters. To Ed- ward Dallin, Harvard graduate and radio experimenter, goes the credit for a novel wireless device mounted on a Dodge Brothers car. While Dalin's equipment is for his own experimental purposes it would be readily adaptable like those mentioned. The set, as invented, is simplicity itself. Two broom handles and a length of lamp cord from the antennae, a wooden box, originally intended to contain milk chocolate, is the cabinet for the sending apparatus, and an or- dinary spark coil supplies plate volt- age for the vacuum tube transmitter. With this set Mr. Dallin can travel about in his Dodge Brothers car and in the vicinity of his home at Quincy Point, Mass., receives messages from points as far distant as Key West, Fla., and Savannah, Ga. His send- ing range averages 10 miles, and he is working now on a much more effec- tive sending apparatus. Dailin says it is a queer sensation to be driving comfortably along in his car and suddenly have the buzz buzz of the box beside him begin to take rythmical form in dots and dashes-- which may be his call number, IFK, or just the rambling message of some amateur operator. The whole set, as it appears in Mr. D ' ' alhn s Dodge Brothers car, occupms only a few cubic feet of space between the front seat and the dash board. The invtor says he could construct one that will take considerably less room. "And some day they will be making them so small that we will have a vest-pocket wireless," he adds with a laugh. Mr. Dallin takes many long trips in his Dodge Brothers car, but he can keep always in close touch with events thru his radio device. QUALIFIED. The homeliest man I ever saw came in one day and struck the chief for a job as salesman. He had a beak- nose, was squint-eyed and his ears didn't match. He started in telling all hi qualifications as a salesman, but the chief interrupted him. "Wait a minutel" said the boss. "Just tell me one thing: Are you one is starched too far down the low- el" part may l)e moistened enough to render it pliable. THE KNOCKER'S PRAYER "Lolxt, please don' let this town grow. I've been here for thiray years, and during that time I've fought every public improvement; I've knock- ed everything and everybody; no firm o.r individual has established a busi- ness here without my doing all I could to put them out of business. I've lied about them and I .would (ha: stolen from them if I had the coLu:e. I've done all I could,.to,.kecp the town from growing and, never spoken a good word for it. I've put ashes on the children's slide and have made the marshal stop the boys from playing ball in my vacant lot. Whenever I saw anyone prospering or enjoying themselves I've started a reform to kill the business or spoil the fun. I don't want the young folks to stay in this town, and I will do all I can by law, rule and ordinance to drive them away. It pains me, O Lord, to see that in spite of my knocking it is beginning to grow. Some day I fear I will be called upon to put down sidewalks in front of my property, and who knows but what I may have to keep up the streets that run by my premises ? This, Lord, would be more than I could bear. I would cost me money, though all I have made was right here in this town. Then, too, more people come if the town begins to grow, which would cause me to lose my pull. I ask, therefore, to keep this town at a standstill. /men."-- The Weekly Graphic. TOMATO JUICE NOW RECOMMENDED FOR BABIES One of the easiest woys to be sure of getting sufficient amounts of vita- mine C, the scurvy-preventing sub- stance, is to eat tomatoes rather regu- larly, perhaps every day, or to make it a practice to put tomato Juice in some of the dishes that we are preparing for the family, says the United States Department of Agriculture. In many homes it is a comparative- ly easy matter to can fairly large quantities of tomatoes, and to have these on hand for use when fresh to- married?" matoes are unattainable or expensive. "Sure,"" answered the applicant. The remarkable part about the tomato "Then," said the boss, "that's with relation to this particular ita- enough. You could sell anythingI" mine is that it still seems to be effi- cient in preventing scurvy after it "How did you get on with spell- has been heated or dried, which it not ing?" Harry's mother asked him, true of all foods which possess it in after his first day at school. "You the raw state. This is probably due look so pleased that I'm sure you did to the fact that the tomato contains well." such large amounts of vitomine C that "No'm, I couldn't spell much of any- part of it survives the heating pro- thing," admitted Harry; "and I cess. couldn't remember the arithmetic very well, nor the geography." The mother showed her disappoint- ment, but Harry had consolation in reserve. "But that's no matter, mother," he said; "the boys all like me, and I've got the biggest feet in the classl" So valuable is the tomato as a source of this mysterious and impor- tant ingredient of the diet, that phy- sicians now recommend it for babies fed on pasteurized milk, just as they have for some time prescribed orange juice. If tomato juice is to be given to a child it should be carefuly strained in You can't preserve happiness iv order to eliminate any seed. One- family jars. half tablespoon of fresh tomato juice "Hey, Morn, I've took my bath--you or one tablespoon of canned tomato come lookit the water." y, is THURSDAY, ROAD ARE TO WINTER Many Outfits With Big ing Needed Road Im Unemployment Relieved. Many camps finished nearing completion, actual starting on the first projects let by M. Babcock, of the state partment, under the "more better roads" winter trunk routes to cut forced Bound by contracts to t April 1 the biggest pa% of of gravel surfacing and 50 gTading on the first list of contractors already are in action in almost every Minnesota. An unofficial is that more than 7,500 men given jobs on a team Special maintenance work the benefit of local farmers ing in some sections, one erintendent reporting 388 teams on his December Commissioner Babcock gains with low bidders on from Omaha, where he president of the American of Highway Officials. The bids checked again in the the commissioner made cording to the tentative except on one culvert job lower figure was found. to the Butler Brothers puny, big contractors of St contract for 25 miles of tween Northfield and trunk highway No. 1 at a mile. This pavement will that south of St. Paul and strip between Northfield bault and is par of the plan Minnesota's longest went next year to nere miles. Benton county has for 22 miles from St. ton and 10 miles on to to be let this week by ty, all under the law. John H. Mullen, deputy er and chief highway pressed the satisfaction partment with the bargain winter road work."Paving on the same low level grading and gravel Mr. Mutlen, "and big ing given for the Savings will enable the to extend improvements ly." Protests that work at less than cost truck owners at neapolis and St. Paul. Babcock said that bonds tee !erformance on addel that the state was interested in the pointed out that effprts use teams rather aan giving unemployment ous localities. Commenting on the protest, the St. Paul Di "All evidence points to Mr. Babcock has driven gain in these contracts of the state, and that being built under the con at a minimum of cost payers. He is to be his success." In the highway winter work is being early letting. It will of grading and grave will be widely state. Good Price for The bottom threatens the market for bitter ity, according to the operative Creamery message to its 250 cries. "The bottom price of poor butter warning says. "At one a difference of 15 cents tween good and poor as the the same thing again this winter, worse condition. The flooded with poor operative creamery that product has to of inferior butter." Asserting that no other farm pays as well as the ting cream to the pure and sweet, to butter, the new agency issued a set ed on the door of creamery in its These rules, drawn vent losses thruthe grade butter, suggest, delivery of cream by hauling; 2--Care in vent dirt from and leaving a flavor in There washing and cans, strainers cooling cream in cold ately after separating, in warm and cold where air is the buttermaker pert judge of An eight pound to Mr. and Mrs. Friday. PAGE 8 HONORS GIVEN OUT AT STATE CROP SHOW Martin Cunty Man Takes Champion- ship Corn Sweepstakes--ltasca Wins on Potatoes (By Farm Bureau News Service) Ahnrst evezy sort of farm product raised in the state, from tobacco to a "'vest pocket" squash, was on exhibi- tion in the Minnesota Crop Show in lYiinneapolis last week. The combined efforts of the State :Horticultural society, the Crop Im- provement association, and the Potato Growers association made the show the largest and best winter crop ex- position ever held here, according to R. S. Mackintosh, general secretary. Iiere are the results of the judging of staple farm products exhibited at show: t:hotatoes, county exhibits--First, Itasca; Second, Kittson, Tird, Koo- chicbing; Fourth, Crow Wing. Oats Sweepstakes, Arthur Norum,, Iall0ck, KiLtson county. I Wheat--Sweepstakes, Henry Holt,l Cokato, Wright county. / Corn--Best single ear, L. E. Zim- J merman, Tracy, Lyon county. C. L. Blanchar, Sherburn, Martin I county, took first place for ten ears l of white corn, grand championship ,I sweepstakes for ten ears, and grand championship sweepstakes for 50 ears. Best ten ears, Minnesota No. 13, C. E. Lehman, Doyle, LeSueur county. Grand sweepstakes, ten ears of yel- low corn, Lewis Scott, Failvaont, Mar- tin county. Southern section -- Yellow corn championship, Thomas Hoskins, North Redwood, Redwood county; White corn championship, Peterson Brothers, New lichland, Waseca county; Sweep- stikes, Peterson Brothers; best 50 ears, L, E. Zimmerman, Tracy. Central section--YelloW champion- shil, A. A. Chapman, Olivia, Renville county; White championship, James Hunter, Appleton, Swift county; Sweepstakes, Chapman; best 50 ears, Villiam Byrne, Farmington, Dakota ounty. Northern section--Champion dent, :l. H. Nixen, Nevis, Hubbard county; dlampion flint, Harry Ophus, Erskine, Polk county; sweepstakes, Nixen; best 0 ears, D. A. Coleman, Aitkin, Aitkin ,county. Professional corn sweepstakes-- outhern section, C. L. Blanchar; entral, John Henderson, Cokato, "Wright; northern, C. C. Williams, De- roit, Becket county. Champion popcorn--C. E. Lehman, Doyle. Champion sweet corneL. A. Wet- lhal, St. Hilaire, Penuington. There were more than 1,200 grain exhibits and scores of entries of gar- den products and flowers, while ten ounties took part in the fruit show. Boys' and girls' clubs showed the best junior potato exhibit ever seen at a state show, stemming to A. G. Tolvas/ secretary of the Potato Growers asso- ciation. TUBERCULOSIS LOVES THE GOLDEN AGE OF MAN "Tubercuesis loves the golden age of man," states Dr. Harvey W. Wiley in Good Housekeeping magazine. In the saae article Dr. Wiley gives some in- .cresting figures to show the ages at h(ch tubcrcu!o3is exerts the greatest :nuence. He says: "The most hreatening of all diseases is tuber- u!os! It first begins to be threaten- :n' as the victim approaches the age f puberty. It cor.tinues with increas- ng fury after tv,e,aty, and only begins =o vAmte its; ravages at forty." Dr. Wiley combined the reports of Aze .,moalty lecolds of the Bureau of Census for five years from 1914- .tb reclusive. From the figures given ,m has shown the l'ic of tuberculosis wilts the wtrious ages and a what ges, males or females were the most lcquent victims. With a group of in- fants and children under the age of five, 18,137 boys and 15,572 girls died ok" tubercu!osis. The particular form of tuberculosis in boys and girls, an(t especially in i:d'ants is not that of the lung, but of the lining of the mem- brane of the brain. A large perceltage of the coral deaths in these children under five was due to tuberculosis meningitis. Passing to the group of children be- tween five anti ten, we find that 4,625 boys and 4.634 girls died of tubercu- to:ds. Boys and girls bdtween the ages of five and ten are equally af- fected with tuberculosis. When we come to the group between ten and fifteen there is an amazing difference During these as, 3,945 boys and 7,115 girls died of tuberculosis. In the group between fifteen and twenty the data show that 15,002 boys and 22,428 girls died of tuberculosis. The golden age of tuberculosis is be- rceen the ages of twenty to thirty- nine inclusive. This group was divided into four sections: from twenty to twenty-four inclusive; from twenty- five to twenty-nine inclusive; from thirty to thirty-four inclusive; from thirty-five to thirty-nine inclusive. In the first group of five years data show that 31,533 young men and 34,- "50 young women died of consumption in all foms. In the group from twen- ty-five to twenty-nine years 35,654 men and 32,532 women died of tuber- cuosis. The men have now forged rapidly aimad in the number of deaths. In the next group, from thirty to thirty- four, the deaths of men were 35,013 and of women 25,740. Here we find a most remarkable difference, men being far more sbsceptible than women to the ravages of the disease. From thir- ty-five to thirty-nine, inclusive, the dif- ference becomes even greater. During this period 34,342 men died of tuber- culosis and only 21,281 women. We see therefore, that the peaks of the dis- ease arrive at different ages. Among women, the greatest fatality occurs during the ages of fifteen to twenty- five. A,mong men, the greatest fatali- ties occur during the ages from thirty to forty. DANCERS ROUTED BY DEVIL AT MARION (Continued From Page i) Govel'aor Cox Of Massachusetts sug- gests that at reeuring intervals great wars break out because new genera- lions have forgotten the evils of the conflicts fought by their fathers, and recommends that children be taught at school the evils of war and the bless- ings of peace, an dthe governors of all e states with one aclaim say Amen. Is it not strange that some of these great men did not think of these things in time to avert the World War ? The doctrine of peace has been preached ever since the "Sermon on the Mount." Now after the dreadful alamity has occurred and millions of human beings are starving to death and the whole world is on the verge of bankruptcy it commences to dawn up- on men that after all Christ's teaci- ings are right and should have been followed and taught to the children of each succeeding generation. God grant that this may be done. That the ex- ample set by the Son of God y be held up to men as true heroism and patriotism, instead of the images of warriors. I  WANT ADS I FOR SALE--White pop corn that is sure to pop, at 10c per pound. Write or phone Glen Piper, Clinton, Min- nesota. 34-2p LOSTBox containing blue petticoat: Between 0rtonville and Milbank. Finder return to Independent for re- ward. 34-1-p FOR SALE--One bull; two cows, to freshen soon. Wanton Green, Clin, ton, Minn. 32-2 FOR SALE--Some full blooded Fer-- ris White Leghorn Roosters. 260 t 300 egg strain, at $2.50 each is taken soon, while they last. F.A. Struck, Clinton, Minnesota. 32-3 W A N T E D--Ladies' and Gents' clothes to clean and press. City Tailor Shop. A. W. Young, pro- prietor. * 12-tf HEMSTITCHINCr--Will do hemstitch- ing at 10c per yard. Mrs. A. L. Waddans. , 27-tf-c i FOR SALE--100 bushels of home grown clover seed at the New Pro- duce. C. C. Steen, Clinton 3-3 FOR SALE--Ladies and Gents' Tail- ored Suits for sale at the City Tail- 12-tf Some claim that he came thru the floor, other that he came down from the roof. He was the regular fellow they say, horns and hoofs and tail. The lights flared, the musical instru- ments flew from the hands of the play- ers and were splintered. Lurid lights filled the place and the devil danced among them. Women and girls scream- ed and some fainted. One or more are still confined in bed with hysteria. They all fled terror-stricvken fromthe place. Some hid in the woods all night, others found shelter at farm houses. Twenty-six cars were left standing by the pavilion until day- light came and the party rallied and kept their courage up by keeping close together and got the cars away. "Many and varied stories are told about the details, but the above is generally told by all. If it was a hoax, it was cleverly done and the proprietor las offered $1,)0 for an explanation of i{. His place, hotel and all is deserted and abandoned. He nor his family dare remain there. "If it was the real devil, he has hurt his own business, for dancing among that class has ceased. It has been a real sensation, and I suppose has been widely advertised. The hardest peo- ple to convince that it was a hoax are those who were there. "Y)urs very sincerely, "A. L. Richardson." COMMUNITY. We build our houses unalike, and so we build our lives, And yet our common brotherhood each difference survives. For man is, after all, a man, beneath the thatch or dome, And ev'ry house, though great or small, is after all a home. For, if that house is not a home, is but a place to dwell, Then high or low, or rich or poor, your house is but a shell; And you yourself, however great the eminence you plan, Must still remain beneath it all the brother and the man. For so we build communities, with houses great and small, And so we make the nation of the in- dividual. But, if you live your life alone, no fellowship to give, Then you are dead and turned to dust, however live. THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT I Cleaning Off the Slate .====..==%===,,%p====.=====.y.%======%,,=y====.%,==%,===,,=======. _ ._ - . .% Preventative Dentistry for Infants. Preventative dentistry should be practiced upon first appearance of the deciduous or baby teeth and continued thruout life. With a soft napkin on the finger, moistened in fresh or salt water, the infant's teeth and gums should be carefully cleansed several times daily. This, while of benefit to the teeth and gums, also accutoms the child to dental manipulations, and if continued will establish the dental toilet as a routine part of the person- al hygiene of youth. As soon as the child has erupted the baby molars, the defitist should be visited for a there inspection of the teeth. At this time painless methods of treatment maybe sufficient to prevent or arrest tooth decay. A psychic factor not to be slighted is that the dentist should not be mentioned in the presence of the child as one to be visited with dread. Experience dealing with the pain and discomforts Of the dental chair should not be related in the hearing of the little patient. This has a definite plaus- ible relation to preventative dentistry, for dental operations involving pain may be escaped if skillful dental at- tention is prc, mptly and regularly ad- ministered during and after infancy, EGG PRODUCTION INCREASED BY USE OF ANIMAL FEED Meat scrap or same other animal feed high in protein is the one essen- tial constituent of the mash which can nJt well be omitted. The United States Department of Agriculture found that a pen of pullets, on free range, which did not get meat scrap or any other animal-protein feed laid only 90 eggs each in a year, compar- ed with yields of from 125 to 150 eggs from pens fed rations containing meat scrap. The eggs from the pen where no meat scrap was fed cost 2.2 cents more a dozen for feed than when the meat scrap was included in the ra- tion. Fish meal or fish scrap can be used to replace the meat scrap and compares favorably with a good grade of meat scrap containing the same per cent of protein. Skim. milk or buttermilk, either sweet or sour, is excellent for replac- ing part or all of the meat scrap. The milk may be used in mixing the mash if a moist mash is fed, or it can be kept before the fowls as a drink. If clabbered and fed thick or like cheese, hens will eat enough of it to replace all of the meat scrap needed. A little bone meal makes an excellent addition to the mash or it can be used to replace a part of the meat scrap. Green cut bone, if fresh and sweet, will also take the place of meat scrap if fed at the rate of one-third to one- half ounce daily per hen. MASCULINE STRATEGY. "Henry," announced the young mother, "I have decided on a name for baby. We will call her Florence." Husband was lost in thought for a moment or two. He did not like the name Florence, but if he opposed his wife she would insist o having her own way. "Good." he said. "My first sweet- heart was named Florence, and she will take it as a compliment." "We will call her Margaret, after my mother," was the instant reply. A Chicago woman shopping in the loop was heard to ask a clerk: "Have you a pair of shoes suitable for this boy ?" "Yes, certainly," was the reply. "French kid, perhaps ?" "No, indeed," was the response. "He is my own son, horn right here in Chi- cago." Roland Reed, of Denver, Colorado, arrived Wednesday for a visit with his sister, Mrs. O. I. Chamberlain. Miss Lou Starff of Princeton has been employed as Clerk in the dry oods department of the Pioneer Store. The milk clarifier purchased by the Rolen dairy is on display at the AI- vah Matthews Implement store this week. Ideal of Health. The creation of an ideal of health is the only effective way in which to interest children in their own health habits . Instead of talking to the lit- tle ones about the bad cold that will result from some indiscretion, or the pain that will result from overeating or the wrong kinds of food, we must give the message of building a strong and eautiful body. We must build in HOW TO MAKE BOILED STARCH I THAT WONT STICK TO IRONS Clothes are starched to stiffen them, to give them the gloss of new material, and to make them keep clean longer. The following is a good general recipe for making cooked starch, recommended by the United States Department of Agriculture: 1 to 4 tablespoons starch, according to stiffness desired. I cup (1-2 pint) cold water. 1-2 teaspoon borax. 1-2 teaspoon paraffin or white fat. 1 quart boiling water Make a paste of the starcl and the cold water; add the borax, the paraf- fin or fat, and the boiling water. Boil the mixture, stirring it thoroughly, until it is clear, or for about 20 min- utes. Remove any scum that forms and strain the starch while hot. The borax may be omitted, but it helps whiten the clothes and it, as well as the paraffin or the fat, makes the starch smoother in ironing. Alum is sometime added (from 1 teaspoor, to 1 tablespoon to 1 quart of water) and is useful in making the starch penetrate the fiber. It apparently thins the paste but does not decrease its stiffening property. It is impossible'to give definite di- rection, s for amounts of cooked starch o be used, because all depends upon the fabric and the degree of stiffness desired. However, if the 4 table- spoons of starch have been used to the quart of water, a cup of this may be diluted with about 3 quarts of water for starching such articles as petticoats and gingham dresses. Gar- ments should be starched wrong side out and left so until they are sprin- kled. For white clothes the starch should be as hot as the hands can stand, because it penetrates better, and thin enough not to leave a glazed surface when ironed. If many clothes are to be starched it is wise to keep a part of the cook- he children's minds a picture of the ed starch hot and add it to the used mystery and wonder of the body, starch as the latter becomes too cool showing the effect on its workings of and thin. The garments that are to uch processes as sleep, exercises and be stiffest should be starched first. he habits of diet.--Sally Lucas Jean, After thorough squeezing and dip- Public Health Nurse. ping the surplus starch should be . wrung out and the garments either MOTOR CAR NOW rubbed or patted. Garments wrung RADIO-EQUIPPED very dry before starching will be _ . stiffer then wetter ones. Stiff-bosom- It does not require an ultra-imagin- ed shirts should ,nat be atarched too ative person to realide the possibilities far down nor.. pleaed,bosoms, t, stiff, of police cars, fire engines, or emer- else they will hmh sp m,,)-, look gency cars with a simple wireless up- clumsy, and feel uncomfortable. If paratus which will transmit instantly messages from headquarters. To Ed- ward Dallin, Harvard graduate and radio experimenter, goes the credit for a novel wireless device mounted on a Dodge Brothers car. While Dalin's equipment is for his own experimental purposes it would be readily adaptable like those mentioned. The set, as invented, is simplicity itself. Two broom handles and a length of lamp cord from the antennae, a wooden box, originally intended to contain milk chocolate, is the cabinet for the sending apparatus, and an or- dinary spark coil supplies plate volt- age for the vacuum tube transmitter. With this set Mr. Dallin can travel about in his Dodge Brothers car and in the vicinity of his home at Quincy Point, Mass., receives messages from points as far distant as Key West, Fla., and Savannah, Ga. His send- ing range averages 10 miles, and he is working now on a much more effec- tive sending apparatus. Dailin says it is a queer sensation to be driving comfortably along in his car and suddenly have the buzz buzz of the box beside him begin to take rythmical form in dots and dashes-- which may be his call number, IFK, or just the rambling message of some amateur operator. The whole set, as it appears in Mr. D ' ' alhn s Dodge Brothers car, occupms only a few cubic feet of space between the front seat and the dash board. The invtor says he could construct one that will take considerably less room. "And some day they will be making them so small that we will have a vest-pocket wireless," he adds with a laugh. Mr. Dallin takes many long trips in his Dodge Brothers car, but he can keep always in close touch with events thru his radio device. QUALIFIED. The homeliest man I ever saw came in one day and struck the chief for a job as salesman. He had a beak- nose, was squint-eyed and his ears didn't match. He started in telling all hi qualifications as a salesman, but the chief interrupted him. "Wait a minutel" said the boss. "Just tell me one thing: Are you one is starched too far down the low- el" part may l)e moistened enough to render it pliable. THE KNOCKER'S PRAYER "Lolxt, please don' let this town grow. I've been here for thiray years, and during that time I've fought every public improvement; I've knock- ed everything and everybody; no firm o.r individual has established a busi- ness here without my doing all I could to put them out of business. I've lied about them and I .would (ha: stolen from them if I had the coLu:e. I've done all I could,.to,.kecp the town from growing and, never spoken a good word for it. I've put ashes on the children's slide and have made the marshal stop the boys from playing ball in my vacant lot. Whenever I saw anyone prospering or enjoying themselves I've started a reform to kill the business or spoil the fun. I don't want the young folks to stay in this town, and I will do all I can by law, rule and ordinance to drive them away. It pains me, O Lord, to see that in spite of my knocking it is beginning to grow. Some day I fear I will be called upon to put down sidewalks in front of my property, and who knows but what I may have to keep up the streets that run by my premises ? This, Lord, would be more than I could bear. I would cost me money, though all I have made was right here in this town. Then, too, more people come if the town begins to grow, which would cause me to lose my pull. I ask, therefore, to keep this town at a standstill. /men."-- The Weekly Graphic. TOMATO JUICE NOW RECOMMENDED FOR BABIES One of the easiest woys to be sure of getting sufficient amounts of vita- mine C, the scurvy-preventing sub- stance, is to eat tomatoes rather regu- larly, perhaps every day, or to make it a practice to put tomato Juice in some of the dishes that we are preparing for the family, says the United States Department of Agriculture. In many homes it is a comparative- ly easy matter to can fairly large quantities of tomatoes, and to have these on hand for use when fresh to- married?" matoes are unattainable or expensive. "Sure,"" answered the applicant. The remarkable part about the tomato "Then," said the boss, "that's with relation to this particular ita- enough. You could sell anythingI" mine is that it still seems to be effi- cient in preventing scurvy after it "How did you get on with spell- has been heated or dried, which it not ing?" Harry's mother asked him, true of all foods which possess it in after his first day at school. "You the raw state. This is probably due look so pleased that I'm sure you did to the fact that the tomato contains well." such large amounts of vitomine C that "No'm, I couldn't spell much of any- part of it survives the heating pro- thing," admitted Harry; "and I cess. couldn't remember the arithmetic very well, nor the geography." The mother showed her disappoint- ment, but Harry had consolation in reserve. "But that's no matter, mother," he said; "the boys all like me, and I've got the biggest feet in the classl" So valuable is the tomato as a source of this mysterious and impor- tant ingredient of the diet, that phy- sicians now recommend it for babies fed on pasteurized milk, just as they have for some time prescribed orange juice. If tomato juice is to be given to a child it should be carefuly strained in You can't preserve happiness iv order to eliminate any seed. One- family jars. half tablespoon of fresh tomato juice "Hey, Morn, I've took my bath--you or one tablespoon of canned tomato come lookit the water." y, is THURSDAY, ROAD ARE TO WINTER Many Outfits With Big ing Needed Road Im Unemployment Relieved. Many camps finished nearing completion, actual starting on the first projects let by M. Babcock, of the state partment, under the "more better roads" winter trunk routes to cut forced Bound by contracts to t April 1 the biggest pa% of of gravel surfacing and 50 gTading on the first list of contractors already are in action in almost every Minnesota. An unofficial is that more than 7,500 men given jobs on a team Special maintenance work the benefit of local farmers ing in some sections, one erintendent reporting 388 teams on his December Commissioner Babcock gains with low bidders on from Omaha, where he president of the American of Highway Officials. The bids checked again in the the commissioner made cording to the tentative except on one culvert job lower figure was found. to the Butler Brothers puny, big contractors of St contract for 25 miles of tween Northfield and trunk highway No. 1 at a mile. This pavement will that south of St. Paul and strip between Northfield bault and is par of the plan Minnesota's longest went next year to nere miles. Benton county has for 22 miles from St. ton and 10 miles on to to be let this week by ty, all under the law. John H. Mullen, deputy er and chief highway pressed the satisfaction partment with the bargain winter road work."Paving on the same low level grading and gravel Mr. Mutlen, "and big ing given for the Savings will enable the to extend improvements ly." Protests that work at less than cost truck owners at neapolis and St. Paul. Babcock said that bonds tee !erformance on addel that the state was interested in the pointed out that effprts use teams rather aan giving unemployment ous localities. Commenting on the protest, the St. Paul Di "All evidence points to Mr. Babcock has driven gain in these contracts of the state, and that being built under the con at a minimum of cost payers. He is to be his success." In the highway winter work is being early letting. It will of grading and grave will be widely state. Good Price for The bottom threatens the market for bitter ity, according to the operative Creamery message to its 250 cries. "The bottom price of poor butter warning says. "At one a difference of 15 cents tween good and poor as the the same thing again this winter, worse condition. The flooded with poor operative creamery that product has to of inferior butter." Asserting that no other farm pays as well as the ting cream to the pure and sweet, to butter, the new agency issued a set ed on the door of creamery in its These rules, drawn vent losses thruthe grade butter, suggest, delivery of cream by hauling; 2--Care in vent dirt from and leaving a flavor in There washing and cans, strainers cooling cream in cold ately after separating, in warm and cold where air is the buttermaker pert judge of An eight pound to Mr. and Mrs. Friday. PAGE 8 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT THURSDAY. DECEMBIgll I'UBERCU .O.IS LOVES TI-IE ......... j ,.=...11o w TO MAKE BOILED STARCH I HONORS GIVEN .............. !F,w, --- ....... " ...... i ....... "STICK T ...... ROAD OUT AT STATE m:yh:co:i;,::y:vi;:]{ Cleaning Off the Slate lth7=sgiTt:dgi2s:giz ARE TO Good Housekeeping magazine. In the  " material, and to make thqm keeg CROP SHOW s:'cetia:tiefiIgul)rer; '?;iIeyog!vt:eSage s iaatl  ........ lclgnaearal:ngrtrripTh;ofl}OnWi]g ..... WINTER -- Idch tuberculosis exerts the greatest  starch, recommended by the Mtin Catty Man Taken Champion- nCucnce. FIe says: "The most x States Department of Agricultu: ship Con SweepstakeItas l. eatonitg of all diseas is tuber- 1 to 4 tablespoons stash. cordin Wins on Potatoes uo:. __ n as the xietim approaches the  1 cup (1 2 pint) cold water (By Palm Bureau Nws Service)  pubrt3' 1-2 topoon hmx- Almet every sort of fa product ng uy afte twenty, and only beglns raisod in Ihe state, from tohao to a :o abate its ravne at forty." 1 quart boiling water. "vest pocket" squh, was on exhibi- DL lViley cmnbincd tile reports of tion in the Minnesota Crop Show in he .mnitanty leco(is ol the cold water; add the borax, the paraf- lIieneapolls last week. ,, Cens or Iba rs from fin or fat, ant/ the boiling water Boll The combined efforts of the State :le m tusi,e, l. rom he figures given mixtm, stirring it thoughly, ,io hs shogn the rip of tubercuonis Hortieultmal society, the Crop lm- lpl'oement association, and the Potato witx the various ages and at what Remove a.y scum Growers associaon made the show ges, nlales oz fenies were the mo:t t starch while hot, the }argent and best winter prop ex- tlequent rioting. With a group of in The borax may be omitted, but it 12itlon ever held here, aording to! tents anti children under the age of helps whiten the clothes and it, as ' R S '.kmte,l,l general sea.tar rive, 18,137 boy s aid '5,572 g ' s d c "HE ...... th e" resu ts of the udg'g] well as the paraffin or the fat, makes o tnbelu]ns!a% Tin pa*tieulal form of staple farm plodUets exhibited at! of tubelulosts la boys and girls, aml (fm I teaspoon the show: SlSiall y Potatoes, unty exhibits--First [ lungs, but of the lining of to I tablespoon to 1 qrt of water) and is ueful n making the ltasea; Second, Kittson, Third, KOO-bruno of lie brain. A large percentage fber. It apparently chiching; Fourth, Crow Wince. [of the total deaths in - Oats Sweepstakes, Arthur Nom,[ nnder five was due to /allock, Kittsnn county, meningitm. t stiffening pporty. Wheab--Sweepstakas, ttenry Hot, It is impossible to okato, Wright county [tween five d ten, we find that 4,625 to be usl, because all depends upon Corn--Best slnge ear, L E Z m- *o s a 4,684 gr s d ed [ abe cu merm. Tracy, Lyon county. [ lois. Boys d girls bdteen the the C. L Blanchar, Sherbu, Martinrages of five and ten a equally of- However, if the 4 county, tk first place for ten ea feted with tuber culosis. When we thePgnSquartf ofSthwater,haVea cupbnof thlsUSedmayt of white co grand ehpionship, come to the with about 3 quarts of sweepstakes for ten ears, and grand there is an amazi.g difference Dentistry for Infants. Idea; of Health. such ehamplonshlp swpsfakes for 50 ears. During these ages, 3,94 boys and Pventative dentistry should be The creation of petticoats and Best ten rs, Minnes0ta No. 13, C. 7,115 girls died of tuberculosis. In prtlced upon first appearan Of the s the only efftive way in which to g side g. lhman, Doyle, LeSueur county, the group between fifteen and twenty :ntert ehlldn in their on health y a sprin- Gd swpstakes, ten ears of yel- that 15,002 boys and With a soft napkin oi low col, Lewis Scott, Faint, Mar- 22,428 girls died of tubolulosis. abits. Instead of talking to the lit- kled. For white tin county. The golden al the infant's teeth and gum tie ones should be as hot as the hand can Southn section -- Yellow corn t'een the ages of twenty to thirty- be carefully clesed , or the stand, because it penetrates better, and thin enough not to leave a glazed ehampioaship, Thomas Hoskins. North Ts group w divided times daily. This, whMe of Redwood, Redwood county; White corn into four stion: from tnty to also accutom ive the meage of building a stng If hpionshlp, Petersoa Brothers, Nv twenty-four inclusive; from twenty- lich/and, Waa county; Sweep- fle to twenty-nine inclusive; from will establish stakes, Paterson Brothe; best thirty to thirty-four inclusive; fm part of the minds a picture of the it to e, I E. Zimmerm, Tey. thirty-five to thirty-nine inclusive at hygiene of youth. As mystery and wonder of the body, CentlaI section--Yellow showing the effect on its workhigs of The gamnLs that are to hil 5, A. A. Chapman, OIivia, Renville In the first group of five rs data child has erupted the baby molars, the ugh processes as sleep, exercises and shol d be sthhed first. county; White championship, game that 81,533 young men and 34,- be isited ly Lucas Jean, After thorough squeezing and dip- inspection of the teeth, ping the sulplus stash sbouId be unter, Appleton, Swift county; 70 young women died of consumption P ainless methods Of treatment may be Sweepstakos, Chapman; best 50 ears In the group from tweu- out and the William Brne, Farmington, ty five to twenty-nine yea 35,64 sumcient to prevent or arrt lbbed OR" patted. Gallants tufty, men and 32e582 women ded decay. A psychic factor slighted RADIO-EQUIPPED very dry befo starching will be stiffer thon wetter ones. Stiff-boom Northern cion--Champion dent J. H. Nixen, Nevls, Hubbard county; The men have now forged rapidly It does not reqtthe  u/tra-imagin- aapion flint. Halg2r Ophus, Erskina head in the nber of deaths. In Experlen  dealing with the pain and tive peRson to allde the possibilities Polk county; sweepstakes. Nixen; besl le ns : ga.oup, from thirty to thil%y- four, the deaths of men were 35,013 tie*  ehalr should of police cars, firo engiues, or emer. else the" will hutq 150 rs, D. A. Coleman, AitkJn, Aitkit and of women 25,740. He we find a the hearing of the simple witless ap- clumsy, and reit unmfortable. If nnty. txo far down the low. Professional corn swpstakes-- most remarkable difference, men being little patient. This has a definite pious from headqrters. To el' part may he moistened enough outhern eetion, C.L. f more seeptible than women to ard Dallin, Haatd gduate and render it pliable. ntral, John Henderson, tke ravages of the disease. Fm thir- dental opetions radio experimenter, goes the credit for Wright; northern, C, C, Williams, De ;y-five to thirty-nine, inclusive, the dif- may be eped if skillful dental at- a uoveI wiree device  THE KNOCKER'S PRAYER it, Bker county, greater. DUring te ntion i. 9rptiy and regalarly ad Dodg e Brothers car. "Lotxl, ple don'f let this Chplon popcorn--C. E. equipment ts for his own experimental )oyle. and during that time I've fought Champion sweet co--L. A, We-. hefo, that the peaks of INCREASED like those mentioned, every pnhlie improvement; I've knock. lhal, St. Hilai, Peuniagon. tges. Among BY USE OF ANIMAL Th e t,  in.uteri, is s mp city ed everything d everybody; no fi Th we mo than 1,200 stair women, the greatest fatality  englh exBibits and ores of entliea of ga during the ages of fifteen to twenty- Meat p or sme other of lamp cord fm the antennae, a tY doing all I could den products and flowers, while ten ,mong men, the gatet fat/i - feed high in ptoit is I le or wooden box, originally intendl to to put them ou of business. and I mold ha atolen unties took part in the fruit show. tial nstltuent of the mash ,, is the cabinet if I had the ehttr. I've to forty. The United for the nding opparatals, and all or . Department of Agriculture dinary spark coil supplies plate volt- done all I could to, kp tke te sta" show, arding DACEP ROUTED found that a pen f pullets, on fe age for the vacuum tube transmitter from gToing and spgken a gd nge, which did not get meat scrap With this set Mr. Dallin can tra] wrd for it. I've put hes on the eiatlon. BY DEVIL A or any other animal*protein feed Iaid about In his Dodg e Blthe ear an d child n's slide and have made the (Continued From Page "1) only 9O eggs in the vicinity of his home at QUincy marshal stop the boys from playing in my vant lot, Governor Cox 6f Massaehtts aug- : e d with yields of from 125 to 150  Point. Mass., ives messages from seato that at euing laterals great Some cialm that he came thru the points  far distant as Key West w yone pspering or warn hk out because new genel floor, other that he ce do from The eggs fm the pen whe Fla., d Say.nab, Go, themlves l'v e started tlons have forgotten the evils of the the roof. Ha was the regular fellow no meat eera I lag range avenges 10 mil, kill the hiness or onfliets fotght by their fathers, and they say, horns and hoofs the is working now on  ml don't wmlt the yog folks to The lights flared, the musil meat ap was included in the ra- ,e sending apparatus, in this town, and 1 will do all 1 can by Iaw, lule and ordinance to dl*l , pLay- Fish meal or fish rap can be Dallin says it i a era and were spih/ttered, Lurid tights pi the meat p and be driving mfortablv along in his them away. It pains me, O Lolxl to spite of my knocking it filled the p]a and the devil favorably with a good car and suddenly have the buzz b is beginning to grow. Some day I mona thenL Womer and girls am- grade of meat rap contninlng the the box beside him begin to takt fear I vdll be Iled upon to put down ed and so fainted. One or mum a amp per pent of protein. sidewalks in front of my property, and still confined In bed with hysteri Skits milk or buttermilk, which may be his call number IFK el ] who knows but what I may ave to They all fled ter.strlevken frn the sweet or sour, is eilt far pl- just the rmbling mesge of kp p ha* streets that n by my ple. Some hid in the wds all ingpart orall themat rap. The amateur npetor. 0mis ? This, Lord, night, others found sheiter at fa milk may be ud in mixing th mah The whole set,  it appears in Mr than I could bear. hous. Twenty-slx cars we left if a moist mash is fed, or It  be Dalltn, s Dodge Bthem o, opiet though all I have standing by the pavilion until day- kept before the fowls  a drink- If only a few cubic feet of space betweer fight here in this town. Then, too, party rallied clobbered and fed thick or like ehse, the fmat seat and the mo people, me if the own begins hens will t enough of it to ple lnvnto r sa to grow, whig would ca  me to 1o together and got the rs away. all of the mt scrap neade& A that wilt take onidmblg less room my pall. I k, thefore, to keep "Many d valqed little bone meal kes  eillent 4,An d som e day ti'y II be maklng this town at a standstill. A*,"-- about the details, but th so all that we will have a The WkIy Graphic. genally told hy all. vest-pocket wiIess," he adds with a h, it w cleverly done bone, If freah and avet, laugh. IOMATO JUICE NOW p*prleter $1,000 for Will al take the pi of meat scrap Mr. Dall[n tak my long trips RECOMMENDED  in Iis Dodge Bthe par, hut he n rommends that ehildn be taught at schl the evils uf war ings of peace, an dthe governnrs of all te states th one laim say Amen. I it not striae that some of thee great m did not think of thee things in time to avert the World War? The dtne uf pe hs b lhed e sln the "Seon on the MuL" Now after the dreadful lamlty human beings a starving ad the whole world is  the verge of bankptey it eammens to dawn up- on m that after all Christ's tech- |rigs are dg {ollnwed d taugl eh succeeding generation. God grant that this may b done. That the ex- ample t by the Son of d ay be eld up to men as latritIj : WANT ADS OR SALF-White pop rn that nesotm LOST--Box Between Ortouvil[e and ward. FOR SALE--One bull; two cows, to fresh n. Wantan Green, Clin- ton, Minm FOR SAme full ria White Leghorn Rooate 3OO egg strain, at $2. each i n, wble they IL F. A. Stnmk, Clinton, Miet 32-8 clot to clean and pre City Tailor Shop. A. W. Yog, p peter. *12-tf IEMSTITCHINC-WtU do hemstiteh- ins at 10e per yard. M. A. K Waddans. ,  Fls of home 'own clover seed at the New Pm- du. C C, 8teen, Clinton ered Sgits for sale at the City Tail and abandoned, H nor his family da rmrada the. "If it w the al devil, he has huJN has ed. real nsatou, and I ppose has beez widely adversed. pe o convince nat xt those who we tbe "Yurs very sincerely, "A. L. Richardson." COMMUNITy. build our hnos unalike, d sc we build our lives, And yet our mmon eh difference urvves. Vor man Is. after all, a man, beneat the thatch or dome, And ev'ry house, though great o small, is after all a hnme. For, If that hoe i not a home, i but a place to dwelL Then high nr low, or fleh or hou is but a shell; And you yourself, hnwever great th eminence you pl, main benth it brother and the man. Eor so we build communities, wit houses great and small, dividuah But if ynu live your llfe alone, ne fellowship to give, Then ynu a dead and turned tv dust half oce daily per heu. MASCULINE STRATEGy. "Henry," annotmeed the og meth, "I have deeded on a name or baby. We will pall her Floren." Hushed was lost in thought fur a He did not ke the a FIonce, but If he oppese ILLS wife she uld inatt o having her wn way. "Good." he sldd. "My first swat- Florence, and she "We will pall her Mgateh after my mother," w the Instt ply. A CIdeago wo shopping iu the IOOl you a pair nf shoes suitable for thin boy?" "Yes, eertanly," was the reply. 'Fnch ldd, perhape 7" i "No, imld," was the response. "He is my own son, he zght he in Chi- cago." Roland Read, nf Denver, Colorado, Wednesday for a vst w h sister, Mrs. O.'1. Chamborlain. Miss Iu Starff of PHnceton ha been employed  Clerk in the dry oeds department of the PInnr Store. The milk dazlfier puhased by the Ralph dry is on display at the A1- Matthews Implement keep aly thin his radio ded. QUALIFIED. in one day and stek the chief f, Jab M lesman. He had a nnse, w squlntyed ddn't match. He started in telling pil his qualifitlens u a salesm, but the elder interrupted him. "Wmt a mlnutel" id the b "Jt tell me oe thing: Are yau marfied?" "SUre," swered the applieau "Tev." said the boss, enough. Ynu eouId sell hlngl" "How did you get on th spell- ing?" Harly's mother asked him, after hi ft day at hooL "Yen look so pleased that I'm sure you did "No'm, I couldn't spell much nf a thing," admitted Harry; "and well, nor the geography." The mnther showed merit, but Hany "But that's no matter, mother," he said; "the boys all llke me, got the biggost ft in the eli" You e't psee hppine family ja "Hey, Morn, I've took My ins Unemployment Relieved. Many camps flnished arng completion, tua ;tarring on the fit fort)' pjeets let b M. Babcock, partment, under ads" winter Bod b April I the biggest of gravel sm-facing gradlng every t An unoffiial ;,b00 men! given jobs pecal ing reporthg 388, Commiioner Babcock gains with low bidders on ] from Omaha, here prmen o: of Highway Officials. The bids checked again in the ; made cording to the tentative [is I lower figu was found b  ., big contractors of Jg tween Nor thfiehi trunk highway NO. strip between Northfield bault and is part of the ; ty, lajoh n- H. Malign, deputy t er and chief highway psd the atisf partment with the winter grading arl gravel Mr. Mullen, *'and ing given for Savngs wiII enable th0 to extend ]y" Ptosts that ntlacto "s I One of the eiest ways to be sure of getting C, the rv-pveuflng aub- tarly, perhaps ery day, or to make it a practice to put tomato Jul in me f tha dihe that we a pparig for the family, eaya the Department of Agricalt. with poar I In many barnes it is a eompativ ly ey matter to pan fairly larg quantities of tomatoes, and to have these on hand for u wh Asserting that no fa pay Ie remarkable tins e to pue and sweet, latian to this particular it butter, the now eight in pventing scuy t issd a set of i h been heated or dried, which it not This is pbably due The les, draw such larg grade buyer, suggest, pa delivery et eam by e peas. hat'ins; 2---Ca in m So valuable is the tomato as a por- Thoro washing tu!t ingrechent of the diet. that phy cooling cam in enid fed en pasteurized milk, jt  they ately after separating, have Ior ome time pgihed onge in wa and enid el piice. If tomato juice I to be given to s pert Judge of crea order to eliminate any seed. One- half tblespoon of fsh tomato jole An eight pound iu]e, daily, Js a safe aBawange, Friday. tee performee on added that the state was point ed nut that efflprts use ams rather a glvla g unemplnyment ous lalities. Cementing on pmtest, the SL Paul I "All evidee points to Mr. Babcock has driven galn in these contracts fc of the state, d that o being built undo the con at a rmnmmn nf coot paye. his success." In work is letUng. ll he dely state. opemtlve Crear message to its 25O pri of poor butter It warmng y I5 twin good md PAGE 8 HONORS GIVEN OUT AT STATE CROP SHOW Martin Cunty Man Takes Champion- ship Corn Sweepstakes--ltasca Wins on Potatoes (By Farm Bureau News Service) Ahnrst evezy sort of farm product raised in the state, from tobacco to a "'vest pocket" squash, was on exhibi- tion in the Minnesota Crop Show in lYiinneapolis last week. The combined efforts of the State :Horticultural society, the Crop Im- provement association, and the Potato Growers association made the show the largest and best winter crop ex- position ever held here, according to R. S. Mackintosh, general secretary. Iiere are the results of the judging of staple farm products exhibited at show: t:hotatoes, county exhibits--First, Itasca; Second, Kittson, Tird, Koo- chicbing; Fourth, Crow Wing. Oats Sweepstakes, Arthur Norum,, Iall0ck, KiLtson county. I Wheat--Sweepstakes, Henry Holt,l Cokato, Wright county. / Corn--Best single ear, L. E. Zim- J merman, Tracy, Lyon county. C. L. Blanchar, Sherburn, Martin I county, took first place for ten ears l of white corn, grand championship ,I sweepstakes for ten ears, and grand championship sweepstakes for 50 ears. Best ten ears, Minnesota No. 13, C. E. Lehman, Doyle, LeSueur county. Grand sweepstakes, ten ears of yel- low corn, Lewis Scott, Failvaont, Mar- tin county. Southern section -- Yellow corn championship, Thomas Hoskins, North Redwood, Redwood county; White corn championship, Peterson Brothers, New lichland, Waseca county; Sweep- stikes, Peterson Brothers; best 50 ears, L, E. Zimmerman, Tracy. Central section--YelloW champion- shil, A. A. Chapman, Olivia, Renville county; White championship, James Hunter, Appleton, Swift county; Sweepstakes, Chapman; best 50 ears, Villiam Byrne, Farmington, Dakota ounty. Northern section--Champion dent, :l. H. Nixen, Nevis, Hubbard county; dlampion flint, Harry Ophus, Erskine, Polk county; sweepstakes, Nixen; best 0 ears, D. A. Coleman, Aitkin, Aitkin ,county. Professional corn sweepstakes-- outhern section, C. L. Blanchar; entral, John Henderson, Cokato, "Wright; northern, C. C. Williams, De- roit, Becket county. Champion popcorn--C. E. Lehman, Doyle. Champion sweet corneL. A. Wet- lhal, St. Hilaire, Penuington. There were more than 1,200 grain exhibits and scores of entries of gar- den products and flowers, while ten ounties took part in the fruit show. Boys' and girls' clubs showed the best junior potato exhibit ever seen at a state show, stemming to A. G. Tolvas/ secretary of the Potato Growers asso- ciation. TUBERCULOSIS LOVES THE GOLDEN AGE OF MAN "Tubercuesis loves the golden age of man," states Dr. Harvey W. Wiley in Good Housekeeping magazine. In the saae article Dr. Wiley gives some in- .cresting figures to show the ages at h(ch tubcrcu!o3is exerts the greatest :nuence. He says: "The most hreatening of all diseases is tuber- u!os! It first begins to be threaten- :n' as the victim approaches the age f puberty. It cor.tinues with increas- ng fury after tv,e,aty, and only begins =o vAmte its; ravages at forty." Dr. Wiley combined the reports of Aze .,moalty lecolds of the Bureau of Census for five years from 1914- .tb reclusive. From the figures given ,m has shown the l'ic of tuberculosis wilts the wtrious ages and a what ges, males or females were the most lcquent victims. With a group of in- fants and children under the age of five, 18,137 boys and 15,572 girls died ok" tubercu!osis. The particular form of tuberculosis in boys and girls, an(t especially in i:d'ants is not that of the lung, but of the lining of the mem- brane of the brain. A large perceltage of the coral deaths in these children under five was due to tuberculosis meningitis. Passing to the group of children be- tween five anti ten, we find that 4,625 boys and 4.634 girls died of tubercu- to:ds. Boys and girls bdtween the ages of five and ten are equally af- fected with tuberculosis. When we come to the group between ten and fifteen there is an amazing difference During these as, 3,945 boys and 7,115 girls died of tuberculosis. In the group between fifteen and twenty the data show that 15,002 boys and 22,428 girls died of tuberculosis. The golden age of tuberculosis is be- rceen the ages of twenty to thirty- nine inclusive. This group was divided into four sections: from twenty to twenty-four inclusive; from twenty- five to twenty-nine inclusive; from thirty to thirty-four inclusive; from thirty-five to thirty-nine inclusive. In the first group of five years data show that 31,533 young men and 34,- "50 young women died of consumption in all foms. In the group from twen- ty-five to twenty-nine years 35,654 men and 32,532 women died of tuber- cuosis. The men have now forged rapidly aimad in the number of deaths. In the next group, from thirty to thirty- four, the deaths of men were 35,013 and of women 25,740. Here we find a most remarkable difference, men being far more sbsceptible than women to the ravages of the disease. From thir- ty-five to thirty-nine, inclusive, the dif- ference becomes even greater. During this period 34,342 men died of tuber- culosis and only 21,281 women. We see therefore, that the peaks of the dis- ease arrive at different ages. Among women, the greatest fatality occurs during the ages of fifteen to twenty- five. A,mong men, the greatest fatali- ties occur during the ages from thirty to forty. DANCERS ROUTED BY DEVIL AT MARION (Continued From Page i) Govel'aor Cox Of Massachusetts sug- gests that at reeuring intervals great wars break out because new genera- lions have forgotten the evils of the conflicts fought by their fathers, and recommends that children be taught at school the evils of war and the bless- ings of peace, an dthe governors of all e states with one aclaim say Amen. Is it not strange that some of these great men did not think of these things in time to avert the World War ? The doctrine of peace has been preached ever since the "Sermon on the Mount." Now after the dreadful alamity has occurred and millions of human beings are starving to death and the whole world is on the verge of bankruptcy it commences to dawn up- on men that after all Christ's teaci- ings are right and should have been followed and taught to the children of each succeeding generation. God grant that this may be done. That the ex- ample set by the Son of God y be held up to men as true heroism and patriotism, instead of the images of warriors. I  WANT ADS I FOR SALE--White pop corn that is sure to pop, at 10c per pound. Write or phone Glen Piper, Clinton, Min- nesota. 34-2p LOSTBox containing blue petticoat: Between 0rtonville and Milbank. Finder return to Independent for re- ward. 34-1-p FOR SALE--One bull; two cows, to freshen soon. Wanton Green, Clin, ton, Minn. 32-2 FOR SALE--Some full blooded Fer-- ris White Leghorn Roosters. 260 t 300 egg strain, at $2.50 each is taken soon, while they last. F.A. Struck, Clinton, Minnesota. 32-3 W A N T E D--Ladies' and Gents' clothes to clean and press. City Tailor Shop. A. W. Young, pro- prietor. * 12-tf HEMSTITCHINCr--Will do hemstitch- ing at 10c per yard. Mrs. A. L. Waddans. , 27-tf-c i FOR SALE--100 bushels of home grown clover seed at the New Pro- duce. C. C. Steen, Clinton 3-3 FOR SALE--Ladies and Gents' Tail- ored Suits for sale at the City Tail- 12-tf Some claim that he came thru the floor, other that he came down from the roof. He was the regular fellow they say, horns and hoofs and tail. The lights flared, the musical instru- ments flew from the hands of the play- ers and were splintered. Lurid lights filled the place and the devil danced among them. Women and girls scream- ed and some fainted. One or more are still confined in bed with hysteria. They all fled terror-stricvken fromthe place. Some hid in the woods all night, others found shelter at farm houses. Twenty-six cars were left standing by the pavilion until day- light came and the party rallied and kept their courage up by keeping close together and got the cars away. "Many and varied stories are told about the details, but the above is generally told by all. If it was a hoax, it was cleverly done and the proprietor las offered $1,)0 for an explanation of i{. His place, hotel and all is deserted and abandoned. He nor his family dare remain there. "If it was the real devil, he has hurt his own business, for dancing among that class has ceased. It has been a real sensation, and I suppose has been widely advertised. The hardest peo- ple to convince that it was a hoax are those who were there. "Y)urs very sincerely, "A. L. Richardson." COMMUNITY. We build our houses unalike, and so we build our lives, And yet our common brotherhood each difference survives. For man is, after all, a man, beneath the thatch or dome, And ev'ry house, though great or small, is after all a home. For, if that house is not a home, is but a place to dwell, Then high or low, or rich or poor, your house is but a shell; And you yourself, however great the eminence you plan, Must still remain beneath it all the brother and the man. For so we build communities, with houses great and small, And so we make the nation of the in- dividual. But, if you live your life alone, no fellowship to give, Then you are dead and turned to dust, however live. THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT I Cleaning Off the Slate .====..==%===,,%p====.=====.y.%======%,,=y====.%,==%,===,,=======. _ ._ - . .% Preventative Dentistry for Infants. Preventative dentistry should be practiced upon first appearance of the deciduous or baby teeth and continued thruout life. With a soft napkin on the finger, moistened in fresh or salt water, the infant's teeth and gums should be carefully cleansed several times daily. This, while of benefit to the teeth and gums, also accutoms the child to dental manipulations, and if continued will establish the dental toilet as a routine part of the person- al hygiene of youth. As soon as the child has erupted the baby molars, the defitist should be visited for a there inspection of the teeth. At this time painless methods of treatment maybe sufficient to prevent or arrest tooth decay. A psychic factor not to be slighted is that the dentist should not be mentioned in the presence of the child as one to be visited with dread. Experience dealing with the pain and discomforts Of the dental chair should not be related in the hearing of the little patient. This has a definite plaus- ible relation to preventative dentistry, for dental operations involving pain may be escaped if skillful dental at- tention is prc, mptly and regularly ad- ministered during and after infancy, EGG PRODUCTION INCREASED BY USE OF ANIMAL FEED Meat scrap or same other animal feed high in protein is the one essen- tial constituent of the mash which can nJt well be omitted. The United States Department of Agriculture found that a pen of pullets, on free range, which did not get meat scrap or any other animal-protein feed laid only 90 eggs each in a year, compar- ed with yields of from 125 to 150 eggs from pens fed rations containing meat scrap. The eggs from the pen where no meat scrap was fed cost 2.2 cents more a dozen for feed than when the meat scrap was included in the ra- tion. Fish meal or fish scrap can be used to replace the meat scrap and compares favorably with a good grade of meat scrap containing the same per cent of protein. Skim. milk or buttermilk, either sweet or sour, is excellent for replac- ing part or all of the meat scrap. The milk may be used in mixing the mash if a moist mash is fed, or it can be kept before the fowls as a drink. If clabbered and fed thick or like cheese, hens will eat enough of it to replace all of the meat scrap needed. A little bone meal makes an excellent addition to the mash or it can be used to replace a part of the meat scrap. Green cut bone, if fresh and sweet, will also take the place of meat scrap if fed at the rate of one-third to one- half ounce daily per hen. MASCULINE STRATEGY. "Henry," announced the young mother, "I have decided on a name for baby. We will call her Florence." Husband was lost in thought for a moment or two. He did not like the name Florence, but if he opposed his wife she would insist o having her own way. "Good." he said. "My first sweet- heart was named Florence, and she will take it as a compliment." "We will call her Margaret, after my mother," was the instant reply. A Chicago woman shopping in the loop was heard to ask a clerk: "Have you a pair of shoes suitable for this boy ?" "Yes, certainly," was the reply. "French kid, perhaps ?" "No, indeed," was the response. "He is my own son, horn right here in Chi- cago." Roland Reed, of Denver, Colorado, arrived Wednesday for a visit with his sister, Mrs. O. I. Chamberlain. Miss Lou Starff of Princeton has been employed as Clerk in the dry oods department of the Pioneer Store. The milk clarifier purchased by the Rolen dairy is on display at the AI- vah Matthews Implement store this week. Ideal of Health. The creation of an ideal of health is the only effective way in which to interest children in their own health habits . Instead of talking to the lit- tle ones about the bad cold that will result from some indiscretion, or the pain that will result from overeating or the wrong kinds of food, we must give the message of building a strong and eautiful body. We must build in HOW TO MAKE BOILED STARCH I THAT WONT STICK TO IRONS Clothes are starched to stiffen them, to give them the gloss of new material, and to make them keep clean longer. The following is a good general recipe for making cooked starch, recommended by the United States Department of Agriculture: 1 to 4 tablespoons starch, according to stiffness desired. I cup (1-2 pint) cold water. 1-2 teaspoon borax. 1-2 teaspoon paraffin or white fat. 1 quart boiling water Make a paste of the starcl and the cold water; add the borax, the paraf- fin or fat, and the boiling water. Boil the mixture, stirring it thoroughly, until it is clear, or for about 20 min- utes. Remove any scum that forms and strain the starch while hot. The borax may be omitted, but it helps whiten the clothes and it, as well as the paraffin or the fat, makes the starch smoother in ironing. Alum is sometime added (from 1 teaspoor, to 1 tablespoon to 1 quart of water) and is useful in making the starch penetrate the fiber. It apparently thins the paste but does not decrease its stiffening property. It is impossible'to give definite di- rection, s for amounts of cooked starch o be used, because all depends upon the fabric and the degree of stiffness desired. However, if the 4 table- spoons of starch have been used to the quart of water, a cup of this may be diluted with about 3 quarts of water for starching such articles as petticoats and gingham dresses. Gar- ments should be starched wrong side out and left so until they are sprin- kled. For white clothes the starch should be as hot as the hands can stand, because it penetrates better, and thin enough not to leave a glazed surface when ironed. If many clothes are to be starched it is wise to keep a part of the cook- he children's minds a picture of the ed starch hot and add it to the used mystery and wonder of the body, starch as the latter becomes too cool showing the effect on its workings of and thin. The garments that are to uch processes as sleep, exercises and be stiffest should be starched first. he habits of diet.--Sally Lucas Jean, After thorough squeezing and dip- Public Health Nurse. ping the surplus starch should be . wrung out and the garments either MOTOR CAR NOW rubbed or patted. Garments wrung RADIO-EQUIPPED very dry before starching will be _ . stiffer then wetter ones. Stiff-bosom- It does not require an ultra-imagin- ed shirts should ,nat be atarched too ative person to realide the possibilities far down nor.. pleaed,bosoms, t, stiff, of police cars, fire engines, or emer- else they will hmh sp m,,)-, look gency cars with a simple wireless up- clumsy, and feel uncomfortable. If paratus which will transmit instantly messages from headquarters. To Ed- ward Dallin, Harvard graduate and radio experimenter, goes the credit for a novel wireless device mounted on a Dodge Brothers car. While Dalin's equipment is for his own experimental purposes it would be readily adaptable like those mentioned. The set, as invented, is simplicity itself. Two broom handles and a length of lamp cord from the antennae, a wooden box, originally intended to contain milk chocolate, is the cabinet for the sending apparatus, and an or- dinary spark coil supplies plate volt- age for the vacuum tube transmitter. With this set Mr. Dallin can travel about in his Dodge Brothers car and in the vicinity of his home at Quincy Point, Mass., receives messages from points as far distant as Key West, Fla., and Savannah, Ga. His send- ing range averages 10 miles, and he is working now on a much more effec- tive sending apparatus. Dailin says it is a queer sensation to be driving comfortably along in his car and suddenly have the buzz buzz of the box beside him begin to take rythmical form in dots and dashes-- which may be his call number, IFK, or just the rambling message of some amateur operator. The whole set, as it appears in Mr. D ' ' alhn s Dodge Brothers car, occupms only a few cubic feet of space between the front seat and the dash board. The invtor says he could construct one that will take considerably less room. "And some day they will be making them so small that we will have a vest-pocket wireless," he adds with a laugh. Mr. Dallin takes many long trips in his Dodge Brothers car, but he can keep always in close touch with events thru his radio device. QUALIFIED. The homeliest man I ever saw came in one day and struck the chief for a job as salesman. He had a beak- nose, was squint-eyed and his ears didn't match. He started in telling all hi qualifications as a salesman, but the chief interrupted him. "Wait a minutel" said the boss. "Just tell me one thing: Are you one is starched too far down the low- el" part may l)e moistened enough to render it pliable. THE KNOCKER'S PRAYER "Lolxt, please don' let this town grow. I've been here for thiray years, and during that time I've fought every public improvement; I've knock- ed everything and everybody; no firm o.r individual has established a busi- ness here without my doing all I could to put them out of business. I've lied about them and I .would (ha: stolen from them if I had the coLu:e. I've done all I could,.to,.kecp the town from growing and, never spoken a good word for it. I've put ashes on the children's slide and have made the marshal stop the boys from playing ball in my vacant lot. Whenever I saw anyone prospering or enjoying themselves I've started a reform to kill the business or spoil the fun. I don't want the young folks to stay in this town, and I will do all I can by law, rule and ordinance to drive them away. It pains me, O Lord, to see that in spite of my knocking it is beginning to grow. Some day I fear I will be called upon to put down sidewalks in front of my property, and who knows but what I may have to keep up the streets that run by my premises ? This, Lord, would be more than I could bear. I would cost me money, though all I have made was right here in this town. Then, too, more people come if the town begins to grow, which would cause me to lose my pull. I ask, therefore, to keep this town at a standstill. /men."-- The Weekly Graphic. TOMATO JUICE NOW RECOMMENDED FOR BABIES One of the easiest woys to be sure of getting sufficient amounts of vita- mine C, the scurvy-preventing sub- stance, is to eat tomatoes rather regu- larly, perhaps every day, or to make it a practice to put tomato Juice in some of the dishes that we are preparing for the family, says the United States Department of Agriculture. In many homes it is a comparative- ly easy matter to can fairly large quantities of tomatoes, and to have these on hand for use when fresh to- married?" matoes are unattainable or expensive. "Sure,"" answered the applicant. The remarkable part about the tomato "Then," said the boss, "that's with relation to this particular ita- enough. You could sell anythingI" mine is that it still seems to be effi- cient in preventing scurvy after it "How did you get on with spell- has been heated or dried, which it not ing?" Harry's mother asked him, true of all foods which possess it in after his first day at school. "You the raw state. This is probably due look so pleased that I'm sure you did to the fact that the tomato contains well." such large amounts of vitomine C that "No'm, I couldn't spell much of any- part of it survives the heating pro- thing," admitted Harry; "and I cess. couldn't remember the arithmetic very well, nor the geography." The mother showed her disappoint- ment, but Harry had consolation in reserve. "But that's no matter, mother," he said; "the boys all like me, and I've got the biggest feet in the classl" So valuable is the tomato as a source of this mysterious and impor- tant ingredient of the diet, that phy- sicians now recommend it for babies fed on pasteurized milk, just as they have for some time prescribed orange juice. If tomato juice is to be given to a child it should be carefuly strained in You can't preserve happiness iv order to eliminate any seed. One- family jars. half tablespoon of fresh tomato juice "Hey, Morn, I've took my bath--you or one tablespoon of canned tomato come lookit the water." y, is THURSDAY, ROAD ARE TO WINTER Many Outfits With Big ing Needed Road Im Unemployment Relieved. Many camps finished nearing completion, actual starting on the first projects let by M. Babcock, of the state partment, under the "more better roads" winter trunk routes to cut forced Bound by contracts to t April 1 the biggest pa% of of gravel surfacing and 50 gTading on the first list of contractors already are in action in almost every Minnesota. An unofficial is that more than 7,500 men given jobs on a team Special maintenance work the benefit of local farmers ing in some sections, one erintendent reporting 388 teams on his December Commissioner Babcock gains with low bidders on from Omaha, where he president of the American of Highway Officials. The bids checked again in the the commissioner made cording to the tentative except on one culvert job lower figure was found. to the Butler Brothers puny, big contractors of St contract for 25 miles of tween Northfield and trunk highway No. 1 at a mile. This pavement will that south of St. Paul and strip between Northfield bault and is par of the plan Minnesota's longest went next year to nere miles. Benton county has for 22 miles from St. ton and 10 miles on to to be let this week by ty, all under the law. John H. Mullen, deputy er and chief highway pressed the satisfaction partment with the bargain winter road work."Paving on the same low level grading and gravel Mr. Mutlen, "and big ing given for the Savings will enable the to extend improvements ly." Protests that work at less than cost truck owners at neapolis and St. Paul. Babcock said that bonds tee !erformance on addel that the state was interested in the pointed out that effprts use teams rather aan giving unemployment ous localities. Commenting on the protest, the St. Paul Di "All evidence points to Mr. Babcock has driven gain in these contracts of the state, and that being built under the con at a minimum of cost payers. He is to be his success." In the highway winter work is being early letting. It will of grading and grave will be widely state. Good Price for The bottom threatens the market for bitter ity, according to the operative Creamery message to its 250 cries. "The bottom price of poor butter warning says. "At one a difference of 15 cents tween good and poor as the the same thing again this winter, worse condition. The flooded with poor operative creamery that product has to of inferior butter." Asserting that no other farm pays as well as the ting cream to the pure and sweet, to butter, the new agency issued a set ed on the door of creamery in its These rules, drawn vent losses thruthe grade butter, suggest, delivery of cream by hauling; 2--Care in vent dirt from and leaving a flavor in There washing and cans, strainers cooling cream in cold ately after separating, in warm and cold where air is the buttermaker pert judge of An eight pound to Mr. and Mrs. Friday.